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Epic’s Reputation, Datapalooza, and Interoperability — #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on June 15, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Topic One: Do you honestly believe, when the clock runs out, CMS will dock non-#MeaningfulUse docs’ reimbursement? Why/Why not?

 

Topic Two: Explain in technical terms why Epic has such a bad reputation for interoperability.

What’s the data roadblock? How to fix? #HITsm — CapSite (@CapSite) June 14, 2013

 

 

 

Topic Three: In your opinion: Coolest thing coming out of D.C. last week with Datapalooza and the other health IT conferences/meetings?

Topic Four: Congress blaming EHRs & #MeaningfulUse for “upcoding” is like blaming screwdrivers for burglaries. Agree/Disagree/Your take?


Topic Five: Will ICD-10 be a non-problem we blew out of proportion like Y2K, or will it be a pretty rough transition? Explain.

Health IT and Worker Burnout — #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on June 1, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

We continue to test various methods to incorporate video into the #HITsm chats. This week a few of us got together to talk about what was said during the #HITsm chat. You can see the video embedded below. It was pretty fun to kind of wrap up what was tweeted during the #HITsm chat. Let us know what you think of the video below. We’re definitely interested in knowing if people like the videos or not. Plus, if you’re interested in participating in one, let us know as well.

Topic One: How might #healthIT CONTRIBUTE to #healthcare worker burnout (#EHR fatigue, etc.)?

 

Topic Two: How are #healthcare worker burnout factors tracked & measured today (or ARE they)?

 

Topic Three: How could/should #healthcare worker burnout factor into #healthIT design principles?

 

Topic Four: How could #healthIT improve the provider experience (reducing burnout risk)?

Topic Five: Should patients have access to #healthcare provider burnout factor ratings & mitigation plans?

Healthcare Innovation – #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on May 18, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Before we get to the regular #HITsm recap, John got together with a couple of other members of the #HITsm community and did a Google Plus hangout during this week’s chat. It’s a little random, but there were some good discussions about the #HITsm chat topics. We’d love to hear feedback about what we did. We’re considering doing something similar in the future, but with a little more focused discussion.

Topic One: What does #healthcare innovation mean to you? How do you define it?

Topic Two: Do you see innovation in #medicine different than in public health, if so how?

 

Topic Three: What are effective methods of globally diffusing innovative ideas/tech when it comes to getting healthcare user buy-in?

Topic Four: Can you name any examples of tech & innovations developed in U.S. that have translated elsewhere, & vice versa?

Hoarding and Sharing Data in Health Care — #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on April 27, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Topic One: Looking in the rearview mirror, what has been the history and rationale for “hoarding” data in health care?

Topic Two: “Open” has varying meanings. What elements/aspects do you think are the most important for healthcare?


Topic Three: How can social media contribute to the transformation from hoarding to sharing? How should patients fit?

Topic Four: What providers/companies use open/collaborative technologies, pt care workflow, strategies, biz models, etc. Who are the stars?

Topic Five: What lessons can #healthcare learn about openness from other industries? What’s most likely to work in healthcare?

Secure Text and Email, Smartphone Physicals, and EMR Documentation – Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on April 14, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

There are so many types of mHealth apps and devices out there, it was inevitable that someone would try to have them work together. At TEDMED 2013, Shiv Gaglani and a team of physicians-to-be will be presenting the “smartphone physical.” Are these types of visits closer to becoming a reality than we may have realized?

One of the amazing technologies that have been developed is a smartphone that measures vitals — maybe this will be used in smartphone physicals someday! The Fujitsu Smartphone analyzes subtle changes in blood flow and determines vital signs, all by the user taking their photo with the phone’s camera. It goes to show that you don’t necessarily need fancy equipment to have incredible mHealth technology.

While some are concerned about the safety of email and texting for healthcare communication, it’s becoming a way of the future. Companies such as Physia and docBEAT are working specifically to make email and texts more secure. So which one is better? Both have their pros and cons – texting is quick and to the point, while email can take more time. Which would you rather receive?

Most doctors will agree, the current documentation options that EMRs offer are frustrating. There’s just too much clicking. However, the tide is shifting and it is very possible full keyboards will be needed. And the need for point of care EMR documentation will be more necessary than ever before.

With the current budget proposal by President Obama, EMR vendors might be impacted significantly. The ONC is suggesting that health IT vendors pay up to $1 million in fees. With the upcoming expiration of the ONC’s $2 billion appropriation from ARRA, the agency is needing some new funds. It also would help maintain ONC’s Certified Health IT Product List. Of course, vendors will not be happy to hear this news.

Pay-for-Play Interoperability, Texting in Healthcare, and Health IT Conferences – #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on April 13, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Topic One: Is “pay-for-play” interoperability going to derail CommonWell’s goal of building an industry-wide, interoperable framework?

Topic Two: Will texting in health care become a main driver of #patientengagement? Are iOS iMessage texts HIPAA compliant?

Topic Three: Experts claim data breaches are inevitable for health systems. Agree? What can be done NOW to minimize #healthIT security risks?

Topic Four: What’s the next-best #healthIT event/conference you’re attending? Are there other health IT topics that deserve their own event?

EHR and mHealth Successes and Fails: Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on March 31, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Patients are somewhat taught to fear sharing medical data. While privacy is important, especially when it comes to health, being more willing to share medical data can yield great results. The key is knowing who to share information with, and who to avoid. 

EHR vendors can be tricky when it comes to keeping clients around. Sometimes, they don’t really have a choice because the EHR holds client information “hostage” when the client says they are switching EHRs. However, this is a sneaky tactic, and there are many other ways to keep an EHR client longer — most importantly, providing a great product.

While many aspects of HIT have come to a halt, mHealth continues to flourish. There are many things that other parts of HIT can learn from mHealth’s success. First, mHealth doesn’t focus on every patient at once. Next, it is an unregulated industry. And finally, the projects are marketed directly to consumers and paid for by them as well. 

Are you a hospital leader and curious about what technologies you should be watching out for? Well, the ECRI Institute has compiled a list of technologies they feel executives should be looking at this next year. This list includes Electronic Health Records, mHealth, imaging and surgery, and more. 

When an EHR fails to work correctly, how do physicians deal with it? Researchers have observed clinical workflows to answer just that question. The observations concluded that while there was no correct answer, many use paper to record information. Hopefully, this study will show EHRs where their gaps are, and help them to correct them.

There are so many consumer medical devices out there. What makes one stand out from the best? And which one has the best form factor? Wrist bands or chest straps…hand held or pocket stored? Chime in over at Smart Phone Healthcare.

100% Interoperability, Quantified Self Data, and Data Liquidity – #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on March 30, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Topic 1: Do you think the healthcare system WANTS 100% interoperability & data liquidity? Why/why not?

 

Topic 2: As consumer, what are YOUR fears about your health data being shared across providers/payers/government?

 

Topic 3: What do you think payers will do with #quantifiedself data if integrated into EHR? Actuarial/underwriting?

 

Topic 4: Could there be a correlation between your fear of data liquidity and your health?

 

Topic 5: What could assuage your fears? Education? Legislation? Regulation? Healthcare system withdrawal?

Meaningful Use, HIMSS, and mHealth Updates – Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on March 17, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Meaningful Use standards prove to be a headache time and time again. For small hospitals, doing their best to implement an EHR and then meet standards may not be enough. And the consequences can be dire — they may not receive their incentive money, and are left worse off than before they purchased the EHR.

And with the recent sequestration, will Meaningful Use incentives be slashed? An editorial by Tom Sullivan discusses the possibility, and talks with Scott Lundstrom, group vice president of consultancy at IDC’s Health Insight Unit. Lundstrom suggests some reason to worry. Anne Zieger analyzes the editorial and chimes in her thoughts about how health IT may have something to worry about soon.

Because HIMSS 13 just finished, there were a few posts about some of the information from the conference here at Healthcare Scene. Mandi Bishop attended and gives an overview of her experience over at EMR and HIPAA. She compares it to the Wizard of Oz, and discovering that the main behind the curtain is simply that.

At another conference, SXSW, John was able to meetup with one of his hospital colleagues, and showed that you may run into anyone at a conference. They can be great networking opportunities, and being able to meet with others allows you to find out about different products and services.

In the smartphone and tablet world, here’s an app you’ll want to download. One way to be healthier is limiting one’s sodium intake. The Mayo Clinic  revealed that while the average person should not have more than 2,300 mg of sodium a day, most Americans get around 3,400 mg. Sodium 101 was created to help people make smarter choices, and understand the amount of sodium they are getting each day. Excess sodium can lead to weight loss and a host of other problems, including many auto immune diseases, so this is an important topic.

On the subject of weight loss, a recent study has found that financial incentives inspire weight loss. The participants in the incentive groups were given a sum of money for meeting their health goals, but also were required to pay a certain sum to a pool that participants were entered to win in the end.

Post-HIMSS13 Discussion — #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on March 16, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

#HITsm T1: What takeaways from #HIMSS13 can we apply to the challenge of improving #patientengagement?

 

 

#HITsm T2. Best chance at driving #interoperability: A vendor initiative like CommonWell or a community initiative like TheCUREProject?

 

 

#HITsm T3: The recent eHI report notes that most advanced HIEs get revenue from a single source. How can this model be changed?

 

 

#HITsm T4: Now that #HIMSSanity is over, what’s the next major #healthIT conference on your calendar? Why?