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Taylor Swift “Blank Space” Parody by ZDoggMD

Posted on January 30, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s Friday on Super Bowl weekend, so I thought we’d do a Fun Friday post. If you’re looking for fun, where better to look than ZDoggMD? In case you don’t know him, his recent Taylor Swift parody video might be a good intro:

I thought this comment by Christina Padrutt on YouTube describes many of the physician and nurse reactions I’ve seen to ZDoggMD’s work:

I absolutely LOVED this. It is a genuine reflection of the issue of drug seeking patient behavior. I can relate so closely to this. I have shown it to many coworkers. I even emailed it to my boss, who in turn forwarded it to other administrators. I actually loved how you show both sides of the story: the provider and a glimpse at the patient’s struggles as well. This is INDEED a real issue. In fact, it is such an issue that our unit is having a “burnout, difficult patient populations, and patient abuse towards staff” inservice to help staff cope. Thank you, Dr. Damania for this comic relief! Also, I would like to add that at least physicians get to spend limited time with this population, nurses are anchored to this behavior for 12-16 hours at a time at the bedside.

I’m thinking about inviting him to speak at the Health IT Marketing and PR Conference. What do you think? I can’t decide. Now that I signed up for him to be my doctor at Turntable Health, I guess that makes me biased.

Either way, have a great (and safe) Super Bowl weekend!

Meaningful Use Is Dead?

Posted on January 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Over on EMR and HIPAA, I got the following passionate response on my post titled Meaningful Use Created A Big Need for Certified MAs that I thought many readers on this site would enjoy.

In the EP world, MU is dead. There are some larger groups, especially primary care still struggling to overcome the huge hurdles of MU2, but most I know have given up and running for the hills. There is a ginormous gap between what ONC is peddling in terms of numbers and real MU use.

This is good example of another hidden cost of trying to MU. We have some excellent MA’s, and I could not tell you which are and are not certified. Makes no difference. Sadly, CMS and ONC, do not realize that they are literally driving EPs from accepting Medicare patients, especially us specialists. And once we are gone, or severely limit new patients with Medicare, we are not coming back.

So the 17 times in 11 years fix for SGR, PQRS, VBM, MU, CPQ, ICD10, HIPAA, RAC audits, sequester cuts, etc. Its too much cost. clicking, paper work to take care of these patients. We actually had a serious discussion with our hospital about cutting back severely on doing Medicare total knees and hips next year due to all this. And the hospital initiated the conversation. So its not just us, even EHs are looking into this.

We all know that CMS and ONC want something, anything in terms of numbers to report anything to Congress, but this is the wrong way to do it. Again, everyone out there that is sitting in their cubicle Monday morning quarterbacking our care for these patients, will be very sad, very soon as we will just stop seeing them.

You can see by the numbers, if 250,000 EPs are taking the first MU hit this year, just wait until the rest give up. EPs can see that MU does not equate to better care, safer care, or more efficient care. We all may use an EHR, but could care less about attestations and audit risks and counting numerators/denominators forever. Again now that at least half the EPS are out, the rest will be right behind.

CMS and ONC need to realize that penalties NEVER work. Incentives like the heady days of MU1, got people to try EHR, but the costs are now piling up, big time. Everyone wants their piece of the pie. But as the incentives have gone away and the clerk like data entry has gone up, EPs have left the program. And are never, I mean never, coming back.

This provider makes an interesting assertion about meaningful use being dead. Do you think that MU is dead?

I thought this post’s timing was interesting given the announcement that CMS is changing the meaningful use stage 2 reporting period to 90 days. Correction…they intend to change it, but I think we all see that it’s going to happen. Just let the rule making process take it’s course.

Before this announcement, I would have largely agreed that meaningful use was pretty close to dead. I know some people have sifted through the meaningful use stage 2 attestations and have said it’s better than we thought, but I think those are the early birds and not the majority. With this announcement, I think the majority will take a much deeper look at taking on MU stage 2. If CMS can simplify some things, I could see many participating to get the incentive money, but to also avoid the penalties. Penalties aren’t the end all be all for doctors, but they represent a big chunk of money for many doctors.

I’d love to hear your thoughts. What are you seeing in the trenches?

ONC Annual Meeting – Who’s Going?

Posted on January 28, 2015 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

ONC’s Agenda – February 2-3, Washington, DC

Next Monday, ONC holds its annual meeting in downtown DC. I’m going, one small advantage of living here. Here’s the agenda. To see day two, click on the agenda header.

I’m particularly interested in these topics:

  • Adverse event reporting,
  • Interoperability standards,
  • Meaningful Use program’s future, and
  • Usability.

Looking at the agenda, I should stay busy with one exception. There isn’t much on usability. The word’s only on the agenda once. Not a surprise since ONC has pretty much relinquished any role to the vendors.

How important do you think the ONC meeting and also the ONC run Healthdatapalooza now that meaningful use has kind of run its course? Will these two meeting gain steam and influence or will organizations start to go other places? I’ll be interested to watch that trend as I attend the event.

If you can’t attend, you can follow on various webcasts and twitter. If you do plan to attend, I’d love to see you there. To email me, click on my name in my profile blurb, or at carl@ehrselector.com.

A Rub On Tatoo for Diabetics

Posted on January 27, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been covering a lot of wearables and sensors over on Smart Phone Healthcare through the years. It’s been great to see the evolution and I still think we’re just at the very beginning of what is going to be possible with these health sensors. However, the leaks in the damn are starting to appear and soon we’ll have a tidal wave of amazing health data from these health sensors.

Don’t believe me? Check out this story on Gizmodo about a Rub On Tattoo that measures a person’s blood glucose levels. For those too busy to click over, here’s an excerpt:

Pricking your finger for a blood glucose test will never, ever be fun. Thankfully, scientists have been hard at work on a bloodless and needleless alternative: a rub-on temporary tattoo that, as weird as it sounds, gently sucks glucose through the surface of the skin.

The thin, flexible device created by nanoengineers at UCSD is based on the much bulkier GlucoWatch, a now-discontinued wristband that worked through the same glucose-sucking principal. But the electric current GlucoWatch used to attract glucose to the surface of the skin was too high, and wearers were not keen on the discomfort. This temporary tattoo gets around the problem by using a gentler but still effective current.

Unfortunately, we’re still a few years out from this becoming a market ready product, but it’s another illustration of the kind of research and ingenuity that’s being put into the health sensors marketplace. I’m personally concerned about my risk for diabetes, and so I’m extremely excited about new developments around diabetes. However, this is just one of many more developments that are going to change the world of healthcare as we know it.

What do you think of this new wave of sensors? How will the medical establishment integrate all this new data? What other changes are happening which we should keep an eye on? I don’t think most doctors, practices, hospitals, EMR companies, etc are ready for what’s happening.

Clinical Decision Support Should Be Open Source

Posted on January 26, 2015 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Clinical decision support is a long-standing occupant of the medical setting. It got in the door with electronic medical records, and has recently received a facelift under the term “evidence based medicine.” We are told that CDS or EBM is becoming fine-tuned and energized through powerful analytics that pick up the increasing number of patient and public health data sets out in the field. But how does the clinician know that the advice given for a treatment or test is well-founded?

Most experts reaffirm that the final word lies with the physician–that each patient is unique, and thus no canned set of rules can substitute for the care that the physician must give to a patient’s particular conditions (such as a compromised heart or a history of suicidal ideation) and the sustained attention that the physician must give to the effects of treatment. Still, when the industry gives a platform to futurists such as Vinod Khosla who suggest that CDS can become more reliable than a physician’s judgment, we have to start demanding a lot more reliability from the computer.

It’s worth stopping a moment to consider the various inputs to CDS. Traditionally, it was based on the results of randomized, double-blind clinical trials. But these have come under scrutiny in recent years for numerous failings: the questionable validity of extending the results found on selected test subjects to a broader population, problems reproducing results for as many as three quarters of the studies, and of course the bias among pharma companies and journals alike for studies showing positive impacts.

More recently, treatment recommendations are being generated from “big data,” which trawl through real-life patient experiences instead of trying to isolate a phenomenon in the lab. These can turn up excellent nuggets of unexpected impacts–such as Vioxx’s famous fatalities–but suffer also from the biases of the researches designing the algorithms, difficulties collecting accurate data, the risk of making invalid correlations, and the risk of inappropriately attributing causation.

A third kind of computerized intervention has recently been heralded: IBM’s Watson. However, Watson does not constitute CDS (at least not in the demo I saw at HIMSS a couple years ago). Rather, Watson just does the work every clinician would ideally do but doesn’t have time for: it consults thousands of clinical studies to find potential diagnoses relevant to the symptoms and history being reported, and ranks these diagnoses by probability. Both of those activities hijack a bit of the clinician’s human judgment, but they do not actually offer recommendations.

So there are clear and present justifications for demanding that CDS vendors demonstrate its reliability. We don’t really know what goes into CDS and how it works. Meanwhile, doctors are getting sick and tired of bearing the liability for all the tools they use, and the burden of their malpractice insurance is becoming a factor in doctors leaving the field. The doctors deserve some transparency and auditing, and so do the patients who ultimately incorporate the benefits and risks of CDS into their bodies.

CDS, like other aspects of the electronic health records into which it is embedded, has never been regulated or subjected to public safety tests and audits. The argument trotted out by EHR vendors–like every industry–when opposing regulation is that it will slow down innovation. But economic arguments have fuzzy boundaries–one can always find another consideration that can reverse the argument. In an industry that people can’t trust, regulation can provide a firm floor on which a new market can be built, and the assurance that CDS is working properly can open up the space for companies to do more of it and charge for it.

Still, there seems to be a pendulum swing away from regulation at present. The FDA has never regulated electronic health records as it has other medical software, and has been carving out classes of medical devices that require little oversight. When it took up EHR safety last year, the FDA asked merely for vendors to participate voluntarily in a “safety center.”

The prerequisite for gauging CDS’s reliability is transparency. Specifically, two aspects should be open:

  • The vendor must specify which studies, or analytics and data sets, went into the recommendation process.

  • The code carrying out the recommendation process must be openly published.

These fundamentals are just the start of of the medical industry’s responsibilities. Independent researchers must evaluate the sources revealed in the first step and determine whether they are the best available choices. Programmers must check the code in the second step for accuracy. These grueling activities should be funded by the clinical institutions that ultimately use the CDS, so that they are on a firm financial basis and free from bias.

The requirement for transparent studies raises the question of open access to medical journals, which is still rare. But that is a complex issue in the fields of research and publishing that I can’t cover here.

Finally, an independent service has to collect reports of CDS failures and make them public, like the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) for drugs, and the FDA’s Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) for medical devices.

These requirements are reasonably light-weight, although instituting them will seem like a major upheaval to industries accustomed to working in the dark. What the requirements can do, though, is put CDS on the scientific basis it never has had, and push forward the industry more than any “big data” can do.

HIM and Where It’s Heading with Charlie Saponaro

Posted on January 23, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Lately I’ve started to really see the importance of HIM In the future of healthcare. I like to break HIM work into: managing the record (ie. Avoid Lawsuits), improving the coding/documentation (ie. More $$), and HIPAA compliance (ie. Avoid penalties). While their future has been questioned during the shift to EHR, I think they have a very important future in these areas.

With this as background, I did an interview with Charlie Saponaro, President and CEO of Medical Record Associates, to talk about the State of HIM. We talk about some major HIM trends like remote HIM and outsourced HIM for example. If you’re over HIM, in HIM or interested in the future of HIM, you’ll enjoy this chat with Charlie.

Athenahealth Goes After Hospitals and Tavenner Steps Down

Posted on January 22, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

There were two big pieces of news this week that I thought I’d discuss. Hopefully you’ll also add your thoughts and insights in the comments.

1. Athenahealth Moves Into Hospital Market With Acquisition Of Atlanta Startup RazorInsights
I thought the announcement of this acquisition was really interesting. Literally the day before this came out, someone asked me what I thought of Athenahealth. After some discussion, they said do you think they’ll take on Epic and Cerner. I quickly responded, “Well, they don’t have an inpatient EHR, so they don’t have a dog in the fight.” Well, now they do have a dog in the fight. Of course, RazorInsights still isn’t a big competitor of Epic and Cerner. However, if I know Jonathan Bush, that’s the ambition. At least that’s what his numerous cloud rants lead you to believe that he thinks he can take down Epic and Cerner with one single word: Cloud. We’ll see what RazorInsights can do under the Athenahealth umbrella.

2. CMS Leader Marilyn Tavenner Steps Down
Neil Versel has a great article covering Tavenner’s departure. His comments are pretty interesting when it comes to her staying low-profile and away from the media during her tenure at CMS. She’s certainly taken a lot of heat from the botched rollout of Healthcare.gov and other programs.

Personally, I’ll most remember her for her promise at HIMSS 2014 that ICD-10 was going to happen and that healthcare organizations better be ready. Of course, we know how that story played out with Congress passing a few lines in the SGR bill to delay ICD-10 another year. Given Tavenner’s promise, I’m quite sure she was blind sided by Congress’ move as well.

I’m not sure her departure is a good or a bad thing for healthcare. I’m sure that the healthcare behemoth will move along like it always has. Best of luck to her wherever she lands. No doubt working in the government in a high profile position is a rather thankless job that usually pays below market wages.

Who do you think will take Tavenner’s position at CMS? Does it matter?

Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference – and the #HITMC Twitter Chat

Posted on January 21, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Regular readers likely noticed the banner ad at the top of EMR and EHR which links to the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR conference (HITMC) that we organize. This event is shaping up to be absolutely fantastic. We’ve just started adding the speakers to the conference website, but I’m thrilled by the quality and variety of speakers that we’ll be having at HITMC 2015.

For those not familiar with the event, we bring together a few hundred of the very best Healthcare IT marketing and PR professionals. This year we’ll be hosting it at the nicely remodeled SLS Las Vegas hotel. No doubt you’ll see members of the HITMC community all over the hotel throughout the two days of the conference. Plus, this year we’re doing some early bird social events to really give attendees a great opportunity to connect.

Along with connecting with your peers, HITMC 2015 will include two days of amazing content on a wide variety of topics. Some of these topics will include:

  • Content Marketing
  • Best Practices for Social Media Marketing, Email Marketing and Search Engine Optimization (SEO)
  • Lead Nurturing
  • Effective PR
  • Marketing Automation Tools
  • Event Marketing
  • Case Studies from Health IT Companies
  • Much much more…

If you’re interested in healthcare IT marketing and PR, you’ll absolutely love this event. Along with all the learning, connecting, and sharing at the event, we also have some fun together too. Early bird registration for the event ends on 1/31/15, so register now to save $500.

For those interested in getting a small flavor for the event, we’re hosting a #HITMC twitter chat on Tuesday, 1/27 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). We hope that many of you can join us as we chat about the challenges associated with healthcare IT marketing and PR.

2014 EMR and EHR Stats Report

Posted on January 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m a little late in posting the stats for this blog, but I thought I’d do it now for posterity’s sake. I previously posted a stats report on EMR and HIPAA and will be doing it on other Healthcare Scene blogs including this one. I think it will tell an interesting story about the progression of the Healthcare Scene blog network over time.

So, without further ado, here are some interesting stats I got from a report on EMR and EHR for 2014.

In 2014, we published 273 new posts on EMR and EHR, growing the total archive of this blog to 1,411 posts.

EMR and EHR was viewed about 720,000 times in 2014. The busiest day of the year was February 28th with 1,484 views.

I’m proud that all but one of the top posts are from 2014. I know Carl spent a lot of time creating #2, so I’m glad that it’s been seen by so many people.
1. 4 Things Your Patient Portal Should Include
2. EHR Product Market Shares Rankings: The Envelope Please!
3. Why ICD-10?
4. Rise of the Digital Patient Infographic
5. Improving the EHR Interface and Topol Saves Patient’s Life on Flight Home

The question that Kyle posed in #3 – Why ICD-10? – is a battle that’s still raging. We’ll see if ICD-10 goes forward and that question goes away or whether it’s delayed again and the battle will rage on. #4 and #5 show the power of a great infographic and Topol saving someone’s life.

EMR and EHR has had visitors from 168 countries in all, but the US is far and away the top readership. Thanks to the 785 views that came from Italy (sorry, I have an Italy bias addiction in case you didn’t know).

I hope you enjoyed the stats and thanks for reading! Here’s to a wonderful 2015!

Exploring the Role of Clinical Documentation: a Step Toward EHRs for Learning

Posted on January 19, 2015 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

We need more clinicians weighing in on the design of the tools they use, so I was gratified to see a policy paper from the American College of Physicians about EHRs this week. In a sporadic and tentative manner, the paper recognizes that our digital tools for clinical documentation are part of a universal health care system that requires attention to workflow, care coordination, outcomes, and research needs.

The strong points of this paper include:

  • A critique of interfaces that hobble the natural thought processes of the clinician trying to record an encounter

  • A powerful call to direct record-keeping away from billing and regulatory requirements, toward better patient care

  • An endorsement of patient access to records (recommendation 6 under Clinical Documentation) and even more impressively, the incorporation of patient-generated data into clinical practice (recommendation 5 under EHR System Design)

  • A nod toward provenance (recommendation 3 under EHR System Design), which tells viewers who entered data and when, thus allowing them to judge its accuracy

Although the authors share my interests in data sharing and making data available for research, their overarching vision is of an electronic record that supports critical thinking. An EHR should permit the doctor to record ideas about a patient’s condition as naturally as they emerge from his or her head. And it should support other care-takers in making treatment decisions.

That’s a fine goal in itself, but I wish the authors also laid out a clearer vision of records within a learning health care system. Currently a popular buzzword, a learning health care system collects data from clinicians, patients, and the general population to look for evidence and correlations that can improve the delivery of health care. The learning system can determine the prevalence of health disorders in an area, pick out which people are most at risk, find out how well treatments work, etc. It is often called a “closed loop system” because it can draw on information generated from within the system to change course quickly.

So at the start of the policy paper I was disappointed to read, “The primary goal of EHR-generated documentation should be concise, history-rich notes that reflect the information gathered and are used to develop an impression, a diagnostic and/or treatment plan, and recommended follow-up.” What about supporting workflows? Facilitating continuous, integrated care such as in a patient-centered medical home? Mining data for new treatments and interventions? Interfacing with personal health and fitness devices?

Fortunately, the authors massage their initial claim by the time they reach their first policy recommendation under Clinical Documentation: “The primary purpose of clinical documentation should be to support patient care and improve clinical outcomes through enhanced communication.” The primary purpose gets even better later on: “As value-based care and accountable care models grow, the primary purpose of the EHR should remain the facilitation of seamless patient care to improve outcomes while contributing to data collection that supports necessary analyses.”

One benefit of reading this paper is its perspective on how medical records evolved to their current state. It notes a swelling over the decades in the length of notes and the time spent on them, “the increased documentation arguably not improving patient care.” Furthermore, it details how the demands of billing drove modern documentation, blaming this foremost on CMS’s “issuance of the evaluation and management (E&M) guidelines in 1995 and 1997.” I suspect that private insurers are just as culpable. In any case, the distortion of diagnosis in the pursuit of payments hasn’t worked well for either goal: 40% of diagnoses are wrongly coded.

The pressures of defensive medicine also reveal the excessively narrow view of the EHR currently as an archive rather than a resource.

The article calls for each discipline to set standards for its own documentation. I think this could help doctors use fields consistently in structured documentation. But although the authors endorse the use of macros, templates, and (with care) copy/forward, they are distinctly unfriendly toward structured data. Their distemper stems from the tendency of structured interfaces to disrupt the doctor’s thinking–the presevervation of which, remember, is their main concern–and to make him jump around from field to field in an unnatural way.

Yet the authors recognize that structured data is needed “for measurement of quality, public health reporting, research, and regulatory compliance” and state in their conclusion: “Vendors need to improve the ability of systems to capture and manage structured data.” We need structured data for our learning health care system, and we can’t wait for natural language processing to evolve to the point where it can reliably extract the necessary elements of a document. But a more generous vision could resolve the dilemma.

Certainly, current systems don’t handle structured data well. For instance, the article restates the well-known problem of redundant data entry, particularly to meet regulatory requirements, a problem that could be solved with minimally intelligent EHR processing engines. The interactive features available on modern mobile devices and web interfaces could also let the clinician enter data in any manner suited to her thinking, imposing structure as she goes, instead of forcing her into a rigid order of data entry chosen by the programmer.

Already, Modernizing Medicine claims to make structured data as easy to enter as writing in a paper chart. As I cover in another article, they are not yet a general solution, but work only with a few fields that deal with a distinct set of health conditions. The tool is a model for what we can do in the future, though.

The common problem of physicians copying observations from a previous encounter and pasting them into the current encounter is a trivial technical failure. On the web, when I want to cite material from a previous article, I don’t copy it and paste it in. I insert a hyperlink, I did in the previous paragraph. EHRs could similarly make reporting simple and accurate by linking to previous encounters where relevant.

The ACP recommendations are sensible and well-informed. If implemented by practitioners and EHR developers who keep the larger goals of health care in mind, they can help jump over the chasm between where EHRs and documentation are today, and where we need them to be.

Full Disclosure: Modernizing Medicine is an advertiser on this site.