Patients Frustrated By Lack Of Health Data Access

Posted on January 3, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

A new survey by Surescripts has concluded that patients are unhappy with their access to their healthcare data, and that they’d like to see the way in which their data is stored and shared change substantially.  Due to Surescripts’ focus on medication information management, many of the questions focus on meds, but the responses clearly reflect broader trends in health data sharing.

According to the 2016 Connected Care and the Patient Experience report, which drew on a survey of 1,000 Americans, most patients believe that their medical information should be stored electronically and shared in one central location. This, of course, flies in the face of current industry interoperability models, which largely focus on uniting countless distributed information sources.

Ninety-eight percent of respondents said that they felt that someone should have complete access to their medical records, though they don’t seem to have specified whom they’d prefer to play this role. They’re so concerned about having a complete medical record that 58% have attempted to compile their own medical history, Surescripts found.

Part of the reason they’re eager to see someone have full access to their health records is that it would make their care more efficient. For example, 93% said they felt doctors would save time if their patients’ medication history was in one location.

They’re also sick of retelling stories that could be found easily in a complete medical record, which is not too surprising given that they spend an average of 8 minutes on paperwork plus 8 minutes verbally sharing their medical history per doctor’s visit. To put this in perspective, 54% said that that renewing a driver’s license takes less work, 37% said opening a bank account was easier, and 32% said applying for a marriage license was simpler.

The respondents seemed very aware that improved data access would protect them, as well. Nine out of ten patients felt that their doctor would be less likely to prescribe the wrong medication if they had a more complete set of information. In fact, 90% of respondents said that they felt their lives could be endangered if their doctors don’t have access to their complete medication history.

Meanwhile, patients also seem more willing than ever to share their medical history. Researchers found that 77% will share physical information, 69% will share insurance information and 51% mental health information. I don’t have a comparable set of numbers to back this up, but my guess is that these are much higher levels than we’ve seen in the past.

On a separate note, the study noted that 52% of patients expect doctors to offer remote visits, and 36% believe that most doctor’s appointments will be remote in the next 10 years. Clearly, patients are demanding not just data access, but convenience.