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Hospital M&A Cost Boosted Significantly By Health IT Integration

Posted on August 18, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @annezieger on Twitter.

Most of the time, hospital M&A is sold as an exercise in saving money by reducing overhead and leveraging shared strengths. But new data from PricewaterhouseCoopers suggests that IT integration costs can undercut that goal substantially. (It also makes one wonder how ACOs can afford to merge their health IT infrastructure well enough to share risk, but that’s a story for another day.)

In any event, the cost of integrating the IT systems of hospitals that merge can add up to 2% to the annual operating costs of the facilities during the integration period, according to PricewaterhouseCoopers. That figure, which comes to $70,000 to $100,000 per bed over three to five years, is enough to reduce or even completely negate benefits of doing some deals. And it clearly forces merging hospitals to think through their respective IT strategies far more thoroughly than they might anticipated.

As if that stat isn’t bad enough, other experts feel that PwC is understating the case. According to Dwayne Gunter, president of Parallon Technology Solutions — who spoke to Hospitals & Health Networks magazine — IT integration costs can be much higher than those predicted by PwC’s estimate. “I think 2% being very generous,” Gunter told the magazine, “For example, if the purchased hospital’s IT infrastructure is in bad shape, the expense of replacing it will raise costs significantly.”

Of course, hospitals have always struggled to integrate systems when they merge, but as PwC research notes, there’s a lot more integrate these days, including not only core clinical and business operating systems but also EMRs, population health management tools and data analytics. (Given be extremely shaky state of cybersecurity in hospitals these days, merging partners had best feel out each others’ security systems very thoroughly as well, which obviously adds additional expenses.) And what if the merging hospitals use different enterprise EMR systems? Do you rip and replace, integrate and pray, or do some mix of the above?

On top of all that, working hospital systems have to make sure they have enough IT staffers available, or can contract with enough, to do a good job of the integration process. Given that in many hospitals, IT leaders barely have enough staff members to get the minimum done, the merger partners are likely costly consultants if they want to finish the process for the next millennium.

My best guess is that many mergers have failed to take this massive expense into account. The aftermath has got to be pretty ugly.

Healthcare IT Career Jobs and Advice

Posted on April 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Late last year I acquired Healthcare IT Central, a healthcare IT job board and career website and have since been diving into the health IT jobs and recruiting space. The site continues to grow at an amazing rate. We now are helping 20,568 job seekers find employment from over 800 health IT companies. In fact, 11,649 healthcare IT professionals have active resumes in our system and we send out a weekly Health IT eNewsletter each week to almost 16,000 Health IT professionals.

If you’re out there looking for a job in the Healthcare IT field, I recommend you register as a job seeker and search through our hundreds of healthcare IT jobs. All of this is offered for free to job seekers. It’s so incredibly satisfying to help thousands of people find a job in healthcare IT. Hopefully many readers of this site will find it helpful as well.

We also offer a number of resources for health IT employers that want to post their jobs, search our resume database for the right candidate or sponsor the weekly newsletter. A little birdie told me we might be rolling out a series of health IT career focused webinars as well.

Finding the right people for your organization is a really challenging task. However, once you find the right one, it’s incredibly satisfying as well.

Along with Healthcare IT Central’s job board, the Healthcare IT Today blog provides some really valuable health IT focused career content. Take a look at a few recent posts:

  • What Not to Do: Radio Silence – A great look at what not to do when searching for a job.
  • 4 Main Compensation Options for Health IT Consultants – A lot of people are considering switching jobs and becoming consultants. This post will give you a lot of insight on the different consultant payment options.
  • My Best Career Advice – This is part of the new “Ask Cassie” series where you can ask a health IT career question and Cassie Sturdevant will answer it in a future post. Feel free to ask in the comments of this post and I’ll forward it on to her as well.

I’ll admit that I’m still really new in the health IT recruiting, jobs and career space. However, I’ve enjoyed learning the various idiosyncrasies. If you have thoughts, ideas, or comments on the various sites, I’d love to hear them. I always love learning new things and making new connections.

Where the Health IT & EHR Jobs Are: Take Two

Posted on February 21, 2014 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

There’s Epic and Then There’s Everybody Else

In the first EHR job review, I looked at the demand for EHR/HIT certifications from organizations such as AHIMA. In this review, I wanted to find the most in demand product certifications. That is, if you’re thinking about being certified in a product, which ones have the most openings? There are two short answers:

  • It’s complicated, and
  • Epic

Where to Look?
Finding openings in the first review was straightforward. In this case, compiling a list of product certifications was more complex.

To start, I assumed that the bigger a company’s market share, the more likely there would be openings. This led to asking, what were the vendor shares? For an answer, I used SK&A’s recent report. They continuously call practitioners about a host of issues. Most other studies are either self selecting web polls or use ONC’s attribution stats. The latter is a hard count, but doesn’t take into account those who don’t participate in MU. In a subsequent post, I’ll cover SK&A’s report and market shares in more depth.

Based on SK&A’s report, here’s the market share for the top 20. Among these, I looked for product certifications for the top dozen, which had a least 2.0 percent of the market.

Table I
EHR Market Share by Practioner Site Size
SK&A – January 2014

No

Vendor

   %

No

Vendor

   %

1

 Epic Systems Corporation

10.8

12

 MedPlus, A Quest Diagnostics Company

1.9

2

 eClinicalWorks

10.0

13

 eMDs, Inc.

1.7

3

 Allscripts

9.5

14

MEDITECH, Inc.

1.7

4

 Practice Fusion

6.4

15

 Sage Software

1.2

5

 NextGen Healthcare

5.7

16

Office Ally

1.2

6

 General Electric Healthcare IT

3.7

17

Community Computer Service Inc.

1.1

7

 Cerner Corporation

3.5

18

 BioMedix Vascular Solutions

1.0

8

 McKesson Provider Technologies

3.4

19

 NexTech Systems, Inc.

0.9

9

 athenahealth, Inc

2.8

20

AdvancedMD 1

0.9

10

 AmazingCharts.com, Inc.

2.5

21

 All Other Vendors (471)

28

11

 Greenway Medical Technologies, Inc.

2.0

 

 

Search Issues

In the prior review, it was simple to find CCA, CPHIMS openings, etc. Product certifications, as a rule, don’t have unique names and may be referred to in many ways. Typical variations for NextGen, etc., are:

  • Certified NextGen professional,
  • NextGen certified,
  • NextGen professional certification, etc.

In addition to these identification issues, there is also the issue of specialties. For example, Epic has about 40 apps from ADT (Inpatient and Outpatient Admission-Discharge-Transfer Application) to Wisdom (Dental Application).

Due to this complexity, and being interested in the relative demand for product certifications, I developed this search protocol, which seems to yield good results:

  • Source. As before, I looked for jobs posted on HealthcareITCentral.com in the last 30 days.
  • Limits. Only look for major product names, that is, not their product varieties.
  • Terms. For each product, I searched for three phrases that varied the product name and the word certification.

Here’s how, for example, here is how I searched for Allscripts’ certifications:

  • Allscripts certified
  • Allscripts certification, and
  • Certified Allscripts

As a check, I also did a Google search for Allscripts and certification to see if I missed a substantial number of openings.

This approach yielded, I believe, a representative group of openings, but it’s not all encompassing. For example, some job ads combine product names. An ad might say Allscripts/Epic certification, but the search engine won’t find Allscripts.

Searching for the words Allscripts and certification will capture more certification openings, but it also will bring up a slew of unrelated others.

The best way, then, to find these openings would be to search for the company name and certification, etc., within so many words of each other. This is called a proximity search. Many text search engines do proximity searches, but I don’t know of a job search engine that does.

Product Certification Openings

With that said, Table I shows the 134 openings I found among the top ten EHRs with 2 percent or more of the market.  This is quite low compared to the general demand for persons with Cerner, NextGen experience. Of the 134, Epic with 90 percent dominates. Only NextGen, with 11 has any other significant demand.

Table II
Product Certification Openings

Vendor

Openings

Epic

120

NextGen

11

Cerner

2

Allscripts

1

Total

134

Chart I shows the states with significant openings. It also shows how  a state’s openings rank compares to its population ranking:

  • Red Columns. Openings per state.
  • Purple Columns. These show how a state’s jobs rank compares to its population share. For example, if a state’s job rank is plus four then its jobs are four levels above its population rank. Conversely, if a state is minus four, its share is four less than its population rank.

It’s no surprise that the states with the largest populations have the most jobs. California leads with 36 openings. There are notable exceptions, such as Colorado, whose openings far outrank its population rank.

To Certify or Not To Certify

I was surprised that several products, such as eClinicalWorks, had no demand. There’s a good reason. From what I later discovered, eClinicalWorks, among others, doesn’t certify users of their products. Indeed, I found it is difficult to know which products have certification programs. Even if they do, it’s not easy to find details. For example, I’ve called and written Epic to find the details of its programs, but so far no response.

As a result, I’ve decided to look at the vendor certification program issue. I want to find out from vendors why they do or do not have programs, their market targets and their level of participation.

The lesson from this review is simple, if you have an Epic certification and live in California, you have good odds of finding a job match. If you are looking to become certified in a product, Epic would appear to be your best shot. However, that may not be the case.

Product specific certification programs are odd beasts. Much depends not only on your product experience, but also on the product vendor’s attitude toward you. Some vendors may have an open door to those who want to learn the product. Others, such as Epic, insist that you be part of an active Epic practice and they do all the training at their Verona, WI headquarters. There is no easy or accessible way to know the ground rules unless you are already using or have used the product.

If you are already familiar with a product, you may find that using social media and personal contacts are the best path to new work rather than setting out to be certified in another product.

Where the Jobs Are: Demand for EHR/HIT Certifications

Posted on January 20, 2014 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

There are dozens of EHR/HIT certification program and counting. A few years ago, I got a CPHIMS. I did it in hopes it would open some work doors. I thought it was useful, well developed and administered, etc., but going fulltime running the EHRSelector.com took me in a different direction. Still, I’ve wondered which certification programs offer the most opportunity and where are they located?

With help from John’s newly acquired Healthcare IT Central job board, I found answers to these questions. HealthcareITCentral has one of the largest, if not the largest collection of HIT positions. Using its advanced search, I looked for jobs, in the last 30, days that required specific certifications.

A few caveats about this review:

  • Each certification counts as one position. For example, if one job posting listed ComTIA, CPHIMS and CPEHR, I counted it as three jobs, one for each certification.
  • General certifications only. For practical reasons this report only covers general certifications that have a one word abbreviation. Finding other certifications, such as eClinicalWorks Certified, etc., requires searching for phrases, which HealthcareITCentral currently doesn’t support (or John needs to teach me how to do). No doubt Epic certification and Cerner certification would be high on this list if it was included.
  • Dynamics. The results I found for these certifications are a snapshot. The job market and the openings that HealthcareITCentral lists constantly change. What is true now, could change in a moment. However, I believe this can give you a good idea of the relative demand that exists.

Certifications Reviewed

Table I lists the certifications and for which I found at least one opening.

Table I

Certifications With Open Positions

1

CCA

9

CHTS

2

CCDP

10

CompTIA

3

CCS

11

CPEHR

4

CCS-P

12

CPHIMS

5

CEMP

13

CPHIT

6

CHDA

14

CPORA

7

CHPS

15

RHIA

8

CHSP

16

RHIT

 

Table II, lists the certifications that had no openings in the last 30 days. I also did a quick check to see if any of these had any jobs listed at all. It appears that there were no open positions for these certifications, though as I note above matters can quickly change.

Table II

Certifications Without Open Positions

1

CAHIMS

8

CMUP

2

CEOP

9

CPCIP

3

CHTP

10

CPHIT

4

CHTS

11

CPHP

5

CHTSP

12

CPORA

6

CICP

13

HWCP

7

CIPCP

Certification Demand

I found that the system listed 1,500 or so positions in the past month. See Chart I. Of those, 440 or 30 percent mentioned one of these certifications.

Of all the certifications, AHIMA’s were most in demand. AHIMA’s prominence among the certifications reviewed is remarkable. It’s three programs account for two thirds of the certification positions.

Its RHIA (Registered Health Information Administrator) was mentioned 101 times. RHIA accounted for about 22 percent of the openings with RHIT (Registered Health Information Technician) slightly less at 94.

RHIA’s designed to show a range of managerial skills, rather than in depth technical ability. If you consider certifications proof of technical acumen, then the strong RHIA demand is a bit counter intuitive.

Where the RHIA has a broad scope, the close second, RHIT, is more narrowly focused on EHRs and their integrity.

In third place, but still with a substantial demand is CCS (Certified Coding Specialist), which as the name implies focuses on a specific ability.

Check out the top 5 certification job categories on Healthcare IT Central:
RHIT Jobs
RHIA Jobs
CCS Jobs
CompTIA Jobs
CCA Jobs

Certification Demand by Location

After looking at certification demand, I looked at demand by location. To do this I merged all the certification job openings into a single list. That is, I added those for RHIA, RHIT, etc., and then eliminated duplicates. This reduced the total from about 390 to 280.

The next step was to rank the states by their job numbers. Chart II for the top ten state openings shows this information two ways:

  • Blue Columns. Openings per state.
  • Green Columns. These show how a state’s jobs rank compared to its population share. For example, if a state is plus four then its jobs rank four levels above its population rank. Conversely, if a state is minus four, its share is four less than its population rank.

As you might expect, the states with the largest populations have the most jobs. California leads with 36 openings. However, there are some notable exceptions, such as Maryland.

Maryland has 21 jobs openings. This puts it fourth between Texas and New York. It is 15 ranks above where its population ranks it. Illinois, on the other hand has nine jobs. This puts it four ranks below its population standing.

 Chart II, Openings by State

Certifications are a response to the demand for persons with demonstrated skills. The question is whether a particular one will reward your time, cost and effort with something that is marketable. Demand alone can’t make that choice for you. Personal satisfaction can’t be discounted as a factor in any decision. I hope this short study may help you find the best fit for you.

10,000+ Healthcare IT Professionals

Posted on December 29, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As we head to the end of the year, I’m really excited that Healthcare IT Central just reached an amazing milestone. That community just passed 10,000 active healthcare IT professional resumes (officially 10,070 as of this post). This sets Healthcare IT Central as one of the top (and possibly the #1) healthcare IT career website out there. As we head into 2014, we’re making plans to ensure that we are the #1 healthcare IT career website for those searching for healthcare IT positions and those looking for healthcare IT talent.

For those readers who might be looking to improve on their current job or are looking for a job, you can search for a health IT job. We’re adding more and more employers and more and more jobs. It’s exciting to see all the match making that happens on the site.

If you happen to be searching for a new or better job, you might check out some of the following links to popular health IT job searches:

Happy New Year to everyone! I hope each of you is able to reach your career goals in 2014.

EMR & EHR Jobs

Posted on December 15, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While it might seem counterintuitive, the holidays are some of the best times to search for a job.  If you’re looking to improve on your current position, you can search for a health IT job or check out some of these popular searches:

This month we’ve had almost as many jobs posted as last month and we’re only half way through the month. The other great part is that if you don’t see a job you like you can set up a job agent to notify you when certain types of jobs are posted.

EHR Job Website Joins Healthcare Scene Family – Healthcare IT Central

Posted on December 1, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those of you who don’t read EMR and HIPAA (which is a shame if you don’t, but you can rectify that by subscribing to its email list now), you might have missed the big announcement that we’d acquired the healthcare IT job board called Healthcare IT Central and its health IT employment blog Healthcare IT Today. It’s been really excited bringing together such a great EMR and EHR job resource with my network of EMR, EHR and Health IT blogs.

Over time we’ll be slowly integrating the sites together where it makes sense. For example, you’ll find a new job listing widget in the sidebar of this site. Every other weekend we’ll be doing a job posting on this site that highlights the various Healthcare IT Central jobs along with covering any other job resources we create.

For example, if you’re interested in learning about how much healthcare IT professionals are making, then you’ll want to check out this survey we’re doing with Greythorn (fill out the survey here). It only takes 10 minutes to complete and Greythorn will donate $1 to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Bellevue and Chicago for every response they receive. We’ll be publishing the results from the survey in future posts.

If you’re an employer looking to hire someone in healthcare IT, then sign up as an employer. With over 16,000 job registrants and approaching 10,000 recently updated resumes, Healthcare IT Central is a really great resource for anyone trying to hire someone in healthcare IT.

For those readers who might be looking to improve on their current job or are looking for a job, you can search for a health IT job or check out some of these popular searches:

I’m really excited about this new venture into the world of healthcare IT recruiting. I’ve already had a chance to see the impact that a site like this has on so many people’s lives. I look forward to doing even more to help people find the right job and companies to find the right people.

If you have any suggestions, comments, thoughts, reactions, I look forward to reading them in the comments or privately on our contact us page.

EMR Costs Outweigh Benefits, Physicians Say

Posted on August 21, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @annezieger on Twitter.

Nobody likes paying for something that’s expensive but not that valuable. But that’s the position many physicians feel they’re in when they buy an EMR, FierceHealthIT reports.

A new study by athenahealth concludes that while physicians do feel EMRs deliver benefits, the expense they have to take on outweigh the benefits EMRs deliver. The EMR vendor surveyed 1,200 physicians, 70 percent specialists and 30 percent primary care doctors to learn more about their attitudes toward EMRs, FHIT said.

The study wasn’t all bad news for EMR use. Thirty-eight percent of doctors had a “somewhat favorable” opinion, and 31 percent had a “very favorable” opinion of EMRs. That being said, 51 percent of responding physicians said that the financial benefits of EMRs don’t outweigh the cost, athenahealth found.

The study found that physicians were more familiar with EMRs than they were when athenahealth did its 2012 Physician Sentiment Index. But doctors’ willingness to buy an EMR  has actually fallen, probably because those who haven’t done it at this late date are particularly resistant. Meanwhile, one thing that hasn’t changed since last year is that doctors don’t think EMRs are made with their practice needs in mind.

Sadly, these results aren’t much of a surprise. While some doctors are adapting to their EMR installation, they’re still struggling with clunky interfaces and questionable vendor support.  Some practices have spent years waiting for their pre-EMR productivity to come back, and have found that it just isn’t happening.

But here and there there are some signs that vendors are “getting it.” For example, I really liked a story John wrote about how EMR vendor Elation requires programmers to shadow a physician as part of the hiring process. To my mind, this kind of thinking is far more likely to bear fruit than the existing system, which puts programmers at a considerable remove from their product’s end users.

The truth is, we’re never going to reach the point where all physicians are EMR boosters, but it’d be nice if we at least reached a point where most saw EMRs as being worth the (big) pricetag.

5 Reasons to Be A Health IT Blogger

Posted on April 16, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Allison sent out the nice tweet above which links to a blog post talking about 5 reasons to blog:

  • You’re Creating a Personal Brand
  • Become A Keyword Search
  • Networking Made Easy
  • Demonstrate Your Skills
  • Learn While You Blog

All of these are great reasons to blog. Allison is also mostly talking about blogging as a way to find a new job. This is really valuable. I know since I’ve gotten a lot of job offers thanks to my blog. In fact, I can attribute every job I’ve had since college to the websites that I’ve created. Having created something and shown some entrepreneurial spirit was what set me apart from other candidates in the interview process. In one case it also helped me overcome the challenge of having no healthcare experience.

For me, the two most important things on the list is to connect with people and learn. Blogs have an amazing way of opening up doors of opportunity to meet new people. I’ve met hundreds of people virtually and in person because of my blogs. It’s my favorite part of blogging.

When you blog, you can learn so much. First, if you want to write a blog post about something, you better be educated on the topic. Second, if you write about a topic you’re not as familiar with, then readers of your blog will be happy to educate you in the comments. Yes, sometimes the education comes with a stiff price (some people are just brutal in the comments), but sometimes that’s part of the learning as well.

I know that blogging isn’t for everyone. Some people just don’t have the discipline to be able to do it. Doing it consistently definitely takes discipline. However, everyone could benefit from sharing their experiences and knowledge on a blog.

Health Data Hacking, Population Health Help, and Childhood Obesity — Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on February 17, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

EMR and HIPAA

Health Data Hacking Likely To Increase

One aspect of EMRs and medical technology many people — physicians and patients alike — are nervous about, are security breeches. Unfortunately, it seems as if this fear is justified, and will continue to be for the time being. Redspin, an IT security firm, gathered data about security and data incidents since 2009, and it has only increased since then. Some of the other findings are rather frightening as well.

Can The Benefits of Hospitals Acquiring Practices Be Achieved By Other Means?

There is a current trend of hospitals acquiring practices. Is there any way for groups of physicians to achieve these results other ways? This post goes into the details of this situation, and different loopholes involved.

Hospital EMR and EHR

Mostashari Asks EHR Vendors to Do What’s “Moral and Right”

Farzad Mostashari, ONC National Coordinator, recently made comments at the Health IT Policy Committee. He didn’t cut any corners when it came to talking about what he is seeing in the EMR world, and encouraged EHR vendors to do the moral and right thing. This post highlights some of his statements.

ACOs Need Population Health Help From EMRs

EMRs, in large part, don’t assist with ACOs and population health help. This is unfortunate, because they definitely need the help. In the future, EMR vendors need to be aware of this, and tweek their EMRs to offer tools to help.

Meaningful Health IT News

My HIMSS Will Be All About Quality And Patient Safety

Because of his experiences in 2012, Neil Versel has a new focus for 2013. He is now dedicated to “bringing news about efforts to improve patient safety and reduce medical errors.” Read this post for more about his goals, and how you can get involved.

Smart Phone HC

Health IT Positively Affects Childhood Obesity

Childhood obesity is on the rise, and the big question is — how can we prevent it? While many experts may be quick to weigh in on the situation, a recent study published in Pediatrics has suggested that Health IT may prove to have a positive affect on the problem. There are many companies and websites working to create ways for children to get involved and proactive about their health, and this post highlights a few of them.