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Google Plus for EMR and Helathcare IT

Posted on July 31, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Considering the amazing adoption of Google Plus, I imagine that many readers of this site are using it. I must admit that I got a little bit of a slow start to Google Plus since I was traveling for 2 weeks. However, I’ve started to dive in head first and see what it’s about. I’m still not sure exactly how this will be used in the future. Although, I’ve already seen some potential for amazing discussions to happen on Google Plus.

You can find me on Google Plus if you’d like to add me to your circle. I’d of course be happy to add any of you to my EMR and Healthcare IT circle.

I’m not really sure where Google Plus is going to lead, but I do know that the more people I connect with on it the more I like it. So, I’m interested in connecting with a lot more EMR and healthcare IT people.

I’d also love to hear what others like or dislike about Google Plus. How are you using it? How do you think it will fit in with other social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

101 Tips to Make Your EMR and EHR More Useful – EHR Tips 91-95

Posted on July 29, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Time for the second entry covering Shawn Riley’s list of 101 Tips to Make your EMR and EHR More Useful. I hope you’re enjoying the series.

95. Background check the vendor’s support team
This is such great advice. You’re guaranteed to have to call your EHR’s support number. You want to know what kind of answer you get. Certainly this can be learned by asking current clients of the EHR vendor. Although, don’t just ask the clients the EHR vendor gives you. Also, be sure to call other users of that EHR system to understand what kind of support they get when they have an issue.

Online forums are also a great place to learn about support. Just be aware that online you’re likely only going to read about the best and worst experiences that people have had with an EHR vendor. Of course, you can also always just give their support number a call and see what happens. Cold calling their support could teach you a lot about the type of service they provide.

94. Ask how the vendor ensures disaster recovery and business continuity
This is particularly important when you’re dealing with a SaaS EHR vendor. Don’t be shy asking them for details of how they’re doing this. In fact, if I were an EHR vendor I’d have a nice detailed explanation of how we’re doing it. If they’re doing it right, they’ll be happy to talk through the details.

If you’re considering a client server based EHR software, then some of this will fall to you and your IT team. However, your IT team can often only implement certain disaster recovery and business continuity features if your EHR vendor supports those features. So, be sure to have a competent IT person look over the EHR vendors capabilities. Plus, you might want to put these capabilities in your EHR contract since they often say one thing about disaster recovery and then deliver another.

93. TRY to use a vendor that actually has standards in their system I find this point from Shawn interesting. My first problem with it is that unfortunately we don’t have great standards in healthcare IT (yet?). However, a few that are easily recognized are HL7 and CCR/CCD. I honestly can’t say I’ve seen any vendor that doesn’t support HL7 though. So, since they all do it, that won’t help you much.

The other side of this coin is the various systems that an EHR vendor uses. Do they use a standard SQL database and a common programming language or do they use a proprietary database and programming language? I’m not sure this should be a complete deal killer, but there is some benefit to choosing an EMR system that uses a standard SQL database. Particularly if we’re talking about a client server EMR system. However, for most people this won’t likely have much impact on them. The only exception being that the language and/or database they use might be an indication of how “legacy” their EHR software is.

92. Google “product name + support forum”
There’s some real value for an EHR vendor to have an online support forum. In some cases, EHR vendors have support forums that are run by a third party. I think we can all see the value in sharing experiences using a specific EHR software with someone else who uses that same software. A lot of learning can happen that way. You’ll be amazed at how creative some people are and how vastly different they might use the same software.

My only problem with some of these third party online forums is that it can often mean that the support from that EHR vendor isn’t very good. Why do I say this? Because if the EHR vendor support was better, people wouldn’t have had to turn to these third party forums to get support. You can usually see if this is the case by browsing the threads of the forum and see how many complain about not getting support from the vendor and so that’s why they found the online forum.

I wouldn’t say an online forum is absolutely essential for an EHR company, but if they have one you should know about it and see what it’s like before you buy.

91. Google “product name + Twitter / Facebook / etc…
It seems that I wouldn’t knock an EHR company as much as Shawn does when it comes to an EHR vendor’s presence on things like Twitter and Facebook. Shawn says that it could be a sign that they’re stuck in the past. While this could be true, it could also just mean that they’ve chosen other forms of marketing that fit their skills and abilities.

While I don’t necessarily count lack of social media presence as a huge minus, it can be a huge plus. Twitter has become a great way for me to get support. For some reason companies like to listen more when I broadcast my need in a public forum. So, EHR companies that listen on the likes of Twitter might be a benefit for you when you’re not getting the support you need. Plus, an EHR vendor’s Twitter, Facebook and blog can tell you a lot about the personality of an EHR company. Something that can be really important in your assessment of the company.

If you want to see my analysis of the other 101 EMR and EHR tips, I’ll be updating this page with my 101 EMR and EHR tips analysis. So, click on that link to see the other EMR tips.

101 Tips to Make Your EMR and EHR More Useful – EHR Tips 96-101

Posted on July 28, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Shawn Riley on HealthTechnica has collected a great list called 101 Tips to Make your EMR and EHR More Useful. I find lists like this really interesting and provide a great point of conversation. So, I’m planning to take the 101 ways, and over 10 or so blog posts, I’m going to cover each suggestion and where appropriate provide some commentary on the tip. I expect it will drive some really interesting conversation.

101. Trust, but verify
This is a fine suggestion. It’s a tough balance to achieve, because you want and need to have the trust of your EHR vendor, because once you’re ready to implement that EHR you’re likely going to ask them for help. Some of the help will be rather easy for them to support, but more often than not you might want to ask them for some pretty custom work to make the EHR work the way you want it to work for your clinic. So, you want to make sure that you have a good relationship with your EHR vendor.

However, that doesn’t mean there’s anything wrong with verifying what the EHR vendor and their salespeople are telling you. In fact, it would be a huge mistake not to verify. There are lots of open forums like this website where you can ask and verify a lot of what the EHR representatives are telling you. Also, visit other hospitals, healthcare centers, doctors etc. who have implemented an EHR from the same vendor.

100. Ask about the learning curve
Great suggestion! Although, I don’t think there’s much value asking the EHR vendor about the learning curve. Ok, maybe you can find a little value if you ask them on average how much training their users require to implement their EHR. However, the learning curve of an EHR goes far beyond the initial training. So, you should ask your EHR vendors existing users about the learning curve. Also, try to ask those doctors who have implemented in the last 3-6 months. It’s easy to forget how hard (or easy) it was to learn something when you did it a few years ago.

99. Ask what platforms are supported
Yes, most EMR software is very specific. You can actually find much of the breakout of which platforms various EHR companies support on this EHR and EMR Operating System Compatibility wiki page. Obviously, if you love your Apple products, then you’re going to need to be sure that your EHR platform supports it. Not to mention, the platforms an EHR vendor supports (or more likely doesn’t support) might be a sign of how well the EHR is at keeping up with the latest technological trends.

98. Look for long life and long term support
Switching EMRs is worse than implementing one in the first place. Sure, they usually go better than the initial implementation, but there’s nothing fun about switching EMR software. So, do what you can to ensure that the EHR that you choose is going to be around into the future. Otherwise, even if you don’t want to switch EHR software, you may be forced to do so. It’s not fun redesigning clinical processes for a new EHR.

97. How will your teams be educated on the EMR / EHR?
Yes, your whole team will need to be educated. Even if you have one person that’s educated on all the components and then trains the rest of your staff, each staff member is going to need training. There are even many EHR companies that offer unlimited training. It’s part of their sales pitch. Basically, they offer unlimited training as a way to show that they have to make the EHR really easy to use so that they don’t spend all their time training you.

Personally, I also like to do some up front training for the EHR implementation and then budget for some training a few weeks or a month down the road. You’ll be amazed how much more you learn and how much better questions you ask after having used the EHR for a few weeks or month.

96. Ensure audit logs are easy to get to and are comprehensive
I like to do this best by imagining 5 legal scenarios that you might need the EMR audit logs. Then, ask the EHR vendor to provide you the audit logs for those 5 scenarios so that you can see how it would look if you happen to need that information. This is even better if you can test drive the EHR software and try running the logs yourself.

There you have it. My commentary on the first 5 of 101 EMR and EHR tips. 10 more posts to go. If you want to see my analysis of the other 101 EMR and EHR tips, I’ll be updating this page with my 101 EMR and EHR tips analysis. So, click on that link to see the other 95.

Reasons Your EHR Will Go Down

Posted on July 26, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

My previous post about the cost of EHR down time prompted me to think of all the ways that your EHR can go down. This might not be an exhaustive list, but hopefully it gives you an idea of the many many ways that your EMR can go down. With that knowledge hopefully you’ll be inspired to plan for EMR down time.

Reasons Your EMR Could Go Down:
Power Outage – Very few EMRs are setup to be able to handle a power outage. Sure, maybe you have a UPS attached to your server and some battery life in your laptop, but that’s only going to last so long. Plus, I bet your router/network switch isn’t on a UPS. What about your printer? You get the idea. EMR and power are friends.

Hard Drive Failure – At some point I asked someone why it was so common for hard drives to crash. They then described that hard drives are moving parts and anytime something is moving, there’s a higher chance that something will go wrong. Of course, now they have solid state hard drives that you can get. Either way, I’ve seen a lot of hard drives fail in my time. Of course, if you have a nice RAID setup for your hard drives, then you often won’t notice. Until they have to replace the failed hard drive with a new one. This could be the hard drive of your server or your computer. Most computers don’t have a RAID configuration.

Power Supply Failure – Most servers have redundant power supply. Why? Because they’ve been known to fail. If your server doesn’t have a redundant power supply, then be ready for down time. Most desktops don’t have redundant power supply and so they could easily fail too.

Network Cable – I don’t think I’ve ever seen a network cable go bad. However, I’ve certainly seen plenty of cables to servers bumped, moved, ripped out of the server. Everyone wonders why the server went down. Takes far too long to see that the network cable just got pulled out a little too much.

Switch/Router – Switches and Routers are what’s used in most offices to connect all your computers to the internet. Certainly these can go down if the power goes out. However, they can have other issues too. It’s not that common, but can sometimes cause down time for your office. Of course, wirelesss routers in particular can cause clinics lots of headaches when they go down.

Motherboard Failure – Might as well cover another common hardware failure: the motherboard. No motherboard and you can’t use your EMR.

EHR Software Issue – I’ve seen where a poorly tested and implemented EMR system would slowly use up all the memory on a server. Once it used up all the memory on the server, the EMR would take forever to do the simplest task. While not technically down since the server is up, it’s still a form of down time since users start refusing to use it in this state.

Internet Outage – This is particularly applicable to a SaaS EHR. Unless you have spent a lot of money to get redundant internet lines to your office (which in some locations is impossible), your internet will go down sooner or later. I don’t know how many times I’ve heard of some construction guy digging up the internet lines and causing outages for doctors offices. Happens all the time.

Much of the above can be applied to servers, desktops or laptops. Sometimes it causes a partial outage (ie. one laptop dies). Other times it takes down your whole EMR system (server dies). Either way, you should consider all these possibilities. Then, you see how you can minimize them (likely with the help of your IT support). Then, you think about what you’re going to do when the EMR down time happens.

Speaking from first hand experience, having a plan for EMR down time made all the difference when the event occurred.

Some Changes to EMR and EHR Advertising

Posted on July 25, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I like to do every couple months, I like to make mention of some of the new advertisers to EMR and EHR and recognize the previous advertisers that continue to renew. Plus, there have been some interesting changes to advertising on EMR and EHR that are worth highlighting.

The HealthcareScene.com blog network is now 14 blogs strong and EMR and EHR is one of the pillars of the network. EMR and EHR has seen some great growth and recorded its best month ever last month. Woot! Thanks to all of you for reading and participating in the comments as well.

In order to handle the growth of EMR and EHR and the Healthcare Scene Blog network in general, I decided to modify how I handled advertising on the site and start rotating all of the ads on EMR and EHR. That way there would be equal exposure for all advertisers on the site including new advertisers. It would also keep the site fresh for readers. Plus, as part of the change, I implemented an ad server to deliver the ads on the site.

The ad server is really exciting, because it will open up a lot of new options like geo-targeted ads (which many people have wanted) and also possibly delivering ads on a CPC (click) or CPM (impression) basis instead of the flat monthly rate that we do now. That will allow advertisers to work with a more limited budget if they can’t pay the full monthly rate. Not to mention, the ad server will be able to provide advertisers more details stats on their EMR and healthcare IT ad campaigns.

If you have more questions about the changes and EMR and EHR advertising options, you can ask on the EMR and EHR contact us page.

Now on to the new EMR and EHR online advertisers.

Quest-Medplus-Care360 EHR – I’m really excited to have Care360 as an advertiser on EMR and EHR. I’ve written quite a few times about the Care360 EHR by Quest (yes, the big lab company). I find their model and approach really interesting for an EHR company. Plus, I know they are really focused in their EHR marketing efforts and so I’m glad that they saw value in advertising on EMR and EHR. If you’re a Quest customer already, it’s really a simple decision to check out the Care360 EHR. You already have a login, they just have to activate the EHR portion. All the SaaS EHR fans out there will love their completely web based approach as well.

Amazing Charts – I love the story of how Amazing Charts became an advertiser, but I’ll save that for another time. Started by a Family Practice Physician in 2001, they’ve been around for quite a while. I’ve heard many people comment on Amazing Charts being one of the most affordable EHR software out there. Plus, with their Free EHR trial it’s easy for doctors to try it out and see if it fits with their EHR needs.

A big thanks to the slew of advertisers that renewed their ad on EMR and EHR. It’s always an honor when they say they want to renew. Thanks Practice Fusion, MxSecure, Mitochon Systems, Nuesoft, Medical Web Experts, and SequelMed.

Tomorrow I have plans to start a new EMR and EHR series. I think it’s a series that many of you are going to really enjoy!

Social Media and EMRs: Worlds Apart?

Posted on July 24, 2011 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Over the last year or two, a growing number of healthcare providers and organizations have gotten involved with social media. There’s a great deal of discussion underway in social media networks on how these new new tools can improve patient care, foster better communication between clinicians and even help patients manage their own care more effectively. (If these topics interest you, do a search on the Twitter hashtag #hcsm, and you’ll find lots of interesting content.)

As this discussion grows richer, a small number of healthcare social media innovators are beginning to discuss how to blend the strengths of social media with the power of EMRs.  At first blush, the two might seem worlds apart — one a database with with a nifty UI (we hope!) and the other a set of disarticulated, freewheeling communication channels.

One of the neatest visions I’ve seen of how this might work comes from pediatric gastroenterologist Dr. Bryan Vartabedian, who blogs on social media and medicine at 33 Charts.

Late last year, Dr. Vartabedian offered a detailed vision of an EMR-based “digital dashboard” which would allow doctors to slip easily between social discussion, content and clinical data. The key seems to be that the EMR would handle everything: it would incorporate social media tools, securely log communications, trigger related content and more.

But how long will it be until EMRs include functions like these?  Well, the general consensus seems to be “I wouldn’t hold my breath.”  Consider these comments from Josh Herigon, MPH, writing for the social media/medical blog KevinMD.com.

Although I dream of the day when we have a system like Dr. Vartabedian’s vision, I am not very optimistic such a system will come to fruition anytime soon…I would be satisfied with truly interconnected EMR systems (i.e.–I can pull up any patient’s chart from any hospital or clinic and see their entire recorded medical history), the elimination of pagers and subsequent replacement with secure smartphone communication systems, widespread use of tablets at the bedside that update the record in real-time so I can finish notes at a workstation, and some level of integration of Facebook/Twitter-like communication within care teams.

I’m not surprised that people are skeptical about linking EMRs and social media together.  While creating the interfaces Dr. Vartabedian describes in his article wouldn’t be a big deal technically, it would represent a big change in how vendors thought about their product. After all, a comprehensive system which juggles both social media and patient data is a much different deal than a patient database with some templates and analytical tools layered on top. The idea of making this kind of shift could give both programmers and vendors a bad case of the vapors.

On the other hand, Dr. Vartabedian is far from the only physician who’s passionate about making better use of social media. If healthcare social media fans can bring more colleagues on board — and slowly but surely, they’re clearly succeeding — EMR vendors will be forced to respond.  Having sat in on many “health 2.0” chats, I can tell you first-hand that there’s a lot of excitement about social media in medicine out there. I wouldn’t be surprised if evangelists defy critics’ expectations and turn social media into an everyday clinical tool.

Is This Failure Really Necessary? Another HIE Closes Its Doors

Posted on July 22, 2011 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

For several years, I’ve been watching health information exchanges struggle to birth themselves. Despite ongoing support from state and local governments, HIEs continue to fade away, few having found a business model that works. And no workable business model seems to be on the horizon yet, either, despite efforts by thousands of providers to keep their HIE afloat.

This week, I was sorry to read about the death of yet another HIE.  CareSpark, a Kingsport, TN-based network which has been in existence for six years, announced on July 11th that it would be ceasing operations.  CareSpark, whose age makes it almost a young adult in HIE years, holds records for 1.28 million patients.

According to a piece in FierceHealthIT, CareSpark was forced to close because it couldn’t come up with a viable plan to sustain itself.  The group’s leaders had hoped to move from a grant-supported non-profit to one-funded by payments from subscribers, but apparently, they just couldn’t attract enough cash to survive.

The group began its final descent in March, when Health Information Partnership of Tennessee pulled federal funding from CareSpark.  The closing leaves 38 participating healthcare organizations in the lurch.

Given you don’t have a mature EMR if you can share health information freely — at least according to HIMSS Analytics — you’d think that providers would finally be ready to dish out enough money to support their local HIE.  But apparently, they aren’t.

The question is, why?  Do hospitals and medical practices think of HIEs as “nice to have” rather than “need to have”?  Do providers only kick in money when they can control the whole exchange (such as linking up hospitals within a single chain)? Have any of them done a cost/benefit analysis which suggests HIEs *aren’t* a good investment?

All I know is that if 38 providers spend six years building up trust, it doesn’t make much sense to cheap out now, especially if it shuts down critical linkages between their EMRs. I’d really like to know why they don’t want to pay for this. Don’t you? After all, it’s about time we figure out what kind of HIE model does work.

Healthcare Billing and HIPAA Impede EMR Progress

Posted on July 21, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I had this post in my drafts from a long long time ago. It linked to an article that is no longer relevant. However, I still think the title is incredible relevant. I was talking with someone this week about the real problem with EMR software is that they have to jump through the crazy billing requirements. Although, you could certainly add in the HIPAA requirements in some regards as well.

We can all appreciate the need to protect patients information. Plus, while HIPAA has some issues, I think it could be much worse. So, I can’t say I can really complain about the HIPAA requirements as they relate to EMR.

Instead, I’ll focus this post on the crazy billing requirements that doctors have to jump through in order to be reimbursed for their work.

Now, imagine the beautiful EMR interface that could be created if everything about the EMR software was focused on patient care and physician workflow. I’d love for someone to do a study on what percentage of EMR functions are there because of the onerous billing requirements. I think we’d be shocked to find out how many of them are there because of billing.

I’ve covered this topic from a lot of different angles before. It just keeps coming back to me over and over again. So, until I find someone who has a fix for it, I’m going to keep bringing it up.

Of course, I wonder if 3 years down the road I’ll be writing a post talking about how meaningful use is impeding EMR progress. Then, I’ll be interested in a study that looks at how many features of an EMR were needlessly added thanks to meaningful use.

#HIT100: Healthcare IT Embraces Twitter in a Big Way

Posted on July 20, 2011 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

It’s not secret that social media continues to play an increasingly powerful role in connecting folks within the healthcare IT community. Sites such as LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter offer easy-to-navigate platforms that enable communication with peers on any continent, in any time zone. Twitter has become a personal favorite – both for its brevity and its simplicity. (Yes, I’ve heard promising things about Google+, but haven’t yet checked it out.)

The healthcare IT community has also embraced Twitter. Follow a variety of hashtags, including personal favorite #HITsm, and you’ll encounter a variety of opinionated, educated, and often humorous industry folk who, through their activity in the social space, are either emerging as thought leaders or bolstering their credibility as one.

The hashtag #HIT100 has been popular of late thanks to the crowdsourcing efforts of Michael Planchart, aka @theEHRguy. According to his Twitter profile, he is a “Healthcare Interoperability Consultant, Enterprise Architect for Healthcare IT and Standards Specialist.” According to his LinkedIn profile, he is a chief software architect at ProKSys. One thing is for sure – he is passionate about the healthcare IT community on Twitter. So much so that just a few weeks ago he began compiling nominations from his peers on Twitter of the top 100 tweeters (personal or company accounts) in the healthcare IT space.

The resultant list, published earlier this week, can be downloaded here: Final HIT100 Nominees. It is a great resource of folks to keep up with. (Be sure to check out @billians at #78!) Anne Zieger at EHROutlook.com (@ehroutlook at #86) has helpfully distilled the list into the top EMR/EHR tweeters.

I’ve met many in person at industry events, and know even more through Twitter. Hopefully I’ll run into Michael Planchart himself at some point. In the meantime, I chatted with him via email about why he wanted to take on this project, and why the healthcare IT community has embraced social media, particularly Twitter.

Why did you decide to embark on this project?

I wanted the healthcare IT community to vote for their most valued peers. Many well-intended folks would come up with their personal list and publish it. I wanted everyone to participate to create a more objective and transparent selection. This one may not yet be perfect, but it is open and publicly created. Hopefully, for 2012 we will have greater participation from many more folks. But for now, we have this to evangelize from.

Do you think there are more influencers in the #HIT space this year than last?

I know many of the folks that I follow and those that follow me. I’ve personally met many at RSNA, HIMSS and other healthcare events. But I’ve noticed a lot of newcomers to the social media space. Many of them I know as excellent contributors to healthcare IT, since I belong to the same standards committees that they do, although many times we work on different projects. What’s new is not them being in healthcare IT, but being in social media representing healthcare IT.

But answering your question more directly, yes there are many more participants this year. To be an influencer like John Halamka, Brian Ahier, Keith Boone, Matthew Holt and Dave deBronkart, just to name a few, most have some miles to go.

And why do you think there has been such an increase?

Twitter has been an open platform to create networks from the beginning. Linkedin and Facebook are too closed to create peer-to-peer networks. So Twitter has been highly influential in creating these peer-to-peer specialized networks like our #hcsm or #HIT groups.

I encourage you to take a look at the list and start connecting, communicating and educating. Be sure to follow this blog – @ehrandhit, and myself – @SmyrnaGirl, while you’re at it!

Cost of EHR Down Time

Posted on July 19, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Mark Anderson has an interesting article on Sys-con media about the cost of EHR down time. Among other analysis he makes the following assertion:
“One hour of software downtime can cost a practice almost $488.00 per physician”

EHR down time is something that I don’t think most doctors put much thought into when they are selecting an EHR. I think that putting a dollar sign next to it will help many doctors to really consider the impact of EHR down time on their clinic.

I believe it’s incredibly valuable for a clinic to seriously consider the impact of EHR down time will have on their clinic. I worked at one clinic where, while it was rather annoying, the patient care wasn’t terribly impacted by down time. They had to ask a few more questions, but in almost every case they could provide the patient care that was needed whether they had access to the EHR or not. Although, they did still have the cost of entering the data after the fact once the EHR came back. Thankfully, they never had more than a couple minutes down time at any point in the 5 years I worked with them.

The challenge of EHR down time is also greatly impacted by your choice of EHR. If you choose an in house EHR software, you’re down time planning will be very different than if you’re talking about a SaaS EHR. In fact, I think this topic is so important that I’m going to save it for a future post.

I’d be interested to hear if other people have tried to put a number on the cost of EHR down time. Did you get something similar to the $488/physician/hour that Mark Anderson suggests? If you have an EHR, how much down time have you experienced with your EHR? What were the causes of your EHR down time?