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A Missing and Ignored Patient Narrative

Posted on February 24, 2017 I Written By

Healthcare as a human right. Physician Suicide Loss Survivor. Janae builds inbound social media sales and marketing plans for healthcare IT companies. twitter: @coherencemed

Sometimes I feel like the discussion of the patient narrative and open notes make me want to scream.  Step away from the new Health trend and back to improving access for every patient. Patient Experience and specifically Patient Narrative has been a theme of the HIMSS healthcare conference this year, from patient data and records to open notes and patient advocates. I have to admit- I love watching what people have done and what companies think of.

It reminds me of my German class on the Literature of the Holocaust. Our professor stood up and introduced the Holocaust as unique because the German Jews could read and write, so they had records. Without records, the voices of countless have been lost. Their voices died with them. Patient Narrative is similar. It’s teaching us so much about better workflow and records and getting better outcomes. Max Stroud gave a great presentation about her sister’s experience with lung cancer and managing patient records. They both admitted that it was difficult for them despite being well educated and knowledgeable about healthcare.

At HIMSS everyone looks at shiny new products with novelty pens and some alternate universe where it makes sense that we all need another plug in to our electronic medical record to really “make a difference” for patient health.

Right before HIMSS some of my late husband’s medical school classmates came to visit me and go to ongoing education in Park City. I asked them what they thought about patient involvement and one of them discussed the reality of emergency room care in impoverished areas.  They discussed losing faith in patients and how to deal with trauma patients. I remember the jokes about drug seekers. I told them about being at dinner in suburban Utah when an acquaintance casually mentioned we should do Molly on our way to yoga. The doctors I told laughed it off and said Molly really wasn’t that serious. Those narratives aren’t on our health records and the healthcare system is hemorrhaging cost with its lack of ability to treat them. Patients in some rural areas have access to care issues that telehealth doesn’t always bridge the gap for.

Is patient narrative just the next buzzword so we can distract ourselves from poverty and violence and human trafficking and corporate identity theft? Are we just talking louder to drown out the patients that healthcare is failing? Not every company or hospital group can afford to go to HIMSS. Participants have relatively good access to care and a lifestyle of relative privilege. Exhibitors are selling something and it certainly isn’t about the unglamorous parts of medicine.  The undocumented patient narrative will never climb the walls of privilege in a system with an entire industry of payor complexity and government regulation.  There were so many companies and even in telemedicine in rural areas and patient narrative presentations I didn’t see the patient stories like the ones I heard from my friends.

We are distracting ourselves from the complete lack of availability of care for economically disadvantaged patients by geeking out over the shiny data with our fellow zealots.  We can learn new things and find interesting new companies and many places are getting better, but we need a new record and involvement from a group that could never come to HIMSS. A narrative for the illiterate, uninformed, impoverished forgotten stories.

 

“We’re All Patients”

Posted on February 15, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Ever since the first #HITsm Chat of the year, I’ve been rolling around the idea of “We’re All Patients.” It was kicked off by what I think was probably a well-intentioned tweet by Andrey Ostrovsky, MD who asked to hear from patients:

This led someone to say “Aren’t we all patients at some point?” which got this response from Erin Gilmer along with a whole firestorm of other comments:

First, let’s applaud Dr. Ostrovsky for asking for the patient perspective and let’s not let the firestorm of defining patients overwhelm the fact that he wanted to hear from patients. That’s a dramatic shift from the past where patients might have been an afterthought. Dr. Ostrovsky was asking for patient input 11 minutes into a 1 hour chat. That’s a big improvement.

Second, if you look at the literal definition of patient, it says “a person receiving or registered to receive medical treatment.” By pure technical definition, it’s true that we’re all patients. Hard to imagine an adult that hasn’t received medical treatment at some point. However, when we say that “We’re all patients” it misses the point of why I think Erin Gilmer and Carolyn Thomas, who wrote the post that Erin linked to, said that we’re not all patients.

The reality is that even if we’ve all been to a doctor before, it doesn’t mean that we’re talking from our view as a patient. Many times when you go to a conference or are participating on a Twitter chat, you’re not having a discussion from your view as a patient. Often you’re talking from a work perspective or from a provider perspective and not from a patient perspective.

We know this happens a lot because you’ll often hear at conferences “This isn’t what I want personally, but this is my perspective on it.” Just because you have been a patient at one point doesn’t mean you’re speaking from that perspective at a conference, Twitter chat, blog post, etc. That’s true for me too when writing these blog posts. I’ll write from a wide variety of perspectives depending on the topic and post. It’s often not from the patient perspective.

Along with not necessarily speaking from your own patient perspective, it’s fair to say that just because you were a patient for some “injury or episode of illness”, it doesn’t mean you can share the perspective of a patient with a chronic condition. That’s a very different situation and one that largely has to be lived to fully comprehend.

The reality is that we need to involve as many different patient voices in our discussions as possible if we want to create solutions that benefit patients the most. On that, I think almost everyone agrees. Studies have shown that having a wide diversity of viewpoints, opinions, and perspectives provides a much better solution.

At the end of the day, we can all only share our own personal experience. I don’t want chronic patients talking for me. Chronic patients don’t want non-chronic patients talking for them. In fact, many chronic patients don’t want other chronic patients talking for them. etc etc etc

Instead, we should do everything we can to incorporate multiple perspectives into all the work we do. That’s where we’ll get the best results. We shouldn’t be so arrogant that we try to speak for someone else. However, we also shouldn’t demonize someone that tries to show empathy and raises the voice of another’s perspective either. The reality of complex problems is that we can all be right depending on perspective. So, let’s embrace as many perspectives as possible. We are all humans and most of us want healthcare to be better.

UPDATE: In a great discussion on Twitter with Erin Gilmer that was prompted by this post, Erin highlights a point that I didn’t cover well in the above commentary. She pointed out that many chronic patients’ voices have been marginalized in the past. I’d take it even a step further and say they’ve not only been marginalized but often ignored.

The reality is that the “healthy” patients have more voices making sure their (my) needs are heard. Chronic patients are smaller in number and so it’s more challenging to have their voices heard. Not to mention the last thing you want to do when you’re dealing with chronic illness is make your voice heard. However, in an impressive manner, many patients with debilitating illnesses do just that.

Erin also made a good point that we shouldn’t use “We are all patients” as an excuse to not involve expert patients at the table. We should definitely elevate their voices. As an advisor to many health IT startup companies and having written about thousands of companies, the challenge of incorporating all these voices and perspectives into a product is impossible. There are always gives and takes with limited resources. However, far too many don’t even make a sincere effort. That’s what’s sad.

This post is about elevating more patient voices from a wide variety of perspectives. That produces the best outcomes and discussions.

Are the Independent Doctors that Remain the Disruptors, the Tough Ones?

Posted on February 14, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’ve seen a dramatic shift in healthcare over the past 3-5 years. More and more small group and independent practices have been selling to much larger health systems. Plus, we’ve seen a consolidation of health systems as well. The move to larger and larger health organizations has happened and I’ve heard many predict that we’ll never go back.

While I know there are pressures that indicate this might be the case, I also wonder if the independent doctors and small group practices that remain are the real industry disruptors. Are they the tough ones that survived through the challenging healthcare environment?

With this thought in mind, I looked up the definition of “survival of the fittest”:

the continued existence of organisms that are best adapted to their environment, with the extinction of others, as a concept in the Darwinian theory of evolution.

Sounds a bit like the independent practice to me. Those independent practices that still exist have had to adapt to the changing healthcare world. The ones that remain are likely the most “fit”. We’ve also seen a lot of other independent practices go “extinct.”

Does this give us hope? On the one hand, I can see how those independent practices that remain are strong and can adapt well. I hope that they do it so well that they disrupt the whole healthcare system in a good way. I think that the health system is generally better with more independent practices. There are a certain ownership and patient kinship that happens with independent practices that is often missing in larger health systems that treat doctors like machines that need to produce certain numbers. It’s unfortunate for healthcare that this is being lost.

The thing that scares me most about this trend is that most of the independent doctors seem to be older doctors. Most of the younger doctors I know are just fine going to the large health systems. They don’t want to take on the risk of starting their own practice. If the younger generation isn’t willing to fight the independent practice fight, then independent practices will die.

How many doctors at large health systems have created real disruptive innovation? Not very many. That’s a scary thought that should all have us worried about the future of the independent doctor. Once it’s gone. It will be hard to see how it could come back.

If you don’t think this is a big deal. Think back to the last time you called your cable provider. There’s a reason they’re ranked the lowest in customer service. They have very little competition to force their hand. The loss of independent practices will mean very little competition for the big healthcare organizations. That’s a bad thing for all of us.

What do you think about independent practices? Are the ones that remain the strong ones? Will the independent practices survive in healthcare? I look forward to reading your thoughts on social media and in the comments.

The Quality Disconnect in Healthcare

Posted on February 2, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

There’s a big problem with the current healthcare model. There’s no real financial incentive to make sure you’re practicing the highest quality care possible. Doctors don’t get paid for quality. Patients don’t select a doctor based on the clinical quality of the doctor since the patient has no way of measuring a doctor’s clinical quality. The clinical quality a doctor provides doesn’t move the needle on her business.

Certainly, I’m not saying that doctors don’t provide quality care. It is also true that over time a doctor could grow a reputation as a poor quality doctor, but those are usually only the extreme cases that end up in court with big medical class action lawsuits.

What’s amazing is that most doctors can’t event evaluate the quality of another doctor. An orthopedic surgeon has no way to evaluate how well an ENT is doing quality wise. Doctors of the same specialty could evaluate a colleague’s clinical quality, but that doesn’t happen in the current system.

In a perfect world, we could create payments based on the quality of care a doctor provides. That makes a lot of sense and it’s what we do in a lot of other industries. We pay people who provide higher quality more than we pay people who provide lower quality. The problem in healthcare is that we don’t have any good way to measure quality.

While I believe there’s no good way to measure quality, that doesn’t mean that it won’t keep organizations from trying. In fact, that’s the basis of much of MACRA and the PQRS program before it. Same goes for Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). These are all efforts to evaluate the quality of care that’s being given and reimburse based on those quality indicators. Most doctors will tell you, that’s not a very good system if you want quality.

What’s screwed up about these quality measures is that they do nothing to actually lower the cost of healthcare. Poor quality care only represents a small portion of the massive premium we pay for healthcare in the US. The real costs come from outrageous drug pricing, pallative care, medical liability fears, and chronic conditions. Those are the four areas we should really be focusing our efforts on. The problem is that there’s not a lot of will in healthcare to address these challenging issues.

Slick Setups to Make Your Health Clinic’s Processes Simple

Posted on December 26, 2016 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Eileen O’Shanassy.

Medical technologies have come a long way since the days of manual appointment and check-in books, clip-board health information, gathering forms, and huge patient medical chart walls. Today, health clinics can enjoy far more simple and efficient processes with only a few changes to traditional methods of providing healthcare. Consider these following four easy-to-use and inexpensive technologies for your own health clinic.

Touchscreen Check-In Desks
You do not have to pay your front office staff any longer to check in patients. With this slick setup, a patient walks up to a desk that features a wide, large LCD monitor located inside the waiting room or near the receptionist’s desk. Instructions at this touchscreen check-in desk explain to the patient that they only need to tap the screen and then tap out the letters of their name using large virtual buttons to check themselves into your clinic. In some clinics that offer a variety of diagnostic and treatment services, patients also select a clinic area.

Health Information Kiosks
A lot of front office staff time is wasted every day providing patients with information that is already available on your clinic’s website or local affiliated health system’s site. With the slick setup of a health information kiosk, your front office staff can direct patients to the kiosk and return to other tasks. Beyond information about the services offered at your clinic and local healthcare systems, health information kiosks can also be set up to provide patients local news and weather conditions, health and safety tips, emergency alerts, and even details about local restaurants and businesses.

Identification Scanning Software
One of the slowest processes at a clinic with new patients is establishing a record that contains accurate personal and health information. Some healthcare systems now provide clinics with the ability to quickly access information about patients already in their medical data storage programs. This is done electronically via scanning software that can be used with a patient’s driver’s license, medical insurance card, or a special system healthcare card. This type of slick setup also makes it possible for your clinic to save important information about a patient who is entirely new to the area and share it with local specialists and their staff members in hospital and other facilities.

These are only a few examples of the types of slick setups that can make traditional processes in your health clinic simple. These and other cutting edge methods can also result in positive testimonials that attract more new patients to your clinic.

About Eileen O’Shanassy
Eileen O’Shanassy is a freelance writer and blogger based out of Flagstaff, AZ. She writes on a variety of topics and loves to research and write. She enjoys baking, biking, and kayaking. Check out her Twitter @eileenoshanassy. For more information on medical data storage and new technology check out Health Data Archiver.

The Importance of Communication in Healthcare and Thoughts on How To Do It Right

Posted on December 23, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A while back I had the chance to sit down with 4 healthcare experts to talk about healthcare communication. The panel consisted of:

  • Mandi Bishop, Chief Evangelist and Co-Founder of Aloha Health
  • Jessica Johnson, Director of Operations, Health Transformation at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Population Health Management
  • Ethan Bechtel, CEO at OhMD
  • Nathan Larson, Chief Experience Officer at ImagineCare
  • John Lynn, Founder of HealthcareScene.com

We had a wide ranging conversation about the importance of communication in healthcare and how to do it more effectively. This is a topic that should be of interest to all of us. Watch the full video conversation below:

Happy Holidays! What more could you want this holiday weekend than some great discussion from amazing people?

Online Reputation Management: Trending Topic or Industry Shift?

Posted on December 20, 2016 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Erica Johansen (@thegr8chalupa).

It seems that in healthcare this year online reputation management has taken center stage in conversations as consumers have a larger voice in the healthcare purchasing experience. Reviews, in particular, provide an interesting intersection point between social media technology and healthcare service. It is no surprise that there is pervasive, and exciting, conversation around this topic across the industry at conferences and online.

During the #HITsm chat on Friday, we had an excellent conversation about the value of online reputation management by physicians and other healthcare providers, and what lessons could be learned from one managing their own reputation online. During our chat, we asked the #HITsm community (as patients) about their behavior leaving and reading reviews as a part of their care selection process, as well as the role that social technology plays today in the patient experience. There were some exceptional insights during our conversation:

1. Should providers be interested in their online reputation? Does it matter? There was a resounding “yes” among attendees that attention should be given to a practice’s online brand.

2. As a patient, have you ever read a review after being referred to, or before selecting, a new physician? Perhaps unsuprisingly, most attendees supported trends in consumer behavior by reading reviews of physicians online.

3. Have you ever written an online review for a healthcare experience? If so, was it generally positive or negative? Suprisingly, the perspective of our attendees suggested that the consumption of reviews was more common than the creation of them. Most folks just won’t review unless they felt compelled by an experience that surpassed,or fell too short, of expectations.

4. Is there an expectation that providers (individual and/or organizational) respond to social media engagements by patients? Our attendees chimed in that maybe it isn’t so much that there is an expectation, but it could signifantly help a negative review or solidify a positive one.

5. What would a healthcare provider who is exceptional at managing their online reputation look like? Examples? Stellar examples shared illustrated folks that have harnessed the power of social media to augment their patient expierence and brand. For example:

Bonus. What lessons could be learned from managing your personal online reputation that could guide provider reputation management? This question took a different turn than I initially anticipated, however, for the better. Many insights shared included mentions to social platforms and meeting the patients where they are. There is so much opportunity for the next phase of healthcare social media as platforms begin to cater more to feature requests and uses based on consumer trends. (One great example of this is the Buy/Sell feature added to Facebook Groups.)

Additional thoughts? There were some flavorful insights shared during the chat that are worth an honorable mention. Enjoy these as “food for thought” until our next #HITsm chat!

I’d like to say a big “thank you” to all who participated in the last #HITsm chat (and are catching up after the fact)! You can view a recap of these tweets and the entire conversation here.

#HITsm will take a break for the next two weeks over the holidays, but we will resume in 2017 on Friday, January 6th with a headlining host Andy Slavitt (@ASlavitt) and the @CMSGov team (@AislingMcDL, @JessPKahn, @AndreyOstrovsky, @N_Brennan, @LisaBari, and @ThomasNOV).

How IRIS Puts the Real Triple Aim of Healthcare In Action

Posted on November 22, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I’ve been doing my Fall Healthcare IT Conference tour, I’ve had the chance to meet with hundreds of companies and thousands of people working to improve healthcare. While all this travel takes its toll, I also come away from all of these meetings invigorated by the quality of people and their desire to make healthcare better. That’s true almost across the board.

While most of the solutions I see are an evolution of something I’ve seen before, every once in a while I meet with a company that’s really impacting healthcare in a unique and interesting way. I found just such a case when I met with Patrick Cresson from IRIS – Intelligent Retinal Imaging Systems.

On face value, many might look at IRIS as just another diabetic retinopathy exam that’s been done by ophthalmologists forever. While this is true, what makes IRIS unique is that they have an FDA cleared exam that can be done in the primary care setting as opposed to being referred to an ophthalmologist. As Patrick pointed out to me, of all the diabetic screenings that need to be done for diabetic patients can be done in the primary care setting except for the retinal exam. At least that was the case before IRIS brought those exams to the primary care setting.

A look at the numbers is quite telling. There are 116 million patients with diabetes or pre-diabetes and that number is increasing every day. It’s estimated that 30 million diabetes patients get referred for an eye exam every year and 19 million diabetes patients do not get the annual retinal exam. There are plenty of reasons why this is the case, but it’s not hard to see why this happens. The same thing happens with referrals across healthcare. Diabetic patients that can’t tell any difference in their eyesight are unlikely to keep going back for an annual retinal exam. Who really wants to go to the pain of scheduling an appointment for what doesn’t seem to be an issue? So, they don’t.

The problem with this thinking is that diabetic retinopathy is asymptomatic. The only way to know if you’re heading for trouble is to have a retinal exam. The good news is that early detection can solve the problem and literally save diabetic patients’ eyesight. I know this first hand since it saved my grandfather’s eyesight.

This is the compelling story that IRIS tells as it pushes the retinal exam into the primary care setting where they can ensure patients are getting the early screenings they’ve so often missed in the past. This plays out in the numbers. Over the past 3 years, IRIS has performed 120,000 diabetic retinopathy exams which resulted in 56,000 patients identified with a pathology and 11,600 patients saved from potential blindness.

While this type of early detection can help healthcare organizations HEDIS compliance, I’m intrigued by the way IRIS straddles the fee for service and value based care worlds. I’ve seen very few models that get a primary care provider paid in the fee for service world, but also work to significantly lower the costs of healthcare in a value based care world. However, that’s exactly what you get from IRIS’s early screening exams.

What’s also fascinating to consider about IRIS is ophthalmologists’ response. It’s easy to see how many ophthalmologists could be afraid of diabetic retinal exams being done in the primary care setting and not in the ophthalmologists’ offices. That’s taking business away from them. While this is true, it’s also easy to see how an increase in retinal exams will drive more previously undiagnosed higher acuity exams, surgeries and interventions to ophthalmologists. Every ophthalmologist I know would much rather do a higher acuity surgery than a basic diabetic retinopathy exam. That’s the reality that IRIS creates since it’s an FDA cleared exam for diabetic retinopathy, but it’s only a screening tool for other eye diseases that require a full exam by an ophthalmologist.

Stories like IRIS are why I love blogging about healthcare IT. IRIS is changing healthcare as we know it by reducing healthcare costs, improving the patient experience, and getting doctors paid. That’s the real triple aim of healthcare in action.

Low – A Flo Rida Clinic Parody by ZDoggMD

Posted on October 28, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s time for a Fun Friday blog post. We don’t do it every Friday, but it’s fun to do on occasion. Our most popular Fun Fridays are whenever we feature the slightly funnier than placebo ZDoggMD. If you haven’t seen his videos, then you’re missing out. There are a ton of incredible ones. Today we’re going to highlight his latest parody of Flo Rida’s song Low. About a third the way into the video ZDoggMD really cranks it up and brings so many laughs.

I love how ZDoggMD is incorporating more and more doctors, nurses, and patients into his videos. I’m told they fly out to Las Vegas to take part in the tapings. Pretty cool. In the above video I also love the appearance of Tony Hsieh, CEO of Zappos. When he flashes the snapchat screen that says “I’m not sure what’s going on” it was the perfectly captured Tony Hsieh moment.

It’s always nice to bring a little humor to the challenges we face in healthcare.

Talking Health Transformation at the First Ever #ATAChat

Posted on October 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

telemedicine-twitter-chat-ata

I’m excited to be the first host of the newly launched #ATAChat organized by the American Academy of Telemedicine. I was lucky to run into Nathaniel Lacktman, an expert legal resource on telehealth, at a recent conference and from that meeting it led to the opportunity for Healthcare Scene to host the first American Telemedicine Association Twitter chat.

For the first Twitter chat, we left the conversation pretty open ended to cover a variety of innovations and transformations happening in healthcare and telehealth. I imagine future ATA Chats will dive deeper into the challenges of telehealth and healthcare transformation. If you have an interest in this area, come and share your insights in what you see happening and things you’re working on. Plus, you’ll be able to learn and connect with a wide variety of other healthcare innovators.

To join the #ATAChat on Twitter, just search for the #ATAChat hashtag on Wednesday, November 9, 2016 at 2 PM ET (11 AM PT). We’ll post the following 5 questions over the hour long chat:

  1. What role should technology play in healthcare and innovation?
  2. What are some of the most exciting ways providers are using virtual care to deliver services?
  3. How is telehealth changing the role of healthcare professionals’ “human touch”, and is it a good thing for patients?
  4. What are the biggest barriers to healthcare innovation and what solutions can we use to navigate them?
  5. What are the best opportunities and areas of unmet need for telehealth and virtual care in the next 3 years?

If you have an insight, question, or comment, just add #ATAChat to your tweets and everyone that’s following along will see it. We hope to make it a really interactive discussion. Plus, it’s always fun to meet new and interesting people that you can connect with on social media.

I look forward to seeing everyone at the #ACAChat on Wed November 9th!