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AHCA Health IT Symposium Videos

Posted on August 5, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m a real fan of local healthcare IT events. They are usually more steeped in practical discussions and they are a great way to really connect with the people doing the hard work in healthcare IT. The larger conferences are great for me to attend as well, but they are usually a much higher level discussion and it’s hard for many in the trenches to make it to the larger events.

With that in mind, I was interested to check out the video from the AHCA Florida’s Health IT Symposium. You can check out all the videos from their sympoisum on the ACHA Florida YouTube page, but I was quite interested in what was said in the Practical Applications session of the symposium, so I’ll embed them here for you to enjoy as well:

And Part 2:

Key Processes and Functions to Meet the Aims of ACOs

Posted on July 2, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In the last Kareo Twitter chat I hosted, we dug into the topic of ACOs and value based reimbursement. I learned a lot in the discussion. In case you missed the chat, you can review the transcript of the chat here.

One of the tweets in the chat came from Steve Sisko (@shimcode) and included the following image (click on the image to see a larger version):
Key Processes and Functions in an ACO

When you see the beautiful complexity of that chart, is it any wonder why we have a hard time understanding and implementing ACOs?

We’re Hosting the #KareoChat and Discussing Value Based Care and ACOs – Join Us!

Posted on June 23, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

ACO and Value Based Reimbursement Twitter Chat
We’re excited to be hosting this week’s #KareoChat on Thursday, 6/25 at 9 AM PT (Noon ET) where we’ll be diving into the details around Value Based Care and ACOs. We’ll be hosting the chat from @ehrandhit and chiming in on occasion from @techguy and @healthcarescene as well.

The topic of value based care and ACOs is extremely important to small practice physicians since understanding and participating in it will be key to their survival. At least that’s my take. I look forward to hearing other people’s thoughts on these changes on Thursday’s Twitter chat. Here are the questions we’ll be discussing over the hour:

  1. What’s the latest trends in value based reimbursement that we should know or watch? #KareoChat
  2. Why or why aren’t you participating in an ACO? #KareoChat
  3. Describe the pros and cons you see with the change to value based reimbursement. #KareoChat
  4. What are you doing to prepare your practice for value based reimbursement and ACOs? #KareoChat
  5. Which technologies and applications will we need in a value based reimbursement and ACO world? #KareoChat
  6. What’s the role of small practices in a value based reimbursement world? Can they survive? #KareoChat

For those of you not familiar with a Twitter chat, you can follow the discussion on Twitter by watching the hashtag #KareoChat. You can also take part in the Twitter chat by including the #KareoChat hashtag in any tweets you send.

I look forward to “seeing” and learning from many of you on Twitter on Thursday. Feel free to start the conversation in the comments below as well.

Full Disclosure: Kareo is a sponsor of EMR and EHR.

Do We Want a Relationship With Our Doctor?

Posted on June 22, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As is often the case, this weekend I was browsing Twitter. Many of the people and hashtags I follow are healthcare and health IT related. Many of the tweets related to the need to change the healthcare system. You know the usual themes: We pay too much for healthcare. We deserve better quality healthcare. We need to change the current healthcare system to be focused on the patient. Etc etc etc.

This wave of tweets ended with one that said “It’s all about the relationships.” I actually think the tweet had more to do with how a company was run, but in the beautiful world of Twitter you get to mesh ideas from multiple disciplines in the same Twitter stream (assuming you follow a good mix of people). I took the tweet and asked the question, “Do We Want a Relationship With Our Doctor?

If you’d asked me a year ago, I would have said, no! Why would I want a relationship with my doctor? I don’t want any relationship with my doctor, because that means that I’m sick and need him to fix something that’s wrong with me. I hope to never see my doctor. Doctor = Bad. Don’t even get me started with hospitals. If Doctor = Bad then Hospital > Doctor.

I’m personally still battling through a change in mindset. It’s not an easy change. It’s really hard to change culture. We have a hard core culture in America of healthcare being sick care. We all want to be healthy, but none of us want to be sick. Going to the doctor admits that we are sick and we don’t want anything to do with that. If we have an actual relationship with our doctor, then we must be really sick.

From the other perspective, do doctors want relationships with their patients? I’ve met some really jaded doctors who probably don’t, but most of the doctors I’ve met would love an actual, deep relationship with their patients. However, they all are asking the question, “How?” They still have to pay the bills, pay off their debts, etc. I don’t know many doctors who have reconciled these practical needs with the desire to have a relationship with their patients.

The closest I’ve seen is the direct primary care and concierge models. It’s still not clear to me that these options will scale across healthcare. Plus, what’s the solution for specialists? Will ACOs and Value Based Reimbursement get us there. I hear a lot of talk in this regard which scares me. Lots of talk without a clear path to results really scares me in healthcare.

What do you think? Do you want a relationship with your doctor? Do doctors want a relationship with their patients? What’s the path to making this a practical reality? Are you already practicing medicine where you have a deep, meaningful relationship with your patient? We’d love to hear your experience.

A 6 Step Guide to Succeeding as an ACO

Posted on June 18, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Farzad Mostashari’s company, Aledade, raising $30 million is a good sign that healthcare organizations are going to be spending a lot of time and money figuring out these new ACO and value based reimbursement models. If you’re a healthcare organization that hasn’t started learning about ACOs, here’s a good whitepaper to start.

The whitepaper is titled “Succeeding as an ACO: A 6-Step Guide for Health Care Organizations” and does a lot more than just talk about the 6 steps to building an ACO. It covers ACO in a pretty thorough way. However, the 6 steps are pretty valuable as well:

1. Understand Your Costs
2. Reduce Out-Migration from Your Network
3. Maximize Pay-for-Performance Reimbursement
4. Identify Early Opportunities for Utilization Reductions
5. Support Chronic Care and Disease Management
6. Predict Who Will Develop Issues

Is your healthcare organization ready for the changing reimbursement model and ACOs? If you’re not sure, read through this FREE whitepaper and you’ll have a better idea of what’s happening and how you want to position yourself and your organization in this changing reimbursement environment.

Patients Can Squawk, But We Have Little To Crow About Open Data

Posted on June 15, 2015 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

One of the biggest disappointments at this year’s Health Datapalooza (which I found disappointing overall) was the continued impasse presented to patients who, bolstered by the best thinking in health care as well as Federal laws and regulations, ask for health data stored about them by doctors and other institutions.

Activists such as Regina Holliday and e-Patient Dave proved years ago that giving patients information and involving them in decisions will save lives. The Society for Participatory Medicine enshrines the principle. But the best witnesses for patient empowerment are the thousands of anonymous patients, spouses, parents, and children quietly trundling folders with their own records through the halls of hospitals, building up more knowledge of their chronic conditions than any professional clinician possesses, and calmly but inflexibly insisting on being equal partners with those who treat them.

There were plenty of high-minded words at the Datapalooza about patient rights to data. It was recognized as a key element of patient empowerment (or “activation,” as the more timid speakers liked to say) as well as an aid to better care. An online petition backed by an impressive array of health reformers is collecting signatures (whom someone will presumably look at) and encourages activists to speak up about this topic on July 4. HHS announced that anyone denied access to data to which the law gives her a right can submit an informal report to noinformationblocking@cms.hhs.gov.

Although occasional mention was made of personal health records (PHRs), most of the constant discussion about interoperability stayed on the safe topic of provider-to-provider data exchange. Keeping data with health care providers leads to all sorts of contorted practices. For instance, patient matching and obtaining consent are some of the most difficult challenges facing health IT in the U.S., all caused by keeping data with providers instead of the patients themselves.

The industry’s slowness to appreciate patient-generated data is also frustrating. Certainly, the health IT field needs to do a lot more to prepare data for use: consumer device manufacturers must assure clinicians of the devices’ accuracy, and researchers need to provide useful analytics that clinicians can plug in to their electronic systems. Still, doctors are demonstrating a disappointing lack of creativity in the face of this revolutionary source of information. It’s all to easy to carp about accuracy (after all, lab tests have limited accuracy as well) or just to state that you don’t know what to do with the data.

I heard about recent progress at the UK’s National Health Service from Brian Ahier, who is the only person I know who can explain the nuances of extensions to FHIR resources while actively using both his laptop and his cell phone at the same time. Ahier heard at a UK-US Bootcamp before the Datapalooza that the NHS has given 97% of its patients access to their records.

But there’s a bit of a caution around that statistic: only one-fifth of the patients have taken advantage of this right. This doesn’t bother me. First of all, one-fifth of the population with access to their personal records would be a dizzying accomplishment for most countries, including the U.S. Second, few people need access to records until some major problem arises, such as the need to see a specialist. They probably feel relieved to know the records will be there when needed.

Another aspect of patient control over data is research. The standard researcher-centered model is seen as increasingly paternalistic, driving patients away. They’re not impressed with being told that some study will benefit people like them–they want to tell researchers what really matters to them as sufferers, and hear more about the study as it goes along. Researchers are frantic to reverse a situation where most studies fail simply because they can’t sign up enough subjects.

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) is one of the progressive institutions in health care who understand that giving patients more of a say will be increasingly important for signing up patients in the first place, as well doing research of value to them. Its PCORnet combines traditional research databases with databases maintained by patient advocacy groups. Each member network can create its own policies for getting consent, which allows researchers to bend with the needs of their research subjects.

OpenClinica, the open source clinical research platform, just announced the release of an app that may contribute to the goals of taking input from patients and binding them closer to the research endeavor.

Public health officials also recognize the sensibilities of the people they monitor. At a panel on data about low-income people, speakers stressed the importance of collecting data in a respectful way that doesn’t make people feel they’re being spied on or could be punished for their behavior.

Let’s talk a minute about health care costs, if only because doctors and insurers don’t want to. (Some doctors are prohibited by their employers from telling patients how much a recommended procedure will cost, supposedly because they don’t want costs to intrude on what should ideally be a clinical decision. This is changing with the increase in deductibles, but often the doctors don’t even know what the final cost will be after insurance.)

One app so admired by the Datapalooza team that they allowed the company to demonstrate its product on the main stage during keynote time was Sensentia. This product everybody is so impressed with takes in information from health plans to allow patients as well as the staff at health care providers to quickly find the health plan benefits for a procedure. (I recently covered another company doing similar work with insurance and costs.)

Sensentia is a neat product, I am willing to aver. It accepts natural language queries, crunches the data about health plans and insurers, and returns the actual health plan benefits for a treatment. Of course, I know the cost of flying from Boston to San Francisco after six clicks in my browser, even though the calculations that go into offering me a price are at least as complicated as those run by health plans. One may be shocked to hear that that current phone calls to an insurer cost $3-$10. This is the state of health care–it costs more than five bucks on average for a doctor just to find out how much it will cost to offer his own service.

A panel on patient-generated data reported more barriers than successes in getting doctors to work with data from patient devices and reports from everyday life. Another panel about improving quality measures culminated in the moderator admitting that more patients use Yelp than anything else to choose providers–and that it works pretty well for them.

For me that was the conference’s low point, and a moment of despairing cynicism that doesn’t reflect the mood of the conference or the health care field as a whole. Truly, if Yelp could solve our quality problems, we wouldn’t need a Datapalooza or the richness of data analysis it highlights. But I think reformers need more strategies to leap the hurdles we’re facing and implement the vision we all share.

If Employers Can’t Improve Individuals’ Health, How Can Accountable Care Organizations?

Posted on June 11, 2015 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

There seems to be a healthy competition among companies to pump up their staff’s participation in “wellness” programs. One recent poll of employers found that 60% offer incentives of some type for healthy behavior. But beyond anecdotal evidence, rigorous studies are casting doubt on the effectiveness of wellness programs. And that makes me wonder: will doctors face the same problems while trying to bend the health cost curve?

Talk to employers, and most will gush with enthusiasm over their wellness programs, which are spreading far and wide in the U.S. But at last week’s Health Privacy Summit, law professor Lindsay Wiley reviewed the literature and found a very different picture. A clinical study of a weight loss program found that the average weight loss it produced was…one pound. Other studies found that if people lost weight or stopped tobacco use to earn financial incentives, they “bounced back” and regained the weight or resumed smoking. Often, weight gains were more than what had been lost.

We should acknowledge that wellness programs take many forms, some showing more promise than others. General initiatives to put healthier food in cafeterias and vending machines seem benign. Incentives for employees to join a gym and get regular medical check-ups also seem successful in meeting those goals. But what health reformers really hope for–whether in the workplace or through clinical efforts such as Accountable Care Organizations–is thorough-going behavior change. Long-term lifestyle practices that reduce the incidence of diabetes, heart failure, etc. are what both employers and insurers seek in order to reduce the costs of health care plans. And that’s just where the wellness programs haven’t demonstrated results.

The panel in which Wiley participated also covered other weaknesses of fitness programs. Some 18% tie incentives to the output of fitness devices or other biomarkers, and nearly 50% intend to move in that direction in the future. But many consumer devices are inaccurate. Furthermore, many are easy to deceive by employees determined to game the system. There are even videos online that tell people how to manipulate results.

Concerns over privacy and discrimination run through these systems. Any device given by an employer to an employee–a Fitbit just as much as a laptop–remains the property of the employer, and so does the data on that device. Do we want employers to have unrestricted access to everything a device says about us? Walls keeping personal data in fitness programs away from human resource departments are insubstantial and easy to penetrate.

It’s disappointing that we lack firm evidence that wellness programs can lead to life-enhancing behavioral changes. But the lessons we learned from employees also have upsetting implications for the rest of the health care system. The whole premise of risk sharing (such as in ACOs) is that clinicians can persuade their patients to reject a lifetime of unhealthy eating, smoking, and sedentary habits. What if they can’t? Are clinicians being set up to fail? Bob Kocher suggested as much in a panel at the recent Health Datapalooza, when he pointed out that many patients have serious and multiple chronic conditions that are hard to turn around.

Some ACOs are demonstrating cost savings through low-hanging fruit, such as calling up patients to remind them to come to appointments or take their medications. These can make a big difference, but after we’ve exhausted the benefits of these simple interventions, how can we move to the next level of changing lifestyles?

I do have hope for lifestyle change. It will involve a lot more than crude incentives. It will require a clinician or other professional to form a trust relationship with a patient. It will require a lot of education. And technology can probably help. If integrated into a clear, individualized plan that the patient buys into, communications technologies and sensors can help patients stick to their commitments.

Health is also a community effort–a key point lost in the rush to wellness programs. Setting up such programs implies that each person is responsible for his or her own health. It moves the blame from social trends in food, transportation, air quality, etc. to individuals.

The workplace is where we spend an increasing number of our waking hours, so it makes sense to put the workplace in the spotlight of health care efforts. But we must let wellness programs whitewash employers’ responsibility for increasing stress, providing ergonomically destructive environments, or disrupting employees’ sleep. A recent Dilbert cartoon is relevant here. Let’s each take responsibility–as employers, as clinicians, as public health officials, and as individuals–for the things over which we have control.

The Dawn of The Community EMR

Posted on May 29, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

While many healthcare stakeholders would like to see clinical data shared freely, the models we have in place simply can’t get this done.

Take private HIEs, for example. Some of them have been quite successful at fostering data sharing between different parts of a health system, but the higher clinical functions aren’t integrated — just the data.

Another dead end comes when a health system uses a single EMR across its entire line of properties. That may integrate clinical workflow to some degree, but far too often, the different instances of the EMR can’t share data directly.

If healthcare is to transform itself, a new platform will be necessary which can be both the data-sharing and clinical tool needed for every healthcare player in a community. Consider the vision laid out by Forbes contributor Dave Chase:

Just as the previous wars impacted which countries would lead the world in prosperity, the “war” we are in will dictate the communities that get the lion’s share of the jobs (and thus prosperity). Smart economic development directors and mayors will stake their claim to be the place where healthcare gets reinvented.

In Chase’s column, he notes that companies like IBM have begun to base their decisions about where to locate new technology centers partly on how efficiently, effectively and affordably care can be delivered in that community. For example, the tech giant recently decided to locate 4,000 new jobs in Dubuque, Iowa after concluding that the region offered the best value for their healthcare dollar.

To compete with the Dubuques of the world, Chase says, communities will need to pool their existing healthcare spending — ideally $1B or more — and use it to transform how their entire region delivers care.

While Chase doesn’t mention this, one element which will be critical in building smart healthcare communities is an EMR that works as both a workflow and care coordination tool AND a platform for sharing data. I can’t imagine how entire communities can rebuild their care without sharing a single tool like this.

A few years ago I wrote about how the next generation of  EMRs would probably be architected as a platform with a stack of apps built over it that suit individual organizations. The idea doesn’t seem to have gained a lot of traction in the U.S. since 2012, but the approach is very much alive outside the country, with vendors like Australia’s Ocean Informatics selling this type of technology to government entities around the world. And maybe it can bring cities and regions together too.

For the short term, getting a community of providers to go all in on such an architecture doesn’t seem too likely. Instead, they’ll cling to ACO models which offer at least an illusion of independence. But when communities that offer good healthcare value start to steal their patients and corporate customers, they may think again.

Customizable EMRs Are Long Overdue

Posted on May 5, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

EMRs can be customized to some extent today, but not that much. Providers can create interfaces between their EMR and other platforms, such as PACS or laboratory information systems, but you can’t really take the guts of the thing apart. The reality is that the EMR vendor’s configuration shapes how providers do business, not the other way around.

This has been the state of affairs for so long that you don’t hear too much complaining about it, but health IT execs should really be raising a ruckus. While some hospitals might prefer to have all of their EMR’s major functions locked down before it gets integrated with other systems, others would surely prefer to build out their own EMR from widgetized components on a generic platform.

Actually, a friend recently introduced me to a company which is taking just this approach. Ocean Informatics, which has built an eHealth base on the openEHR platform, offers end users the chance to build not only an EMR application, but also use clinical modules including infection control, care support, decision support and advanced care management, and a mobile platform. It also offers compatible knowledge-based management modules, including clinical modeling tools and a clinical modeling manager.

It’s telling that the New South Wales, Australia-based open source vendor sells directly to governments, including Brazil, Norway and Slovenia. True, U.S. government is obviously responsible for VistA, the VA’s universally beloved open source EMR, but the Department of Defense is currently in the process of picking between Epic and Cerner to implement its $11B EMR update. Even VistA’s backers have thrown it under the bus, in other words.

Given the long-established propensity of commercial vendors to sell a hard-welded product, it seems unlikely that they’re going to switch to a modular design anytime soon.  Epic and Cerner largely sell completely-built cars with a few expensive options. Open source offers a chassis, doors, wheels, a custom interior you can style with alligator skin if you’d like, and plenty of free options, at a price you more or less choose. But it would apparently be too sensible to expect EMR vendors to provide the flexible, affordable option.

That being said, as health systems are increasingly forced to be all things to all people — managers of population health, risk-bearing ACOs, trackers of mobile health data, providers of virtual medicine and more — they’ll be forced to throw their weight behind a more flexible architecture. Buying an EMR “out of the box” simply won’t make sense.

When commercial vendors finally concede to the inevitable and turn out modular eHealth data tools, providers will finally be in a position to handle their new roles efficiently. It’s about time Epic and Cerner vendors got it done!

5 Lessons Providers Can Learn from Payers Infographic

Posted on May 1, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

ClinicSpectrum has been putting out a whole series of healthcare IT infographics. I recently saw one of them that really caught my eye as it came across my Twitter stream. The infographic offers 5 things providers can learn from payers. I’m sure that concept is a bit unsettling for some providers, but the list is quite intriguing:

  1. Leverage Data to Identify High-Risk Patients
  2. Help Patients Manage Their Meds
  3. Designate a Patient Engagement Advocate
  4. Build Partnerships
  5. Seek Interoperability Opportunities

What do you think about these ideas? Check out the full infographic below for more details:
5 Lessons Learned from Payers
Full Disclosure: ClinicSpectrum sponsors posts on Healthcare Scene.