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Optimizing Your EHR for MIPS and Other Quality Payment Programs – MACRA Monday

Posted on October 9, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Meena Ande currently acts as Director of Implementation for Advantum Health. This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program (QPP) and related topics.

As quality reporting requirements ramp up under value-based payment programs like MIPS, healthcare organizations are busy retrofitting their EHRs to make way for new measures. In some settings, not much has changed by way of tech utilization since initial EHR investments were made. Many outpatient settings still lack the internal expertise needed to optimize their implementations.

The truth is many EHRs have the functionality providers need for quality reporting, but many providers don’t know that due to limited exposure to the system. Couple that stunted tech knowledge with the well documented lack of familiarity with MACRA and the recent rise of the service model in healthcare is no surprise. Many practice administrators are relying on their EHR vendor or engaging outside experts to help lead the charge on system reconfiguration to meet Quality Payment Program demands.

There are several EMR capabilities providers can take advantage of to support QPP reporting efforts. Here are a few tips to keep in mind as you customize your EHR for MIPS and other value-based models.

Don’t boil the ocean when selecting CQMs.

Most EHRs give the option of tracking more than what is required for quality reporting. Initially, track applicable measures that exceed reporting requirements. After three to four weeks you’ll know which are your strong areas. Pick the best of the litter and proceed.

Providers can be overwhelmed by too many measures, particularly in multi-specialty practice settings. While it can be difficult to find overlap in measures between specialties, taking advantage of shared metrics whenever possible can reduce reporting burdens. Sit down as early as possible and develop an EHR configuration that works for your practice’s various clinicians.

Case in Point:

A gastroenterologist and a cardiologist may work in the same multi-specialty organization and on the same EHR, but the clinical quality measures they care about differ. There is no reason to give the gastroenterologist access to the cardiology problem list in the EHR. Specialty views improve ease-of-use and support more complete documentation.

Most EHRs offer role-based and specialty-based customization. Administrators can enable or disable EHR features related to some quality measures at the practice level and sometimes at the individual provider level. Clinical quality measures are based on details about the patient, but what is captured at each point of care should be tailored to the specific provider role.

Consider the roles impacted by different CQMs.

Keep the role of the person who may be responsible for different quality measures and Advancing Care Information workflows in mind when selecting and carving out space for CQMs in your EHR. Select measures that spread reporting work across multiple roles to relieve clinicians of unnecessary burdens.         

Case in Point:

The insurance eligibility verification required under Meaningful Use is managed by the front office. Front-office staff members should be made aware of the processes they need to complete before a patient checks in, and where to document that task in the EHR.

Control what is included in MIPS denominators.

Like Meaningful Use, patient encounter volume is important under MIPS. The size of the patient pool under any given quality measure directly impacts your adherence percentage. While most primary care encounters do meet patient visit requirements under MACRA, that is not always the case in specialty settings. Clinicians can exercise some control in determining what is included in patient denominators when reporting under MIPS.

Case in point:

Some primary care visits can be omitted. Let’s say a two-physician practice sees 50 patients a day. Only 15 of those patients might be seen by a physician. The rest of the patients may be there for a simple procedure like a blood pressure screening, stress test, or echocardiogram, where quality reporting elements are not verified. Such visits should be excluded.

Evaluate your reporting paths.

MIPS offers both EHR-based and registry-based reporting paths. Most specialties can submit CQM data via their EHR while others will have to rely on paid registry reporting. Additional reporting options might include submitting through associations that member clinicians are affiliated with, or through registries created by large hospital affiliates to help related providers.

Another hurdle for clinicians is deciding whether to submit data as a group or independently. Groups interested in participating in MIPS via the CMS web interface or administering the CAHPS for MIPS survey had until June 30, 2017, to register. Beyond that, clinicians have until the March 31, 2018, MIPS submission deadline to decide whether to report independently or as a group.

Case in point:

Big groups with different levels of EHR proficiency among providers may be better suited reporting at an individual level. Individual reporting takes more time for attestation, but the advantage is that higher-performing clinicians can avoid a penalty if the group doesn’t collectively meet reporting criteria.

Each month, sample 10 percent of EHR CQM data, including instances where criteria have been met and where it has not. Catch outliers with trouble following through on processes and extend targeted training to the team members bringing numbers down.

Conclusion

Optimizing the EHR and other tech resources providers have in place can be a huge MIPS enablement factor. Up-front customization work helps providers meet reporting requirements and save time over the long run. EHR optimization also enables future value-based care initiatives and lays the groundwork for population health management programs. Gains made in EHR use benefit the life of the practice through increased efficiency and, at the end of the day, better patient care.

About Meena Ande
Meena Ande currently acts as Director of Implementation for Advantum Health where she manages Implementation of services along with EHR optimization, with emphasis on workflow management for value-based reporting.

MACRA Preparation, Are You Ready? – MACRA Monday

Posted on October 2, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program (QPP) and related topics.

I’ll admit that the timing of this week’s MACRA Monday is a bit rough for me given the tragedy that’s occurred in my town, Las Vegas. Instead of dwelling on the tragedy and the person who could do such an awful thing, it’s been amazing even in these early hours to see how many people in Las Vegas and around the world want to and are supporting the victims of this tragedy.

We heard that there was a need for blood and thought we could help. Turns out that hundreds of others had the same idea and the blood banks have their schedules full through Wednesday. We’ll go after that to replenish the blood banks that no doubt will take a while to replenish their supply.

Thanks to everyone on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media that have reached out to myself and the rest of us that live in Las Vegas. We’re in a bit of shock and it doesn’t feel real.

To keep with our tradition of MACRA Monday, I thought I could at least share this infographic from Integra Connect on how prepared specialty practices are for MACRA:

No doubt there are a lot of healthcare organizations that aren’t ready for MACRA and they are confused on how they should be ready. Hopefully, those who have read our weekly MACRA Monday posts feel better prepared than most. MACRA is upon us whether you’re ready or not. However, MACRA certainly seems much less important on this day of mourning in Las Vegas.

On this tragic day, it’s worth noting all the incredible stories I’ve heard about Las Vegas healthcare professionals that were prepared and ready for a tragedy like this. I read stories of UMC, a major Las Vegas hospital that was so full of victims that they asked to stop bringing people to UMC that didn’t have life-threatening injuries. I read of EMS people who were at home and went into the danger to help transport victims. No doubt there will be hundreds of other stories of heroism by healthcare professionals. Many that likely won’t be heard or seen, but saved people’s lives. We thank them for their preparation, care, and work that no doubt has saved hundreds of people’s lives.

A big thank you from Vegas to each of you for all of your support.

New EHR Certification Rules Including Self-Declaration – MACRA Monday

Posted on September 25, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program (QPP) and related topics.

Elise Sweeney Anthony and Steven Posnack recently announced on the ONC Health IT Blog two major changes to the EHR certification program. In some ways, it shows a maturity of the EHR certification program, but in other ways, it’s ONC kind of taking a more hands off approach to EHR certification.

Here are the two big changes they made:

  1. Approving more than 50% of test procedures to be self-declaration; and
  2. Exercising discretion for randomized surveillance of certified health IT products.

The first one is really fascinating since they’re making 30 out of the 55 certification criteria as “self-declaration only.” That basically means that EHR vendors will just have to claim they meet the requirements. The ONC-ACBs won’t be certifying those 30 test procedures. In many ways, it reminds me of the meaningful use self-attestation. Does that mean that ONC-ACBs will cut their costs in half? Don’t be holding your breath on that one.

Let’s just hope that most EHR vendors don’t self-certify the way eCW approached EHR certification. Although, the eCW EHR certification issues are the perfect example of why a company self certifying their EHR software or the ONC-ACB certifying the EHR software is just about the same. I haven’t seen which test procedures will be self-declared, but my guess is that it was the ones that the ONC-ACBs weren’t really doing much to test and certify anyway. Ideally, this will free up the ONC-ACBs to dive deeper into the 25 test procedures they’ll still complete so they can avoid another eCW like incident.

Some might wonder why we don’t just take the self-declared EHR certification tests altogether if there’s no one that’s going to be checking them. What those people miss is that the self-declaration still keeps the EHR vendors on the hook for properly implementing the EHR certification criteria. If it’s discovered that they claimed to be compliant but aren’t, then the government can go after the EHR vendor for false claims.

The second change has me a little more puzzled. I’m not sure why they would want to release ONC-ACBs from the requirement to randomly audit EHR certifications. Maybe they didn’t discover any issues during their random audits and so they didn’t see a need to continue them. Or maybe the ONC-ACBs said they were going to pull out as certifying bodies if the government didn’t lighten the EHR Certification load. This is all conjecture, but they could be some of the reasons why ONC decided to make this change. They did offer the following insight into their reasoning:

This exercise of enforcement discretion will permit ONC-ACBs to prioritize complaint driven, or reactive, surveillance and allow them to devote their resources to certifying health IT to the 2015 Edition.

I wonder how many complaints the ONC-ACBs have gotten about the EHR software they’ve certified. Have they just been so overwhelmed with complaints that they need more time to deal with those complaints and so audits aren’t needed? I’d be surprised if this was the case. At this point I imagine most people with EHR certification issues will be calling the whistle blower attorneys, but I could be wrong.

All in all, I don’t think these EHR certification changes are a huge deal. It’s largely a maturing of the EHR certification program and does little to help the EHR certification burden on software vendors. Maybe the ONC-ACBs will charge a little less for their certification, but that’s always been a negligible cost compared to the development costs to become a certified EHR. I’m sure the ONC-ACBs are happy with these changes though.

What do you think of these changes? Any other impacts I haven’t described above that we should consider?

Mental Health EMRs And MIPS – MACRA Monday

Posted on September 18, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program (QPP) and related topics.

Recently, I began researching the mental health EMR market on behalf of a client. I had expected to find it dwindling as a) the big EMR players have always insisted that an all-purpose EMR could be adapted to serve mental health providers effectively and b) more importantly because mental health professionals weren’t eligible for Meaningful Use payments, which presumably made them lousy sales targets for vendors.

However, my research concluded that there’s roughly a dozen mental health EMRs out there and kicking and that at least two large medical EMR vendors had bought into the mental health technology niche. (Allscripts bought a stake in NetSmart Technologies last year, and Cerner acquired Anasazi outright in 2012). With their investments, the two vendors effectively admitted that supporting mental health providers wasn’t as easy as they’d suggested.

Now, with MIPS imposing new demands on clinicians, mental health providers are likely to expect even more from mental health IT vendors, said Bob Ring, a consultant with Mica Information Systems.

Right now, few mental health EMRs defining themselves as “therapy specific” are CEHRT technology, which could become an issue if MDs on staff in a mental health setting want to meet MIPS requirements, Ring notes.

Under MIPS, psychiatrists must provide a wide range of mental health-specific data, some of which calls for specialty-related technology. For example, one category under the Clinical Practice Improvement Activity Performance Category calls for enhancements to an EMR to capture added data on behavioral health populations and use that data for additional decision-making.

But uncertified EMRs are likely to stay that way, Ring says. “Because these therapy-specific [EMRs] are generally priced very low, and it is expensive to go through the ONC certification process, it’s questionable whether many of them ever will be,” he concludes.

Not only that, things could get even trickier for both mental health clinicians and mental health EMR vendors in the future, if CMS follows through on its threat to hold therapists to the same standards as MDs beginning in 2019.

This could create chaos, however, according to my colleague John Lynn, who contends that putting mental health therapy EMRs under MIPS would be “a disaster.” Instead, mental health should not piggyback MU or MIPS, but instead, focus on incentives for mental health focused EHR incentives.

“The relationship between a mental health provider and a client is totally different than the relationship between a medical provider and their patient,” said John, whose first EMR implementation came when he rolled out a medical EMR in a health and counseling center. “Their methods of documentation are different. Their methods of billing are different. Their approach to care is different. We made it work, but it took a lot of duct tape and jerry rigging to fit it in.”

Xerox Files Patents For Blockchain-Based Tech With Healthcare Applications

Posted on September 5, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

According to a site focused on blockchain technology, Xerox has filed patents for technology using blockchain to securely revise electronic documents. The patent application was filed in February of last year, but the move became news this month when it was reported by Coin Telegraph.

According to the site, the patent filings propose a network of nodes that can create and update documents and share data using blockchain technology. The system can be used by regional hospital organizations to exchange electronic health records, Xerox says in its application.

In a more-recent blog post, Xerox India’s director of global document outsourcing, Ritesh Gandotra, asserts that the use of blockchain can offer unique benefits.

“Historically, EHRs were never really designed to manage multi-institutional and lifetime medical records,” he writes. “…Adopting the blockchain structure to EHRs will help manage authentication, confidentiality, accountability and data sharing while allowing medical researchers to access insights into medical treatment.”

Xerox is hardly the first organization to take an interest in blockchain’s potential as a backbone for health data management. Not only that, but leaders in the industry are developing what look like practical models for using blockchain in this manner.

For example, my colleague John Lynn recently shared an infographic outlining a use case for blockchain in healthcare. You’ll probably learn more by clicking through and looking at the infographic yourself, but in summary, the model outlines a process in which:

  • Health organizations direct administrative information to the blockchain via APIs and track clinical data in parallel using existing health IT
  • The blockchain stores each transaction with a unique identifier
  • When they need information, healthcare organizations query the blockchain
  • Patients share their identity with healthcare organizations, using a private key that links their identity to blockchain data

Not only that, high-profile industry thinkers like John Halamka, MD, CIO at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, have developed their own models for the use of blockchain in healthcare. (In a Harvard Business Review article, Dr. Halamka describes a system for managing EHRs using blockchain which he and his co-authors call “MedRec.”)

What’s striking here is that while Xerox may have filed some patent applications, it probably doesn’t know anything we don’t. The applications it describes for blockchain in healthcare document management certainly sound fine, and may be the basis for something great in the future.

If you look around the web, however, you’ll see that virtually anyone with an interest in health IT is out there making predictions about its applications for healthcare. What will really be interesting is when we get beyond ideas — as intriguing as they can be — and pilot some real, concrete technology.

In the meantime, let the blockchain games continue. Obviously, Xerox won’t be the last company angling for a piece of this market. There’s little doubt it will come to something eventually, and the rewards will be great for the company that helps to shape its future.

The EMR Vendor’s Dilemma

Posted on June 6, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Yesterday, I had a great conversation with an executive at one of the leading EMR vendors. During our conversation, she stressed that her company was focused on the future – not on shoring up its existing infrastructure, but rather, rebuilding its code into something “transformational.”

In describing her company’s next steps, she touched on many familiar bases, including population health, patient registries and mobile- first deployment to support clinicians. She told me that after several years of development, she felt her company was truly ready to take on operational challenges like delivering value-based care and conducting disease surveillance.

All that being said – with all due respect to the gracious exec with whom I spoke – I wouldn’t want to be a vendor trying to be transformed at the moment. As I see it, vendors who want to keep up with current EMR trends are stuck between a rock and a hard place.

On the one hand, such vendors need to support providers’ evolving health IT needs, which are changing rapidly as new models of care delivery are emerging. Not only do they need to provide the powerhouse infrastructure necessary to handle and route massive floods of data, they also need to help their customers reach and engage consumers in new ways.

To do so, however, they need to shoot at moving targets, or they won’t meet provider demand. Providers may not be sure what shape certain processes will take, but they still expect EMR vendors to keep up with their needs nonetheless. And that can certainly be tricky these days.

For example, while everybody is talking about population health management, as far as I know we still haven’t adopted a widely-accepted model for adopting it. Sure, people are arriving at many of the same conclusions about pop health, but their approach to rolling it out varies widely.  And that makes things very tough for vendors to create pop health technology.

And what about patient engagement solutions? At present, the tools providers use to engage patients with their care are all over the map, from portals to mobile apps to back-end systems using predictive analytics. Synchronizing and storing the data generated by these solutions is challenging enough. Figuring out what configuration of options actually produces results is even harder, and nobody, including the savviest EMR vendors, can be sure what the consensus model will be in the future.

Look, I’m aware that virtually all software vendors face this problem. It’s difficult as heck to decide when to lead the industry you serve and when to let the industry lead you. Straddling these two approaches successfully is what separates the men from the boys — or the girls from the women — and dictates who the winners and losers are in any technology market.

But arguably, health IT vendors face a particularly difficult challenge when it comes to keeping up with the times. There’s certainly few industries are in a greater state of flux, and that’s not likely to change anytime soon.

It will take some very fancy footwork to dance gracefully with providers. Within a few years, we’ll look back and know vendors adapted just enough.

Quick EHR Twitter Roundup

Posted on May 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I use to do these types of posts a lot more. Not really sure why I stopped them since so much good information and so many good discussions are happening on Twitter. In these Twitter roundups, I select a few tweets to highlight and then add a few lines of my own commentary. I hope you enjoy. If you don’t like them, I’d love to hear that as well.


We’ve seen a lot of investors get really interested in the EMR and healthcare space. However, once they see the regulations they usually go running. No doubt it’s ripe for disruption and there’s a lot of disatisfaction and poor use of technology. However, most VCs underestimate what it takes to get into healthcare.


I’ll admit that I hadn’t seen an offer like this for a while. We use to see things like this all the time, but most EHR vendors have moved away from selling EHR software to leveraging their current EHR customers. I think that’s part of why we’ve seen the change in marketing. I feel bad for the salespeople still trying to sell EHR. Those that remain certainly have known about EHR and have chosen not to get one and so EHR sales today have to be a real challenge.


I actually don’t think Justin’s suggestion is that daring. However, I expect most doctors would think that it was a daring suggestion. There’s still a lot of resistance to this idea, but patients will continue pushing for it.

What I found more interesting about Justin’s tweet is the idea of a next-gen EMR. We’ll have to cover this in a future post, but I wonder if people think that a next-gen EMR will come along that will replace the current crop of EMR software. Or will the current EMR become a next-gen EMR. I’d love to hear your thoughts on how the next generation EMR will come to be.

Ambulatory EHR Vendors Are Now Distribution Channels

Posted on February 23, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been thinking about this idea since MGMA and it was illustrated even more deeply at the HIMSS 2017 Annual conference as well. EHR vendors with a reasonably sized user base have made a really big shift. Instead of selling EHR software, they’ve become a really interesting distribution channel.

Sure, you can still go to any of the EHR vendors and buy an EHR. They all can do that and they have some effort to sell EHR, but not really. Instead, you can see that the focus of many EHR software vendors have shifted to retaining their existing customer base and selling them new products. Some of them integrate smartly with the EHR software, but many of them have very little to do with the EHR.

Think about it from the EHR vendor perspective. They could churn their wheels trying to sell EHR software to a bunch of clinics that have basically chosen to not do EHR. Sounds like fun, right? They could also try and get people to switch EHR companies. Another really fun task, right? No, it’s a really challenging thing to do.

Instead of the really hard challenge of selling EHR software to people that don’t want it or don’t like the one they have, they instead sell something of value to their existing user base. It’s no wonder that EHR vendors have chosen to become distribution channels. If you have a sizable user base in a saturated market, it’s much easier to become a distribution channel to your users than it is to try and take users from your competitor.

Does this not describe where we are in the ambulatory EHR market? I’m seeing that play out across a whole lot of EHR vendors. This dynamic will be extremely interesting to watch. It will also be interesting to see what this means for smaller EHR vendors who don’t have a large enough user population to be a good distribution channel.

What do you think of this shift?

Practice Management Market To Hit $17.6B Within Seven Years

Posted on February 1, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

A new research report has concluded that the global practice management systems market should hit $17.6 billion by 2024, fueled in part by the growth of value-adds like integration with other healthcare IT solutions.

The report, by London-based Grand View Research, includes a list of what it regards as key players in this industry. These include Henry Schein MicroMD, Allscripts Healthcare Solutions, AdvantEdge Healthcare Solutions, athenahealth, MediTouch, GE Healthcare, Practice Fusion, Greenway Medical, McKesson Corp, Accumedic Computer Systems and NextGen Healthcare.

The report argues that as PM systems are integrated with external systems EMRs, CPOE and laboratory information systems, practice management tools will increase in popularity. It says that this is happening because the complexity of medical billing and payment has grown over the last several years.

This is particularly the case in North America, where fast economic development, plus the presence of advanced research centers, hospitals, universities and medical device manufacturers keep up the flow of new product development and commercialization, researchers suggest.

In addition, researchers concluded that while PM software has accounted for the larger share of the market a couple of years ago, that’s changing. They predict that the services side of the business should grow substantially as practices demand training, support and system upgrades.

The report also says that cloud-based delivery of PM technology should grow rapidly in coming years. As Grand View reminds us, most PM systems historically have been based on-premise, but the move to cloud-based solutions is the future. This trend took off in 2015, researchers said.

This report, while worthwhile, probably doesn’t tell the whole story. Along with growing demand for PM systems,I’d contend that vendor sales strategies are playing a role here. After all, integration of PM systems with EMRs is part of a successful effort by many vendors to capture this parallel market along with their initial sale.

This may or may not be good for providers. I don’t have any information on how the various integrated practice management systems compare, but my sense is that generally, they’re a bit underpowered compared with their standalone competitors.

Grand View doesn’t take a stand on the comparative benefits of these two models, but it does concede that emerging integrated practice management systems linking EMRs, e-prescribing, patient engagement and other software with billing are actually different than standalone systems, which focus solely on scheduling, billing and administration. That does leave room to consider the possibility that the two models aren’t equal.

Meanwhile, one thing the report doesn’t – and probably can’t – address is how these systems will evolve under value-based care in the US. While appointment scheduling and administration will probably be much the same, it’s not clear to me how billing will evolve in such models. But we’ll need to wait and see on that. The question of how PM systems will work under value-based care probably won’t be critically important for a few years yet.

(Side note:  You may want to check out John’s post from a few years ago on practice management systems trends. It seems that the industry goes back and forth as to whether independent PM systems serve groups better than integrated ones.)

Accountable Care HIT Spending Growing Worldwide

Posted on November 30, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

A new market research report has concluded that given the pressures advancing the development of accountable care models, the market for solutions serving ACOs should expand worldwide, though North America is likely to lead the segment for the near future.

The report, by research firm Markets & Markets, covers a wide range of technologies, including EHRs, healthcare analytics, HIE, RCM, CDSS, population health, claims management and care management. It also looks at delivery mode, e.g. on premise, web and cloud and end-user, which includes providers and payers. So bear that in mind when you look at these numbers. That being said, providers accounted for the largest share of this niche last year, and should see the highest growth in the sector over the next five years.

Broadly speaking, Markets & Markets reports that the accountable care solutions market grew a healthy growth rate during the last decade. Researchers there expect to see this market grow at a CAGR of 16.6% over the next five years, to hit $18.86 billion by 2021.

When it comes to leaders in the sector, researchers identify Cerner, IBM, Aetna and Epic as leaders in the current ACO solutions market and probable future winners between 2016 and 2021. Other major players in the space include UnitedHealth Group, Allscripts, McKesson, Verisk Health, Zeomega, eClinicalWorks and NextGen. Given how broadly they define this category, I’m not sure how important this is, but there you have it.

According Markets & Markets, the growth of the ACO solutions market worldwide is due to forces we know well, including shifting government regulations, the rollout of initiatives shifting financial risk from payers to providers, the demand to slow down healthcare cost increases in the advance of IT and big data capabilities. (Personally, I’d add the desire of health systems – ACO-affiliated or not – to differentiate themselves by performing well at the population health level.)

If your view is largely US-centric, as is mine, you might be interested to note that the trend towards ACO-like entities in the Asia-Pacific and Latin American regions is expanding, the researchers report. Most specifically, Markets & Markets researchers found that there is notable growth occurring in Asian countries, which, it reports, are modifying regulations and monitoring the implementation of procedures, policies and guidelines to promote innovation and commercialization. This has led to an increasing number of hospitals and academic institutions interested in the sector, along with a government focus on implementing health IT solutions and infrastructure – factors likely to generate an expanding ACO solutions market there.

After reading all of this, the question I’m left with is whether there’s any point in differentiating an “ACO” specific player as these researchers have. Maybe I’m playing with words too much hear, but wouldn’t it be more accurate to say that the definition of health system infrastructure is evolving, whether it’s part of an ACO as such or not?