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Telehealth and Its Contribution to Healthcare

Posted on December 6, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Juan Pablo Segura, Co-founder & President of Babyscripts.

In 2016, Americans spent roughly 18% of GDP on healthcare. Abetted by an aging population and continuously rising costs of care, CMS projects that this number will only grow over the next decade, increasing at an average of 5.6% annually. A crisis seems unavoidable: yet a huge fraction of this sum is lost to inefficient spending, which, when compared to other factors like an aging population, socio-economic challenges, or expensive new treatments, seems completely within the industry’s control to control and eliminate. A new OECD report calculates that approximately 20 cents out of every dollar spent on healthcare are considered unnecessary.

Could a simple reallocation of time and resources be enough to check the seemingly inevitable? The potential cost-savings of such a reallocation has policymakers and health professionals poised to revolutionize healthcare, as an industry that has long been resistant to innovation rejects antiquated models of care for more efficient methods that prioritize patient and provider alike.

A simple resolution that is already allowing more patients to receive necessary and important primary care is the extension of care teams through mid-level providers that cost a fraction of the salary of a full time physician. Physician’s Assistants and nurse practitioners are being granted more autonomy, as State governments remove restrictions while enacting legislation that grants PAs and other personnel full prescriptive authority. Allowing these lower cost health professionals to perform routine, primary care instead of more expensive, specialized physicians, immediately eliminates inefficiencies in the system and increases access to care to patients in the midst of a physician shortage.

These changes in personnel are necessary, but not enough to respond to the changing face of care. The answer to more affordable care is in leveraging existing technologies.

The rapid adoption of synchronous, video visits between patients and providers across the country is an exciting example of how technology can eliminate waste and help the system reallocate its resources. Recognizing its potential to decrease the administrative demands on providers and facilitate access to patients in remote areas, the industry has placed great emphasis on this aspect of telemedicine, even to the extent of providing incentives to providers for facilitating care through video.

But far from being the solution, video visits just scratch the surface of technology’s potential contributions to affordable healthcare, and in fact are the least beneficial of the efficiencies that technology is poised to provide. Some studies have indicated that when video visits are included in a medical plan, patients tend to treat them as an add-on, rather than a replacement for traditional in-person care. Furthermore, without integrated systems, video visits function much as if a patient were receiving all medical care at the ER, producing a fractured and incomplete medical record.

The dialogue must be centered on those innovations that revolutionize the way we approach healthcare, not simply attempt to translate an outdated system into a world that has evolved past it.

The conversation needs to focus on the most relevant, effective and impactful technology tools to affect the ultimate cost of care. Already, forward thinking providers like Greenville Health are creating end to end “virtual strategies” that rely heavily on remote monitoring apps and asynchronous visits that have the capacity to identify the problems before they begin. Beyond the immediate benefit of proper allocation of time and resources, the ultimate goal of technological innovation in healthcare has always been the opportunity to identify potential problems and create the necessary infrastructure to allow our healthcare system to focus on preventative health.

Of the healthcare apps currently in the digital marketplace, some have been shown not only to decrease costs but to be as successful as medication in preventing complications, anticipating a future of decreased prescription costs. Remote monitoring programs that use IOT devices like blood pressure cuffs and weight scales have reduced the cost of prenatal care by 40% while detecting problems like preeclampsia and other high-risk illnesses. Yet there is very little coding or direct payer incentive for deploying preventative technologies like that provided for video visits.

And why not? Video visits are a move in the right direction, but the decrease to cost of care does not have to come at the expense of the client/physician relationship or integrated care. Instead, effective technology should cut costs while assuring patient and provider of the continuity and efficacy of care.

The conversation amongst policymakers needs to expand to include these more revolutionary aspects of digital health, rewarding those who are effectively reducing costs without compromising care. Digital health will not be confined to a narrow vision, but it is up to the government and the industry to expedite the future of healthcare.

About Juan Pablo Segura
Juan Pablo Segura is Co-founder & President of Babyscripts, a Washington, DC-based technology company that builds mobile and digital tools to empower women to have better pregnancies. Juan Pablo was named a Wireless Life Saver by CTIA and a health care Transformer by the Startup Health Academy in New York City.

Patients May like Their Physician…But That Doesn’t Mean They’ll Stay

Posted on November 8, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Jim Higgins, Founder & CEO at Solutionreach. You can follow him on twitter: @higgs77

Medical providers are dealing with a more impatient, demanding patient base than ever before. Armed with research, awareness, and a plethora of online data, today’s consumer patients treat their search for a medical provider in much the same way they would any purchasing decision.

They weigh the pros and cons of each provider, evaluating how each practice would fit their lifestyle and then make a decision.

Unfortunately, that is not the end of the process. Even after a patient chooses a specific practice, they are not even close to becoming loyal patients.

Smooth processes trump provider loyalty

It often surprises medical practices to discover that retaining patients has less and less to do with the medical competence of the office. Today, it may not be enough for a patient to simply like their physician.

For busy patients, the road to loyalty goes directly through the processes and procedures of an office. Studies back this up. Consider this. Sixty-one percent of patients say they are willing to visit an urgent care clinic instead of their primary care clinic for non-urgent issues. This is true regardless of whether they like their primary care provider or not.

The #1 reason they prefer urgent care? Because of difficulty scheduling appointments and long wait times with a primary care physician. According to a study by Merrit Hawkins, wait times have increased by 30 percent since 2014. Patients have noticed.

These long wait times were also noted as one of the key reasons patients will switch practices according to respondents of the Patient Provider Relationship study:

  • Sixty-eight percent say that wait times in their medical office are not reasonable.
  • Sixty-six percent say that they have to wait too long to schedule an appointment.
  • Sixty-eight percent say they feel like messages are not returned in a timely manner.

Reducing wait times is crucial to patient retention

In order to increase patient retention levels, practices must find ways to offset the frustration of long wait times. Consider implementing these three methods of wait-time optimization.

  1. Self-scheduling. It is common for doctors to have calendars booked out months in advance. This can cause patient frustration and turnover. When practices allow patients to schedule themselves, however, this frustration is minimized. With self-scheduling, they can quickly see which doctors are available and when. Since 41 percent of patients would be willing to see another doctor in the practice to reduce their wait, this is a simple way to optimize your scheduling without sacrificing patient experience.
  2. Communication. There are times when long waits are unavoidable. This is where communication is key. Studies show that 80 percent of patients would be less frustrated if they were kept aware of the issue. When you know an appointment is going to be delayed, send out an email or text letting them know.
  3. Texting. If your patient has a question, texting can save them a lot of time. Research shows that it takes just 4 seconds to send the average text message. Compare that to the several minutes it takes to make a phone call. Factor in playing phone tag and you’ve saved both time and headaches. Unfortunately, the Patient-Provider Relationship Study found that while 73 percent of patients would like to be able to be able to send a text message to their doctor’s office, just 15 percent of practices have that ability. Practices in that 15 percent will stand out from their competitors.

In this era of consumer-driven behavior, practices need to prioritize ways to create smooth processes for patients. Medical offices should look at ways to optimize their processes to reduce frustration and wait times for patients.

Solutionreach is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. As the leading provider of patient relationship management solutions, Solutionreach is dedicated to helping practices improve the patient experience while saving time for providers and staff. Learn more about the Patient-Provider relationship survey here.

Ensuring Patient Comprehension

Posted on October 31, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Erin Gilmer recently posted a very interesting “Literacy Comprehension” form from an Endoscopy Center. Check out the form below:

You have to applaud this effort by a practice to make sure that the patients understand the information being presented to them as part of the procedure. The cynic might argue that the clinic is just trying to cover their backside. However, Erin asks the more important question, “Is this an effective way to prove comprehension?”

I do like how this can open the patient up to the option to have a discussion about something they don’t understand. It sends a good message to the patients in that regard which could make the patient feel more appreciated and help the patient feel comfortable asking a question about something they would have just previously kept to themselves.

However, for those that aren’t literate, I don’t think this form will do much. I expect that many patients that aren’t literate likely get into a zone where they just sign whatever the medical practice gives them regardless of what it is and regardless of whether they can read it or not.

I think the idea is a good one but could be executed better. Could this be done verbally and have a bigger impact? What other ideas have you seen implemented? Do you like this approach or are their better ways to accomplish it?

Bridging the Gap between What Patients Want and What Practices Offer

Posted on October 11, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Jim Higgins, Founder & CEO at Solutionreach. You can follow him on twitter: @higgs77

With the growing pressure of increasingly complex healthcare regulations, malpractice litigation, and expectations of quality care, modern-day medical practices face an unprecedented set of challenges when it comes to running a successful practice.

Throw in marketing, billing, scheduling, appointment reminders, and all of the other day-to-day aspects of running a practice, and many practices are maxed out.

But while practices are busy juggling this growing number of expectations, patient satisfaction has been falling.

Today’s patients have become accustomed to a buyer-centered approach in nearly every industry. Likewise, they expect the same from their healthcare professionals. Unfortunately, many practices have been slow to adapt.

The Patient-Provider Relationship Study recently found that the average medical provider with a panel of 2,000 patients could lose around 700 patients in the next couple of years. A large number of these patients are leaving due to dissatisfaction with their experience at a practice.

Much of the growing dissatisfaction from patients is in relation to practices not offering the services and technology that they have come to expect. Experts warn that the medical field lags behind every other industry in the adoption of new technology. This inevitably leads to a gap between what patients expect from their medical practice and what practices actually offer.

Perform a thorough gap assessment

According to the study, 60 percent of patients are not completely satisfied with practice logistics such as appointment scheduling, reminders, and communication. In fact, logistics is the area in which patients have the greatest overall dissatisfaction with their practice.

It is important that practices both understand what patients want the most and then complete an assessment to determine areas that need improvement.

The Patient-Provider Relationship Study found that patients want many additional touchpoints, including:

  • Text appointment reminders
  • Appointment alerts by email
  • Appointment alerts by text
  • Being able to text message back and forth with the practice
  • Allowing patients to initiate text messages to the practice

Unfortunately, a large number of practices do not offer these services. The following chart highlights how many practices offer each of these services, compared to a goal of 100 percent implementation.

With the majority of patients expressing dissatisfaction with the logistics offered by their medical practice, it is clear that changes need to be made. This requires the implementation of new, or more robust, technology.

Implement technology without distress

Practices want to be more efficient and provide an improved patient experience, but the fear of making the wrong choices around new technology can hold them back. Each of the aforementioned services have the potential to either improve processes and efficiency or make them more difficult. The outcome depends on the practice’s ability to carefully assess each piece of technology before moving forward.

There are steps you can take to eliminate some of the risk when choosing a new technology. One of the most important things you can do is to ask right questions before and during the selection process. Consider the following:

  1. Who will be impacted by this change?
  2. How will the technology affect your current workflow?
  3. Is the technology compatible with your current systems?
  4. Will the technology meet current and future compliance requirements?
  5. What will the implementation process include?
  6. How have other offices felt about the technology?
  7. What type of on-going customer service and training does the company offer?

When it comes to achieving high levels of patient satisfaction, it is critical that practices bridge the gap between what patients want and what is currently being offered. After performing a gap assessment and carefully vetting available technology, practices will be able to move forward in a way that will reduce the load on employees, create meaningful improvements in the practice, and boost the bottom line.

Solutionreach is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. As the leading provider of patient relationship management solutions, Solutionreach is dedicated to helping practices improve the patient experience while saving time for providers and staff. Learn more about the Patient-Provider relationship survey here.

MGMA17 Day 2 – The Future of Patient Engagement Looks Bright

Posted on October 10, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Day 2 at MGMA17 started very early for exhibitors when the doors to the exhibit hall opened sharply at 6:30am Pacific Time. It was clear that MGMA organizers were catering to the early-rising-east-coast contingent of attendees. Thankfully there was a warm breakfast with plenty of caffeine options available.

The early exhibit hours provided a unique opportunity to slowly browse the floor and read booth signage fully without being blocked by fellow attendees walking in the aisles…and in some cases without being blocked by company representatives in the booth itself.

As I walked around the exhibits I began to notice that the words “Patient Engagement” appeared frequently. EHR companies, revenue cycle management companies, call center providers and even HR consultants had this nebulous term emblazoned on their booth properties. I thought it would be interesting to ask a few of these companies how they interpreted patient engagement and how they saw it evolving over the next three years.

Josh Weiner, Chief Operating Officer at SolutionReach, was quick to say “Patient Engagement is more than having a portal on your EHR”. He believed that the key to engaging patients was communicating with them in an easy, convenient manner. “For SolutionReach, this means texting. Everyone knows how to text and it’s just so simple to use. A few years ago texting patients was just one-way. Doctors would send a text to a patient and that would be it. More recently companies like SolutionReach introduced the ability for healthcare providers to conduct one-to-one conversations with patients via text. We call it SR Conversations and we have over 4,000 clients using it.”

In the future, Weiner predicted that providers and patients would continue to use SMS texting as the primary means of patient engagement. The key difference is that instead of just sending text messages back and forth we would be sending mini-text-applications back and forth. He cited the example of the latest iOS upgrade which now featured the ability to send a map, a Starbucks gift card and other such applications within an SMS message. He foresaw a day when we will have the ability to send a prescription, a lab test, a referral and an appointment schedule to a patient via SMS.

At BinaryFountain, a company that makes a platform that consolidate patient feedback from multiple social media sources as well as from HCAHPS surveys and allows providers to publish positive comments made in those medium as online reviews, they define patient engagement through the lens of reputation management. Engaged patients mean they are more likely to provide a positive comment and if they provide a positive comment, they are more likely to rate the doctor/practice/hospital highly. That, in turn, leads to a better reputation which attracts patients who are more likely to be engaged in their care. In the future, the company believes that quantitative measures for patient engagement will be developed and that these measures will be used in a similar way that the 5-star rating system is used today.

West Communications is a provider of telephony solutions to a broad range of industries. In healthcare, West offers a number of patient communication tools that engage patients via phone, email, and text. They define patient engagement as the degree to which a patient is active in and adherent to their care plan. They saw a bright future for patient engagement – especially as technologies from other industries are adapted to healthcare. The West team, for example, has been working on adding AI-based intelligent IVR capabilities to their healthcare IVR solutions so that inbound calls from patients can be automatically triaged quickly based on needs.

At Stericycle Communication Solutions, Sarah Bennight, Healthcare Strategist, defined patient engagement as getting patients to be active throughout their care journey. “Patient engagement creates trust between patients and providers. It’s more than just pushing information out to patients, it’s true two-way conversations that are relevant to where the patients are in that moment. It means providing patients with useful calls to action – clicking on a button to book their next appointment, download information or connect with the right clinician.”

Bennight sees a patient engagement future that includes new forms of communication through platforms like Snapchat and iMessage. “The younger generation communicates in different ways. They’ve gone beyond voice, text, and email. Healthcare will need to adapt to these new forms of communication. We may even need to develop a healthcare nomenclature for communicating information via emoji’s and giphies.”

Finally, Varun Hippalgaonkar, Senior Vice President of Growth at HealthGrid suggested that patient engagement is the sum total of all the interactions that a patient has with their healthcare providers including face-to-face visits, phone calls, text messages, telemedicine, and emails. The key for Hippalgaonkar was not to try and engage patients across all channels, but rather to zero in on the communication modalities that each individual patient preferred.

“HealthGrid is striving to be the single communication platform for all pre-, day of and post- visit patient interactions. Our platform will provide a consistent patient experience in the communication channel or channels that patients prefer to use. We mine our own interaction data to determine the best way to interact with patients. For example, the analysis of past interactions may reveal that John Smith responds better during weekday mornings via text message and seems to prefer phone calls at night. When a hospital or a practice has the information they want to share with John, they simply put the content in our system and we handle how it will be delivered to him based on his known response patterns.”

Down the road, Hippalgaonkar saw patients interacting with AI-powered chat bots that were so sophisticated that patients would feel they were interacting with a person. These bots would work across the different communication channels providing a consistent experience no matter what modality the patient elected to use.

Hippalgaonkar summed up by saying: “In the end it’s all about motivating patients to make changes to their health or put another way, to engage in their health. We can only achieve this if we communicate with patients in a way that compels them to take action. As an industry, we need to build technologies and processes that takes things down to the individual patient level. We need to use AI, machine learning, personalization and deliver meaningful information to patients so that they are compelled to make a change.”

From these conversations, it was clear that patient engagement meant different things to different people. Yet everyone agreed healthcare needed more engagement and more involvement from patients in order to deliver on the promise of better health at lower cost. Motivating patients to become more involved is not going to be easy, but if the MGMA17 exhibit hall is representative of HealthIT overall, the future is certainly bright for patient engagement.

Full Disclosure: Solution Reach and Stericycle Communication Solutions are both sponsors of Healthcare Scene.

#SHSMD17 in 17 Tweets – Perspectives on Healthcare Marketing

Posted on October 4, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

The AHA’s Society for Healthcare Strategists and Marketing Development recently held its annual conference – SHSMD17 – in Orlando Florida. For three full days, 1,500 attendees shared ideas and traded insights on the latest trends healthcare marketing trends. The 60+ concurrent sessions covered a variety of topics including:

  • Developing online support groups for patients
  • Successful blog-driven content marketing
  • Media relationships
  • Communication and preparedness during a crisis
  • Chatbots
  • Consumerism

For daily summaries of SHSMD17, check out these Day 1, Day 2 and Day 3 blogs. As well see this blog on the release of SHSMD’s Bridging Worlds 2.0 report during the conference.

If I had to pick an overall theme for SHSMD17 it would have to be “perspective”. The four keynote speakers and many of the session presenters urged the audience to break out of our boxes in order to truly “see” healthcare from multiple viewpoints – including patients, clinicians and government. Only by putting ourselves into the shoes of healthcare’s various stakeholders can we create effective marketing campaigns and hospital programs.

During the conference, there was a lot of live-tweeting and there were many conversations happening via social media with people who were not in attendance. I thought it would be fun to highlight 17 tweets from SHSMD17.

Here goes.

Fun SHSMD17 Tweets

 

CareCloud + First Data Partnership a Hopeful Sign of Things to Come

Posted on October 3, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Earlier today, CareCloud and First Data (NYSE: FDC) announced they have partnered to create Breeze, a new patient experience management platform. Built on First Data’s Clover infrastructure, Breeze’s mobile, web and kiosk based applications provide consumer-style convenience to patients while helping practices streamline workflows. Through Breeze, CareCloud customers will be able to offer patients the ability to book appointments, fill out medical forms, check-in remotely and manage payments from their phones.

“We looked outside of healthcare for inspiration on what patients want” says Juan Molina, VP of Strategy and Business Development at CareCloud. “What we found was that consumer interactions have changed from in-person transactions to online experiences. We wanted to give patients the same experience in healthcare that they are used to from the rest of the world through apps like Uber, OpenTable and Amazon.”

At a Breeze-enabled CareCloud practice, the “happy path” patient interaction would be as follows:

  • Patient is invited to Breeze by their doctor’s office through a text with a specific link
  • Patient downloads the Breeze app to their phone through that link
  • Patient books an appointment through the app
  • Prior to the appointment date, patient is reminded by the app to fill in paperwork which could include: demographic information, consent forms and insurance data (photo of insurance cards can be uploaded)
  • On the day of the appointment, patient can check in remotely
  • After the appointment, patient can manage payments through the app (credit card on file, Apple Pay, Android Pay or other options made available by the practice)

By automating parts of the appointment booking, patient intake and payment workflows, Breeze reduces the workload on front-line staff.

“From the moment that the patient walks in, they are happier, and my staff no longer has to spend time dealing with packets of registration papers. Our front office can now focus on patient care and delivering the excellent level of service that they deserve,” says Barbara Arbide, a practice manager who is using Breeze in her allergy practice in Coral Gables, FL.

The CareCloud and First Data partnership is encouraging. For many years now, EHR vendors have tried to build their own walled gardens where customers and partner companies could play nicely together. Unfortunately, a lack of useful application interfaces (APIs) and a high cost of entry for potential partners, resulted in a barren courtyard with high walls (aka a prison) for customers rather than a thriving garden.

By partnering with First Data, CareCloud is showing that it is a company willing to break from traditional EHR vendor thinking. They have opted to play in someone else’s ecosystem in order to bring more functionality to their customers at a faster pace.

First Data’s Clover platform already has hundreds of useful business apps built for it including employee scheduling tools, customer loyalty apps, inventory management systems and survey programs. By basing Breeze on Clover, CareCloud’s customers have access to this rich library of apps.

“After just two days of using Breeze,” Molina told EMRandEHR.com, “A practice in southern Georgia went and downloaded a time-and-attendance app for their system from the Clover library. This replaced a cumbersome Excel spreadsheet that they had been using. This helped the practice become more efficient and sophisticated.”

Could CareCloud have developed a time-and-attendance app on their own? I’m sure they could have. Would it have been a wise investment of their time? Probably not. Would it have been delivered in two days? Absolutely not. Although in theory CareCloud is forgoing potential revenue, their partnership with First Data allows them to focus on what truly matters – improving the clinical and practice operations side of their own platform.

What’s next for Breeze? According to Molina: “Patient expectations are only going to climb higher and higher as more and more consumer apps bring more sophistication into their lives. We have to pay attention to what’s happening outside of healthcare – how people are booking tickets online, speaking to Alexa, tracking their fitness with wearables and getting food from uberEats. Patients don’t want to be transported back to the 1980s when they come to a physician office where you have to fill out forms on a clipboard. With Breeze we have a flexible platform that can continue to grow and expand. We will be able to build new patient-centric applications faster, that help our clients with more and more of their workflows.”

Hopefully this new partnership is a sign of things to come.

How Does Age Impact Patient Satisfaction?

Posted on September 13, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Jim Higgins, Founder & CEO at Solutionreach. You can follow him on twitter: @higgs77

If you walked into the average medical practice on any given day, you would see patients ranging in age from 1 to 101. Understanding and adapting to the needs of such a diverse group of patients is challenging. Many offices are struggling with this, and patient dissatisfaction is at an all-time high.

In the Patient-Provider Relationship Study, recently commissioned by Solutionreach, researchers found that one in three patients are likely to switch practices within the next couple of years.

The question is why. What is happening to patient loyalty? And more importantly—what can medical offices do to stem the tide?

In addition to studying patient switching preferences, the study also examined the dynamics of generational satisfaction and preferences, posing the following questions:

  • What impact does age have on patient satisfaction and retention?
  • What role does it play in patient loyalty?
  • Which services create satisfaction for the different generations?

A Closer Look at How Age Impacts Patient Satisfaction

To better understand how age impacts patient retention, it is important to take a closer look at the results from each of the key age groups.

  1. Millennials—Satisfaction levels among the youngest cohort were dismal. Millennials are the least satisfied with all aspects of the practice, including the doctor, office team, and practice logistics. In fact, a stunning 81 percent say that they are not completely satisfied with their medical office. Unsurprisingly, millennials are also extremely likely to switch practices in the upcoming years. Nearly half—46 percent—of millennials say they will probably move on to a new medical practice in the next couple of years.
  2. Gen X—The satisfaction levels of Gen Xers lies somewhere between millennials and boomers. The numbers are still concerning, however. Two out of three Gen Xers are not satisfied with their medical office. Around 35 percent say they will probably change practices in the near future.
  3. Baby Boomers—While millennials are three times more likely to switch providers than boomers, there are still a significant number of unhappy patients in this demographic. Nearly 60 percent of boomers are not completely satisfied with their medical office and one in five will switch practices in the near future.

Regardless Of Age—Technology Boosts Patient Satisfaction

It’s easy to assume that everyone who moves on to a new practice does so because they move or change insurance providers. The truth is a growing number are switching for other reasons.

Why are they so dissatisfied?

Picture the average patient in your mind. What characteristics about them have changed over the past few decades?

The biggest thing is that we have become unbelievably attached to technology—it’s rare to find any of us without either a phone, tablet, or computer. We use technology for virtually everything.

This is the area in which medical practices are struggling to keep up. Solutionreach’s study found that this is the exact category in which patients are least satisfied with their medical office. This is true regardless of age. Millennials, Gen Xers, and baby boomers all want more technology.

The biggest gap between what patients want and what medical practices offer is around texting. Texting has been the most used form of communication for over a decade now, but according to the survey less than 30 percent of practices offer any texting options. Today, every office should be able to:

  • Send a text—94 percent of millennials and 87 percent of Gen Xers want to receive texts from your office. But it’s not just the “youngsters.” Two out of three baby boomers also want you to text them.
  • Receive a text—While some offices have started sending out reminder texts, far fewer actually have the ability to have a patient initiate text messaging through the office number. Eighty-seven percent of millennials and seventy-nine percent of Gen Xers say that they want to be able to text their doctor. Once again, boomers are also on board—58 percent say they want to send a text to their medical practice.

Today’s patient lives are completely intertwined with technology. Medical practices will need to adapt to using technology in new ways to connect with patients or risk losing one in three patients in the coming two years.

Solutionreach is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. As the leading provider of patient relationship management solutions, Solutionreach is dedicated to helping practices improve the patient experience while saving time for providers and staff. Learn more about the Patient-Provider relationship survey here.

Patients Frustrated with Poor Practice Logistics

Posted on August 9, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Jim Higgins, Founder & CEO at Solutionreach. You can follow him on twitter: @higgs77

A new study shows that patients have just about had it with poor practice logistics—things like communication, scheduling, and accessibility. There have certainly been signs this was coming for quite some time, but now the data shows patients really are getting fed up with not having some of the same basic tools they have in service and retail interactions.

The Patient-Provider Relationship Study, which was conducted by Solutionreach, surveyed over 2,000 patients about their recent experiences with different types of providers. Over 500 of those who responded had seen a primary care provider in the past year and were asked questions about that interaction. The questions focused on satisfaction with the provider, their staff, and the practice in general as well as likelihood of switching providers and preferences around communication and accessibility.

The results were pretty stunning. Only 35 percent of patients were completely satisfied with their primary care provider and thirty-four percent of patients said they were considering switching primary care providers in the next couple of years. In addition, 12 percent had switched in the past year. And, quite a few left for reasons other than things like changing insurance or moving. Just under 40 percent of those who had switched said they left because of customer service and experience issues. The problems they listed included:

  • Feeling more like a number than a person
  • Trouble getting appointments
  • Poor communication with/from the staff
  • The staff were not friendly
  • Not satisfied with the staff (other than the provider)

These are very fixable issues. We’re talking almost entirely about the personal perceptions of patients about their interactions with staff, with just a couple exceptions. And those exceptions have largely to do with communication and access, which are also pretty manageable things to change.

You can improve communication and appointment scheduling, and with the right technology, you can do it in a way that feels more personal as well. Not surprisingly many patients want to schedule appointments online and they want options for email and text for communications like reminders. In fact, 79 percent of patients said they wanted text messages from their primary care providers.

It’s important to note that these things don’t just improve the patient experience outside the practice, they save time for staff, which means a better experience when patients are in the practice. So why are providers so hesitant to invest in tools that can fix this problem?

To some degree, it appears to be about fears that these investments won’t pay off—in added reimbursement or return on investment (ROI) from savings. In a study conducted by HIMSS in 2015, providers cited time constraints and lack of reimbursement as barriers to improving patient engagement. The truth is many of the things that fall under “engagement” can also be seen as “customer service,” and patients want better customer service. In another study conducted by MicKinsey, patients said they had similar expectations of service from healthcare providers and non-healthcare companies.

While there will never be added reimbursement for smiling or greeting patients by name, there are some clear areas of ROI that can make up for that. Email and text reminders have been shown to reduce no-shows by 30 to 50 percent, saving the average primary care practice about $40,000 a year. Online appointment scheduling not only saves the practice on scheduling calls, which generally take four to eight minutes, but it can also help patients find earlier appointments, shortening wait times.

For providers who worry that texting with patients will suck up more time with no reimbursement, there is hope as well. Texts take only about four seconds on average while the average call is more like two or more. Also, texts can be responded to at the convenience of providers and staff. There is no need to play phone tag, which is a waste of time for everyone.

When it comes to reimbursement for engagement and service activities, it’s time to think bigger picture. Reimbursement can be time saved. It can be patients retained. It can be increased compliance or fewer phone calls. There are a lot of ways a better patient experience can translate into a better bottom line.

Solutionreach is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. As the leading provider of patient relationship management solutions, Solutionreach is dedicated to helping practices improve the patient experience while saving time for providers and staff. Learn more about the Patient-Provider relationship survey here.

WorkFlow Wednesday: Patient Satisfaction and West’s Patient Experience Survey

Posted on July 5, 2017 I Written By

Healthcare as a Human Right. Physician Suicide Loss Survivor.
Janae writes about Artificial Intelligence, Virtual Reality, Data Analytics, Engagement and Investing in Healthcare.
twitter: @coherencemed

Providers can improve patient experiences and revenue. So much of what improves satisfaction is outside the clinical setting.  West’s Insights and Impact Study titled “Prioritizing the Patient Experience” examines the gaps in patient value perception in the current healthcare marketplace.

West recently conducted a survey of patients providers to get more insights into what patients and providers value.  With value based payment models and consumer focused health providers are increasingly motivated to provide high quality service. Today’s patient is more aware of choice in provider options and will shop around for a provider that matches their needs.

Patients and Value Based Care Provide More Awareness of Choice in the Healthcare Marketplace

Patient experience using current technology and workflows is the space West has been working in for 25 years, including patient reminders for large hospital systems. As a company that specializes in patient experience, they used an outside firm to get insight about how well provider and patient perceptions were aligned. It was impressive to see an engagement company practicing what they preach and being proactive about feedback and improvement.

The most interesting takeaway from all of the statistics and research and report is that we know what the drivers of a good experience are. If you ask patients and providers what their motivation are answers are not usually aligned. This gap in what providers and patients value in terms of healthcare experience can cost providers revenue and patients. Patients value a high level of communication and transparency about cost of care more than providers believe.

Looking at the study, 78% of patients with a Chronic condition are likely to say that their provider cares about them as a person. Personally I’ve experienced this with my son that has a Chronic condition. We researched providers to ensure that we had similar values about communication and follow-up. Social Media groups like mom groups on Facebook have a lot of feedback about provider value. I know his provider gives great care and cares about him.

Patients with a Chronic Condition are Likely to Receive Personalized Care.

My Takeaways From the West Report

  • Current Systems do not always create a seamless workflow. Smooth workflow and patient communications improve patient experience.
  • Patients really want to know about what to expect in appointments. Sending a notification about costs including copays and obligations improves patient satisfaction.
  • Wait times are a huge cause of concern for patients. Electronic messaging or text information about waits can improve patient satisfaction even in cases where delays cannot be avoided.
  • Making payment as easy for patient as possible improves patient healthcare experience. A reminder about a bill with information about how to pay will improve practice revenue and patient experience.
  • Simple workflow improvement and automation improves clinical outcomes and patient retention in an increasingly consumer aware healthcare world.
  • Providers can focus on using the technology to better measure that for further strategy for improvement.

Well developed workflow can ensure that physicians have fewer patient surprises. Rather than waiting for an HCAP you can proactively collect data and brief surveys on specific topics before you are doing emergency triage. Contact recently discharged patients via an automated phone message or email. Have the questions tie back to HCAP survey questions so they can see what they will get.

What can systems do? Select Key measures for patient satisfaction.

What can physicians do? Tell patients that what to expect.

West is following their own advice and getting feedback about the value of communications and technology The survey is a connector for patients and for technology companies in the HealthIT space. Great ideas about Workflow improvement and best practice for business from West.

The report can be accessed online here and these key takeaways and is a great read for providers.