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Karen DeSalvo Remains as National Coordinator of ONC Along with New Position

Posted on October 31, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In case you missed it, last week it was announced that Karen DeSalvo had been appointed Assistant Secretary of Health focused on Ebola by HHS Secretary Burwell. In that same announcement Jacob Reider also announced his departure from ONC.

While the news was true that DeSalvo was taking on a new role at HHS as Assistant Secretary of Health, ONC also published a blog post that DeSalvo would stay on as National Coordinator of Health IT as well:

Dr. DeSalvo will serve as Acting ASH while maintaining her leadership of ONC. Importantly, she will continue to work on high level policy issues at ONC, and ONC will follow the policy direction that she has set. She will remain the chair of the Health IT Policy Committee; she will continue to lead on the development and finalization of the Interoperability Roadmap; and she will remain involved in meaningful use policymaking. She will also continue to co-chair the HHS cross-departmental work on delivery system reform.

Lisa Lewis will provide day to day leadership at ONC. Lewis served as Acting Principal Deputy National Coordinator before Dr. DeSalvo joined ONC, so she has had experience with all parts of our work. She will lead our extremely talented and very strong team during Dr. DeSalvo’s deployment to the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health.

But most importantly, the team that is ONC is far more than one or two leaders. The team of ONC is personified in each and every individual – all part of a steady ship and a strong and important part of HHS’ path toward delivery system reform and overall health improvement.

Seems like an awkward arrangement if you ask me. DeSalvo will be providing high level leadership on policy direction, but Lisa Lewis will handle the day to day leadership. That job description for DeSalvo sounds like something an Assistant Secretary of Health might do and Lisa Lewis’ job sounds like something the National Coordinator would do.

I’m sure there’s more to this story. Maybe moving DeSalvo to Assistant Secretary was a way for ONC to save money and keep DeSalvo on board working on healthcare IT. If ONC’s budget gets cut, then HHS still has a way to pay for DeSalvo. Maybe that’s why Lisa Lewis can’t be promoted to full National Coordinator. Then again, maybe it’s like I mentioned when we first heard the DeSalvo news, DeSalvo is more of a public health person than she is a healthcare IT person.

The fact that DeSalvo is remaining as National Coordinator is interesting. However, I just came back from CHIME (healthcare CIO conference) where DeSalvo was scheduled as one of the plenary session speakers. However, she didn’t show and so the whole session was cancelled. I guess you could make the case that she’s got Ebola to deal with right now, but it also illustrates how health IT will be playing second fiddle for her going forward. Likely says something about the future of ONC.

Meaningful Use #HITsm Twitter Chat

Posted on October 17, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I had the honor today to host the #HITsm Twitter chat. For those not familiar with the #HITsm chat, you just join every Friday at Noon ET and watch the tweets that are sent using the #HITsm hashtag. There are usually 4-5 questions that are discussed over the hour chat. Since I was the host, I created the questions this week. I chose to focus the chat on the latest happenings with meaningful use. The transcript of the chat is found here.

I just took a look at the stats for the chat on Symplur and saw that the chat had 68 participants that sent out 474 tweets which had 3,196,079 impressions. You have to be a little careful looking at impressions since that’s potential impressions, but it’s still interesting to consider the possible reach of a chat.

There were some really interesting tweets during the chat, so here are the questions and a few (ok, more than a few since I got carried away) of my favorite tweets: Read more..

Purpose of EHR Incentive Program According to CMS

Posted on September 9, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

When I was reading through the EHR Certification flexibility final rule, I found a really interesting part of the rule (pg.49-50) that describes what CMS sees as the purpose of the HITECH act and all the money their spending on EHR software:

The entire overarching purpose of the EHR Incentive Program is to move providers towards advanced use of health IT to support reductions in cost, increased access, and improved outcomes for patients.

It’s been one of my pet peeves lately. People always come on this site or on social media and say “that goes against the purpose of the HITECH act.” I often would reply, “what is the purpose of the HITECH act?”

My problem with people’s comments about the purpose of all this spending on EHR software is that purpose changes depending on perspective. I’ve written before about the misalignment between “incentives” and “purpose.”

While I think the purpose for something changes based on whose perspective you’re talking about, I think it’s really important to know where CMS is coming from when it comes to the EHR incentive money and meaningful use. Now we know. They made it quite clear in the final rule.

How do you think the EHR incentive money is doing at achieving CMS’ purpose?

One Physician’s Experience Seeing an Ophthamalogist Pre and Post EHR

Posted on August 27, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I always love to hear doctor’s perspectives on EHR and how they’re impacting their day. You can be certain that they’ll lead with a long list of complaints. Many of the initial complaints are minor things that can be easily resolved with workflow or by a small enhancement by the EHR vendor. Once you get past the initial complaints, then you get to the heart of what they really think about the EHR software. I’ve had this experience hundreds of times and it’s always insightful.

However, this time a doctor shared something even more interesting. This was a doctor visiting another doctor as a patient. Rather than put words in his mouth, I’ll just share with you what he shared with me (EHR vendor name excluded since this could apply to many different EHR vendors):

I was in my ophthalmologist today. He is a really nice, busy doctor. He is in group practice and used to run his wing with one long time nurse with no hassles. He could previously see a patient in 10 min finish refraction, move from room to room and breeze through cases jotting what he needed to write down on one clean ophthalmology SOAP note. Since 2011 they have had EHR Vendor A. (because a consultant sold them on it and promised rewards from CMS)

Today, It took them a total of 1.5 hours to get my refraction, eye exam done. The workflow seemed to be in a complete disarray (remember this is an installed cloud based software since 2011, supposed to the be cream of the crap for Ophthalmology). What shocked me the most was that he now has 4 ladies doing inane things with EMR, trying to help him. I can also see why errors can creep in because he was reading out numbers for the assistant/ Nurse to enter into EHR Vendor A. Distraction fatigue, EMR ennui can cause errors of entry. So the cost of running crappy software far exceeds the physical costs / monthly service costs of the product. It amplifies personnel costs. It took the lady 20 minutes to take totally pointless history and do ROS!

I did not tell her I was a physician and she was clicking away to glory. I counted more than 50 clicks before anything of substance was even gathered. Based on the EMR prompts she made me do finger counting and asking me if I can see her face etc..>! I had clearly indicated to her that I just wanted a retinal exam and prescription for glasses because I wanted to buy new lenses and that I had not required change of prescription for glasses in 10 years!

Then I walk out with mydriatic in my eyes…and saw a hazy illusion of one of my ex-patients, a severe schizophrenic waiting for his turn to be checked in. He was talking about meeting Jesus and asked if I have had a “meeting Jesus moment” in my life.. I assured him I just did…

In those 1 hr and 45 min, the good doctor had seen just 4 patients and 6 more were still waiting impatiently on one arse looking irate, checking their iphones and smart watches …spreading anxiety.

I’m always torn on sharing these type of stories. I know that this doesn’t have to be the case since I know many EHR users who don’t have these issues. However, far too many of them do that it’s worth keeping this perspective in mind. Plus, regardless of how efficiently someone has incorporated the MU requirements, it’s had a huge impact on everyone that’s participating.

I guess it’s fair to say that the above ophthamologist doesn’t agree that meaningful use saves a doctor time.

Could Clinicians Create Better HIE Tools?

Posted on August 13, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Andy Oram.His post reminds me of when I asked “Is Full Healthcare Interoperability a Pipe Dream?

A tense and flustered discussion took place on Monday, August 11 during a routine meeting of the HIT Standards Committee Implementation Workgroup, a subcommittee set up by the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC), which takes responsibility for U.S. government efforts to support new IT initiatives in the health care field. The subject of their uncomfortable phone call was the interoperability of electronic health records (EHRs), the leading issue of health IT. A number of “user experience” reports from the field revealed that the situation is not good.

We have to look at the depth of the problem before hoping to shed light on a solution.

An interoperability showcase literally takes the center of the major health IT conference each year, HIMSS. When I have attended, they physically arranged their sessions around a large pavilion filled with booths and computer screens. But the material on display at the showcase is not the whiz-bang features and glossy displays found at most IT coventions (those appear on the exhibition floor at HIMSS), but just demonstrations of document exchange among EHR vendors.

The hoopla over interoperability at HIMSS suggests its importance to the health care industry. The ability to share coordination of care documents is the focus of current government incentives (Meaningful Use), anchoring Stage 2 and destined to be even more important (if Meaningful Use lasts) in Stage 3.

And for good reason: every time we see a specialist, or our parent moves from a hospital to a rehab facility, or our doctor even moves to another practice (an event that recently threw my wife’s medical records into exasperating limbo), we need record exchange. If we ever expect to track epidemics better or run analytics that can lower health case costs, interoperability will matter even more.

But take a look at extensive testing done by a team for the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, recently summarized in a posting by health IT expert Brian Ahier. When they dug into the documents being exchanged, researchers found that many vendors inserted the wrong codes for diagnoses or drugs, placed results in the wrong fields (leaving them inaccessible to recipients), and failed to include relevant data. You don’t have to be an XML programmer or standards expert to get the gist from a list of sample errors included with the study.

And that list covers only the problems found in the 19 organizations who showed enough politeness and concern for the public interest to submit samples–what about the many who ignored the researchers’ request?

A slightly different list of complaints came up at the HIT Standards Committee Implementation Workgroup meeting, although along similar lines. The participants in the call were concerned with errors, but also pointed out the woeful inadequacy of the EHR implementations in representing the complexities and variety of patient care. Some called for changes I find of questionable ethics (such as the ability to exclude certain information from the data exchange while leaving it in the doctor’s records) and complained that the documents exchanged were not easy for patients to read, a goal that was not part of the original requirements.

However, it’s worth pointing out that documents exchange would fall far short of true coordinated care, even if everything worked as the standards called for. Continuity of care documents, the most common format in current health information exchange, have only a superficial sliver of diagnoses, treatments, and other immediate concerns, but do not have space for patient histories. Data that patients can now collect, either through fitness devices or self-reporting, has no place to be recorded. This is why many health reformers call for adopting an entire new standard, FHIR, a suggestion recognized by the ONC as valid but postponed indefinitely because it’s such a big change. The failure to adopt current formats seems to become the justification for keeping on the same path.

Let’s take a step back. After all those standards, all those certifications, all those interoperability showcases, why does document exchange still fail?

The JAMIA article indicated that failure can be widely spread around. There are rarely villains in health care, only people pursuing business as usual when that is insufficient. Thus:

  • The Consolidated CDA standard itself could have been more precisely defined, indicating what to do for instance when values are missing from the record.

  • Certification tests can look deeper into documents, testing for instance that codes are recorded correctly. Although I don’t know why the interoperability showcase results don’t translate into real-world success, I would find it quite believable that vendors might focus on superficial goals (such as using the Direct protocols to exchange data) without determining whether that data is actually usable.

  • Meaningful Use requirements (already hundreds of pages long) could specify more details. One caller in the HIT Standards Committee session mentioned medication reconciliation as one such area.

The HIT Standards Committee agonized over whether to pursue broad goals, necessarily at a slow pace, or to seek a few achievable improvements in the process right away. In either case, what we have to look forward to is more meetings of committees, longer and more mind-numbing documents, heavier and heavier tests–infrastructure galore.

Meanwhile, the structure facilitating all this bureaucracy is crumbling. Many criticisms of Meaningful Use Stage 2 have been publicly aired–some during the HIT Standards Committee call–and Stage 3 now looks like a faint hope. Some journalists predict a doctor’s revolt. Instead of continuing on a path hated by everybody, including the people laying it out, maybe we need a new approach.

Software developers over the past couple decades have adopted a range of ways to involve the users of software in its design. Sometimes called agile or lean methodologies, these strategies roll out prototypes and even production systems for realistic testing. The strategies call for a whole retooling of the software development process, a change that would not come easily to slow-moving proprietary companies such as those dominating the EHR industry. But how would agile programming look in health care?

Instead of bringing a doctor in from time to time to explain what a clinical workflow looks like or to approve the screens put up by a product, clinicians would be actively designing the screens and the transitions between them as they work. They would discover what needs to be in front of a resident’s eyes as she enters the intensive care ward and what needs to be conveyed to the nurses’ station when an alarm goes off sixty feet away.

Clinicians can ensure that the information transferred is complete and holds value. They would not tolerate, as the products tested by the JAMIA team do, a document that reports a medication without including its dose, timing, and route of administration.

Not being software experts (for the most part), doctors can’t be expected to anticipate all problems, such as changes of data versions. They still need to work closely with standards experts and programmers.

It also should be mentioned that agile methods include rigorous testing, sometimes to the extent that programmers write tests before writing the code they are testing. So the process is by no means lax about programming errors and patient safety.

Finally, modern software teams maintain databases–often open to the users and even the general public–of reported errors. The health care field needs this kind of transparency. Clinicians need to be warned of possible problems with a software module.

What we’re talking about here is a design that creates a product intimately congruent with each site’s needs and workflow. The software is not imported into a clinical environment–much less imposed on one–but grows organically from it, as early developers of the VistA software at the Veterans Administration claimed to have done. Problems with document exchange would be caught immediately during such a process, and the programmers would work out a common format cooperatively–because that’s what the clinicians want them to do.

Karen DeSalvo’s Sit Down Interview with Shahid Shah at the Health Privacy Summit

Posted on August 7, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

At the 2014 Patient Privacy Summit, Shahid Shah had a “Fireside Chat” with Karen DeSalvo. The interview was really great because it was the first time that I’ve seen Karen DeSalvo talk in a more casual and less scripted setting. In the interview you learn a lot about the leader of ONC and what’s on her mind and how her and ONC plan to approach healthcare IT in the future. Of course, since it’s at the Patient Privacy Summit, there’s a specific emphasis on privacy, but they also cover a lot of other related topics. Enjoy!

Rep. Phil Gingrey Comes After Healthcare Interoperability and Epic in House Subcommittee

Posted on July 30, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

On July 17th, the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s subcommittee on Communications and Technology and Health (that’s a mouthful) held a hearing which you can see summarized here. Brought into question were the billions of dollars that have been spent on EHR without requiring that the EHR systems be interoperable.

In the meeting Rep. Phil Gingrey offered this comment, “It may be time for this committee to take a closer look at the practices of vendor companies in this space given the possibility that fraud may be perpetrated against the American taxpayer.”

At least Rep. Gingrey is a former physician, but I think he went way too far when he used the word fraud. I don’t think the fact that many EHR vendors don’t want to share their healthcare data is fraud. I imagine Rep. Gingrey would agree if he dug into the situation as well. However, it is worth discussing if the government should be spending billions of dollars on EHR software that can’t or in more cases won’t share data. Epic was called out specifically since their users have been paid such a huge portion of the EHR incentive money and Epic is notorious for not wanting to share data with other EHR even if Judy likes to claim otherwise.

The other discussion I’ve seen coming out related to this is the idea of de-certifying EHR vendors who don’t share data. I’m not sure the legality of this since the EHR certification went through the rule making process. Although, I imagine Congress could pass something to change what’s required with EHR certification. I’ve suggested that making interoperability the focus of EHR certification and the EHR incentive money is exactly what should be done. Although, I don’t have faith that the government could make the EHR Certification meaningful and so I’d rather see it gone. Just attach the money to what you want done.

I have wondered if a third party might be the right way to get vendors on board with EHR data sharing. I’d avoid the term certification, but some sort of tool that reports and promotes those EHR vendors who share data would be really valuable. It’s a tricky tight rope to walk though with a challenging business model until you build your credibility.

Tom Giannulli, CMIO at Kareo, offers an additional insight, “The problem of data isolationism is that it’s practiced by both the vendor and the enterprise. Both need to have clear incentives and disincentives to promote sharing.” It’s a great point. The EHR vendors aren’t the only problem when it comes to not sharing health data. The healthcare organizations themselves have been part of the problem as well. Although, I see that starting to change. If they don’t change, it seems the government’s ready to step in and make them change.

The Impact of Meaningful Use on EHR Development

Posted on July 22, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been getting a really strong response to my post calling for EHR vendors to expand their definition of customer service. Although, the title doesn’t do the post justice since I also talk about the impact of meaningful use on EHR development. Many of the readers of EMR and HIPAA (and if you don’t read EMR and HIPAA you should go subscribe to the emails now) have highlighted some important points I wanted to share with a broader audience.

First, Peggy Salvatore provides this insight about the impact of billions of dollars of EHR incentive money:

Almost 15 years ago, I wrote material for Intel (the computer chip company) based on research they were doing on physician workflow to make EHRs more usable. It was one of the early efforts to tackle this issue. I mention this to say that a lot of spade work has been done in this field but (in my humble opinion) government regulation has gotten in the way of software businesses trying to build electronic patient record products that work for the end users. Experience has shown time and again that customers will drive product improvements, and the same is true in the healthcare industry as in all others. The government has wasted tens of billions of dollars requiring systems be installed to meet timelines that were not realistic given the budgets and time available, or, to this point, to install products that were not really ready for prime time. Let the customers – in this case – the providers and the patients – drive development and you will end up with products that solve problems, not create them.

Brenden Holt, CEO of Holt Systems, offers this startling commentary on the EHR industry:

To me it is more clear. EHR Vendors, large and small and all points in between are currently working on the support nightmare (R&D and Direct Support) of Meaningful Use. It is the same when CCHIT was coming out, and not much different then the 100′s, if not 1000′s, of current copy cat products, all in one way or another a copy of the master Logician (GE).

Innovation does not bring in customers in the current environment. Government Adherence and more importantly relationships (Marketing and Sales) accomplish this. That is to say products need to be improved upon, but only to the extent of meeting the Government Regulatory Demands and the demands of the Large Organizations that are buying these things in bulk.

Innovation is available, but more then likely will take some time, as will thinking of how we document patient care as a whole, which is antequated methodology.

So as a CEO of a software company, one in the sea of many, I will say, innovation will happen when the phones get off the hook form highly demanding end users who want to make sure the MU is met and a Government Final Ruling that will get Government out of Development. Government is a terrible manufacture of innovation. One other major issue is that the end users don’t really want to pay for the innovation, if the EHR is working they are happy with the LOB application. That in and off itself is a issue, new features don’t translate to higher fees, the opposite is the case, less features in a Free Package can be much more attractive as both meet the basic LOB requirements.

We are the US, as much as the rest of the world tries, inguinity is what makes us great, our leading export, but in this vertical it is all but dead.

Catherine Huddle offered this insight about MU not just derailing EHR development innovation, but also possibly making things worse:

As for MU, as an EHR vendor I would agree that it and related government programs such as PQRS and PCMH have significantly derailed most other product development. Not only was Stage 2 a development “hog” but it brought in required changes that are often unnatural in a practice’s workflow and overly complicated.

MU has changed the goal from delivering what providers need to finding the best way to deliver MU to make it easiest for the providers and other staff – while still trying to make other improvements to the EHR. Unless the government repeals MU and the Medicare penalties the winning EHRs will be the ones that make MU as easy as possible.

While there’s plenty to be pessimistic about what’s happened with EHR, I’m still optimistic that we’ve passed through the meaningful use waters and that the future will bring forth opportunity for EHR development innovation. I’m hopeful (although not 100% certain) that the people in Washington have seen the toll that meaningful use has paid on the industry and they’ll lighten the load so that EHR vendors can start listening to end users instead of regulators.

The Meaningful Use Revolution

Posted on May 29, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Meaningful Use change is afoot in the world of EHR software. Many doctors, hospitals and EHR vendors were set up to step away from meaningful use stage 2. Many would have filed for an exception, others would have opted out of Medicare, and others would have just taken the penalties on the chin. It wouldn’t have been pretty and the people at CMS/ONC/HHS realized this was happening and had to do something to avoid the meaningful use stage 2 fall out. It wouldn’t have looked good to have billions of dollars of EHR incentive money sitting on the table with no one wanting it.

CMS decided to cover this wound with a bandaid fix that essentially delays meaningful use stage 2. There are still a lot of details of the proposed rule that are unclear. For example, can anyone attest to meaningful use stage 1 or is that option only available to those EHR vendors who aren’t ready for meaningful use stage 2? I’ve sent that question to CMS, but still haven’t gotten an answer.

Can you imagine the fallout if this is indeed the case? Basically they’d be saying, “All of you EHR vendors and organizations that were good and stayed up with the latest regulations are going to have to do more work and attest to the stricter MU2 criteria while we reward those EHR vendors and organizations that weren’t ready for MU2 with a simpler option.” Can you imagine the backlash that would occur if this is indeed what they decide to do? For that reason alone, I can’t imagine them keeping it that way. I think they have to just open up all the stages/certifications to anyone and everyone regardless of your EHR vendor’s readiness for MU2. (Note: I haven’t dug in to see if this is really a viable option or if a 2014 Certified EHR required changes to the software which make it so it can’t do both MU2 and MU1, but I think it should work out fine. For example, CQMs are tied to certification year and not MU stage. Update: Lynn Scheps from SRSSoft sent me the following update “Prior to the publication of the proposed rule, 2014 CEHRT was required for everyone who wanted to earn an incentive in 2014, so part of the certification requirements was that the EHR could be used for stage 1 or stage 2.”)

What’s even more important is that this is really just the start of the meaningful use revolution. I’ve pointed out my article to “blow up meaningful use” a few times before and that message is starting to be shared by other healthcare IT influencers. For example, the title of this post came from a post by EHR certification and Meaningful Use expert, Jim Tate’s post “You Say You Want a Meaningful Use Revolution” which was a great follow up to his “Meaningful Use Zombie Land” post.

It has become really clear that there’s a lot of confusion afoot. The thing people want most from government regulation is clarity and ICD-10 and now meaningful use are suffering from a lack of clarity. John Halamka summarizes this issue really well:

at some point we need to recognize that layering fixes on top of existing Meaningful Use regulation, some of which was written by CMS and some of which was written by ONC creates too much complexity. I have direct access to the authors of the regulations and email them on a daily basis. It’s getting to the point that even the authors cannot answer questions about the regulations because there are too many layers. I realize that we are reaching the end of the stimulus dollars, but as we head into Stage 3, I wonder if we can radically simplify the program, focusing on a few key policy goals such as interoperability, eliminating most of the existing certification requirements, and giving very clear direction to hospitals and professionals as to what must be done when.

I’m glad to see that John Halamka and myself are on the same page. We need to simplify meaningful use and focus on interoperability. That’s a simple and clear message that providers will understand. I was excited that EHR vendor athenahealth offered a similar view in their post “We Should Be Pushing Interoperability Boundaries, Not EHR Certification Timelines.”

Jim Tate has a good call to action to those who care about what’s happening with meaningful use. As of last night, only 8 comments had been made during the public comment period for the meaningful use stage 2 delay NPRM. You can submit your comments on the rule incredibly easy at the following link: http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=CMS-2014-0064-0002 I’ll be taking this post and my “blowing up meaningful use” and modifying them as my comments. I hope you’ll take the time and share your thoughts on the delay and the future of meaningful use.

TrueMU – When You Realize the MU Standards Are Too Low

Posted on May 15, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been writing about meaningful use a lot lately and the path forward for meaningful use. You may want to check out my post about Meaningful Use Being On the Ropes as one example. Although, even more important is this post about how meaningful use missed the patient engagement opportunity. Plus, my next post on LinkedIn is going to be about blowing up meaningful use.

In some ways, people are looking at what I write as a call to dumb down meaningful use. I don’t think that’s what I’m trying to do at all. I don’t think we should lower our standards of what we expect to get from EHR software. I just think that we should make it more meaningful. That’s why the example of patient engagement is an important one. A slight tweak to the meaningful use requirements and we’d actually get more patient engagement out of meaningful use for the same price.

I saw a great example of what I want to achieve in something called TrueMU by HelioMetrics. I think this line from their page says a lot:

“Healthcare providers are achieving Meaningful Use and realizing that standards are lower than the goals that they would like to set for their organizations.”

One of the problems with setting an expectation for people is that they then often go into default mode and just try to meet the expectation. This is happening with meaningful use. People see that as the standard they need to meet to be updated in their use of technology. If this artificial bar weren’t there, many of them would strive for even higher results.

The great part is that we can recognize this and fix it. We can think more strategically in how we’re using technology and achieve well beyond what’s defined in meaningful use. We just have to strategically make this part of our thinking.

I actually saw a lot of this happening with ICD-10. Many organizations saw ICD-10 and didn’t just choose to organize around trying to meet the ICD-10 standard. Instead, they created entire clinical documentation improvement (CDI) programs that would improve the quality of their documentation regardless of which standard they chose to use (or in this case chose to delay).

I wonder what results organizations are seeing when they stop focusing so much on meaningful use and instead focus on ways technology and EHR software can improve their organizations. If you have a story like this, I’d love to hear it.