Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

Bridging the Gap between What Patients Want and What Practices Offer

Posted on October 11, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Jim Higgins, Founder & CEO at Solutionreach. You can follow him on twitter: @higgs77

With the growing pressure of increasingly complex healthcare regulations, malpractice litigation, and expectations of quality care, modern-day medical practices face an unprecedented set of challenges when it comes to running a successful practice.

Throw in marketing, billing, scheduling, appointment reminders, and all of the other day-to-day aspects of running a practice, and many practices are maxed out.

But while practices are busy juggling this growing number of expectations, patient satisfaction has been falling.

Today’s patients have become accustomed to a buyer-centered approach in nearly every industry. Likewise, they expect the same from their healthcare professionals. Unfortunately, many practices have been slow to adapt.

The Patient-Provider Relationship Study recently found that the average medical provider with a panel of 2,000 patients could lose around 700 patients in the next couple of years. A large number of these patients are leaving due to dissatisfaction with their experience at a practice.

Much of the growing dissatisfaction from patients is in relation to practices not offering the services and technology that they have come to expect. Experts warn that the medical field lags behind every other industry in the adoption of new technology. This inevitably leads to a gap between what patients expect from their medical practice and what practices actually offer.

Perform a thorough gap assessment

According to the study, 60 percent of patients are not completely satisfied with practice logistics such as appointment scheduling, reminders, and communication. In fact, logistics is the area in which patients have the greatest overall dissatisfaction with their practice.

It is important that practices both understand what patients want the most and then complete an assessment to determine areas that need improvement.

The Patient-Provider Relationship Study found that patients want many additional touchpoints, including:

  • Text appointment reminders
  • Appointment alerts by email
  • Appointment alerts by text
  • Being able to text message back and forth with the practice
  • Allowing patients to initiate text messages to the practice

Unfortunately, a large number of practices do not offer these services. The following chart highlights how many practices offer each of these services, compared to a goal of 100 percent implementation.

With the majority of patients expressing dissatisfaction with the logistics offered by their medical practice, it is clear that changes need to be made. This requires the implementation of new, or more robust, technology.

Implement technology without distress

Practices want to be more efficient and provide an improved patient experience, but the fear of making the wrong choices around new technology can hold them back. Each of the aforementioned services have the potential to either improve processes and efficiency or make them more difficult. The outcome depends on the practice’s ability to carefully assess each piece of technology before moving forward.

There are steps you can take to eliminate some of the risk when choosing a new technology. One of the most important things you can do is to ask right questions before and during the selection process. Consider the following:

  1. Who will be impacted by this change?
  2. How will the technology affect your current workflow?
  3. Is the technology compatible with your current systems?
  4. Will the technology meet current and future compliance requirements?
  5. What will the implementation process include?
  6. How have other offices felt about the technology?
  7. What type of on-going customer service and training does the company offer?

When it comes to achieving high levels of patient satisfaction, it is critical that practices bridge the gap between what patients want and what is currently being offered. After performing a gap assessment and carefully vetting available technology, practices will be able to move forward in a way that will reduce the load on employees, create meaningful improvements in the practice, and boost the bottom line.

Solutionreach is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. As the leading provider of patient relationship management solutions, Solutionreach is dedicated to helping practices improve the patient experience while saving time for providers and staff. Learn more about the Patient-Provider relationship survey here.

MGMA17 Day 2 – The Future of Patient Engagement Looks Bright

Posted on October 10, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Day 2 at MGMA17 started very early for exhibitors when the doors to the exhibit hall opened sharply at 6:30am Pacific Time. It was clear that MGMA organizers were catering to the early-rising-east-coast contingent of attendees. Thankfully there was a warm breakfast with plenty of caffeine options available.

The early exhibit hours provided a unique opportunity to slowly browse the floor and read booth signage fully without being blocked by fellow attendees walking in the aisles…and in some cases without being blocked by company representatives in the booth itself.

As I walked around the exhibits I began to notice that the words “Patient Engagement” appeared frequently. EHR companies, revenue cycle management companies, call center providers and even HR consultants had this nebulous term emblazoned on their booth properties. I thought it would be interesting to ask a few of these companies how they interpreted patient engagement and how they saw it evolving over the next three years.

Josh Weiner, Chief Operating Officer at SolutionReach, was quick to say “Patient Engagement is more than having a portal on your EHR”. He believed that the key to engaging patients was communicating with them in an easy, convenient manner. “For SolutionReach, this means texting. Everyone knows how to text and it’s just so simple to use. A few years ago texting patients was just one-way. Doctors would send a text to a patient and that would be it. More recently companies like SolutionReach introduced the ability for healthcare providers to conduct one-to-one conversations with patients via text. We call it SR Conversations and we have over 4,000 clients using it.”

In the future, Weiner predicted that providers and patients would continue to use SMS texting as the primary means of patient engagement. The key difference is that instead of just sending text messages back and forth we would be sending mini-text-applications back and forth. He cited the example of the latest iOS upgrade which now featured the ability to send a map, a Starbucks gift card and other such applications within an SMS message. He foresaw a day when we will have the ability to send a prescription, a lab test, a referral and an appointment schedule to a patient via SMS.

At BinaryFountain, a company that makes a platform that consolidate patient feedback from multiple social media sources as well as from HCAHPS surveys and allows providers to publish positive comments made in those medium as online reviews, they define patient engagement through the lens of reputation management. Engaged patients mean they are more likely to provide a positive comment and if they provide a positive comment, they are more likely to rate the doctor/practice/hospital highly. That, in turn, leads to a better reputation which attracts patients who are more likely to be engaged in their care. In the future, the company believes that quantitative measures for patient engagement will be developed and that these measures will be used in a similar way that the 5-star rating system is used today.

West Communications is a provider of telephony solutions to a broad range of industries. In healthcare, West offers a number of patient communication tools that engage patients via phone, email, and text. They define patient engagement as the degree to which a patient is active in and adherent to their care plan. They saw a bright future for patient engagement – especially as technologies from other industries are adapted to healthcare. The West team, for example, has been working on adding AI-based intelligent IVR capabilities to their healthcare IVR solutions so that inbound calls from patients can be automatically triaged quickly based on needs.

At Stericycle Communication Solutions, Sarah Bennight, Healthcare Strategist, defined patient engagement as getting patients to be active throughout their care journey. “Patient engagement creates trust between patients and providers. It’s more than just pushing information out to patients, it’s true two-way conversations that are relevant to where the patients are in that moment. It means providing patients with useful calls to action – clicking on a button to book their next appointment, download information or connect with the right clinician.”

Bennight sees a patient engagement future that includes new forms of communication through platforms like Snapchat and iMessage. “The younger generation communicates in different ways. They’ve gone beyond voice, text, and email. Healthcare will need to adapt to these new forms of communication. We may even need to develop a healthcare nomenclature for communicating information via emoji’s and giphies.”

Finally, Varun Hippalgaonkar, Senior Vice President of Growth at HealthGrid suggested that patient engagement is the sum total of all the interactions that a patient has with their healthcare providers including face-to-face visits, phone calls, text messages, telemedicine, and emails. The key for Hippalgaonkar was not to try and engage patients across all channels, but rather to zero in on the communication modalities that each individual patient preferred.

“HealthGrid is striving to be the single communication platform for all pre-, day of and post- visit patient interactions. Our platform will provide a consistent patient experience in the communication channel or channels that patients prefer to use. We mine our own interaction data to determine the best way to interact with patients. For example, the analysis of past interactions may reveal that John Smith responds better during weekday mornings via text message and seems to prefer phone calls at night. When a hospital or a practice has the information they want to share with John, they simply put the content in our system and we handle how it will be delivered to him based on his known response patterns.”

Down the road, Hippalgaonkar saw patients interacting with AI-powered chat bots that were so sophisticated that patients would feel they were interacting with a person. These bots would work across the different communication channels providing a consistent experience no matter what modality the patient elected to use.

Hippalgaonkar summed up by saying: “In the end it’s all about motivating patients to make changes to their health or put another way, to engage in their health. We can only achieve this if we communicate with patients in a way that compels them to take action. As an industry, we need to build technologies and processes that takes things down to the individual patient level. We need to use AI, machine learning, personalization and deliver meaningful information to patients so that they are compelled to make a change.”

From these conversations, it was clear that patient engagement meant different things to different people. Yet everyone agreed healthcare needed more engagement and more involvement from patients in order to deliver on the promise of better health at lower cost. Motivating patients to become more involved is not going to be easy, but if the MGMA17 exhibit hall is representative of HealthIT overall, the future is certainly bright for patient engagement.

Full Disclosure: Solution Reach and Stericycle Communication Solutions are both sponsors of Healthcare Scene.

#SHSMD17 in 17 Tweets – Perspectives on Healthcare Marketing

Posted on October 4, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

The AHA’s Society for Healthcare Strategists and Marketing Development recently held its annual conference – SHSMD17 – in Orlando Florida. For three full days, 1,500 attendees shared ideas and traded insights on the latest trends healthcare marketing trends. The 60+ concurrent sessions covered a variety of topics including:

  • Developing online support groups for patients
  • Successful blog-driven content marketing
  • Media relationships
  • Communication and preparedness during a crisis
  • Chatbots
  • Consumerism

For daily summaries of SHSMD17, check out these Day 1, Day 2 and Day 3 blogs. As well see this blog on the release of SHSMD’s Bridging Worlds 2.0 report during the conference.

If I had to pick an overall theme for SHSMD17 it would have to be “perspective”. The four keynote speakers and many of the session presenters urged the audience to break out of our boxes in order to truly “see” healthcare from multiple viewpoints – including patients, clinicians and government. Only by putting ourselves into the shoes of healthcare’s various stakeholders can we create effective marketing campaigns and hospital programs.

During the conference, there was a lot of live-tweeting and there were many conversations happening via social media with people who were not in attendance. I thought it would be fun to highlight 17 tweets from SHSMD17.

Here goes.

Fun SHSMD17 Tweets

 

CareCloud + First Data Partnership a Hopeful Sign of Things to Come

Posted on October 3, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Earlier today, CareCloud and First Data (NYSE: FDC) announced they have partnered to create Breeze, a new patient experience management platform. Built on First Data’s Clover infrastructure, Breeze’s mobile, web and kiosk based applications provide consumer-style convenience to patients while helping practices streamline workflows. Through Breeze, CareCloud customers will be able to offer patients the ability to book appointments, fill out medical forms, check-in remotely and manage payments from their phones.

“We looked outside of healthcare for inspiration on what patients want” says Juan Molina, VP of Strategy and Business Development at CareCloud. “What we found was that consumer interactions have changed from in-person transactions to online experiences. We wanted to give patients the same experience in healthcare that they are used to from the rest of the world through apps like Uber, OpenTable and Amazon.”

At a Breeze-enabled CareCloud practice, the “happy path” patient interaction would be as follows:

  • Patient is invited to Breeze by their doctor’s office through a text with a specific link
  • Patient downloads the Breeze app to their phone through that link
  • Patient books an appointment through the app
  • Prior to the appointment date, patient is reminded by the app to fill in paperwork which could include: demographic information, consent forms and insurance data (photo of insurance cards can be uploaded)
  • On the day of the appointment, patient can check in remotely
  • After the appointment, patient can manage payments through the app (credit card on file, Apple Pay, Android Pay or other options made available by the practice)

By automating parts of the appointment booking, patient intake and payment workflows, Breeze reduces the workload on front-line staff.

“From the moment that the patient walks in, they are happier, and my staff no longer has to spend time dealing with packets of registration papers. Our front office can now focus on patient care and delivering the excellent level of service that they deserve,” says Barbara Arbide, a practice manager who is using Breeze in her allergy practice in Coral Gables, FL.

The CareCloud and First Data partnership is encouraging. For many years now, EHR vendors have tried to build their own walled gardens where customers and partner companies could play nicely together. Unfortunately, a lack of useful application interfaces (APIs) and a high cost of entry for potential partners, resulted in a barren courtyard with high walls (aka a prison) for customers rather than a thriving garden.

By partnering with First Data, CareCloud is showing that it is a company willing to break from traditional EHR vendor thinking. They have opted to play in someone else’s ecosystem in order to bring more functionality to their customers at a faster pace.

First Data’s Clover platform already has hundreds of useful business apps built for it including employee scheduling tools, customer loyalty apps, inventory management systems and survey programs. By basing Breeze on Clover, CareCloud’s customers have access to this rich library of apps.

“After just two days of using Breeze,” Molina told EMRandEHR.com, “A practice in southern Georgia went and downloaded a time-and-attendance app for their system from the Clover library. This replaced a cumbersome Excel spreadsheet that they had been using. This helped the practice become more efficient and sophisticated.”

Could CareCloud have developed a time-and-attendance app on their own? I’m sure they could have. Would it have been a wise investment of their time? Probably not. Would it have been delivered in two days? Absolutely not. Although in theory CareCloud is forgoing potential revenue, their partnership with First Data allows them to focus on what truly matters – improving the clinical and practice operations side of their own platform.

What’s next for Breeze? According to Molina: “Patient expectations are only going to climb higher and higher as more and more consumer apps bring more sophistication into their lives. We have to pay attention to what’s happening outside of healthcare – how people are booking tickets online, speaking to Alexa, tracking their fitness with wearables and getting food from uberEats. Patients don’t want to be transported back to the 1980s when they come to a physician office where you have to fill out forms on a clipboard. With Breeze we have a flexible platform that can continue to grow and expand. We will be able to build new patient-centric applications faster, that help our clients with more and more of their workflows.”

Hopefully this new partnership is a sign of things to come.

How Does Age Impact Patient Satisfaction?

Posted on September 13, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Jim Higgins, Founder & CEO at Solutionreach. You can follow him on twitter: @higgs77

If you walked into the average medical practice on any given day, you would see patients ranging in age from 1 to 101. Understanding and adapting to the needs of such a diverse group of patients is challenging. Many offices are struggling with this, and patient dissatisfaction is at an all-time high.

In the Patient-Provider Relationship Study, recently commissioned by Solutionreach, researchers found that one in three patients are likely to switch practices within the next couple of years.

The question is why. What is happening to patient loyalty? And more importantly—what can medical offices do to stem the tide?

In addition to studying patient switching preferences, the study also examined the dynamics of generational satisfaction and preferences, posing the following questions:

  • What impact does age have on patient satisfaction and retention?
  • What role does it play in patient loyalty?
  • Which services create satisfaction for the different generations?

A Closer Look at How Age Impacts Patient Satisfaction

To better understand how age impacts patient retention, it is important to take a closer look at the results from each of the key age groups.

  1. Millennials—Satisfaction levels among the youngest cohort were dismal. Millennials are the least satisfied with all aspects of the practice, including the doctor, office team, and practice logistics. In fact, a stunning 81 percent say that they are not completely satisfied with their medical office. Unsurprisingly, millennials are also extremely likely to switch practices in the upcoming years. Nearly half—46 percent—of millennials say they will probably move on to a new medical practice in the next couple of years.
  2. Gen X—The satisfaction levels of Gen Xers lies somewhere between millennials and boomers. The numbers are still concerning, however. Two out of three Gen Xers are not satisfied with their medical office. Around 35 percent say they will probably change practices in the near future.
  3. Baby Boomers—While millennials are three times more likely to switch providers than boomers, there are still a significant number of unhappy patients in this demographic. Nearly 60 percent of boomers are not completely satisfied with their medical office and one in five will switch practices in the near future.

Regardless Of Age—Technology Boosts Patient Satisfaction

It’s easy to assume that everyone who moves on to a new practice does so because they move or change insurance providers. The truth is a growing number are switching for other reasons.

Why are they so dissatisfied?

Picture the average patient in your mind. What characteristics about them have changed over the past few decades?

The biggest thing is that we have become unbelievably attached to technology—it’s rare to find any of us without either a phone, tablet, or computer. We use technology for virtually everything.

This is the area in which medical practices are struggling to keep up. Solutionreach’s study found that this is the exact category in which patients are least satisfied with their medical office. This is true regardless of age. Millennials, Gen Xers, and baby boomers all want more technology.

The biggest gap between what patients want and what medical practices offer is around texting. Texting has been the most used form of communication for over a decade now, but according to the survey less than 30 percent of practices offer any texting options. Today, every office should be able to:

  • Send a text—94 percent of millennials and 87 percent of Gen Xers want to receive texts from your office. But it’s not just the “youngsters.” Two out of three baby boomers also want you to text them.
  • Receive a text—While some offices have started sending out reminder texts, far fewer actually have the ability to have a patient initiate text messaging through the office number. Eighty-seven percent of millennials and seventy-nine percent of Gen Xers say that they want to be able to text their doctor. Once again, boomers are also on board—58 percent say they want to send a text to their medical practice.

Today’s patient lives are completely intertwined with technology. Medical practices will need to adapt to using technology in new ways to connect with patients or risk losing one in three patients in the coming two years.

Solutionreach is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. As the leading provider of patient relationship management solutions, Solutionreach is dedicated to helping practices improve the patient experience while saving time for providers and staff. Learn more about the Patient-Provider relationship survey here.

Patients Frustrated with Poor Practice Logistics

Posted on August 9, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Jim Higgins, Founder & CEO at Solutionreach. You can follow him on twitter: @higgs77

A new study shows that patients have just about had it with poor practice logistics—things like communication, scheduling, and accessibility. There have certainly been signs this was coming for quite some time, but now the data shows patients really are getting fed up with not having some of the same basic tools they have in service and retail interactions.

The Patient-Provider Relationship Study, which was conducted by Solutionreach, surveyed over 2,000 patients about their recent experiences with different types of providers. Over 500 of those who responded had seen a primary care provider in the past year and were asked questions about that interaction. The questions focused on satisfaction with the provider, their staff, and the practice in general as well as likelihood of switching providers and preferences around communication and accessibility.

The results were pretty stunning. Only 35 percent of patients were completely satisfied with their primary care provider and thirty-four percent of patients said they were considering switching primary care providers in the next couple of years. In addition, 12 percent had switched in the past year. And, quite a few left for reasons other than things like changing insurance or moving. Just under 40 percent of those who had switched said they left because of customer service and experience issues. The problems they listed included:

  • Feeling more like a number than a person
  • Trouble getting appointments
  • Poor communication with/from the staff
  • The staff were not friendly
  • Not satisfied with the staff (other than the provider)

These are very fixable issues. We’re talking almost entirely about the personal perceptions of patients about their interactions with staff, with just a couple exceptions. And those exceptions have largely to do with communication and access, which are also pretty manageable things to change.

You can improve communication and appointment scheduling, and with the right technology, you can do it in a way that feels more personal as well. Not surprisingly many patients want to schedule appointments online and they want options for email and text for communications like reminders. In fact, 79 percent of patients said they wanted text messages from their primary care providers.

It’s important to note that these things don’t just improve the patient experience outside the practice, they save time for staff, which means a better experience when patients are in the practice. So why are providers so hesitant to invest in tools that can fix this problem?

To some degree, it appears to be about fears that these investments won’t pay off—in added reimbursement or return on investment (ROI) from savings. In a study conducted by HIMSS in 2015, providers cited time constraints and lack of reimbursement as barriers to improving patient engagement. The truth is many of the things that fall under “engagement” can also be seen as “customer service,” and patients want better customer service. In another study conducted by MicKinsey, patients said they had similar expectations of service from healthcare providers and non-healthcare companies.

While there will never be added reimbursement for smiling or greeting patients by name, there are some clear areas of ROI that can make up for that. Email and text reminders have been shown to reduce no-shows by 30 to 50 percent, saving the average primary care practice about $40,000 a year. Online appointment scheduling not only saves the practice on scheduling calls, which generally take four to eight minutes, but it can also help patients find earlier appointments, shortening wait times.

For providers who worry that texting with patients will suck up more time with no reimbursement, there is hope as well. Texts take only about four seconds on average while the average call is more like two or more. Also, texts can be responded to at the convenience of providers and staff. There is no need to play phone tag, which is a waste of time for everyone.

When it comes to reimbursement for engagement and service activities, it’s time to think bigger picture. Reimbursement can be time saved. It can be patients retained. It can be increased compliance or fewer phone calls. There are a lot of ways a better patient experience can translate into a better bottom line.

Solutionreach is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. As the leading provider of patient relationship management solutions, Solutionreach is dedicated to helping practices improve the patient experience while saving time for providers and staff. Learn more about the Patient-Provider relationship survey here.

WorkFlow Wednesday: Patient Satisfaction and West’s Patient Experience Survey

Posted on July 5, 2017 I Written By

Healthcare as a Human Right. Physician Suicide Loss Survivor. Janae writes about Artificial Intelligence, Virtual Reality, Data Analytics, Engagement and Investing in Healthcare. twitter: @coherencemed

Providers can improve patient experiences and revenue. So much of what improves satisfaction is outside the clinical setting.  West’s Insights and Impact Study titled “Prioritizing the Patient Experience” examines the gaps in patient value perception in the current healthcare marketplace.

West recently conducted a survey of patients providers to get more insights into what patients and providers value.  With value based payment models and consumer focused health providers are increasingly motivated to provide high quality service. Today’s patient is more aware of choice in provider options and will shop around for a provider that matches their needs.

Patients and Value Based Care Provide More Awareness of Choice in the Healthcare Marketplace

Patient experience using current technology and workflows is the space West has been working in for 25 years, including patient reminders for large hospital systems. As a company that specializes in patient experience, they used an outside firm to get insight about how well provider and patient perceptions were aligned. It was impressive to see an engagement company practicing what they preach and being proactive about feedback and improvement.

The most interesting takeaway from all of the statistics and research and report is that we know what the drivers of a good experience are. If you ask patients and providers what their motivation are answers are not usually aligned. This gap in what providers and patients value in terms of healthcare experience can cost providers revenue and patients. Patients value a high level of communication and transparency about cost of care more than providers believe.

Looking at the study, 78% of patients with a Chronic condition are likely to say that their provider cares about them as a person. Personally I’ve experienced this with my son that has a Chronic condition. We researched providers to ensure that we had similar values about communication and follow-up. Social Media groups like mom groups on Facebook have a lot of feedback about provider value. I know his provider gives great care and cares about him.

Patients with a Chronic Condition are Likely to Receive Personalized Care.

My Takeaways From the West Report

  • Current Systems do not always create a seamless workflow. Smooth workflow and patient communications improve patient experience.
  • Patients really want to know about what to expect in appointments. Sending a notification about costs including copays and obligations improves patient satisfaction.
  • Wait times are a huge cause of concern for patients. Electronic messaging or text information about waits can improve patient satisfaction even in cases where delays cannot be avoided.
  • Making payment as easy for patient as possible improves patient healthcare experience. A reminder about a bill with information about how to pay will improve practice revenue and patient experience.
  • Simple workflow improvement and automation improves clinical outcomes and patient retention in an increasingly consumer aware healthcare world.
  • Providers can focus on using the technology to better measure that for further strategy for improvement.

Well developed workflow can ensure that physicians have fewer patient surprises. Rather than waiting for an HCAP you can proactively collect data and brief surveys on specific topics before you are doing emergency triage. Contact recently discharged patients via an automated phone message or email. Have the questions tie back to HCAP survey questions so they can see what they will get.

What can systems do? Select Key measures for patient satisfaction.

What can physicians do? Tell patients that what to expect.

West is following their own advice and getting feedback about the value of communications and technology The survey is a connector for patients and for technology companies in the HealthIT space. Great ideas about Workflow improvement and best practice for business from West.

The report can be accessed online here and these key takeaways and is a great read for providers.

Retail Clinics Are Not the Enemy, Inconvenience Is!

Posted on June 16, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Check out this incredible insight that Gabriel Perna shared on Twitter:

What a great insight and something that most of the entrenched healthcare people don’t understand. Retail clinics are not the enemy, inconvenience is.

In many ways, it reminds me of the approach that taxi cabs took to Uber and Lyft. Taxis described them as evil as opposed to understanding why consumers wanted to use Uber and Lyft instead of a taxi cab. If the taxi cab industry would have understood the conveniences that Uber and Lyft provided customers, they could have replicated it and made Uber and Lyft disappear (or at least they could have battled them more effective than they’ve done to date).

Gabriel Perna further describes the issues of retail clinics and AMA’s approach to retail clinics in his article and this excerpt:

There are many reasons for this phenomenon [growth of retail clinics], but more than anything though, retail clinics are convenient and many physician offices are not. Because of this, the AMA shouldn’t be trying to treat the retail clinics as some kind of foreign invader, but rather use their rise to prominence as a way to guide physician practices forward. For instance, getting in to see a doctor shouldn’t be a three-week endeavor, especially when the patient is sick and needs attention immediately. However, that’s what has happened. Personally, I’ve been told “the doctor doesn’t have anything open for at least a month” more times than I can count.

It’s simple supply and demand. If you or your child needs to see someone immediately because of an illness and your doctor’s office can’t take in you for a week, and there happens to be a retail clinic down the street, guess where you’re going? Any hesitations you may have over your care being fragmented, the limited ability of your retail clinic physician, or anything else will go out the window pretty quickly.

I agree completely with the idea that convenience is key. However, what Gabriel doesn’t point out is that the fact that doctors have a 3 week waiting list for patients is why they don’t care about offering convenience to their patients. They have enough patients and so they don’t see why they should change.

You can imagine the taxi cab industry was in a similar position. They had plenty of people using their taxi service. They didn’t see how this new entrant could cause them trouble because they were unsafe and whatever other reasons they rationalized why the new entrant wouldn’t be accepted by the masses. Are we seeing the same thing with retail clinics vs traditional healthcare? I think so. Will it eventually catch up to them? I think so.

What’s even more interesting in healthcare is that retail clinics are just one thing that’s attacking the status quo. Telemedicine is as well. Home health apps and sensors are. AI is. etc etc etc. All of these have the potential to really disrupt the way we consume healthcare.

The question remains: Will traditional healthcare system be disrupted or will they embrace these changes and make them new tools in how they offer care? It took the taxi cab industry years to adapt and build an app that worked like Uber and Lyft. However, it was too late for them. I don’t think it’s too late for healthcare, but it’s getting close.

The Challenge of Being a Patient with a Rare Disease – #PatientStories

Posted on June 2, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest blog post by Chelsea Freund who blogs at The Sick and the Dating. This post is part of our series of Patient Story blog posts where we ask patients to share their first-hand experiences with healthcare.

Do you believe in coincidences? Back in 2007, I decided to go back to school to become an R.N. I had been volunteering at Phoenix Children’s Hospital as a “bedside hugger” – which is exactly what it sounds like – and decided that I wanted to be a pediatric nurse, so I was studying away. The subject was advanced medical terminology, and specifically I was on the GI tract. I had been feeling terrible all day. I hadn’t been able to eat, hadn’t had any appetite. There was a nagging pain on my right side that wouldn’t go away. Finally I forced myself to eat something but it really didn’t sit well and the pain became increasingly worse.

I continued studying. I came across a paragraph or two that outlined the symptoms of appendicitis. I stopped. I thought to myself, “No way.” But by that time I couldn’t completely straighten up, and I re-read the paragraphs again. I probed my lower right quadrant. Yes, pain, there was definitely pain. I was sweating. I was also by myself and feeling a little silly; my roommate was off somewhere with her boyfriend, so it was up to me to make something happen. I had two thoughts: 1) I’ll go to the hospital that’s a mile away, and at worst, I’ll feel like an idiot, and 2) I’m going to check ahead in my book to see what else the universe has in store for me. The next chapter was on the eyes. (This is significant.) I drove myself to the hospital, hobbled up to the front desk doubled over, and it turned out my appendix was close to bursting.

I didn’t get to finish my nursing degree. The school system that I had chosen cut out evening classes for nurses and I needed my day job in the tech field in order to survive. But what I learned in school proved invaluable.

I have three-ring binders full of my medical records that I carry with me to new doctors. In the past almost seven years, I have tallied up all of the new doctors I have seen – including those in the ER – and the count is now at 59. This is where my nursing school comes in handy. I can easily communicate using the correct terminology, plus I understand what they are referring to 98% of the time – rarely do I have to ask for an explanation. Friends tell me either that it was a waste that I went to school and that I didn’t get my degree, or that I can finish it out later, and I tell them that I’m pretty sure that I went for this purpose alone: to be a patient, and specifically to be a rare disease patient.

I have been a patient all of my life. Some people are lucky in that they rarely get sick. I was that kid who always sat out from gym class because my asthma was strangling me, or I was allergic to the chlorine in the pool so I emerged from the water with great, big hives. I was always in the middle of or recovering from some upper respiratory or lung infection.

As a young adult in my 20s, I lost all of my hair over my entire body. It’s okay, I had been losing it in increments when I was much younger; it just decided to take a hike permanently when I hit 28. At age 31, I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s. It’s also not a show stopper – I just have a really tough time losing weight and controlling my body temperature. Going through nursing school actually gave me an advantage over other students because I already understood these processes, and in turn I had a much easier time communicating with my doctors.

I was 36 when I came down with my mystery disease in July of 2010. I have never cursed my student loans – not once. I didn’t have a lot of catching up to do in the medical field to be my own advocate, because this road has been very lonely. I have to advocate a lot while also being very sick. Not once have I ever had someone come with me to appointments or the hospital.

The very first encounter I had with a neurologist was a disaster, but I knew enough not to take his answer as the final word. He performed an EMG on my limbs, checking me for myasthenia gravis, because my face was paralyzed on one side when I was upright and I would get ptosis in both of my eyelids (but they would go back to normal immediately when I tilted my head parallel to the floor), and I had a lot of trouble walking. We agreed I likely didn’t have MS or even Hashimoto’s encephalopathy according to the MRIs I had done. The EMG came out with normal results. He wrote in my chart that what I had must be psychosomatic and sent me on my way.

I started to do a lot of research at that point. After going through 14 doctors in various disciplines, I ended up being helped by a neurosurgeon through Barrow Neurological Associates in Phoenix, simply because I demanded a lumbar puncture since that was the only test I hadn’t had done in the past year. My symptoms resolved for 12 hours, so we repeated the test 4 days later, and the exact same thing happened. We decided to insert a shunt.

However, we didn’t know I would be allergic to the shunts. I had 10 surgeries in less than 4 years. My body clogs and strangles and breaks the shunts in rebellion, now only days after surgery. My neurosurgeon gave up on trying to keep a working shunt in me. But I feel like we found something out in the process that we wouldn’t have found out if the failures wouldn’t have kept happening only because we moved the location of the shunts, and that is that the membranes in my brain are extra thick. My neurosurgeon has only seen that in one other patient in his lifetime.

After my neurosurgeon stopped operating on me, I moved back to Minnesota so my family could help to care for me – I can’t be upright for any length of time before my face becomes paralyzed and my eyelids are 80% closed, and the pressure in my cranium builds to an intolerable level. After I moved, a former acquaintance happened to find my dormant account on Twitter. He had actually been looking for a former client with the same first name, but was happy to reconnect. When he read my blog, he encouraged me to actively use Twitter to make connections and join chats. It’s because of his tutelage that I’ve been a guest on podcasts, became a product blogger, and have been in contact with various researchers, so I’m forever grateful.

One of the researchers I connected with has discovered the lymph node system in the cranium, which was previously thought not to be present. We traded a few emails, but the biggest barrier is that I’m a human, and he works mainly with rats. It’s a big leap to go from rodent to human in his world, even if we can both see the possibilities. So though there may be some sort of connection between my thick membranes and his newly-discovered brain lymph node drainage system, he’s probably not going to look at me until my brain is ready for slides.

Since I’ve moved to Minnesota, it’s been very difficult to convince doctors to see me, much less keep me as a patient. In fact, after five unsuccessful tries to get in, I now have an official letter from the Mayo Clinic telling me they will not see me because I’m too rare to diagnose or treat. I had one neurologist tell me she was “just a neighborhood neurologist,” so there wasn’t anything she could do for me. I had a rheumatologist tell me to do Thai Chi, and then write in my records that I was being non-compliant for not doing it, even though my severe vertigo doesn’t even allow me to stand in a shower. I’ve had endless doctors pat me on the knee and tell me that they couldn’t help me but they were sure “someone” could.

I finally settled on a neurologist – I think she was the 58th doctor to see me – because she ordered the tests I asked for, and even one I didn’t: I wanted an upright MRI because everything happens with my symptoms when I’m upright, and I got a cognitive function test to boot. When the upright MRI showed that all of my ventricles collapsed and I have a tumor, she attempted to refer me to a neurosurgeon. The neurosurgeon sent a letter back saying that “nothing looked out of the ordinary.” I’m no expert, but then again, I’m no slouch – and I just happen to know that looking at my corpus callosum on the MRI, it should not look like Charlie Brown’s crumpled up hair swoop. The search continues for any neurosurgeon in the state of Minnesota who can handle my case. The neurologist has agreed to keep me as a patient, but her nurse often calls and starts with, “The doctor doesn’t think she needs to see you, but if you feel like you want to see her, you can.” That’s not exactly the welcoming committee.

I do have a few excellent doctors. I wish I could clone my GI doctor and carry him around in my pocket and take him out when I need a pep talk. He has the best bedside manner and has taken the time to talk to me about what is happening with me besides my intestinal tract because he’s truly interested and he wants to help. I think my pain doctor is a standup guy too; he’s in the process of moving to another medical group and deliberately chose one that didn’t have a non-compete clause. It meant less money for him, but it also means he can keep seeing the same patients. He has learned to respect me because he recognizes that I do my research and I’m a rule follower.

I have another doctor and diagnosis simply because of coincidence, and it’s a big one. While I was trekking around and being rejected by so many doctors, a friend called me up and said, “Why don’t you make an appointment with this mast cell activation syndrome doctor? It seems like you have a lot of the symptoms.” I thought to myself, “Well, why not? I’m making all of these appointments. What’s another appointment?” It turns out that that particular doctor takes a year to get into for the initial appointment. There was a cancellation, so I got in within eight months. And I did get the diagnosis. And it’s the reason my body rejects the shunts. And this doctor moved to Minnesota a year before I did. I have been assured that he won’t send me away like all of the other doctors.

So if we are in the same city and we happen to meet, I might show you my stupid human trick, which is to tilt my head so that the fluid moves around in my cranium and my face becomes un-paralyzed and I can see again. If you have the time, I may whip out my binders of medical records. I can explain everything to you. You just need to believe what you are seeing and keep an open mind.

Thanks to Chesea for sharing her story. Be sure to read other

Christina Farr’s TEDx Talk Asks “What If the Patient Knows Best?”

Posted on June 1, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of my favorite healthcare IT journalists is Christina Farr. She’s skipped around a few publications over the years, but she’s currently writing for CNBC about large tech companies like (Apple, Alphabet(Google), etc) that are getting into the healthcare and biotech world. Plus, she covers a lot of healthcare IT startup companies.

Christina Farr recently gave a TEDx talk at TEDx Oslo where she shared her perspective on the move from a doctor-dominated healthcare model to an empowered patient model where patient and doctor work together to find the best care solution together.

If you care about patients, take 12 minutes to listen to Christina’s TEDx talk embedded below and think about what her message means for you. It’s a good one.