Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

Physician Burnout Cartoon – Fun Friday

Posted on September 29, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you haven’t noticed, I love irony. That’s why this cartoon from Pediatrician and Cartoonist Dr. Maypole was perfect for a Fun Friday entry.

The sad part of this Fun Friday is that this is far too true for far too many doctors. The one good thing is that people are now recognizing it and working to address it in their workforce as Dr. Maypole suggests we do.

A Look At Share Everywhere, Epic’s Patient Data Sharing Tool

Posted on September 28, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Lately, it looks like Epic has begun to try and demonstrate that it’s not selling a walled garden. Honestly, I doubt it will manage to convince me, but I’m trying to keep an open mind on the matter. I do have to admit that it’s made some steps forward.

One example of this trend is the launch of App Orchard, a program allowing medical practices and hospitals to build customized apps on its platform. App Orchard also supports independent mobile app developers that target providers and patients.

Marking a break from Epic’s past practices, the new program lets developers use a FHIR-based API to access and Epic development sandbox. (Previously, Epic wouldn’t give mobile app developers permission to connect to its EMR unless a customer requested permission on its behalf.) We’ll have to keep an eye on the contracts they require developers to sign to see if they’re really opening up Epic or not.

But enough about App Orchard. The latest news from Epic is its launch of Share Everywhere, a new tool which will give patients the ability to grant access to their health data to any provider with Internet access. The provider in question doesn’t even have to have an EHR in place. Share Everywhere will be distributed to Epic customers at no cost in the November update of its MyChart portal.

Share Everywhere builds on its Care Everywhere tool, which gives providers the ability to share data with other healthcare organizations. Epic, which launched Care Everywhere ten years ago, says 100% of its health system customers can exchange health data using the C-CDA format.

To use Share Everywhere, patients must log into MyChart and generate a one-time access code. Patients then give the code to any provider with whom they wish to share information, according to a report in Medscape. Once they receive the code, the clinician visits the Share Everywhere website, then uses the code once they verify it against the patient’s date of birth.

As usual, the biggest flaw in all this is that Epic’s still at the center of everything. While patients whose providers use Epic gain options, patients whose health information resides in a non-Epic system gain nothing.

Also, while it’s good that Epic is empowering patients, Direct record sharing seems to offer more. After all, patients using Direct don’t have to use a portal, need not have any particular vendor in the mix, and can attach a wide range of file formats to Direct messages, including PDFs, Word documents and C-CDA files. (This may be why CHIME has partnered with DirectTrust to launch its broad-based HIE.)

Participating does require a modest amount of work — patients have to get a Direct Address from one of its partners — and their provider has to be connected to the DirectTrust network. But given the size of its network, Direct record sharing compares favorably with Share Everywhere, without involving a specific vendor.

Despite my skepticism, I did find Share Everywhere’s patient consent mechanism interesting. Without a doubt, seeing to it that patients have consented to a specific use or transmission of their health data is a valuable service. Someday, blockchain may make this approach obsolete, but for now, it’s something.

Nonetheless, overall I see Share Everywhere as evolutionary, not revolutionary. If this is the best Epic can do when it comes to patient data exchange, I’m not too impressed.

The Value of Collaborating with Customers in EMR Optimization

Posted on September 27, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the biggest challenges I see in healthcare IT is that the knowledge on how to get value out of EHR and other health IT is not evenly distributed. One healthcare organization that figures out how to optimize their EHR system for maximum benefit doesn’t have the opportunity to share that knowledge with other organizations across the country. Plus, even an organization that has optimized their EHR solution in one specific area is still missing optimization benefits in other areas.

Sharing optimization best practices is a massive problem that needs to be solved if we’re going to finally optimize EHR and other health IT systems to benefit both healthcare organizations and patients.

While some healthcare organizations are competitive and don’t want to share best practices, I’ve found that most hospitals and health systems are happy to share their EHR and health IT practices with their peers across the country. Healthcare is so regional and most people doing the optimization work want to benefit patients regardless of other competitive pressures.

Why then don’t healthcare organizations share if in fact most of them want to share their insights and experiences? The challenge is that most professionals don’t see any easy way for them to collaborate and share with their colleagues.

I recently saw where Galen Healthcare Solutions took this problem head-on as they gathered together a focused group of MEDITECH users in a project they called Claire[IT]. Check out this webinar on Claire[IT] to learn more about how Galen Healthcare Solutions involved their users to create enginu[IT]y.

Out of this user focus group they produced a package of MEDITECH rules and best practices which could be implemented by any MEDITECH user. What makes this package special is that it wasn’t just one person’s best thinking but Galen brought together a wide variety of end users to each contribute their best practices and insights into the MEDITECH rules they created. I love that one participant in the user focus group said “I am the only one in my organization that loves MEDITECH rules. It was great to finally be part of a group of other people as passionate as me about rules.”

This is the type of collaboration we need to see happening in healthcare IT and EHR for us to receive all the benefits technology can provide. Plus, now a company like Galen Healthcare Solutions can package up this knowledge and EMR optimization best practices and share it with all of the other MEDITECH users out there. This MEDITECH EHR rules knowledge doesn’t have to be confined to one organization.

The problem is that this type of focus group is really targeted and includes a lot of minutiae that only those that are deep in these systems will appreciate. These aren’t conversations that casually happen at an event like HIMSS. However, when you put the right EHR users together it’s like magic and the sharing and collaboration happens naturally. I love that Galen Healthcare Solutions called their webinar “Operation #NerdyWork.” Talking over MEDITECH rules really is #NerdyWork, but it’s also essential work if you want to truly get the most out of your MEDITECH EHR. The same is true for all the other EHR vendors. There’s a lot of #NerdyWork required to optimize them.

Props to Galen Healthcare Solutions for showing us one way EMR end users can collaborate together to share best practices and provide everyone with a better solution than if they’d done the EMR optimization alone. Now we just need to scale up this collaboration and sharing so that every EMR in every healthcare organization is working in the most optimized way possible.

Note: Galen Healthcare Solutions is a sponsor of Healthcare Scene and the EMR Clinical Optimization Series of blog posts.

There’s a New Medicare ID Coming in April – CMS Dumps SSN

Posted on September 26, 2017 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

Following a 2015 Congressional directive, CMS is abandoning its Social Security based Medicare ID for a new randomly generated one. The new card will be hitting beneficiary’s mailboxes in April with everyone covered by a year later.

The old ID is a SSN plus one letter. The letter says if you are a beneficiary, child, widow, etc. The new will have both letters and numbers. It is wholly random and drops the coding for beneficiary, etc. Fortunately, it will exclude S, L, O, I, B and Z, which can look like numbers. You can see the new ID’s details here.

                           New Medicare ID Card

Claimants will have until 2020 to adopt the new IDs, but that’s not the half of it. For the HIT world, this means many difficult, expensive and time consuming changes. CMS sees this as a change in how it tracks claims. However, its impact may make HIT managers wish for the calm and quiet days of Y2K. That’s because adopting the new number for claims is just the start. Their systems use the Medicare ID as a key field for just about everything they do involving Medicare. This means they’ll not only have to cross walk to the new number, but also their systems will have to look back at what was done under the old.

Ideally, beneficiaries will only have to know their new number. Realistically, every practice they see over the next several years will want both IDs. This will add one more iteration to patient matching, which is daunting enough.

With MACRA Congress made a strong case for Medicare no longer relying on SSNs for both privacy and security reasons. Where it failed was seeing it only as a CMS problem and not as a HIT problem with many twists and turns.

New EHR Certification Rules Including Self-Declaration – MACRA Monday

Posted on September 25, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program (QPP) and related topics.

Elise Sweeney Anthony and Steven Posnack recently announced on the ONC Health IT Blog two major changes to the EHR certification program. In some ways, it shows a maturity of the EHR certification program, but in other ways, it’s ONC kind of taking a more hands off approach to EHR certification.

Here are the two big changes they made:

  1. Approving more than 50% of test procedures to be self-declaration; and
  2. Exercising discretion for randomized surveillance of certified health IT products.

The first one is really fascinating since they’re making 30 out of the 55 certification criteria as “self-declaration only.” That basically means that EHR vendors will just have to claim they meet the requirements. The ONC-ACBs won’t be certifying those 30 test procedures. In many ways, it reminds me of the meaningful use self-attestation. Does that mean that ONC-ACBs will cut their costs in half? Don’t be holding your breath on that one.

Let’s just hope that most EHR vendors don’t self-certify the way eCW approached EHR certification. Although, the eCW EHR certification issues are the perfect example of why a company self certifying their EHR software or the ONC-ACB certifying the EHR software is just about the same. I haven’t seen which test procedures will be self-declared, but my guess is that it was the ones that the ONC-ACBs weren’t really doing much to test and certify anyway. Ideally, this will free up the ONC-ACBs to dive deeper into the 25 test procedures they’ll still complete so they can avoid another eCW like incident.

Some might wonder why we don’t just take the self-declared EHR certification tests altogether if there’s no one that’s going to be checking them. What those people miss is that the self-declaration still keeps the EHR vendors on the hook for properly implementing the EHR certification criteria. If it’s discovered that they claimed to be compliant but aren’t, then the government can go after the EHR vendor for false claims.

The second change has me a little more puzzled. I’m not sure why they would want to release ONC-ACBs from the requirement to randomly audit EHR certifications. Maybe they didn’t discover any issues during their random audits and so they didn’t see a need to continue them. Or maybe the ONC-ACBs said they were going to pull out as certifying bodies if the government didn’t lighten the EHR Certification load. This is all conjecture, but they could be some of the reasons why ONC decided to make this change. They did offer the following insight into their reasoning:

This exercise of enforcement discretion will permit ONC-ACBs to prioritize complaint driven, or reactive, surveillance and allow them to devote their resources to certifying health IT to the 2015 Edition.

I wonder how many complaints the ONC-ACBs have gotten about the EHR software they’ve certified. Have they just been so overwhelmed with complaints that they need more time to deal with those complaints and so audits aren’t needed? I’d be surprised if this was the case. At this point I imagine most people with EHR certification issues will be calling the whistle blower attorneys, but I could be wrong.

All in all, I don’t think these EHR certification changes are a huge deal. It’s largely a maturing of the EHR certification program and does little to help the EHR certification burden on software vendors. Maybe the ONC-ACBs will charge a little less for their certification, but that’s always been a negligible cost compared to the development costs to become a certified EHR. I’m sure the ONC-ACBs are happy with these changes though.

What do you think of these changes? Any other impacts I haven’t described above that we should consider?

What’s Involved In Getting To EHR 2.0?

Posted on September 22, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

While the current crop of EHRs have (arguably) served a useful purpose, I think we’d all agree that there’s a ton of room for improvement. The question is, what will it take to move EHRs forward?

Certainly, we face some significant obstacles to progress.

There are environmental factors in play, such as reimbursement issues.

There’s the question of what providers will do with existing EHR infrastructure, which has cost them tens or even hundreds of millions of dollars if next-gen EHRs call for a new technical approach.

Then, of course, there’s the challenge of making the darn things usable by real, human clinicians. So far, we simply haven’t gotten anything that solves that issue yet.

That doesn’t mean people aren’t considering the issue, however. One health IT leader that’s stepped up to the plate is Dr. John Halamka, chief information officer of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and CIO and dean for technology at Harvard Medical School.

In his Life As Healthcare CIO, Halamka lays out the changes he sees as driving the shift to EHR 2.0. Here are some of his main points:

  • Regulators are shifting their focus from prescribing certain types of EHR functionality to looking at results technology achieves. This supports the healthcare industry’s movement from a data recording focus to an outcomes focus.
  • With doctors being pulled in too many directions, it will take teams to maintain patient health, this calls for a new generation of communication and groupware tools. These tools should include workflow integration, rules-based escalation messages, and routing based on time of day, location, schedules, urgency, and licensure.
  • With value-based purchasing gradually becoming the norm, EHRs need new capabilities. These should include the ability to document care plans and variation from those plans, along with outcomes reported from patient-generated healthcare data. Eventually, this will mean the dawn of the Care Management Medical Record, which enrolls patients and protocols based on their condition then ensures that patients get recommended services.
  • EHRs must be more usable. To accomplish this, it’s helpful to think of EHRs as platforms upon which entrepreneurs can create add-on functionality, along the lines of apps that rest on top of mobile operating systems.
  • Next-gen EHRs need to become more consumer-driven, making patients an equal member of the care team. Although existing EHR models do have patient portals, they aren’t robust enough to connect patients fully with their care, and they don’t include tools helping patients navigate their care system.

As far as I can tell, Dr. Halamka has covered the majority of issues we need to address in transitioning to new EHR models. I was also interested to learn that regulatory bodies have begun to “get it” about the limitations of demanding certain functions be included in an EHR system.

I’m still left with one question, however. How does interoperability fit into this picture? Can we even get to the next generation of EHRs without answering the question of how they share data between one another? To me, it’s clear that the answer is no, we can’t leave this issue aside.

Other than that, though, I found Dr. Halamka’s analysis to be fairly comforting. Nothing he’s described is out of reach, unless, of course, vendors won’t cooperate. I think that as providers reach the conclusions he has, they’ll demand the kind of functionality he’s outlined, and vendors will have no choice but to pony up. In other words, there might actually be light at the end of the EHR tunnel.

Virtual Reality Offers New Options For Healthcare Data Analysis

Posted on September 21, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve always been interested in virtual reality. In fact, given my long-time gaming habit, I’ve been waiting with bated breath for the time when VR-enabled games become part of the consumer mainstream.

Until I read the following article, however, I hadn’t given much thought to how VR technology could be used outside of the consumer sphere. In the article, the author makes a compelling case that VR tools may be the next frontier in big data analytics.

The author’s arguments include the following:

  • VR use allows big data users to analyze data dynamically, as it allows users to “reach out and touch” the data they are studying.
  • Using an approach known as immersive data visualization, coupled with haptic or kinesthetic interfaces, users can understand data intuitively and discover patterns.
  • VR allows users to view and manipulate huge amounts of data simply by looking at them. “VR enables you to capably stack relevant data, pare it and create visual cues so that you can cross-refer instantly,” the author writes.
  • With VR tools, users can interact naturally with data. Rather than glancing at reports, or reviewing spreadsheets, they can “manipulate data streams, push windows around, press buttons and actually walk around data worlds,” the article says.
  • VR makes multi-dimensional data analysis simpler. By using their hands and hearing, you just can pin down the subject, location and significance of specific data sources.

Though these concepts have been percolating for quite a while, I haven’t found any robust use cases for VR-based big data analytics either in or outside of healthcare. (They may well exist, and if you know of one above to hear about it.)

Still, a wide range of healthcare-related VR applications are emerging, including both inpatient care and medical education. I don’t think it will be long now before smart health IT leaders like yourselves begin to apply this approach to healthcare data visualization.

Ultimately, it seems likely that some of the healthcare data technologies are in play will converge with VR applications. By combining immersive or partially-immersive VR technologies with AI and big data analytics tools, healthcare organizations will be able to transform their data-guided outcomes efforts far more easily. And future use cases abound.

Hospitals could use VR to model throughput within the ED and, by layering clinical and transactional data over traffic statistics, doing a much better job of boosting efficiency.

I imagine health insurers combining claims records and clinical performance data, then using VR to as a next-gen tool predict how value-based care contracting play out in certain markets.

We may even see a time when surgeons wear VR glasses and, when perplexed in mid-procedure, can summon big data-driven feedback on options that improve patient survival.

Of course, VR is just set of technologies, and it can’t offer answers to questions we don’t know to ask. However, I do think that by people using their intuition more effectively, VR-based data analysis may extract new and valuable insights from existing data sets. It may take a while for this to happen, but I believe that it will.

Very Little Manual Entry in EHR

Posted on September 20, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This is some fascinating data on how much of a doctor’s EHR note is entered manually versus some other automated method. I honestly wouldn’t have guessed that only 18% of the doctor’s EHR note was being entered manually. Although, from the doctor’s perspective, they still see a copied section of note as something they largely entered manually since a good doctor that copies something into the note generally also reviews it to make sure that it’s accurate for the patient they’re seeing.

What’s ironic is that every doctor I know would love for their note to be 100% automated so that they didn’t have to create any clinical note. In fact, that’s kind of what I outline in the perfect EHR workflow – Video EHR. Doctors would love to just see and interact with patients and have the EHR documentation be completely automated so they could just reference it as needed. Sadly, we’re not there yet. Not even close.

Plus, the critics of this type of automation would argue that automatic note creation will take (many aptly argue that it already has taken) the life and soul out of a note. They appropriately suggest that these auto-generated EHR notes are impossible to effectively read and have ruined patient notes. What used to be an elegantly written (although often illegible) note has now become an auto-generated mess of a note which makes it hard to find the relevant findings, issues, and treatment plan.

Except for a few rare exceptions, these critics are spot on in their analysis of the EHR note. The problem with these criticisms is that it’s not the automation which is making these notes useless. It was the automation’s focus on billing which has made these notes useless. In order to satisfy higher levels of billing, the Jabba the Hutt EHR note was created and is still thriving in healthcare today. Now we’re seeing organizations doing machine learning on this ugly billing notes to try and make the notes useful for patient care.

The difference between a note designed around patient care and one designed for billing is shocking.

What we need to realize is that automated notes don’t have to mean lower quality notes. However, improved patient care has to be the goal of the automated notes and not billing if we want to achieve that vision.

It’s not clear to me if many EHR vendors can achieve both visions of a quality billing note and a note designed around patient care or if it will require a new approach to documenting patient visits to achieve both goals. I have no doubt EHR vendors are going to try to do both. The problem is that most of them already tell themselves that they have a great clinical note that improves care. That attitude is preventing changes to the note that would make them more effective clinically.

I’m all for more automation in healthcare and particularly in doctor’s note creation. Every doctor I know wants to stop being a data entry clerk and spend more time being a doctor. However, we need to rethink our approach to automated note creation so it does more than effectively bill for services. Seems obvious, but I assure you that’s a dramatic change in mindset for many EHR organizations.

Say It One More Time: EHRs Are Hard To Use

Posted on September 19, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

I don’t know about you, but I was totes surprised to hear about another study pointing out that doctors have good reasons to hate their EHR. OK, not really surprised – just a bit sadder on their account – but I admit I’m awed that any single software system can be (often deservedly) hated this much and in this many ways.

This time around, the parties calling out EHR flaws were the American Medical Association and the University of Wisconsin, which just published a paper in the Annals of Family Medicine looking at how primary care physicians use their EHR.

To conduct their study, researchers focused on how 142 family physicians in southeastern Wisconsin used their Epic system. The team dug into Epic event logging records covering a three-year period, sorting out whether the activities in question involved direct patient care or administrative functions.

When they analyzed the data, the researchers found that clinicians spent 5.9 hours of an 11.4-hour workday interacting with the EHR. Clerical and administrative tasks such as documentation, order entry, billing and coding and system security accounted about 44% of EHR time and inbox management roughly another 24% percent.

As the U of W article authors see it, this analysis can help practices make better use of clinicians’ time. “EHR event logs can identify areas of EHR-related work that could be delegated,” they conclude, “thus reducing workload, improving professional satisfaction, and decreasing burnout.”

The AMA, for its part, was not as detached. In a related press release, the trade group argued that the long hours clinicians spend interacting with EHRs are due to poor system design. Honestly, I think it’s a bit of a stretch to connect the study results directly to this conclusion, but of course, the group isn’t wrong about the low levels of usability most EHRs foist on doctors.

To address EHR design flaws, the AMA says, there are eight priorities vendors should consider, including that the systems should:

  • Enhance physicians’ ability to provide high-quality care
  • Support team-based care
  • Promote care coordination
  • Offer modular, configurable products
  • Reduce cognitive workload
  • Promote data liquidity
  • Facilitate digital and mobile patient engagement
  • Integrate user input into EHR product design and post-implementation feedback

I’m not sure all of these points are as helpful as they could be. For example, there are approximately a zillion ways in which an EHR could enhance the ability to provide high-quality care, so without details, it’s a bit of a wash. I’d say the same thing about the digital/mobile patient engagement goal.

On the other hand, I like the idea of reducing cognitive workload (which, in cognitive psychology, refers to the total amount of mental effort being used in working memory). There’s certainly evidence, both within and outside medicine, which underscores the problems that can occur if professionals have too much to process. I’m confident vendors can afford design experts who can address this issue directly.

Ultimately, though, it’s not important that the AMA churns out a perfect list of usability testing criteria. In fact, they shouldn’t have to be telling vendors what they need at this point. It’s a shame EHR vendors still haven’t gotten the usability job done.

Mental Health EMRs And MIPS – MACRA Monday

Posted on September 18, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program (QPP) and related topics.

Recently, I began researching the mental health EMR market on behalf of a client. I had expected to find it dwindling as a) the big EMR players have always insisted that an all-purpose EMR could be adapted to serve mental health providers effectively and b) more importantly because mental health professionals weren’t eligible for Meaningful Use payments, which presumably made them lousy sales targets for vendors.

However, my research concluded that there’s roughly a dozen mental health EMRs out there and kicking and that at least two large medical EMR vendors had bought into the mental health technology niche. (Allscripts bought a stake in NetSmart Technologies last year, and Cerner acquired Anasazi outright in 2012). With their investments, the two vendors effectively admitted that supporting mental health providers wasn’t as easy as they’d suggested.

Now, with MIPS imposing new demands on clinicians, mental health providers are likely to expect even more from mental health IT vendors, said Bob Ring, a consultant with Mica Information Systems.

Right now, few mental health EMRs defining themselves as “therapy specific” are CEHRT technology, which could become an issue if MDs on staff in a mental health setting want to meet MIPS requirements, Ring notes.

Under MIPS, psychiatrists must provide a wide range of mental health-specific data, some of which calls for specialty-related technology. For example, one category under the Clinical Practice Improvement Activity Performance Category calls for enhancements to an EMR to capture added data on behavioral health populations and use that data for additional decision-making.

But uncertified EMRs are likely to stay that way, Ring says. “Because these therapy-specific [EMRs] are generally priced very low, and it is expensive to go through the ONC certification process, it’s questionable whether many of them ever will be,” he concludes.

Not only that, things could get even trickier for both mental health clinicians and mental health EMR vendors in the future, if CMS follows through on its threat to hold therapists to the same standards as MDs beginning in 2019.

This could create chaos, however, according to my colleague John Lynn, who contends that putting mental health therapy EMRs under MIPS would be “a disaster.” Instead, mental health should not piggyback MU or MIPS, but instead, focus on incentives for mental health focused EHR incentives.

“The relationship between a mental health provider and a client is totally different than the relationship between a medical provider and their patient,” said John, whose first EMR implementation came when he rolled out a medical EMR in a health and counseling center. “Their methods of documentation are different. Their methods of billing are different. Their approach to care is different. We made it work, but it took a lot of duct tape and jerry rigging to fit it in.”