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EMR and EHR Reaches 2000 Posts Published

Posted on April 24, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re taking a small break from our regularly scheduled MACRA Monday program to bring you this special announcement. This post is the 2000th blog post on EMR and EHR! Check out the admin view I woke up to this morning:

I’m pretty excited by this achievement since I nearly sold this blog about 8-9 years ago. Plus, this blog was kind of started on a lark to help someone who wanted a place to blog. 21 blog posts later, he got a new job and couldn’t blog anymore, so I continued it without him.

As EMR and EHR has progressed, we’ve worked hard to focus the content of the site on the ambulatory market and have expanded beyond the topics of EMR and EHR into anything that might be useful to an ambulatory organization. I’m happy to say that EMR and EHR is approaching 5 million pageviews.

In the beginning, I was the main blogger on the site, but I certainly haven’t done this alone. To all those people who contributed to EMR and EHR over the years, I can’t thank you enough:

Anne Zieger – 429 posts
Jennifer Dennard – 143 posts
Andy Oram – 106 posts
Katie Clark – 44 posts
Carl Bergman – 45 posts
Priya Ramachandran – 40 posts
Dr. Jeff – 21 posts
Janae Sharp – 5 posts
Julie Maas – 5 posts
Colin Hung – 1 post
Guest Bloggers – 53 posts
*Note: Many of these people also blog on other Healthcare Scene blogs as well.

The nice thing is, we’re really just getting started. We have a lot more planned for EMR and EHR. One thing we’re working on is doing a number of blog post series on topics that matter to ambulatory practices similar to what we’ve done with MACRA Monday. These series will be deep dives into topics that matter to ambulatory practices.

From these blog post series, we’re also going to generate a list of the various companies in that space similar to what we’ve done with EHR companies in the past. One challenge we see ambulatory practices face is they don’t know all of the companies out there that are creating innovative solutions that can make their practice run more efficiently. Hopefully these new resources will help them cut through all the noise and discover companies they’ve likely never heard of before.

It’s an exciting time in the industry because I think that practices are now ready to move beyond the EHR. Don’t get me wrong, the EHR has had a good run and will continue to be an integral part of every practice. In fact, we still have a lot of work to do to get value out of the EHR. However, we need to explore what else practices need to be successful in this ever-changing healthcare world. We’ll be exploring this question in our next 2000 blog posts.

Thanks to all of you who keep reading and please let us know on our contact us page how we can help you even more.

The Disconnect Between Where Wearables Are Needed and Where Wearables are Used

Posted on April 21, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

No one can argue that we haven’t seen an explosion of wearable devices in the healthcare space. In most cases, they’ve been a consumer purchase, but there are a few cases of them being used clinically. While we’ve seen a huge uptick in wearable use, there seems to be a massive disconnect between those who use them and those who need to use them.

This was highlighted to me recently when I heard someone say that at the recent Boston Marathon they predicted that almost every athlete running the Boston Marathon had some sort of tracking device on them to track their running. Runners love to track everything from steps to heart rate to speed and everything in between. I wish the Boston Marathon did a survey to know what devices the runners used. That would be a fascinating view into which wearables are most popular, but I digress.

When I heard this person make this observation, I quickly thought “That’s not who we need using wearables if we want to lower the cost of healthcare.”

With some exceptions, those who run the Boston Marathon are in incredible shape. They exercise a lot (maybe too much in some cases) and most of them eat quite healthy. These are the outliers and my guess is that they’re not the people that are costing our healthcare system so much money. That seems like a fair assumption to me.

Yes, the people we need using these wearables are those people sitting on the couch back at home. We need the unhealthy people tracking their health, not healthy people. While not always the case, unhealthy people don’t really want to track their health. What’s more demotivating to your healthy goals than being in a FitBit group with a marthon runner that always destroys you?

This is a challenging psychological problem that I haven’t seen any wearable company address. I guess there’s too much money to be made with healthy people that want to track themselves that they don’t need to dive into the psychological impact of wearables on unhealthy people. However, that’s exactly what we’re going to need to do as wearables become more clinically relevant and can help us better understand a patient’s health.

The Personalization of Healthcare and Healthcare Chatbots

Posted on April 20, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

At HIMSS 2017, I did a plethora of videos where I was interviewing people and even more where people were interviewing me. Many of those videos are just now starting to leak out onto the internet. One of those videos where I was interviewed was with the team from Availity. They had a great team there that interviewed a bunch of the HIMSS Social Media Ambassadors including me.

I’ll admit that I was pretty tired when I did this interview at the end of the day, right before the New Media Meetup at HIMSS. However, I think the interview shares some high-level views on what’s happening in healthcare IT and important topics coming out of the conference. Check out the full video to learn the details:

I like that I talked about the personalization of healthcare and then healthcare chatbots in the same video interview. Some people might see these as opposites. How can talking with a healthcare chatbot be more personal than a human?

The answer to that question has two parts. First, a chatbot can quickly analyze a lot more information to personalize the experience than a human can do. Notice that I said personalization and not personal. There’s a subtle but important difference in those two words. Second, I didn’t clarify this in the video, but the healthcare chatbot will not fully replace the care provider. Instead, it will just replace the care provider from having to do the mundane tasks that the providers hate doing. Done correctly, the healthcare chatbot will fee up the providers to be able to focus on providing patients a more personalized and personal experience. That’s something we would all welcome in healthcare.

All of this health data we are amassing on patients is going to make both the healthcare chatbot and the human healthcare provider better able to give you a personalized experience. That’s a great thing.

Since in the video I also recommended that people follow Rasu Shrestha, MD, you may also want to check out the video interview Rasu did with Availity:

I love the idea that we go to conferences to not just learn something, but to unlearn things. Rasu is great!

A New Definition of EHR

Posted on April 19, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

That’s a pretty funny play on words by Nicholas DiNubile, MD. Well, it’s funny unless you’re the one that’s become the government tool. Dr. DiNubile also shared this picture with the above definition.

While I think that this picture is an exaggeration of reality for most doctors, what isn’t an exaggeration is administrative overheard a doctor has now is much greater than it was in the past. In most cases, the EHR hasn’t made it any better and what the EHR vendors have had to implement for meaningful use and now mACRA have generally made this worse.

Over the past couple weeks, I’ve had the good luck of spending a lot of time with my colleague Shahid Shah. Something he’s been sharing lately is that “Doing stupid faster isn’t innovation.” We see a lot of this in healthcare. Talking to one healthcare IT vendor he came to the realization that all his company does is stupid faster. It was a shocking thought for him and likely for many that read this.

As you look at your organization and where you want to take it, are you focused on true innovation or are you busy doing stupid faster? If you’re doing the former, keep fighting the good fight. If you’re doing the later, it might be time to take a step back and reconsider your path forward.

Is ICSA Labs Getting Out of the EHR Certification Business?

Posted on April 18, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I got the following email that was received by ICSA customers:

Dear Valued Customer:

Your organization has received product testing and certification services as a customer of ICSA Labs, a division of MCI Communications Services, Inc., d/b/a Verizon Business Services (“ICSA Labs”).

I am writing to inform you that ICSA Labs will no longer be accepting new engagements for product testing and certification, or renewing expiring Statement(s) of Service. However, please be assured that we will continue to honor any existing, active Statements of Service that we may have with your organization, and to maintain any current certifications for the applicable term.

Thank you for your attention to this matter. If you have any questions, please contact icsalabsinfo@icsalabs.com.

Sincerely,

George Japak
ICSA Labs, Managing Director

Does this mean ICSA is withdrawing as an EHR Certifying body (ATCB)? I asked EHR certification expert, Jim Tate, which EHR certifying bodies remain if ICSA is pulling out and he said that right now Drummond, ICSA, InfoGard, and SLI are authorized to test and only Drummond, ICSA, and InfoGard are authorized to certify. You can find more details on the ONC website.

A part of me isn’t really surprised since the EHR certification business isn’t a great business. There are a limited number of clients and a limited amount of revenue available. Plus, under meaningful use, EHR certification became a commodity. That’s why CCHIT couldn’t survive. Seems like ICSA Labs is heading the same direction as CCHIT.

The bigger question I would ask is should EHR certification continue at all?

MACRA Stats – MACRA Monday

Posted on April 17, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

I love a good stat. I realize that you can make stats tell you whatever you want. However, if you look at them with a critical eye, you can learn something about both the organization producing the stat and the population that the stat represents.

It’s no surprise that I found these MACRA stats shared by David Chou to be of great interest and a perfect MACRA Monday discussion.

The stat that stands out to me is the 51% of physicians who reported that they weren’t getting paid on a performance basis or that their compensation had a very small performance based piece to it. For those of us following the cutting edge of what’s happening in the world of healthcare, it’s sometimes important to remember that while the shift to value based reimbursement is happening, it still has a long ways to go.

I found David Chou’s tweet with these stats interesting when he said “Most physicians prefer the old model of payment vs MACRA.” I would look at these stats a bit differently than David.

I would suggest that these stats say that doctors prefer reimbursement models they understand and ones that pay them well. This is proven out in the stat that 71% of physicians surveyed would participate in value-based payment models if offered financial incentives to do so. It’s not really a shocking insight that doctors are happy to shift models if there are financial incentives to do so.

The challenge is that most doctors don’t think that a value based reimbursement model is going to pay them more for the work they do. They’re probably right. This explains why nearly 8 in 10 physicians surveyed prefer fee-for-service or salary for their compensation. If a new model came along that would pay them more than their current fee for service model, then they’d happily switch models.

Sometimes we make things too complicated. Physicians just want to be paid well for the work they do. Sounds like all of us no? The concern for most physicians is that these models are unlikely to pay them more. In fact, it’s quite possible they’ll pay them less or at least pay them the same for more work.

I haven’t seen any plan or projections to pay doctors more. In fact, the rhetoric in society is that we pay too much for healthcare (which is true). As a society, we all agree that we should be paying less for healthcare. However, as a healthcare provider or healthcare organization the idea of paying less for healthcare translates to getting paid less. Who’s going to take the hit when it comes to getting paid less? Providers? Hospitals? Pharma? Med device companies? Health IT Companies?

Could value based reimbursement models theoretically cost less and pay all of these stakeholders the same amount of money because patients were healthier? Works great in theory, but looking at the past history of these programs tells another story. So, it’s no wonder that most doctors would happily stay in the fee-for-service reimbursement world they know vs moving to value based reimbursement models.

Be sure to check out all of our MACRA Monday blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

Patient Access to Health Information is a Right

Posted on April 14, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was browsing some old notes I’d taken to interesting resources and ideas. I came across some videos that ONC had created around the rights of patients when it comes to accessing health information.

Here’s a look at the first video:

The video is 3 minutes long and the information could have been shared in 30 seconds, but some of the points it shares are really good. For example, that it’s your right to be able to access your health information. Also, they make the point that you still have the right to get access to your health information even if you haven’t paid your bill.

It’s always amazing to me how many misconceptions there are out there when it comes to access to health information. We see HIPAA and other rules used as a reason to not provide patients their health information a lot and it’s often wrong.

The great thing is that over the 11 years I’ve been blogging, we’ve seen a real sea change in people’s perspectives on how and when you should have access to your patient record. That said, we still have a ways to go. Technology should make that record available to you whenever and wherever you want in near real time fashion. We see that in some organizations, but not enough.

These videos will never go viral, but they are a good information source for those patients who aren’t sure about their rights when it comes to access to their health information.

The Physician – Patient Disconnect

Posted on April 13, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you’ve been in healthcare for a while, then you know that there’s often a disconnect between patients and healthcare professionals. However, this divide was illustrated pretty sharply in some research that Conduent (previously known as Xerox) put out about the relationship.

Plus, to add to this disconnect, there was an even bigger divide between patients from different ages. In fact, they’re a very heterogeneous group. However, so many healthcare organizations treat them the same.

For a good illustration of these differences, take a second to look at this infographic:

A Quick Look at MACRA in the Twittersphere – MACRA Mondays

Posted on April 10, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

MACRA is still an extremely hot topic and so there’s a lot of discussion about it happening on Twitter and other social media platforms. For today’s MACRA Monday I thought I’d highlight a number of tweets about MACRA that might help you in your efforts.


This was one of the main reasons that doctors didn’t want to participate in meaningful use. Seems like it’s carrying over into MACRA. Is there reason to be concerned?


I thought this was an interesting way to breakdown the two parts of MACRA: APMs and MIPS. I’d just add that APMs require the new entities to report as well. You can’t get away from reporting in either of them.


Leavitt Partners has a deep perspective on what’s happening with healthcare. In the link they assert that MACRA may have a bigger direct impact on physicians and the delivery system than ACA (Obamacare). They could very well be right.


I wouldn’t have guessed this is a radiology society’s top priority. It matters to them, but it seems like they’d have bigger fish to fry.


Numbers like this are disturbing. Does it really take that much to be prepared for MACRA? Or do doctors just not understand MACRA and so they answered that they’re not ready? Maybe I was wrong about how many will just take the penalties. Although, it’s still early and I think most will be able to avoid penalties thanks to Pick Your Pace.

Any great tweets or insights you’ve seen about MACRA lately? If so, share them in the comments.

Be sure to check out all of our MACRA Monday blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

Insights from Alan Portela on Healthcare IT Barriers and Opportunities

Posted on April 5, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve interviewed hundreds and maybe even thousands of healthcare IT professionals. I learn a little bit from each of them. However, some people I interview offer me a view of healthcare IT that I haven’t thought about before. That’s what it was like for me when I first interviewed Alan Portela, CEO of AirStrip, 4-5 years ago.

Ever since then, I’ve never turned down a chance to interview Alan Portela. Plus, he’s so insightful that I usually ask him if it’s ok if we turn the cameras on so that everyone can learn from him. That’s what happened at HIMSS when I had a chance to interview Alan.

The focus of my interview with Alan was around the changing world of healthcare IT. I wanted to hear what challenges Alan and his team at AirStrip were facing and also what opportunities he saw for healthcare IT’s future. Like usual, Alan brought out some great insights that will benefit anyone working in healthcare IT.

Watch my full video interview with Alan Portela below:

Find more great Healthcare Scene interviews on YouTube.