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ONC to Meet with Potential CCHIT Alternatives

Posted on June 24, 2009 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

There’s been a lot of talk around the blogosphere about the new EHR certification pathways proposed by CCHIT. However, Neil Versel is reporting on his blog that there’s a rumor that ONC is planning a July meeting with several people that are considering starting up an EHR certification program.

Makes complete sense to me. David Blumenthal does seem open to the idea of not having CCHIT be the sole certification body. Certainly he’ll feel some big time pressure from the various big EHR vendors out there, but I’m hopeful that David Blumenthal will be able to do well and keep at least some competition in the EHR certification process.

Meaningful Use Sent Back by ONC Head David Blumenthal

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Everyone in the healthcare IT world is sitting and waiting to know the fate of the words “certified EHR” and “meaningful use.” Yes, only a few billion dollars of EHR stimulus money are riding on those 2 terms.

Well, after the Health IT Policy Committee came out with their initial set of recommendations, it was reported that David Blumenthal, National Coordinator for Health IT, said “lively discussion (on the criteria) and considerable input on meaningful use, we decided to send the work group back to work on another set.”

Looks like the new date for more guidance from the Health IT policy committee will be their July 16th meeting.

Declaration of Health Data Rights

Posted on June 22, 2009 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I came across an interesting site which is calling for people to support a “Declaration of Health Data Rights.”  Here’s the basic declaration they’d like people to support:

In an era when technology allows personal health information to be more easily stored, updated, accessed and exchanged, the following rights should be self-evident and inalienable. We the people:

  • Have the right to our own health data
  • Have the right to know the source of each health data element
  • Have the right to take possession of a complete copy of our individual health data, without delay, at minimal or no cost; if data exist in computable form, they must be made available in that form
  • Have the right to share our health data with others as we see fit

These principles express basic human rights as well as essential elements of health care that is participatory, appropriate and in the interests of each patient. No law or policy should abridge these rights.

Pretty interesting stuff they’re trying to accomplish. I think this concept is really great. I just hope that their zeal doesn’t overstep and make releasing a patient’s information an enormous burden on a doctor’s office. Seems like you could do so without too much trouble, but it can get out of hand if people aren’t careful. Luckily, those who have an EMR or EHR in their office should be at a big advantage in this regard.

Guest Post: The Recent EMR Debate

Posted on June 15, 2009 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The recent increase in the adoption of EMRs due to the Obama administration’s stimulus package has caused a stir within the medical field.  This computerized record technology has already changed the face of American health care, amidst an inner sense of conflict between smaller and larger healthcare centers.  The stimulus package has forced many smaller offices to update their health records because of the government’s overall plan to hasten the implementation of EMRs in order to curb the cost of care nationwide.  While this new implementation has proved to be controversial, its intentions are for the better of society as a whole.

While most healthcare centers already use computerized software to keep their records in order, a lot of smaller companies do not have the necessary funds needed in order to fully implement this system.  Because of the increased demand for this technology, larger companies have acquired larger shares of health information-technology specialists, leaving everyone else to scramble for a share.  This will in turn lead to smaller companies becoming forced to team with larger ones simply to adopt computerized health records because of the overarching cost.  While this was a largely unforeseen consequence of the stimulus package, it is still one that has affected many smaller practices in a large way.

Healthcare should be computerized in general, as it leads to better archival records and an easier way to back everything up.  However, smaller companies should not be forced to update their systems simply because the government has now deemed it necessary to convert to this method.  Many smaller practices are now hurting because of this transition, which is the exact opposite goal of the stimulus package.  The recent technological revolution has been ongoing since the beginning of the twentieth century, ushering in an age in which computers are commonplace and do well to be placed within doctor’s offices.  However, the government should take on the expense of implementing these throughout the country rather than forcing small businesses (which it is initially supposed to be protecting) to combine with larger ones simply in order to maintain their revenue.

It seems difficult to argue against a measure that is intended to benefit the whole of society in the end, but for a while, this will drastically alter the finances of many smaller health practices.  In consideration of these smaller centers, we need to discover a way in which we can consolidate health care practice into a technological aspect without causing further expense to an already “strapped” industry.

This post was contributed by Meredith Walker, who writes about the top nursing schools. She welcomes your feedback at MeredithWalker1983 at gmail.com

Survey on Impact of EHR Adoption and EHR Implementation

Posted on June 10, 2009 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Here’s a short summary of a survey on the impact of EHR adoption and the major challenges of EHR implementation:

Stamford, Conn.- based IVANS Inc., a provider of electronic communications services to insurance and healthcare companies, surveyed 508 healthcare providers throughout the United States in April 2009.

According to the survey providers do see the benefits of healthcare IT, with 66 percent of those surveyed believing that EHRs can have a positive impact on their business, and 74 percent believing EHRs can have a positive impact on the healthcare industry overall.

The biggest challenge to implementation cited by providers was, “lack of budget” (82 percent) followed by “lack of awareness and expertise.”

I’m not sure how well this survey was executed, but the results seem to match what I’ve experienced in the EHR industry as well.