Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

5 Tips to Help You Create Awesome Content to Market Your Healthcare Practice

Posted on November 9, 2016 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Alex Membrillo
alex-membrillo-head-shot
While the phrase “content is king” has surely worn out its welcome, there’s no denying that one of the most effective ways to get noticed, build an audience and grow your practice is to produce high-quality content.

The “blog” is still the most thought-of content type out there, but in more recent years, healthcare practitioners are testing out new waters, such as video marketing and podcasting.

Regardless of your preferred form of content, one of the biggest struggles the busy healthcare professional encounters when trying to market his/her practice is finding ideas to talk about.

These 5 tips should help you create awesome, high-quality content that will demonstrate your expertise and expand your reach to new prospects.

1. Look no further than your calendar
Each month marks at least one – if not a handful of – observances related to the healthcare industry. October, for example, is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. November is American Diabetes Month. June 27 is National HIV Testing Day.

Each of these observances provides a foundation and direction for you to create content around. For October, for example, you could create four blog posts (scheduled once per week) that discusses a different perspective of breast cancer.  For June 27, you could create an infographic that outlines what to expect when getting tested for HIV.

The benefit of turning to your calendar for content ideas is two-fold:

  1. You can plan your content well in advance, so that you’re never left scrambling at the last minute
  2. You can take advantage of the social conversations going on in places like Twitter and Facebook (using hashtags or tagging key influencers helps immensely)

You can turn to Healthfinder.gov to get a list of the observances taking place each year.

2. Tap into the existing news trends
One thing you can always count on is that health and sciences will always be covered in the news. Whether it’s a breakthrough drug, a new form of alternative care, a controversial surgery or statistics that demonstrate a trend in human health (such as obesity), health is always on the front-page, so to speak, of news.

This is a tremendous opportunity for you to create relative, real-time content that folks are talking about at this very moment.

If, for example, Good Morning America just aired a segment on the latest development on the Zika virus, you can be certain that millions of folks will be searching online – and on social media – for terms related to Zika.

By producing your own commentary or perspective on the matter, you can win over some of this traffic and come across as an expert and influencer.

3. Find out what your audiences want to know about
The whole purpose of creating quality content is to provide something of value for folks who conduct online searches.

What better way to produce relative content people actually care about than to go straight to the source?

You can do this a few different ways:

  1. Conduct a survey on your blog or through email, asking your readers what topics they’re most concerned about or would like for you to cover. Survey Monkey is a good free tool to use.
  2. Look at the blogs and social profiles of your local and national counterparts. What are they writing about that seems to have garnered audience response?
  3. Use keyword research. If you know who your audiences are, then you can figure out what search terms they use on Google. These key terms will serve as the subject matter of your content.

4. Don’t resist the list
One of the most effective types of blog posts is the “list.”

5 Ways to Reduce Stress at Home. 10 Reasons to Lower Your Salt Intake.

These types of articles speak directly to the human mind, which likes to group and classify things. A list article tells the reader: This is what you’re going to get, nothing more, nothing less. Readers like this, because they know they’ll be able to skim the list and absorb its value without having to commit to a ton of reading.

Just by thinking in “list” form, you’ll likely come away with a few story ideas. If, for example, you’re an orthopedic surgeon, think to yourself, what would my readers want to know? Perhaps you might come away with ideas such as:

  • Five Ways Runners Can Reduce Joint Pain
  • 7 Reasons Why You Don’t Need Back Surgery
  • The 3 Exercises You Can Do at Home to Strengthen Your Bones

5. Go ahead – reuse, recycle, repurpose!
If you’ve actively been producing content, then there’s no need to reinvent the wheel each and every time. Why not go back over your existing content and figure out a way to spin it into something new?

Is there a new angle you can focus on? Hospitals, for example, could take an article that highlights one field and rewrite it to focus on another one.

Perhaps an article you wrote last year is outdated and could benefit from the inclusion of the latest study or statistics. Create that new post, and link to the original one.

Let’s say, for example, you’re a plastic surgeon who wrote a popular blog post last year about the use of Botox for patients suffering from excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis). Since then, you’ve had a few clients see remarkable benefits from this procedure. You can then update your blog post with patient testimonials and promote it again across your digital channels.

Billions of content is produced daily – getting noticed can be a challenge

As a healthcare professional, your time is already extremely limited, but you know the importance of marketing in order to grow your practice.

Use these 5 tips above to help you quickly come up with high-quality pieces of content that’ll attract your prospects and demonstrate your expertise.

About Alex Membrillo
Alex Membrillo is the CEO of Cardinal Web Solutions, an award winning healthcare marketing agency based in Atlanta, GA. His innovative approach to digital marketing has transformed the industry and delivered remarkable results to clients of all sizes and markets. Visit www.CardinalWebSolutions.com to find out more about Cardinal Web Solutions.  

Follow him on Twitter @Alex_Membrillo

The Exciting Future of Healthcare IT #NHITWeek

Posted on September 28, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One time I went to my wife’s OB/GYN appointment and I was in shock and awe with how well the doctor remembered my wife’s past pregnancies. Literally down to the tear that occurred. The reason I was in shock was that she prefaced her memory of my wife’s medical history with “Your old chart is off in storage, but as I recall you had a…”

While year later I’m still impressed with this OB/GYN’s ability to remember her patients, I know that this is not always the case. Doctors are humans and can’t possibly remember everything that occurred with every patient. Humans have limits. In fact, doctors deserve credit that they’ve provided such amazing medical care to so many patients despite these limits.

My esteem for doctors grows even greater when I think of the challenges associated with diagnosing computer problems (Yes, I am the nerd formerly known as @techguy). It’s not easy diagnosing a computer problem and then applying the fix that will remedy the problem. In fact, you often find yourself fixing the problem without really even knowing what’s causing the problem (ie. reinstall or reboot). While fixing computers is challenging, diagnosing and treating the human body has to be at least an order and probably two or more orders of magnitude more complex.

My point is that the work doctors do is really hard and they’ve generally done great work.

While I acknowledge the history of medicine, I also can’t help but think that technology is the pathway to solving many of the challenges that make doctors lives so difficult today. It seems fitting to me that IT stands for Information Technology since the core of healthcare’s challenges revolve around information.

Here are some of the ways technology can and will help:

Quality Information
The story of my wife’s OB/GYN is the perfect illustration of this potential. Doctors who have the right information at the point of care can provide better care. That’s a simple but powerful principle that can become a reality with healthcare IT. Instead of relying on this OB/GYN’s memory, she could have had that information readily available to her in an EHR.

Certainly, we’re not perfect at this yet. EHR software can go down. EHR can perpetuate misinformation. EHRs can paint the incorrect picture for a patient. However, on the whole, I believe an EHRs data is more accessible and available when and where it’s needed. Plus, this is going to get dramatically better over time. In some cases, it already is.

Deep Understanding of Individual Health Metrics
Health sensors are just starting to come into their own. As these health sensors create more and more clinically relevant data, healthcare providers will be empowered with a much deeper understanding of the specific health metrics that matter for each unique patient. Currently, doctors are often driving in the dark. This new wave of health sensors will be like turning the lights on in places that have never seen light before. In some cases, it already is.

Latest Medical Research
Doctors do an incredible job keeping up on the latest research in their specialty, but how can they keep up with the full body of medical knowledge? Even if they study all day and all night (which they can’t do because they have to see patients), the body of medical knowledge is so complex that the human mind can’t comprehend, process, and remember it all. Technology can.

I’m not suggesting that technology will replace humans. Not for the forseeable future anyway. However, it can certainly assist, inform, and remind humans. My phone already does this for me in my personal life. Technology will do the same for doctors in their clinical life. In some cases, it already is.

Patient Empowerment
Think about how dramatic a shift it’s been from a patient chart which the patient never saw to EHR software that makes your entire record available to patients all the time. If that doesn’t empower patients, nothing will. I love reading about how many kings use to suppress their people by suppressing information. Information is power and technology can make access to your health information possible.

Related to this trend is also how patients become more empowered through communities of patients with similar conditions and challenges. The obvious example is Patients Like Me, but it’s happening all over the internet and on social media. This is true for chronic patients who want to find patients with a rare condition, but it’s also true for patients who are finding the healthcare system a challenge to navigate. There is nothing more empowering than finding someone in a similar situation that can help you find the best opportunities and solutions to your problems.

In some cases, patient empowerment is already happening today.

Yes, I know that many of the technologies implemented to date don’t meet this ambitious vision of what technology can accomplish in healthcare. In fact, many health technologies have actually made things worse instead of better. This is a problem that must be dealt with, but it doesn’t deter me from the major hope I have the technology can solve many of the challenges that make being a doctor so hard. It doesn’t deter me from the dream that patients will be empowered to take a more active role in their care. It doesn’t deter me from the desire to leverage technology to make our healthcare system better.

The best part of my 11 years in healthcare IT has been seeing technology make things better on a small scale (“N of 1” –@cancergeek). My hope for the next decade is to see these benefits blow up on a much larger scale.

The Waiting Room – A Patient’s First Impression

Posted on September 23, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

We’ve all heard about the importance of first impressions. They last a long time and happen very quickly. The same is true for a medical practice. Patients’ first impression of a medical practice is the waiting room and that impression can last a very long time. What have you done to improve your patients’ experience in the waiting room?

Instead of doing a bunch of small things in your waiting room, I suggest you focus on creating one specific WOW! factor that patients will remember. In many cases people are turning to digital signage to provide this wow factor. Combine amazing content with some amazing digital signage like a curved TV, 3D TV, or massive screen and you can quickly implement the WOW! factor in your waiting room.

These type of memorable experiences for patients in your waiting room are the fuel that feeds social media and physician rating services today. If you want patients to share their experience at your office on social media or rate you highly on the various physician rating websites, start by WOWing them in your waiting room. Almost all of your patients now arrive with a phone in their pocket which they can use while they wait to provide your practice a quality rating. Leverage that as an asset.

I’ve heard some people argue that digital signage isn’t valuable anymore in the exam room because patients all show up with their own smartphones and tablets. They argue that patients have their heads buried in their phones and so they never see the digital signage you put in the exam room. This couldn’t be further from the truth.

The reality is that most of us with smartphones have become quite habituated to what people call the second screen experience. More and more people are watching TV while playing on their smartphone. It’s normal for us to be processing what’s on a TV while keeping an eye on our smartphone at the same time. The same thing happens in the waiting room when you provide a compelling digital experience. We consume both the TV and our smartphone.

Leveraging a high-quality digital experience in your waiting room provides a better patient experience overall. What’s the worst part of a waiting room? You have to wait. What’s the solution? We all have experienced a long flight or car ride that felt like it was much shorter thanks to some sort of digital media experience. This same experience can be had by patients if you invest in the right digital signage and content. Shorter wait times lead to better physician ratings in ambulatory practices and better HCAHPS scores in hospitals.

How have you approached your waiting room? Is there something unique or interesting you’ve done that’s made the patient experience better? What kind of first impression are you making on your patients?

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Finding Value in the #HIT100

Posted on July 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The #HIT100 has come to a close with plenty of controversy and discussion about the details of “the list.” In fact, there are two lists you can enjoy perusing. I’ll leave the controversy for someone else. As I mentioned when I hosted the #HIT99 last year, I’m not that interested in the ranking on the list. With just my own health IT Twitter accounts I could get someone in the top 75 (it was top 50 last year, so that’s an improvement as far as involvement) and so it’s easy to see how the system can be easily gamed. Such is life with any crowd sourced list. I’ll leave that to the data experts.

Instead, I find the most valuable parts of the #HIT100 in the nominating process itself and in the social discovery of everyone that’s nominated.

When it comes to the nominating process, it’s amazing to share and be shown gratitude. I believe in the power of gratitude and the #HIT100 is a great time to express appreciation to so many of the people on healthcare social media that have affected your life. Given the state of society, a little gratitude and recognition is a really beautiful thing. We need more of that, not less of it. I’m glad that most people enjoy the gratitude and don’t get lost in the competitive aspects of it.

As far as social discovery, I probably know or have seen most of the people in the top 100 of the #HIT100. Seeing them on the list is nice, but it doesn’t do much for me if I already know them and interact with them on a regular basis. That’s why I like to look beyond the Top 100 so I can discover new accounts I probably had never seen before.

For example, I like to look at the people who only got one #HIT100 nomination. There were 606 by my count and a bunch of them I’d never seen before. Some of these extraordinary accounts like @halletecco, @heatherhaugen, @histalk, @hospitalEHR, @healthITPR, @janoldenburg, @jenwebs, @jimmyweeks, @missykras, @naveen101, @pjmachado, @rrowleymd, @thedocsmitty, @thegr8chalupa, @davisjamie77, @davidblumenthal, @anthony_guerra, @annezieger, and @aneeshchopra all only got 1 vote and I’m sure that many of my readers don’t know them, but should. There are a lot more like them that can be discovered in the full list of people that were nominated to the #HIT100 (by my numbers it’s 921 people nominated total).

Since I find such value in the new account discovery that can happen by looking at anyone that’s been nominated to the #HIT100 or anyone that’s nominated someone to the #HIT100, I took @shimecode’s data and created this spreadsheet of everyone that was nominated and everyone that nominated someone else. There are a lot of incredible Twitter accounts throughout the list that are worth adding to your followers.

As has been noted by many people, there are a lot of people that impact healthcare and health IT that aren’t on social media or Twitter. That’s true and it’s ok. The #HIT100 is about those that are on social media. We could start a whole other list of people who aren’t on social media, but that would be a different list. In fact, maybe we should start a list of people we wish were on Twitter that aren’t. That would be fascinating.

All in all, I know that @theehrguy and @shimcode put a lot of work into processing the data for #HIT100. Which list is right and which list is wrong? The more I’ve thought about it, the more I don’t care. I’ll stick to enjoying the gratitude and social discovery that still exists in the #HIT100. Now, time to go through the list and see who else I should start following.

Insights from #WEDI25

Posted on May 25, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week I’ve been spending time at the WEDI annual conference in Salt Lake City. I’ve never been to a conference with a more diverse set of attendees. I’ve really enjoyed the diversity of attendees and perspectives that were at the conference. I was a little disappointed (but not really surprised) that clinicians weren’t part of the event. I understand why it’s hard to get them to attend an event like this, but it’s unfortunate that the physician voice isn’t part of the discussion.

Here’s a quick list of some insights I tweeted during the conference which could be useful to you:

Physician Transparency List

Posted on May 13, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the most progressive thinkers in healthcare social media is Ed Bennett. He’s most famous for the Hospital Social Media list that Ed started back in 2009. That list was an eye opener for many hospitals that were debating how and if they should take part in social media. That list is still alive and is owned and managed by The Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media.

Ed Bennett recently announced a new list that looks at healthcare organizations who are publishing patient comments and ratings for their physicians. He currently has 29 healthcare organizations on the list, but I agree that this will likely grow similar to how his hospital social media list grew from 150 hospitals to 1500. If you’re organization is publishing your physician’s ratings and patients comments on your website, you can reach out to Ed and get your organization on the list as well.

Physician Profiles with Physician Ratings and Patient Comments List

I also find it interesting that Ed is listing the “implementation vendors” that do survey and web integration services. Here’s who he has listed so far:

Nice work Ed, putting this together. It’s always interesting how something like a list can move people to change. I have a feeling we’ll have a move towards more physician transparency happening across the industry thanks to Ed’s latest list. Nice work Ed!

New HIM Social Community Tag – #HIMSocial

Posted on April 11, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

HIM Social Media - #HIMSocial


I think this is a great idea by Brad Justus to bring together the HIM community on social media. We’ve seen such amazing benefits from the communities that have been created around the #HITsm #hcsm and #hcldr hashtags (to name just a few).

In response to Brad’s tweet, some people suggested that the HIM and HIT communities are very similar and that maybe there shouldn’t be two communities. While I agree that many of the topics discussed by the HIM and HIT communities are the same, the people involved in both communities doesn’t overlap all that much. Most HIT professionals don’t see themselves as HIM professionals and vice versa. Maybe they should, but that’s a topic for another discussion.

Like Brad, I’ve had a chance to spend quite a bit of time at AHIMA and other HIM related events and it’s definitely a distinct community that looks at the challenges of health information management from a unique perspective. That’s why I think the #HIMSocial tag could do very well.

There are a few challenges to creating a community around the #HIMSocial tag. First, there is kind of already a community of HIM professionals that use the AHIMA hashtag. Although, I think the #HIMSocial tag would feel a little more inclusive and even create an opportunity for collaboration with the health IT community. Second, there are still a lot in the HIM community that don’t want to take part in social media like Twitter. There are some incredible exceptions, but speaking generally there are still a lot of HIM professionals that aren’t likely to take part in social media. No doubt that will continue to change.

If you’re part of the HIM (Health Information Management) profession, take a second to check out the #HIMSocial hashtag and send some tweets to contribute to the community.

Experiences and Perspective from #NatCon16

Posted on March 9, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The past couple days I’ve been enjoying a new experience at the National Council for Behavioral Health’s NatCon Conference. It’s been quite an experience for a techguy like me to dip my toes into the world of behavioral health. Plus, in many ways this takes me back since when I started my journey into the world of healthcare, I was charged with implementing an EMR into a university counseling center. I’m no doubt one of only a few bloggers that’s ever blogged about behavioral health EMR and the challenges of implementing a general medicine focused EMR (most of them anyway) in a counseling center.

As I noted in my previous post, what’s surprising is how many things behavioral health EMR has in common with the rest of the healthcare world. That theme seems to carry through.

However, today I had a couple more insights. First, we think we have it complex when it comes to medical care and sometimes it is very complex. However, the challenges that behavioral health professionals face is much more challenging and often absolutely gut wrenching. Hearing some of the stories just tugs at your heart in an extraordinary way. It definitely takes someone special to work in the behavioral health field. That’s especially true given the many stigmas they have to battle against. It was amazing to hear how many times the stigma of behavioral health was discussed at the conference. It’s unfortunate how much stigma holds us back.

Second, we need better collaboration between behavioral health providers and the rest of the healthcare system. In a private Q&A I saw with Dr. Kevin Pho (better known as @KevinMD), he clearly articulated how there’s only so much he can do to help a patient with behavioral health issues in his 10-15 minute appointment slot. We have to work together to solve these problems or it will never get better.

As I think about the need for collaboration and overcoming stigmas, I can’t help but think of the Twitter Chat session I attended at the conference. I’ve always been amazed by how an open platform like Twitter can bring together so many communities of people around a common cause. These communities can break down barriers and stigmas. It’s not easy, but it’s possible. I see it happening every day on social media. The news media likes to only cover the bad effects of social media, but there is a tremendous amount of good that comes from actively participating in social media as well.

All in all, #NatCon16 was an eye opening experience for a blogger like me. It gave me a reminder of how challenging behavioral health is, but also the tremendous opportunities that are available to do so much good in the world when we tackle these challenging problems and are successful.

Around the Twittersphere – Healthcare Simplicity!

Posted on February 25, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


Complexity has a home in healthcare. However, simplicity is hard everywhere.


Simplicity in action!


Seriously? We’re still talking about pagers? In healthcare, yes we are! How sad is that? There are simpler, better solutions.

Meet the HIMSS Social Media Team – #GoesBeyond

Posted on February 19, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A few weeks ago, I took part in an initiative that Greythorn (Full Disclosure: Greythorn pays to post jobs on our Healthcare IT Central job board) started around the great hashtag #GoesBeyond. Using that hashtag they’re asking people to recognize people in healthcare IT that are doing amazing work. You can read my first #GoesBeyond post that recognized the work of Steve Sisko.

For my next #GoesBeyond post I want to recognize the whole HIMSS Social Media team. Many people don’t realize how much work this team puts in to make HIMSS one of the most social media driven conferences in the world and far and away the most tweeted healthcare conference in the world.

That’s why I’m highlighting the whole HIMSS social media team for #GoesBeyond. I hope many others who read this will take part in the #GoesBeyond effort and highlight other people in the healthcare IT community that deserve recognition. There’s nothing better we can do for the community than to show gratitude for each other.

The HIMSS social media numbers don’t lie. Check out the Twitter activity alone around HIMSS:
HIMSS-Social-Media-Growth
While most people are familiar with the @HIMSS account which boasts 74,753 followers (and growing), I’m sure that many don’t realize that the HIMSS LinkedIn group has 166,325 members. These are extraordinary numbers and they don’t happen by happen stance. This kind of growth only comes through consistent focused effort in creating and sharing amazing content and engaging and facilitating the discussion on each platform.

What’s impressive is that it’s not a large team that makes all this stuff happen. Here’s the 4 main team members:

Say what you will about the HIMSS machine, what makes this group of social media ninjas special is that they truly do care about healthcare and want to find the best way to improve healthcare through the use of technology. Each one of them truly is a mission driven individual.

A great example of this is their work creating the official HIMSS16 Hashtag Guide. A lot of social media people could have easily just hopped on some generic hashtags that anyone could have created around the buzzwords at the conference. Those hashtags would end up being as meaningless as the buzzwords themselves. Instead they created hashtags which represent directions we need to head and goals we should achieve.

For example, they used #Engage4Health to represent patient engagement, but that we are engaging patient with a clear purpose. The #HITworks hashtag is another great example where they’re working to extract the clear value that technology can provide healthcare. Of course, the #IHeartHIT hashtag which started last year tells the personal stories of how technology can impact healthcare.

My favorite place I’ve seen the HIMSS social media team “go beyond” is in the imagery they’ve created. Take a look through all the images shared on the #HIMSS16 hashtag and you’ll see that many of the best ones were created by this team. It’s no wonder that this team was recognized with the HITMC Award for Best Social Media Program last year.

HIMSS is right around the corner. Good luck to this team as they try to curate more tweets than anyone can handle. Not to mention all the new video activity we’re going to see on Periscope and Blab. They’re certainly worthy of the #GoesBeyond hashtag.

About #GoesBeyond
In this series, writers take time thank an individual who #GoesBeyond expectations to make an impact in their community or industry. Read other posts in this series on LinkedIn and Twitter, then write one of your own on your favorite blog, LinkedIn pulse, Medium or other platform. Use #GoesBeyond and @mention the person who has made such a big difference, then copy this paragraph so others know how they can participate, too.