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Doctors without Planets – Doc Vader

Posted on June 23, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The incomparable ZDoggMD has been creating a whole series of videos for his alter ego’s alter ego, Doc Vader and has even launched a website for Doc Vader. There are some really funny videos and a lot of them touch on healthcare IT.

The latest Doc Vader video is called Doctors Without Planets:

What’s amazing is that the Doc Vader character actually came out of a sponsored video that ZDoggMD did with Dr First. Here’s the Doc Vader, Episode 1: The Pager Menace video that started the character:

Happy Friday everyone and thanks to ZDoggMD for putting out such funny content.

Is Your Health Data Unstructured? – Enabling an AI Powered Healthcare Future

Posted on June 22, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you asked a hospital IT executive how much of their data is unstructured data, most of them would reasonably respond that a lot or most of their data was unstructured. If you asked a practice manager or doctor how much of health data is unstructured, they’d likely respond “What do you mean?”

The reality is that most doctors, nurses, practice managers, etc don’t really care if their data is structured data or not. However, they should care about it and more importantly they should care about how they’re going to extract value out of the structured and unstructured data in their organizations.

The reality in healthcare, as the above tweet and image point out, is that much of the data we have and are going to get is going to be unstructured data. Our systems and software need to handle unstructured data in order to facilitate the AI powered healthcare future. That’s right. An AI powered healthcare future is coming and it’s going to be built on the back of structured and unstructured healthcare data.

I think the reason so many healthcare providers are concerned with this AI powered future is that they know the data they currently have is not very good. That’s going to be a problem for many organizations. Bad data is going to produce bad AI powered support.

We shouldn’t expect technology to solve our problems of bad data but, technology will amplify the state of your organization. If your organization is doing an amazing job creating high quality health data, then the AI powered future will propel you in amazing ways to be an even better organization. However, the opposite is also true. If your health data is poor, then these new AI powered systems are going to highlight how poorly your organization is being run. I get why that’s scary for many people.

This should be one of the big lessons we take away from the EHR experience. Healthcare organizations with poor workflows hoped that implementation of an EHR would help them fix their workflows. Instead of EHR fixing the workflows it just highlighted the poor workflows. Technology accentuates and accelerates your current state. It doesn’t usually fix it. You have to fix your organization and workflows first and then use technology to accelerate your organization.

The next step after that is what Rasu Shrestha highlighted when he said, “How can we move from ‘doing digital’ to ‘being digital’. Let’s not replicate analog workflows. Let’s rethink!”

5 Stages of Provider Dissatisfaction and Happiness

Posted on June 21, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A couple weeks ago I posted an infographic on the 5 stages of patient frustration and the 5 stages of patient satisfaction. This week SCI Solutions came out with a new infographic which looks at the 5 stages of provider dissatisfaction and the 5 stages of provider happiness.

It was interesting that the infographic focused so much on the pains of prior auths. I agree that this is extremely painful for doctors and definitely leads to a lot of dissatisfaction. However, I’m surprised that they didn’t include the EHR and other regulations related to the EHR in their list of provider dissatisfaction. I’m sure EHR and prior auths would fight a good fight as to which is more annoying to doctors.

As for the provider satisfaction, the infographic focused so much on easy access to the right information. I agree that’s a valuable thing, but the most valuable thing is doctors getting quality time that helps their patients. We need to facilitate more of that in healthcare.

A Tribute to Larry Weed

Posted on June 20, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I must admit that I didn’t really know about Larry Weed until in 2013 I saw Neil Versel interviewing him at HIMSS. I’d been getting to know Neil Versel pretty well at this point and I saw him hit the press room full of energy and totally engaged with a man who was 89 years of age. I was new to the press room then, but I now know well the look Neil gets when he has a good interview. It’s how he looked at HIMSS 2013 when I saw him interviewing the 89 year old Larry Weed.

After the interview, I was talking with Neil and he recounted to me that he’d just been able to interview Larry Weed. I could tell that this was a real highlight for him and that he was honored by the opportunity. This month, Larry Weed passed away and Neil Versel offered up this great tribute to Larry Weed’s work.

I love this Larry Weed quote that Neil shared in his tribute:

“The worst, the most corrupting of all lies is to misstate the problem. Patients get run off into the most unbelievable, expensive procedures … and they’re not even on the right problem,” Weed said during that memorable presentation in New Orleans.

“We all live in our own little cave. We see the world out of our own little cave, and no two of us see it the same way,” he continued, explaining the wide deviation from standards of care. “What you see is a function of who you are.”

We should all take a week or so to think about the most corrupting lie of misstating the problem and how our own experiences corrupt our views.

I also didn’t know that Larry Weed was possibly one fo the founding father’s of patient empowerment. As Neil notes:

Indeed, it could be argued that Weed was a founding father of patient empowerment. Back in 1969, Weed wrote a book called “Medical Records, Medical Education, and Patient Care.” In that, he said, “patients are the largest untapped resource in medical care today.”

Larry Weed also co-developed an early EMR and the SOAP note was his idea.

I often don’t think that those of us who take healthcare IT and EHR for granted today realize the rich history and evolution of technology in healthcare. Thanks Neil for sharing a small glimpse into that history and honoring a man who was an important part in it.

Everyone should take 2 minutes and go and read Neil Versel’s full tribute to Larry Weed.

MACRA Video Training – MACRA Monday

Posted on June 19, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

I did a quick search on YouTube for the term MACRA and it found 23,300 search results. It’s not surprising to find so much MACRA content. It seems to me that healthcare has an insatiable appetite for MACRA information.

While it’s great that so many organizations are producing MACRA content, no doubt some of it is not all that valuable and a bunch of it isn’t accurate. Case in point, the first video returned in the YouTube search for MACRA was a video from eClinicalWorks (eCW). Is there anyone that would want eCW to train them on government regulations after the recent eCW settlement that revolved around their decision to not properly certify their EHR and the meaningful use program? Maybe all the information is accurate, but that’s not where I’d go to for my source of MACRA information.

If you wanted a really brief, high level overview of MACRA, I found this 2 minute cartoon video from MediSync to be a nice intro to the intent of MACRA:

If you want a much more in depth look into MACRA’s MIPS program, you’ll want to check out Answers Media’s 25 videos in their The ABCs of MIPS series:

We all know that the government MACRA website is the first place to go for really high quality MACRA information. Do you have another go to source for your MACRA information that we should know about? Let us know in the comments.

Retail Clinics Are Not the Enemy, Inconvenience Is!

Posted on June 16, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Check out this incredible insight that Gabriel Perna shared on Twitter:

What a great insight and something that most of the entrenched healthcare people don’t understand. Retail clinics are not the enemy, inconvenience is.

In many ways, it reminds me of the approach that taxi cabs took to Uber and Lyft. Taxis described them as evil as opposed to understanding why consumers wanted to use Uber and Lyft instead of a taxi cab. If the taxi cab industry would have understood the conveniences that Uber and Lyft provided customers, they could have replicated it and made Uber and Lyft disappear (or at least they could have battled them more effective than they’ve done to date).

Gabriel Perna further describes the issues of retail clinics and AMA’s approach to retail clinics in his article and this excerpt:

There are many reasons for this phenomenon [growth of retail clinics], but more than anything though, retail clinics are convenient and many physician offices are not. Because of this, the AMA shouldn’t be trying to treat the retail clinics as some kind of foreign invader, but rather use their rise to prominence as a way to guide physician practices forward. For instance, getting in to see a doctor shouldn’t be a three-week endeavor, especially when the patient is sick and needs attention immediately. However, that’s what has happened. Personally, I’ve been told “the doctor doesn’t have anything open for at least a month” more times than I can count.

It’s simple supply and demand. If you or your child needs to see someone immediately because of an illness and your doctor’s office can’t take in you for a week, and there happens to be a retail clinic down the street, guess where you’re going? Any hesitations you may have over your care being fragmented, the limited ability of your retail clinic physician, or anything else will go out the window pretty quickly.

I agree completely with the idea that convenience is key. However, what Gabriel doesn’t point out is that the fact that doctors have a 3 week waiting list for patients is why they don’t care about offering convenience to their patients. They have enough patients and so they don’t see why they should change.

You can imagine the taxi cab industry was in a similar position. They had plenty of people using their taxi service. They didn’t see how this new entrant could cause them trouble because they were unsafe and whatever other reasons they rationalized why the new entrant wouldn’t be accepted by the masses. Are we seeing the same thing with retail clinics vs traditional healthcare? I think so. Will it eventually catch up to them? I think so.

What’s even more interesting in healthcare is that retail clinics are just one thing that’s attacking the status quo. Telemedicine is as well. Home health apps and sensors are. AI is. etc etc etc. All of these have the potential to really disrupt the way we consume healthcare.

The question remains: Will traditional healthcare system be disrupted or will they embrace these changes and make them new tools in how they offer care? It took the taxi cab industry years to adapt and build an app that worked like Uber and Lyft. However, it was too late for them. I don’t think it’s too late for healthcare, but it’s getting close.

EHR Data – Is it Improving Healthcare?

Posted on June 14, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve written pretty regularly about the wave of data that’s coming to the world of healthcare. It’s really something quite extraordinary. However, data in itself doesn’t solve anything. So, I was bothered by this tweet which suggested that technology was improving healthcare by illustrating that more and more health data was being collected by technology.

Here’s the tweet:

Attached to this tweet is the following image which doesn’t illustrate the above assertion at all.

No one believes that technology can help improve healthcare more than me. However, it’s not right to make that assertion on Twitter and then use the increased collection of healthcare data as proof of this fact. We can collect all the data in the world and healthcare can remain exactly as it is today.

This reminds me of when the government suggested that HITECH (Meaningful Use) was a success based on graphs that show that most organizations have adopted an EHR. I guess if EHR adoption is your goal, then it was a success. However, if your goal is to use technology to improve healthcare, then EHR adoption is a vanity metric.

We need to stop focusing on adoption and start focusing more on metrics that really matter. Are we improving care? Are we lowering the cost of healthcare? Are we improving the efficiency of our healthcare providers? If technology can’t help you in one of these areas, then we should question why we’re doing it. Let’s bring some sanity back to our approach to healthcare technology.

Will the eCW Settlement Impact MACRA? – MACRA Monday

Posted on June 12, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

In case you missed it, eCW settled a whistleblower lawsuit for $155 million. At the core of the lawsuit were the Medicare meaningful use payments that were paid to eCWs customers. The lawsuit alleged that eCW had been inappropriately certified as an EHR and told their customers that they were appropriately certified.

Many in the industry including myself are suggesting that eCW isn’t the only EHR vendor that could run into these types of issues. It’s quite easy for an EHR vendor to pass the EHR certification test. It’s another thing to have actually implemented all of the EHR certification requirements. We’ll see what other lawsuits come forward.

What does this settlement mean for MACRA?

Before the eCW settlement, many in the EHR industry didn’t realize their risk profile because their customers were getting government money. Once your customers start taking government money, the legal framework really changes. This is going to be true with the MACRA program as well.

It behooves every EHR vendor to really make sure they are following the spirit of the law and not just trying to game the EHR certification process (which we all know is easily gamed). I expect that most EHR vendors will step up their game and make a good faith effort to comply. I think this is the hope of the US Attorney’s office given their press release about the settlement.

We’re still waiting to see if the eCW settlement will cause any issues for eCW users who attested with the inappropriately certified eCW software. My prediction is that they’ll be fine, but some have argued that their meaningful use incentive payments could be pulled too. If that happens, that could really impact participation in the MACRA/MIPS program.

You can be sure that healthcare organization’s compliance officers are going to spend more time verifying their EHR vendor’s certification. I wouldn’t be surprised if we saw some new contracts that include some new language to cover the healthcare organization if their EHR has issues similar to eCW.

One other thing that might be an issue is those organizations that choose to switch to a new EHR from eCW. EHR switching has always been an issue when it comes to meaningful use and now MACRA and MIPS. We’ll have to dive into EHR switching and MACRA in a future post.

What impact do you think the eCW settlement will have on MACRA?

5 Stages of Patient Frustration and Satisfaction Infographic

Posted on June 8, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

SCI Solutions sent me a really interesting infographic that looks at the 5 stages of patient frustration, but also the 5 stages of patient satisfaction. Check it out below:

I’m not sure that it’s best to describe these as stages since I’m not sure that they always flow through the various stages. Instead, I would rather describe them as patient states or even patient emotions. Regardless of the semantics, I like how this graphic explains the emotions patients feel both good and bad. It’s worth looking at your workflow and seeing where you can move from the frustrated patient emotions and into the happy patient emotions.

Roadmap to Succeed in Value Based Contracts with Mark Anderson

Posted on June 7, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Nishanth Varghese, Marketing Director at Innovaccer, sat down to talk with Mark R. Anderson, Chief Operating Officer at East Texas Healthcare System and a well-known thought leader with over 44 years of healthcare experience, about the ongoing shift from fee-for-service to value-based reimbursement.

This is an extremely important topic and Mark Anderson never pulls punches and has a deep understanding of healthcare. So, take 34 minutes and let Mark catch you up to speed on what’s happening with value based contracts.

Is there anything Mark Anderson didn’t cover in this discussion that we should know. Anything that he talked about where you have a different perspective? Let’s hear your thoughts in the comments.