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Healthcare Optimism and LinkedIn

Some of you might be wondering how I grouped these two topics together. It’s simple. I recently was invited to participate in LinkedIn’s Influencer program and so I’ve written a few posts on the LinkedIn platform to see how it works. It’s been a hit or miss experience so far, but I’m intrigued by what they’re doing.

It turns out, my first post on the LinkedIn Influencer platform was titled “Why We Should be Optimistic in Healthcare.” What’s amazing to me is that the post is still getting a ton of traffic and social media tweets. I think that I struck a chord.

I think if we’re honest, we often like to kind of dwell in the challenges that we face every day in healthcare. Sometimes it’s hard to take a look at what we’re doing and be optimistic about the future of healthcare. However, when you take a second to step back from the day to day grind and challenges, there is a lot to be optimistic about in healthcare.

If I hearken back to my first job in healthcare, I’m reminded of all the times I told someone about my new job. I always highlighted how cool it would be if something I did in healthcare could actually save someone’s life. An ambitious goal indeed, but it’s the reality of working in healthcare. Now that I’ve worked in healthcare a number of years, my view has slightly changed. I still love the idea that I could save someone’s life, but I love just as much the ability to make someone’s life better.

Let’s not forget the potential of the work we do. It’s incredibly important.

April 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

What Software Will Replace EHR?

I’m usually a very grounded and practical person. I’m all about dealing with the practical realities that we all face. However, every once in a while I like to sit back and think about where we’re headed.

I’ve often said that I think we’re locked into the EHR systems we have now at least until after the current meaningful use cycle. I can’t imagine a new software system being introduced in the next couple years when every hospital and healthcare organization has to still comply with meaningful use. Many might argue that meaningful use beyond the current EHR incentive money might lock us in to our existing EHR software for many years after as well.

Personally, I think that a new software will replace the current crop of EHR at some point. This replacement will likely coincide with the time an organization is up for renewal of their current EHR. The renewal costs are usually so high that a young startup company could make a splash during renewal time. Add in a change of CIO and I think the opportunity is clear.

My guess is that the next generation of healthcare documentation software will be one that incorporates data from throughout the entire ecosystem of healthcare. I’m not bullish on many of the current crop of EHR software being able to make the shift from being document repositories and billing engines into something which does much more sophisticated data analysis. A few of them will be able to make the investment, but the legacy nature of software development will hold many of them back.

It’s worth noting that I’m not talking about the current crop of data that you can find outside of the healthcare system. I’m talking about software which taps into the next generation of data tracking which goes as far as “an IP address on every organ.” This type of granular healthcare data is going to change how we treat patients. The next generation healthcare information system will need to take all of this data and make it smart and actionable.

To facilitate this change, we could really use a change in our reimbursement system as well. ACOs are the start of what could be possible. What I think is most likely is that the current system will remain in place, but providers and organizations will be able to accept a different model of payment for the healthcare services they provide. While I fear that HHS might not be progressive enough to do such a change, I’m hopeful that by making it a separate initiative they might be able to make this a reality.

What do you think? What type of software, regulations and technology will replace our current crop of EHR? I don’t think the current crop of EHR has much to worry about for now. However, it’s an inevitable part of a market that it evolves.

April 15, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Windows XP Is No Longer HIPAA Compliant

For those of you who missed it, thousands in healthcare are now out of compliance with HIPAA thanks to Microsoft’s decision to stop supporting Windows XP. I wrote about the details of Windows XP and HIPAA compliance previously. Microsoft stopped supporting the Windows XP operating system on April 8, 2014 and as Mac McMillan says in the linked post, OCR has been clear that unsupported systems are not HIPAA compliant.

I asked Dell if they had any numbers on the number of PCs out there that are still running XP. Here was their response (Note: These are general numbers and not healthcare specific)

The latest data I’ve seen shows that around 20-25% of PCs are still running XP (number vary depending on the publication). But most of those are consumer devices or very small businesses. Larger organizations seem to be complete, on track to completing by April, or have already engaged Dell (or competitor) to migrate them.

Dell also told me that globally, they have helped more than 450 customers (exact count is 471) with Windows 7 migration and automated deployment.

I’m not sure I agree with their assessment that the larger organizations have pretty much all upgraded beyond Windows XP. I agree that they’re more likely to have upgraded, but I’m sure there’s still plenty of Windows XP in large hospital systems across the nation. I’d love to hear from readers to see if they agree or disagree with this assertion.

I’ve heard some people make some cases for why Windows XP might not be considered a HIPAA violation if it was a standalone system that’s not connected to a network or if it was in a highly controlled and constrained use case. Some medical devices that still require Windows XP might force institutions to deal with HIPAA like this. However, I think that’s a risky situation to be in and may or may not pass the audit or other legal challenges.

I think you’re a brave (or stupid if you prefer) soul to still be running Windows XP in healthcare. Certainly there wasn’t a big disaster that occurred on April 8th when Windows XP was no longer supported. However, I’d hate to be your organization if you have Windows XP and get a HIPAA audit.

If you haven’t updated your HIPAA policies lately, you may want to do that along with updating Windows XP. This whitepaper called “HIPAA Compliance: Six Reality Checks” is a good place to start. Remember also that once an auditor finds one violation (like Windows XP), then they start digging for even more. It’s a bit like a shark that smells (or however they sense) blood in the water. They get hungry for more. I don’t know anyone that enjoys a HIPAA auditor, let alone one that really starts digging for problems.

April 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

EMR Customer Service, EMR Not Meeting ACOs Needs, and Patient Centered EMR Rollout


Zappos is in Las Vegas, and I can assure you that this story is true. I’ve always wondered how they’d scale that policy if thousands of people called for pizza. The key I think is that they do focused customer service. Chandresh asks an important question. Which EHR vendors have delightful customer service?


If EHR vendors don’t make the ACO possible, who will?


I’d be more interested in seeing an EHR roll out that considered the patient.

April 13, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Not All EHR Clicks Are Evil

There’s a great blog post on HIStalk that is a beautiful CMIO Rant. He provides some really needed perspective on the issues with EHR software. In many ways, the post reminded me of my post titled “Don’t Act Like Charting on Paper Was Fast.” In that post, I highlight the fact that far too many people are comparing EHR against doing nothing versus comparing EHR against the alternative. Those are two very different comparisons.

The money line from the CMIO rant was this one:

If we insist that all clicks are wasted time, then we can’t have a conversation about usability, because under the prescription pad scenario, the only usable computer is one you don’t have to use at all.

I love when you take something to the extreme. It’s true that we all want stuff to just happen with no work. That’s perfect usability. However, that’s just not the reality (at least not yet). If we want the data to be accurate and to be recorded, then it takes human intervention (ie. clicks). Some clicking is necessary.

The CMIO goes on to say that the key to EHR usability is expectations. I thought that was an interesting word to describe EHR usability. I’ve written about this topic before when I compared the number of EHR clicks to the keys on a piano. In that article I suggested that the number of clicks wasn’t the core issue. If we could create EHR software that was hyper responsive (like a piano key), was consistent in its response speed, and we provided proper training, then having a lot of EHR clicks wasn’t nearly as big an issue.

Not that this should be an excuse for EHR vendors to make crappy software. They should still do what they can to minimize clicks where possible. However, the bigger problem is that we haven’t achieved all three of these goals. So, we’ll continue to hear many people complaining about all the EMR clicks.

April 11, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Healthcare IT Innovation – #HITsm Chat Topics

I’m excited to be hosting this week’s #HITsm chat. For those not familiar with it, every Friday at Noon EST we all follow the #HITsm tag on Twitter and participate in a Twitter chat covering 4-5 questions. If you want to participate you can just watch, or chime in with your own thoughts and questions. To do so, just add the #HITsm tag to your tweets. I’m the host this week and so I chose the topic and questions.

I’ve had healthcare IT innovation on my mind a lot lately, and so I thought it would make for an interesting topic. It might be worth reading my first LinkedIn post called “Why We Should be Optimistic in Healthcare.” In that post I outline why I think there’s a lot of innovation in healthcare that’s about to happen and that’s why I’m so optimistic.

I hope you’ll join me and a few hundred others on Twitter for the #HITsm chat. Here are the topics we’ll be discussing. Feel free to start the discussion early in the comments.

Topic 1: Can innovation happen within the current healthcare beauracracy or will innovation have to replace our current model?

Topic 2: What’s the most innovative thing you’ve seen in healthcare IT in the last 6 months?

Topic 3: What type of results will we see from the tricorder Xprize? Does innovation come from contests like this?

Topic 4: If you had a million dollars you had to invest in health IT, where or how would you invest it?

Topic 5: Think 5-10 years out, what will be the most exciting innovation in healthcare?

April 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Scribes and Problems with the Healthcare System

In a recent #HITsm chat we had a pretty good discussion about scribes and their place in healthcare. I know a lot of people that are really big proponents of scribes, but I also know many people who are against them.

During the discussion, the question was asked if scribes mask the problems of the EHR software. This was my reponse:

If I were to do that tweet again, I might replace healthcare system with reimbursement system. Scribes are a mask to the fundamental problems with how we pay for healthcare. I’ve always loved to think about what an EHR would look like if it didn’t have to worry about billing. It would be a completely different system than what we have with EHRs today.

The reality is that doctors want to get paid and so EHRs have to deal with billing. Plus, now they have to deal with meaningful use regulation as well. Add those two together and you can understand why scribes are so popular with doctors.

Every single EHR would be better and easier to use if they were just worrying about providing a tool to doctors that lets them document the visit and ensure quality patient care. However, until that happens (which is never) scribes and other alternative methods to document are going to be very popular with many physicians.

April 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Where is Clinical Decision Support Heading?

A few months ago I had a chance to sit down an interview Jonathan Teich, MD, PhD, Elsevier’s Chief Medical Informatics Officer and a physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. In our discussion we dig into the current and future state of clinical decision support. For example, I ask Dr. Teich if you’ll be able to be a doctor in the future without it. If you want to learn more about clinical decision support and where it’s going, you’ll enjoy this video interview:

April 7, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

You might be an #HITNerd If…

You might be an #HITNerd If…

you love this Lady Gaga parody video…or this Katy Perry parody video for that matter.

Find all our #HITNerd references on: EMR and EHR & EMR and HIPAA and check out the new #HITNerd t-shirts, hat, and phone cases.

NEW: Check out the #HITNerd store to purchase an #HITNerd t-shirt of cell phone case.

Note: Much like Jeff Foxworthy is a redneck. I’m well aware that I’m an #HITNerd.

April 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Planning a Successful Patient Engagement Strategy

On social media and at events like HIMSS, we hear a lot of discussion about this new trend called patient engagement. While there are certainly new tools to help an organization engage the patient, I don’t think it’s fair to say that patient engagement is a new strategy. Patient engagement has always been considered a good thing in practices and healthcare organizations.

The challenge is that we’ve never rewarded those who actually did engage the patient. Healthcare reimbursement has actually discouraged patient engagement despite providers natural desire to want to engage the patient. Every doctor I know would love to sit down with a patient for an hour and really engage them in their health. Unfortunately, we don’t pay them to do this.

While I don’t think we’ll see an over night transition to hour long visits with our doctors, the move to value based reimbursement will finally start rewarding providers who engage deeply with their patients.

The next question doctors should ask is where to start when it comes to patient engagement in this changing landscape. This whitepaper on 5 Elements of a Successful Patient Engagement Strategy would be a good place to start. It provides a realistic strategy for your organization to consider.

The whitepaper also has this great quote from Leonard Kish:

“If patient engagement were a drug, it would be the blockbuster drug of the century and malpractice not to use it.”

Those practices that choose to not have a patient engagement strategy are going to fall behind. This won’t be an issue right away, but it will catch up to many practices who don’t see the coming change.

April 2, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.