Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

EMR and EHR Update

Posted on June 30, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The evolution of blogging has been interesting to me. I use to celebrate all sorts of milestones on my blogs. Now that we’re 10 years and over 10,000 blog posts into my healthcare IT blogging career, I sometimes take for granted what each blog accomplishes. I’ll try and fix that by covering a few of the latest stats for EMR and EHR:

  • 4.6 million pageviews
  • 1,789 blog posts
  • 3,887 comments
  • Average of 4.9 blog posts/week

Looks like my first post on EMR and EHR was way back on April 30, 2009. I’m pretty proud of what we’ve built at EMR and EHR over the past 7 years. Ironically, I actually started this blog for a guy named Jamie. I was busy blogging over on EMR and HIPAA. 5 blog posts in he got a new job which didn’t leave him the time to blog, so I took it over and have been blogging on it with a group of other amazing writers ever since.

A year or so after I started EMR and EHR, I almost sold the blog for $50k. Considering the revenue this blog has generated since then and what it’s worth, I’m glad I chose not to sell it at the time.

Speaking of which, I’ve been lucky to have hundreds of great healthcare IT and EHR companies support this blog over the years. We started off largely selling EHR display ads and they still do quite well for us since our readers are often looking for the right EHR and healthcare solutions. Since then we’ve really expanded our healthcare IT marketing options to things like email marketing and sponsored content.

Thanks to the hundreds of advertisers that have and continue to support the work we do covering the healthcare IT and EHR industry. Plus, I can’t express my gratitude enough for the millions of readers who have visited EMR and EHR. Especially the many people who have shared our content, corrected our mistakes, extended the conversation, shared us on social media, and helped us continue to be the go to place for what’s happening in healthcare IT.

Here’s looking forward to another 7 years of excitement. I can only imagine where EHR and health IT will be 7 years from now. That’s what makes this field so exciting.

Physician Data Paradox

Posted on June 29, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

“[Doctors] are overloaded on data entry and yet rampantly under-informed.”
-Andy Slavitt at Health Datapalooza

This quote from Andy Slavitt at Health Datapalooza has really stuck with me. He calls it the physician data paradox. It’s an ugly paradox and is at the heart of so many doctors discontent with EHR software. Andy Slavitt is spot on with his analysis. Doctors spend hours entering all of this data and get very little return value from that data or the volume of health data that is being captured.

My friend Dr. Michael Koriwchak has made an interesting request. In a recent blab interview he was on he said that CMS should only require the collection of data they’re actually going to use.

My guess is that the majority of meaningful use data would not need to be collected if Dr. Koriwchak’s rule was in place. CMS hasn’t really even collected the data from doctors, so they’re certainly not using it. Some of the principles of meaningful use would still exist like interoperability and ePrescribing, but we wouldn’t be turning our doctors into data entry clerks of data that’s not being used.

Think about the reality of meaningful use data collection: CMS doesn’t use the data. Clinicians don’t use the data.

We’ve basically asked doctors and other medical staff to spend millions of hours collecting a bunch of data that’s not being used. Does that make sense to anyone? You could make the argument that the data collection is creating a platform for the future. There’s some value in this thinking, but that’s pretty speculative spending. Why not do this type of speculative data collection with small groups who get paid for their efforts and then as they discover new healthcare opportunities? We can expand the data collection requirement to all of healthcare once doctors can do something meaningful with the data they’re being required to collect.

In fact, what if we paid docs for telling CMS or their EHR vendor how EHR data could be used to benefit patients? I’d see this similar to how IT companies pay people who submit bug reports. Not using health data the right way is kind of like reporting a bug in the health system. Currently, there’s no financial incentive for users to share their best practices and discoveries. Sure, some of them do it at user conferences or other conferences, but imagine how much more interested they’d be in finding and sharing health data discoveries if they were paid for it.

If we finally want to start putting all this health data to work, we’re going to have to solve the physician data paradox. Leveraging the power of the crowd could be a great way to improve the 2nd part of the paradox.

Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) Chart

Posted on June 28, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It seems like my latest kick is talking about Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) and their impact on our health and the health system (Note: I blame Mandi Bishop for this). Many of you might remember that I recently asked if doctors ever cared about SDOH. The topic also came up in the recent Health Disruptors chat where I asked pointed questions about SDOH from a practicing doctor. Dr. Vanagon’s responses were quite insightful.

During that chat, I started listing off some of the possible social determinants of health. I knew my list was lacking and I figured someone else had created a much better list. As fate would have it, this list popped up on my social news feed:

Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) Chart

Does anyone else get a bit overwhelmed when you see a full list like this? However, it also displays huge opportunities since our current health system is working on such a small portion of this chart. We’re going to have to expand what we’re doing if we truly want to lower the cost of healthcare as we know it. Although, it’s also important to note that doctors can only influence so much of what impacts our health.

Which SDOH factors do you think it would be best for our health system to work on first?

CommonWell and Healthcare Interoperability

Posted on June 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: In case you missed the live interview, you can watch the recorded interview on YouTube below:

2016 June - CommonWell and Healthcare Interoperability-headshots

For our next Healthcare Scene interview, we’ll be sitting down with Scott Stuewe, Director at Cerner Network and Daniel Cane, CEO & Co-Founder at Modernizing Medicine on Wednesday, June 29, 2016 at 3 PM ET (Noon PT). Cerner was one of the Founding Members of CommonWell and Modernizing Medicine just announced they were joining CommonWell. No doubt these diverse perspectives will provide an engaging discussion about the work CommonWell is doing to improve healthcare data sharing.

You can join my live conversation with Scott Stuewe and Daniel Cane and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask them questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Wednesday, June 29, 2016 at 3 PM ET (Noon PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’re hoping to include as many people in the conversation as possible. The discussion will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

As we usually do with these interviews, we’ll be doing a more formal interview with Scott Stuewe and Daniel Cane for the first ~30 minutes of this conversation. Then, we’ll open up the floor for others to ask questions or join us on camera. CommonWell has become a big player in the healthcare interoperability space with most of the major EHR vendors involved, so we’re excited to learn more about what’s happening with CommonWell.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

Sometimes Health Is About A Simple Connection to the Right People

Posted on June 24, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

One of our biggest health care costs comes from our aging population. No doubt they’re a challenging group that often has multiple chronic conditions and is generally seen as anti-technology. While their medical conditions can be a challenge, it’s unfair to say that technology can’t have a great impact for good on even senior citizens.

In fact, one of the biggest health challenges senior citizens face is loneliness. It’s amazing the health impact being lonely can have on a person. The great thing is that technology as simple as a tablet can have a dramatic impact for good on senior citizens. Here’s a great video from Samsung and Breezie that illustrates this point:

I’ve seen a number of solutions like the Breezie tablets that have made the internet extremely accessible for senior citizens. It’s extraordinary to watch the impact for good that connecting to their friends and family on a tablet can have on a person. Plus, once their emotional state is in a better place, it’s often much easier for them to deal with their physical health challenges as well.

The amazing part is that these tablets don’t need some sort of complex health apps. They don’t need an AI generated dog to be their friend (Although, people are working on this). They don’t need dozens of healthcare sensors that are constantly monitoring their every health stat (Although, people are working on this too). All these seniors need is simple apps like Facebook where they can see pictures of their grandkids and email where they can communicate with their family and friends.

I’m sure that as things progress we’ll see more and more advanced health apps on these tablets. Many seniors have a challenge traveling to see their doctor, so you can easily see how a telemedicine app would be very convenient for both patient and doctor. Plus, sometimes you don’t even need video, but just a personal message from your trusted caregiver to help a patient feel better. All of this will come to the tablets, but we can start with something much simpler. A basic connection to the right people for that person.

I heard of one project where the patient improvement came as much from the daily call these lonely, elderly patients received as it was the actual study that was being conducted. While we could throw more people at the problem, that only scales so far. If we really want to scale this type of care to seniors, we’re going to need to utilize technology. These tablets designed for seniors are a great place to start. Then, we can build from there.

I don’t think it will be long before we see doctors prescribing tablets to patients. It’s not currently in doctors normal line of thinking, but maybe it should be.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Dallas Children’s Health and Sickle Cell Patients: Cobbling Together a Sound Solution

Posted on June 23, 2016 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a genetic, red blood cell condition, which damages cell walls impeding their passage through capillaries. Episodic, it is often extremely painful. It can damage organs, cause infections, strokes or joint problems. These episodes or SCA crises can be prompted by any number of environmental or personal factors.

In the US, African Americans are most commonly susceptible to SCA, but other groups can have it as well. SCA presents a variety of management problems in the best of circumstances. As is often the case, management is made even more difficult when the patient is a child. That’s what Children’s Health of Dallas, Texas, one of the nation’s oldest and largest pediatric treatment facilities faced two years ago. Children’s Health, sixty five percent of whose patients are on Medicaid, operates a large, intensive SCA management program as the anchor institution of the NIH funded Southwestern Comprehensive Sickle Cell Center.

Children’s Health problem wasn’t with its inpatient care or with its outpatient clinics. Rather, it was keeping a child’s parents and doctors up to date on developments. Along with the SCA clinical staff, Children’s Chief Information Officer, Pamela Arora, and Information Management and Exchange Director, Katherine Lusk, tackled the problem. They came up with a solution using all off the shelf technology.

Their solution? Provide each child’s caregiver with a free Verizon smartphone. Each night, they extracted the child’s information from EPIC and sent it to Microsoft’s free, vendor-neutral HealthVault PHR. This gave the child’s doctor and parents an easy ability to stay current with the child’s treatment. Notably, Children’s was able to put the solution together quickly with minimal staff and without extensive development.

That was two years ago. Since then, EPIC’s Lucy PHR has supplanted the project. However, Katherine Lusk who described the project to me is still proud of what they did. Even though the project has been replaced, it’s worth noting as an important example. It shows that not all HIE projects must be costly, time-consuming or resource intense to be successful.

Children’s SCA project points out the value of these system development factors:

  • Clear, understood goal
  • Precise understanding of users and their needs
  • Small focused team
  • Searching for off the shelf solutions
  • Staying focused and preventing scope creep

Each of these proved critical to Children’s success. Not every project lends itself to this approach, but Children’s experience is worth keeping in mind as a useful and repeatable model of meeting an immediate need with a simple, direct approach.

Note: I first heard of Children’s project at John’s Atlanta conference. ONC’s Peter Ashkenaz mentioned it as a notable project that had not gained media attention. I owe him a thanks for pointing me to Katherine Lusk.

E-Patient Update: Apple Offers iPhone EMR Access

Posted on June 22, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Over the last few years, Apple has steadily beefed up the health data access provided by its iPhone operating system, in ways that have made some sense. But depending on how consumers react, its latest effort may have the biggest impact of all of its data sharing efforts to date.

In its latest mobile operating system, Apple is allowing users to store their EMR data directly in its Health app, using the HL7 CCD standard. And while this isn’t a huge step forward for interoperability, it does give e-patients like me a greater sense of control, which is definitely a good thing.

In recent years, Apple has made increasingly sophisticated efforts to unify healthcare data. Perhaps the highest profile effort is the summer 2014 launch of HealthKit, a healthcare data integration platform whose features include connecting consumer-generated data with traditional clinical sources such as the Epic EMR.

Meanwhile, it has steadily added capabilities to the Health app, which launched with iOS 8. Since then, it has been encouraging consumers to manage health data on their phone using HealthKit-enabled apps like the Epic MyChart patient portal app. The new EMR data retrieval function is available in the iOS 10 version of Health.

According to Apple blog 9to5Mac, consumers can import the CCD data from Mail, Safari and other applications as well as into Health. When consumers add the CCD file to Health, the app opens and providers a quick preview of the document’s data, including the healthcare provider’s name, patient’s name and document owner’s name. It also identifies the document’s custodian. Once downloaded, the device stores the document in encrypted form, indefinitely.

Also, when a user confirms that they want to save the record to the Health app, the CCD info is added to a list of all of the health record documents stored in the app, making it easier to identify the entire scope of what a user has stored.

Looked at one way, the addition of medical record storage capabilities to the latest iOS release may not seem like a big deal. After all, I’ve been downloading broad swaths of my healthcare data from the Epic MyChart app for a couple of years now, and it hasn’t rocked my world. The document MyChart produces can be useful, but it’s not easily shareable. How will it change patients’  lives to store multiple records on their cell phone, their tablet or heaven help us, their Apple Watch?

On the surface, the answer is almost certainly “not much,” but I think there’s more to this than meets the eye. Yes, this solution doesn’t sound particularly elegant, nor especially useful for patients who want to share data with clinicians. My guess is that at first, most consumers will download a few records and forget that they’re available.

However, Apple brings something unique to the table. It has what may be the best-integrated consumer technology base on the planet, and can still claim a large, fanatical following for its products. If it trains up its user base to demand EMR data, they might trigger a cultural shift in what data patients expect to have available. And that could prove to be a powerful force for change.

Dr. Google – Or at Least a WebMD Replacement

Posted on June 21, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’ve all heard the talk about Dr. Google and how it’s the first place many of us reach out to with are various medical issues. Well, Dr. Google (my term, not there’s) is stepping up their game even more with their most recent announcement. Here’s an excerpt of the changes to a Google search for symptoms:

So starting in the coming days, when you ask Google about symptoms like “headache on one side,” we’ll show you a list of related conditions (“headache,” “migraine,” “tension headache,” “cluster headache,” “sinusitis,” and “common cold”). For individual symptoms like “headache,” we’ll also give you an overview description along with information on self-treatment options and what might warrant a doctor’s visit. By doing this, our goal is to help you to navigate and explore health conditions related to your symptoms, and quickly get to the point where you can do more in-depth research on the web or talk to a health professional.

Lest you think this is just Google, they have worked with some actual doctors on their results:

We worked with a team of medical doctors to carefully review the individual symptom information, and experts at Harvard Medical School and Mayo Clinic evaluated related conditions for a representative sample of searches to help improve the lists we show.

Although, Google did follow that up with a big disclaimer that they’re just a source of information and that it shouldn’t replace consulting a doctor for medical advice. Yeah, Google’s not quite ready to take on the liability of actually giving medical advice. So, take their results with that grain of salt.
Dr. Google
Of course, Google doesn’t have to worry about it. Millions already take their health-related search results with a grain of salt. I’d really say that this update is an algorithm tweak and an interface tweak more than it being a real change to the way Google does things.

If I’m WebMD, I’d be a bit worried by these tweaks by Google. Doesn’t what Google’s doing sound a lot like WebMD? However, I’m sure Google sends a ton of traffic WebMD’s way, so they won’t likely complain about things. At least not for now.

I’m sure most doctors’ reaction to this is likely covered by this coffee cup:
Dr Google - Google Search Replacement for Medical Degree
In response to this mug, e-Patient Dave provides an alternate and important perspective on the balance between an informed patient versus an arrogant, disrespectful patient. Like most things in life, it’s what you do with the information or tool that matters. It can be used for good or bad depending on how you approach it.

All of this said, the patient is becoming more empowered every day. Consumer driven healthcare is here to stay and Dr. Google is going to be one important tool in that toolbox for many patients.

Practice Fusion Settles FTC Charges Over “Deceptive” Consumer Marketing

Posted on June 20, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

In what may be a first for the EMR industry, ambulatory EMR vendor Practice Fusion has settled Federal Trade Commission charges that it misled consumers as part of a campaign to gather reviews for its doctors.

Under the terms of the settlement, Practice Fusion agreed to refrain from making deceptive statements about the privacy and confidentiality of the information it collects from consumers. It also promised that if it planned to make any consumer information publicly available, it would offer a clear and conspicuous notice of its plans before it went ahead, and get affirmative consent from those consumers before using their information.

Prior to getting entangled in these issues, Practice Fusion had launched Patient Fusion, a portal allowing patients whose providers used its EMR to download their health information, transmit that information to another provider or send and receive messages from their providers.

The problem targeted by the FTC began in 2012, when Practice Fusion was preparing to expand Patient Fusion to include a public directory allowing enrollees to search for doctors, read reviews and request appointments. To support the rollout, the company began sending emails to patients of providers who used Practice Fusion’s EMR, asking patients to review their provider. In theory, this was probably a clever move, as the reviews would have given Practice Fusion-using practices greater social credibility.

The problem was, however, that the request was marketed deceptively, the FTC found. Rather than admitting that this was an EMR marketing effort, Practice Fusion’s email messages appeared to come from patients’ doctors. And the patients were never informed that the information would be made public. And worse, a pre-checked “Keep this review anonymous” only withheld the patient’s name, leaving information in the text box visible.

So patients, who thought they were communicating privately with their physicians, shared a great deal of private and personal health information. Many entered their full name or phone number in a text box provided as part of the survey. Others shared intimate health information, including on consumer who asked for dosing information for “my Xanax prescription,” and another who asked for help with a suicidally depressed child.

The highly sensitive nature of some patient comments didn’t get much attention until a year later, when EMR and HIPAA broke the story and then Forbes published a follow up article on the subject. After the articles appeared, Practice Fusion put automated procedures in place to block the publication of reviews in which consumers entered personal information.

In the future, Practice Fusion is barred from misrepresenting the extent to which it uses, maintains and protects the privacy or confidentiality of data it collects. Also, it may not publicly display the reviews it collected from consumers during the time period covered by the complaint.

There’s many lessons to be gleaned from this case, but the most obvious seems to be that misleading communications that impact patients are a complete no-no. According to an FTC blog item on the case, they also include that health IT companies should never bury key facts in a dense privacy policy, and that disclosures should use the same eye-catching methods they use for marketing, such as striking graphics, bold colors, big print and prominent placement.

Long Standing EHR Issues That Remain Unaddressed

Posted on June 17, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Dr. Jayne has presented a pretty great voice of reason in her blog posts about the realities of being a doctor in the meaningful use era. In a recent post she offered this comment which I’ve heard from many doctors:

And while we as physicians are having to cope with arduous workflows as a result of the regulations, there are advancements that would really benefit us that remain unaddressed.

I realize that EHR vendors have to prioritize requests from users. Plus, they have to deal with massive government regulation which has made it hard to prioritize user requests over government regulations. However, I know from the end user standpoint Dr. Jayne’s comment about the advancements that could be made in an EHR that still haven’t been added creates a really awful feeling.

Dr. Jayne also added this sad observation:

We’re forced to gather loads of information that could be put to good use but isn’t. For example, we collect information on race, ethnicity, religious preference, language preference, sexual orientation, and more. In many cases, it’s not used to further clinical care. It would have been great to have a prompt to ask about religious fasting the other night when I was treating a patient with profound dehydration. Although it occurred to me to ask, it didn’t occur to my patient care technician or to the resident I was supervising.

The optimistic side of me says that comments like this are a very good thing. 5-10 years ago, doctors wouldn’t have even thought to request this kind of feature. All they wanted to do was automate the paper charts. So, it’s progress that now we’re talking about ways we can incorporate the data in an EHR at the point of care in a much more effective way.

Now if EHR vendors can just be given the flexibility to work on these challenging problems instead of a list of prescriptive goverment regulations which just add to the burden of doctors as opposed to creating magical experiences.