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Participants Wanted for Remote EHR Usability Study

My friend Bennett Lauber of  The Usability People is looking for medical professionals, MD’s, RN’s or CMA’s to participate in a remote EHR usability study. Here’s the information on the project:

This study will be conducted during the first and second week of May, 2014. Qualified participants that complete the study will receive compensation up to a $100 Amazon gift card.

Please complete the following form to see if you qualify:

http://www.theusabilitypeople.com/participate

Thanks in advance

 Bennett Lauber
Chief Experience Officer
The Usability People, LLC

Check it out if you think you can help. We all know that EHR Usability can use all of our help.

April 17, 2014 I Written By

When Carl Bergman’s not rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

What Software Will Replace EHR?

I’m usually a very grounded and practical person. I’m all about dealing with the practical realities that we all face. However, every once in a while I like to sit back and think about where we’re headed.

I’ve often said that I think we’re locked into the EHR systems we have now at least until after the current meaningful use cycle. I can’t imagine a new software system being introduced in the next couple years when every hospital and healthcare organization has to still comply with meaningful use. Many might argue that meaningful use beyond the current EHR incentive money might lock us in to our existing EHR software for many years after as well.

Personally, I think that a new software will replace the current crop of EHR at some point. This replacement will likely coincide with the time an organization is up for renewal of their current EHR. The renewal costs are usually so high that a young startup company could make a splash during renewal time. Add in a change of CIO and I think the opportunity is clear.

My guess is that the next generation of healthcare documentation software will be one that incorporates data from throughout the entire ecosystem of healthcare. I’m not bullish on many of the current crop of EHR software being able to make the shift from being document repositories and billing engines into something which does much more sophisticated data analysis. A few of them will be able to make the investment, but the legacy nature of software development will hold many of them back.

It’s worth noting that I’m not talking about the current crop of data that you can find outside of the healthcare system. I’m talking about software which taps into the next generation of data tracking which goes as far as “an IP address on every organ.” This type of granular healthcare data is going to change how we treat patients. The next generation healthcare information system will need to take all of this data and make it smart and actionable.

To facilitate this change, we could really use a change in our reimbursement system as well. ACOs are the start of what could be possible. What I think is most likely is that the current system will remain in place, but providers and organizations will be able to accept a different model of payment for the healthcare services they provide. While I fear that HHS might not be progressive enough to do such a change, I’m hopeful that by making it a separate initiative they might be able to make this a reality.

What do you think? What type of software, regulations and technology will replace our current crop of EHR? I don’t think the current crop of EHR has much to worry about for now. However, it’s an inevitable part of a market that it evolves.

April 15, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

EMR Customer Service, EMR Not Meeting ACOs Needs, and Patient Centered EMR Rollout


Zappos is in Las Vegas, and I can assure you that this story is true. I’ve always wondered how they’d scale that policy if thousands of people called for pizza. The key I think is that they do focused customer service. Chandresh asks an important question. Which EHR vendors have delightful customer service?


If EHR vendors don’t make the ACO possible, who will?


I’d be more interested in seeing an EHR roll out that considered the patient.

April 13, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Not All EHR Clicks Are Evil

There’s a great blog post on HIStalk that is a beautiful CMIO Rant. He provides some really needed perspective on the issues with EHR software. In many ways, the post reminded me of my post titled “Don’t Act Like Charting on Paper Was Fast.” In that post, I highlight the fact that far too many people are comparing EHR against doing nothing versus comparing EHR against the alternative. Those are two very different comparisons.

The money line from the CMIO rant was this one:

If we insist that all clicks are wasted time, then we can’t have a conversation about usability, because under the prescription pad scenario, the only usable computer is one you don’t have to use at all.

I love when you take something to the extreme. It’s true that we all want stuff to just happen with no work. That’s perfect usability. However, that’s just not the reality (at least not yet). If we want the data to be accurate and to be recorded, then it takes human intervention (ie. clicks). Some clicking is necessary.

The CMIO goes on to say that the key to EHR usability is expectations. I thought that was an interesting word to describe EHR usability. I’ve written about this topic before when I compared the number of EHR clicks to the keys on a piano. In that article I suggested that the number of clicks wasn’t the core issue. If we could create EHR software that was hyper responsive (like a piano key), was consistent in its response speed, and we provided proper training, then having a lot of EHR clicks wasn’t nearly as big an issue.

Not that this should be an excuse for EHR vendors to make crappy software. They should still do what they can to minimize clicks where possible. However, the bigger problem is that we haven’t achieved all three of these goals. So, we’ll continue to hear many people complaining about all the EMR clicks.

April 11, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Scribes and Problems with the Healthcare System

In a recent #HITsm chat we had a pretty good discussion about scribes and their place in healthcare. I know a lot of people that are really big proponents of scribes, but I also know many people who are against them.

During the discussion, the question was asked if scribes mask the problems of the EHR software. This was my reponse:

If I were to do that tweet again, I might replace healthcare system with reimbursement system. Scribes are a mask to the fundamental problems with how we pay for healthcare. I’ve always loved to think about what an EHR would look like if it didn’t have to worry about billing. It would be a completely different system than what we have with EHRs today.

The reality is that doctors want to get paid and so EHRs have to deal with billing. Plus, now they have to deal with meaningful use regulation as well. Add those two together and you can understand why scribes are so popular with doctors.

Every single EHR would be better and easier to use if they were just worrying about providing a tool to doctors that lets them document the visit and ensure quality patient care. However, until that happens (which is never) scribes and other alternative methods to document are going to be very popular with many physicians.

April 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Where is Clinical Decision Support Heading?

A few months ago I had a chance to sit down an interview Jonathan Teich, MD, PhD, Elsevier’s Chief Medical Informatics Officer and a physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. In our discussion we dig into the current and future state of clinical decision support. For example, I ask Dr. Teich if you’ll be able to be a doctor in the future without it. If you want to learn more about clinical decision support and where it’s going, you’ll enjoy this video interview:

April 7, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Barriers and Pathways to Healthcare IT

The following is a guest blog post by Andy Oram, writer and editor at O’Reilly Media.

Those who follow health IT for a long time can easily oscillate between overenthusiasm and despair. Electronic records will bring us into the 21st century! No, electronic records just introduce complexity and frustration! Big data will find new cures! No, our data’s no good!

Indeed, a vast gulf looms between the demands that health reformers make on information technology and the actual status of that technology. But if we direct a steady vision at what’s available to us and what it provides, we can plan a path to the future.

This is the goal of a report I recently wrote for O’Reilly Media: The Information Technology Fix for Health: Barriers and Pathways to the Use of Information Technology for Better Health Care. As part of a comprehensive overview, it dissects the issues on some topics that often appear on this blog:

  • Patient empowerment. After looking at the various contortions hospitals go through to provide portals and pump up patients’ interest in following treatment regimes, I conclude that the best way to get patients involved in their care is to leave their data in their own hands.

    But wresting data out of doctors’ grip will be heavy exercise. Well aware that previous attempts at giving patients control over data (Google Health and Microsoft HealthVault) have shriveled up, and that new efforts by Box and Apple seem to be taking the same path, I suggest a way forward by encouraging people to collect health data that will hopefully become indispensable to doctors.

  • What’s wrong with current EHRs? We know that doctors grab any opportunity handed them to complain about their EHRs. Even more distressing, the research bears out their pique; my report cites examples from the medical literature finding only scattered benefits from EHRs. Sometimes their opacity and awkward interfaces contribute to horrific medical errors.

    One might think that nobody is actually getting what they want from their EHR, but in fact plenty of providers are quietly enjoying their records–success has a lot to do with their preparation and whether they take the extra effort to make effective use of data gathered by the EHRs.

    New interfaces such as tablets, convenient storage in the cloud, and agile programming may be producing a new crop of EHRs that will meet the needs of more clinicians. But open source software would lead to the most widespread advances, enabling more customization and a better response to bug reports.

  • The viability of ACOs. Accountable care, pretty much a synonym for the notion of pay-for-value, is on the agendas of nearly all payers, from CMS on down. It certainly makes sense to combine data and keep close tabs on people as they move from one institution to another. But it’s really a job to be done on a national level, or at least a regional one. Can a loose collection of hospitals and related institutions muster the data and the resources to analyze patient data, created viable health information exchanges, and perform data analysis? I don’t think the current crop of ACOs will meet their goals, but they’ll provide valuable insights while they try.

  • Can standards such as ICD-10 improve the data we collect? What about the promise of new standards, such as FHIR? I’m a big believer in standards, but I’ve seen enough of them fail to know they must be simple, lithe, and unambiguous.

    That doesn’t characterize ICD-10 to be sure. Perhaps it does pretty well in the unambiguous department. But like most classifications, it’s a weak representation of the real world: a crude hierarchy trying to reflect many vectors of interlocking effects–for instance, the various complications associated with diabetes. And although ICD-10 may lead to more precise records, the cost of conversion is so burdensome that the American Medical Association has asked the government to just let doctors spend their money on more pressing needs. The conversion has also been ruthlessly criticized on the EMR & EHR site.

    FHIR is a radical change of direction for the HL7 standards body. For the first time, a standard is being built from the ground up to be web-friendly as well as sleek. It currently looks like a replacement for C-CDA, so I hope it is extended to hold patient-generated data. What we don’t need is another hundred vendors going off to create divergent formats.

    For real innovation, we should look to the open SMART Platform. Its cleverness is that it functions as a one-way valve channeling data from silo’d EHRs at health providers to patient-controlled sites.

We need to know what current systems are capable of contributing to innovative health solutions, and when to enhance what we have versus seeking a totally disruptive solution. I look forward to more discussion of these trends. Comment on this article, write your own articles on the topics in the report, and if you like, comment to me privately by writing to the infofix alias @ the oreilly.com domain.

April 3, 2014 I Written By

Reply to Dr. Jacob Reider on NIST Dissects Workflow: Is Anyone Biting?

One comment on my latest post, NIST Dissects Workflow: Is Anyone Biting?, deserves a more than casual reply.

Here’s the comment from Jacob Reider (Note: Dr. Reider is ONC’s Acting Principle Deputy National Coordinator and Chief Medical Officer. He has made major contributions to the HIT field and is one of its significant advocates.)

Carl, ONC’s UCD requirement references ISO 9241–11, ISO 13407, ISO 16982, NISTIR 7741, ISO/IEC 62366 and ISO 9241–210 as appropriate UCD processes.

We also require summative testing as defined in NISTIR 7742.

Might “Refuses to incorporate NIST recommendations” be a bit of an overstatement?

We solicited public comment in our proposed rule for 2015 certification and would welcome specific suggestions for how we can/should improve user experience of health IT products for efficiency and safety.

Dr. Reider, thank you for your comment – it certainly falls into the category of you never know who’s reading.

Let’stake a look at your last comment first, “Might ‘Refuses to incorporate NIST recommendations’ be a bit of an overstatement?”

Obviously, I don’t think so, but I am not alone.

I based my comment on ONC’s statement in its rule making that refers to NIST’s usability protocols. It says:

While valid and reliable usability measurements exist, including those specified in NISTIR 7804 “Technical Evaluation, Testing and Validation of the Usability of Electronic Health Records,” (21) we are concerned that it would be inappropriate at this juncture for ONC to seek to measure EHR technology in this way.

Sounds like a rejection to me, however, don’t take my word. Here’s the AMA’s response to this decision. First, they demur and quote ONC:

We disagree with ONC’s assertion in the Version 2014 final rule that, “[w]hile valid and reliable usability measurements exist, including those specified in NISTIR 7804 ‘‘Technical Evaluation, Testing and Validation of the Usability of Electronic Health Records,’’ we expressed that it would be inappropriate for ONC to seek to measure EHR technology in this way.”

It then says:

To the contrary, we believe that it is incumbent upon ONC to include more robust usability criteria in the certification process.  The incentive program has certainly spurred aggressive EHR uptake but has done so through an artificial and non-traditional marketplace.  As a consumer, the physician’s choice of products is limited not only by those EHRs that are certified but also by the constraint that all of these products are driven by federal criteria.  The AMA made several detailed recommendations for improving Version 2014 certification in our Stage 2 comment letter, which were not adopted, but still hold true, and we recommend ONC consider them for the next version.  Testimony of AMA’s Health IT Policy Committee’s Workgroups on Certification/Adoption and Implementation, July 23, 2013, pp. 5-6

I recognize that ONC says that it may consider the protocols in the future. Nevertheless, I think the plain English term rejected fits.

In the first part of his statement, Dr. Reider cites several ISO standards. With the exception of the Summative Testing, all of these have been referred to, but none have been adopted. Reference to a standard is not sufficient for its inclusion under the operation of the federal Administrative Procedure Act, which governs all federal agency rulemaking. In other words, these standards are important, but ONC simply calls them out for attention, nothing more.

I think two factors are at work in ONC’s reluctance to include the NIST usability protocols. The first is that the vendors are adamantly opposed to having them mandated. However, I believe there is a way around that objection.

As I have argued before, ONC could tell vendors that their products will be subject to a TURF based review of their product for compliance and that the results would be made public. That would give users a way to judge a product for suitability to their purpose on a uniform basis. Thus, users looking at the results could determine for themselves whether or not one or more non compliance was important to them, but at least they would have a common way to look at candidate EHRs, something they cannot do now , nor under ONC’s proposed approach.

The other factor is more complex and goes to the nature of ONC’s mission. ONC is both the advocate and the standards maker for HIT. In that, it is similar to the FAA, which is vested with both promoting and regulating US aviation.

It’s well established that the FAA’s dual role is a major problem. It’s hard to be a cheerleader for an industry and make it toe the line.

With the FAA, its dual mandate is exacerbated when the highly respected NTSB investigates an incident and makes recommendations. The FAA, acting as industry friend, often defers NTSB’s authoritative and reasonable recommendations to the public’s determent.

I believe that something similar is going on with ONC. NIST’s relationship to ONC is roughly analogous to that of the NTSB’s to the FAA.

NIST is not an investigative agency, but it is the federal government’s standards and operations authority. It isn’t infallible. However, ONC dismissing NIST’s usability protocols, in one word, inappropriate. It did this without explanation or analysis (at least none that they’ve shared). In my view, that’s really inappropriate.

ONC has a problem. It’s operating the way it was intended, but that’s not what patients and practioners need. To continue the aviation analogy, ONC needs to straighten up and fly right.

March 31, 2014 I Written By

When Carl Bergman’s not rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

Time Using EMR, EMR Copy and Paste, and Larry Page on EMR


The good news is that EMRs will get better.


I’ve often said that it’s not copy and paste that’s bad. It’s how you use it. Many use it poorly which leads to bad data.


This whole interview with Larry (Founder of Google) is great. Plus, I adore Charlie Rose interviews.

March 30, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

The Time Has Finally Come for MU, It Really Is Now or Never

The following is a guest blog post by Lea Chatham.
Lea Chatham

The healthcare industry has been talking about Meaningful Use (MU) for years now. The program started in 2011, but there were discussions and planning going on years before that. It’s become a ubiquitous topic in healthcare publications and blogs. So much so that many providers probably still think that they have time to decide if they are really going to attest or not.

The truth is that 2014 is last year to initiate participation for Medicare to receive incentive payments. To avoid the first adjustment of 1%, providers must attest for Stage 1, Year 1 no later than the third quarter of 2014 (July 1 – September 30, 2014). You can still start MU in future years to avoid additional penalties, but you won’t get any incentives and you will still have the 1% deduction on your Medicare Part B Claims starting in 2015. That penalty doesn’t go away if you start MU in 2015 or 2016.

What this means is that the estimated 40% of America’s physicians who don’t’ have an EHR and haven’t yet begun to attest for MU have a decision to make—now. And there are essentially three options:

  1. Choose an EHR and attest in 2014
  2. Accept the penalty (which increases each year)
  3. Request a hardship exception.

Here is what you need to know about each of these options so you can make the right choice for your practice.

Choose an EHR & Attest

Over $16 billion in incentives has been paid out to providers who have been attesting for MU. If you start in 2014, you’ll still get $24,000 over three years for your efforts. You’ll also avoid the penalties, which start with 1% in 2015 and increase each year for a minimum of three years. The larger your Medicare pool of patients, the more sense this makes financially.

If you are going to adopt an EHR now, be sure to choose the right solution for your needs. Many of the providers who have not yet implemented an EHR, are small practices (10 or fewer providers). According to a survey conducted in January by SK&A, the smaller the practice, the lower the adoption rate. Small, independent practices don’t have staff, time, or money to waste. So it has to be right the first time. Take these factors into consideration:

  1. Cost: There are now free and low cost EHRs that can offer almost any specialty the tools they need to reap the benefits of an EHR.
  2. Cloud-based and Mobile: Its 2014, don’t choose an EHR unless it offers anytime, anywhere access and true mobile connectivity.
  3. 2014 Edition Certified for MU: As of January 1, 2014, you need a 2014 Edition certified EHR to attest for MU. Only about 12% of complete EHRs have this certification, which narrows the field.
  4. Total Integration: You can get more from your EHR if it is fully integrated with your practice management and billing system. You can meet MU and streamline many other functions. As a bonus it can actually increase both charges and collections. A UBM white paper showed that the average increase in revenue was $33,000 per FTE provider per year!

Accept the Penalty

So you are thinking you’ll just take the penalty. This may be because you don’t serve Medicare patients or at least not that many. It could also be that you are planning to retire soon and don’t think you’ll be around in another couple of years. But consider this, with MU, PQRS, and eRx penalties, it reaches over 10% in total adjustments to your Medicare Part B claims in five years. If you do start seeing more Medicare patients (as your patients age) or you don’t retire, 10% is nothing to sneeze at. If you are a solo doc and you generate an average of $30,000 a month and about 30% of your patients have Medicare, that’s $10,000 a month. A 10% cut adds up to $12,000 a year. To make that up, you would have to conduct about 100-120 more patient visits a year (if your average visit reimbursement is around $100-150).

And here is something else to consider. Perhaps you are willing to take that hit, and you are sure that you don’t want to attest for MU. But does that mean you don’t need to implement an EHR? Not these days. Patient expectations are changing, and to stay competitive you need to meet those expectations. A study conducted by the Optum Institute showed that 62% of patients want to correspond with their physician online and 75% are willing to view their medical records online. Another survey conducted by Deloitte showed that two-thirds of patient would consider switching to a physician who offers secure access to medical records online. You need patients to stay in business so take their changing needs seriously or you may struggle to stay competitive in changing times.

Request a Hardship Exception

The first thing that needs to be said here is that not everyone can apply for a hardship exception. If you’d like to attest for MU, but need more time AND you meet one or more of the criteria, then you should definitely consider this option. This is a summary, check the CMS tipsheet to find out more:

  1. Your area lacks the necessary infrastructure (i.e., no broadband)
  2. You’re a new provider
  3. Natural disaster or other unforeseen barrier
  4. Lack of face-to-face interaction with patients
  5. Practice in multiple locations
  6. EHR vendor issues (i.e., your current vendor was unable to certify for 2014 edition)

For most providers who are practicing full time in a single location and have not yet chosen an EHR, these exceptions won’t apply. This leaves you with choices and one and two above. You will still need to decide if you want to attest or not.

If you are still on the fence, consider this… Beyond MU, practices are facing the ICD-10 transition and a changing reimbursement landscape with ongoing reform from of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Technology can be a very effective tool to help you manage these changes and turn this set of challenges into an opportunity to optimize your practice and position your business for success no matter what comes your way.


About Lea Chatham

Lea Chatham is the Content Expert at Kareo, responsible for developing educational resources to help small medical practices improve their businesses. She joined Kareo after working at a small integrated health system for over five years developing marketing and educational tools and events for patients. Prior to that, Lea was a marketing coordinator for Medical Manager Health Systems, WebMD Practice Services, Emdeon, and Sage Software. She specializes in simplifying information about healthcare and healthcare technology for physicians, practice staff, and patients.

March 27, 2014 I Written By