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Awesome #HIT99 Profile Site

Posted on August 31, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Communities are amazing and that’s especially true of the healthcare social media community. For those who didn’t see it, we recently held the #HIT99 to recognize and thank those people who’ve been active in the healthcare social media community. You can see the official #HIT99 rankings listed here along with a number of other lists to help you find some interesting healthcare people on social media.

Steve Sisko (@shimcode) did all the massive work associated with collecting the nominations for the #HIT99 and he published the raw data for anyone to use. We both hoped that people would use that data to do cool things for the community. Luckily Don Lee (@dflee30) did just that when he created the #HIT99 List site. Here’s a description of how the #HIT99 site came to be:

A few weeks ago on the #HITSM chat a bunch of people were talking about how it would be nice to have a central blog site for the HIT99 list. I suggested a relatively easy way to do it. Rather than being the “here’s how we should do this” guy who then does nothing, I went ahead and built it. My goal is to provide an MVP that solves just the original problem – create a central place for the HIT99ers to tell us some more about what they do and more importantly, why they do it.

I love what he’s started, because it’s always fun to learn something more about the people behind the list. He’s started collecting people’s profiles (including mine) and he has details for how to update your profile if you’re on the list and haven’t sent over your info yet. Let’s all support Don and get our profiles updated.

Outsourced Medical Billing #KareoChat on Twitter

Posted on August 26, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

On Thursday, August 27th at 9 AM PT (Noon ET), I’ll be hosting the #KareoChat where we’ll be discussing the good and bad of outsourced medical billing. You can follow along tomorrow on Twitter by watching the #KareoChat hashtag or by checking out my tweets on @ehrandhit.
Outsourced Medical Billing Twitter Chat
Here are the questions we’ll be discussing in tomorrow’s Twitter chat:

  1. Why are many practices choosing outsourced billing over in house?
  2. What are the disadvantages of outsourced billing?
  3. How will ACOs and value based reimbursement work with an outsourced billing company?
  4. How do you select a high quality outside billing company? What differentiates these companies?
  5. Does your outsourced billing company need to have tight integration with your EHR? Why or why not?
  6. What are the pros and cons of outsourcing your billing to your EHR vendor?

I’m particularly interested in people’s responses to question number 3. I think many in healthcare understand the good and bad of doing the billing in house or outsourcing it. Although, I’m pretty sure I’ll learn even more on the Twitter chat tomorrow. However, how things like ACOs and value based reimbursement will impact an outsourced billing company is still a really important topic of discussion. Will it drive more people towards outsourcing their billing or will it mean more practices bring their billing in house? I’ll be interested to hear people’s thoughts on tomorrow’s Twitter chat or feel free to start the discussion in the comments below.

Periscope and Healthcare – Healthcare Scene “Minute”

Posted on August 25, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Last week I posted a question on EMR and HIPAA: Do You Periscope? I’m sure that many readers had no idea what periscope even is even though there are more than 10 million Periscope accounts created to date. After writing the post, the discussion about Periscope was hopping on Twitter and so I decided that it would be fun to try something new. I call it the Healthcare Scene “Minute”.

What’s the Healthcare Scene “Minute”? Well, I basically hop on Periscope and spend ~1 minute talking about a topic related to healthcare IT. Since doing the Periscope 21 hours ago, I’ve had 24 replay viewers and I had 38 live viewers. Not a bad start. You can view the video on periscope for the next few hours here.

What I realized when I started the Periscope is that many people would love to talk about something more than just the topic I planned to talk about for a minute or 2 (or 3 in the case below). So, for now the Healthcare Scene “Minute” periscopes I do will start with 30 seconds to a minute intro where people get a chance to join live. Then, I’ll talk for a minute on a specific topic. After I finish a quick look into a specific topic, I’ll stay on and answer questions from those who attend for as long as I have time.

In case you missed the live Periscope linked above, here’s a look at the chopped out Healthcare Scene “Minute” video where I talk about Periscope (seemed like an appropriate topic for my first Periscope):

In the Q&A that followed, someone asked an important question, How Can Periscope Be Used in Healthcare? Turns out in my Healthcare Scene minute (which wasn’t much time even at 3 minutes) I mostly talked about Periscope and how it fit in social media and video streaming and not how it applied to Healthcare. So, here’s my in the moment response to how Periscope can be used in healthcare:

I asked on Twitter if I should be consistent in my Periscopes. I decided that I’d be consistently inconsistent. Although, I’m already planning to do the next Healthcare Scene “Minute” today where I’m going to talk about the cost of Epic (Update: Here’s a link to the Periscope stream I did today. I forgot to hit the save button and so it will be gone after 24 hours. Lesson learned!). Hopefully I’ll see you on Periscope.

Online Reputation Management for Doctors

Posted on August 7, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As you know, I’m a sucker for an infographic. So, I couldn’t resist sharing this online reputation management strategy infographic for doctors that was posted by CureMD. There’s so much to chew on in this infographic, but my favorite part is the last image which shows the breakout of how people review doctors. It shows the physician reviews definitely skewing positive. What do you find interesting?
Doctor Online Reputation Management Strategies

Blogging Forces You to Raise Your Standard

Posted on July 6, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

e-Patient Dave has a great story up about his wife’s knee replacement surgery done by the popular social media orthopedist Howard Luks. There are many items to note in e-Patient Dave’s write up of his wife’s experience with Dr. Luks. However, I couldn’t help but consider the impact that Howard Luks’ blogging has had on his practice.

The most obvious impact is that he’s gotten new patients from his blogging. While e-Patient Dave’s wife is one example, he’s done many posts talking about how new patients have found him through his blog and social media efforts. I won’t dig into this more since I think most doctors realize this can happen.

What I think is less obvious is that I believe blogging holds Howard Luks to a higher standard. Think about what happens when you choose to blog about something. You’re now on the record for how you’d approach something and you’re now accountable to it. By its very nature, this accountability requires a doctor (or anyone in any field) to step up to the plate and make sure that they’re working at the highest level possible. No one wants to blog about something and then be called out for not doing what they were telling other people to do.

This is a scary thing for many people and no doubt it’s why many people choose not to blog. They don’t want to be accountable to their blog. I should also note that blogging about something doesn’t mean that you have to be perfect. Some blogs can be exploratory and can help you learn and grow so that you can reach “perfection.” In fact, one of the best reasons to blog is to help you refine and improve what you’re doing. I’m sure Howard Luks has benefited from this as well. There’s nothing like thousands of people educating you on why and how you’re wrong you can improve.

While this accountability is powerful, what’s even more powerful about blogging is that it requires you to really sit down and think through why and how you do something. This is especially true for physician bloggers. That time spent thinking through and evaluating your processes is powerful. I think you see the results of this type of deep thinking in the results described by e-Patient Dave above. His wife likely benefited from Howard Luks spending time thinking deeply about how he practices medicine and ensuring he is practicing in the most effective way possible.

I’m not saying you have to be a blogger and share your processes publicly to think deeply about the way you practice. However, blogging publicly about how you practice medicine is a great way to force yourself to do this evaluation. Plus, the fact that people are going to read, evaluate, comment, rip to shreds, give feedback, and help you refine your approach forces you to raise your standard.

I’ve seen this happen over and over again with blogging. It’s had that effect on me as a father once I started my daddy blog. I had to start upping my game as a father since I couldn’t write about how I was an average father that had average experiences. I was forced to become the father I wanted to be. My wife has benefited too since who wants to write about being the lazy husband who doesn’t do the dishes? It doesn’t work. However, I can write about the amazing experience of putting the dishes away even though I wanted to sit down with some TV.

How often in medicine do doctors prefer to sit down with TV as opposed to going the extra mile to optimize their practice? Blogging can change that paradigm.

I’ve seen the same happen for healthcare IT and EHR companies. Once these companies blog about the importance of EHR up time or making EHR software usable, they raise the standard for how they approach those two problems. First, they’re not going to blog about those things if they haven’t worked hard to make sure they’ve done a good job in those areas. Second, once they’ve blogged about it, it often becomes part of the culture of who they are at the company. In fact, healthcare IT CEO’s have to be a little careful about what they blog about since it’s a powerful medium that can push their company in the right or wrong direction. A few pointed blog posts can really impact a company’s culture. Although, as a user I definitely prefer a healthcare IT vendor that blogs. I think it forces the company to think critically and deeply about the challenges their customers face. Plus, it gives you a view into the culture of the company.

Going back to where we started. Would e-Patient Dave have written such a glowing article about his wife’s visit to Howard Luks if Dr. Luks wasn’t blogging? The obvious answer is no since it would have been unlikely that e-Patient Dave would have known about Dr. Luks. While this is true, I also think that many of the processes and approaches that e-Patient Dave describes would likely not be in place if Dr. Luks wasn’t such an avid blogger. Blogging about your business forces you to raise your standard.

Finding New Patients Twitter Chat and Webinar

Posted on April 28, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve gotten together with Healthcare Scene sponsor Kareo to present a webinar titled “5 Marketing Tips to Get New Patients Now” on Wednesday, May 6 at 1 PM ET (10 AM PT). I’ll be focusing on the digital methods for finding new patients and will cover topics like an effective practice website, Search Engine Optimization (SEO), a practice blog, managing your online reputation and patient engagement tools. It should be a great webinar that many doctors and practice managers will appreciate.

Alongside the webinar, I’m also hosting the #KareoChat this week on the same topic. The #KareoChat Twitter chat is held every week on Thursday at 9 AM PT. I’m sure we’ll have a lively conversation which will be a great lead in to the webinar.
Kareo Chat - John Lynn - Healthcare Scene
If you’d like to participate in the #KareoChat, here are the 6 questions we’ll be covering in the chat:

Q1: Can your website get you new #patients? What features would you say attract new patients most? @ehrandhit #KareoChat #smallpractice

Q2: Is search engine optimization worth the money? How do you approach #SEO? #KareoChat @ehrandhit #physicians #marketing #smallpractice

Q3: What topics should you cover on your practice’s #blog? How often should you post? #KareoChat @ehrandhit #physicians #patients #marketing

Q4: How do you make the most of #physician rating and review sites? How do you manage your #reputation? #KareoChat @ehrandhit

Q5: What #socialmedia have you found useful for finding new #patients? How? #KareoChat @ehrandhit #smallpractices #physicians #marketing

Q6: What #patientengagement tools drive new and returning #patients to your practice? #KareoChat @ehrandhit #marketing

I look forward to seeing many of you at the webinar and on the Twitter chat.

A Few #HIMSS15 Twitter Tips and Tricks

Posted on March 27, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you haven’t been keeping an eye on the #HIMSS15 hashtag, it’s been incredibly active and we’re still a little over 2 weeks out from the event. I have no doubt that #HIMSS15 will shattered past years records for tweets at HIMSS.

While I’ve always been a huge fan of social media at conferences, I think it’s going to be used a bit differently at HIMSS 2015 than it’s been used in years past. I believe this, because I’ve seen it happen at other conferences that literally blow up the twitter stream for the conference hashtag. You have to take a different strategy.

Here are a few tips you might want to consider as you approach your use of Twitter at HIMSS 2015.

Get to Know Twitter Advanced Search – If you’re not familiar with Twitter’s advanced search feature, now’s the time to get familiar with it. The #HIMSS15 Twitter stream is so voluminous that advanced searches can be a really powerful way for you to find interesting people. For example, do a search for #HIMSS15 and people that are near whatever city you’re from. There’s nothing like traveling across the country to bond with people in your local area. If you’re looking for other Epic users, do a search for #HIMSS15 and Epic. Simple little filters like that will help you extract value out of the #HIMSS15 Twitter stream.

Create a Twitter List – Spend some time creating a Twitter list of people that you trust and respect that will be at HIMSS. Then, you can just check out the tweets from the people on that list. I’d suggest you add @ehrandhit, @HITMarketingPR and @techguy to that list, but I am a bit biased. A few others I’ll be watching are @nversel, @healthcarewen, and @mandibpro to name just a very few. I’d love to hear your list of #HIMSS15 people we should follow on Twitter in the comments.

Follow @HITConfGuy – The man behind this account does a lot of work to filter through the #HIMSS15 stream, so you don’t have to. I’m pretty sure this year I’ll be relying on this account a lot more than I have any other year. He does a good job keeping it interesting.

Interact with People Directly – Gone are the days that you can just say something on #HIMSS15 and get tons of responses. If you want to get a response from people, then mentioned them directly. Plus, you can tag someone in a tweet as well. You can be sure there will be some side threads happening with a whole group of interesting people tagged in the tweet. While we can’t always watch the full conference stream, most people watch when they’re mentioned or tagged on Twitter.

Check Out the Subtags – Each year, a number of new hashtags come out of the HIMSS conference. In fact, HIMSS puts together their official hashtag guide with all of them. However, even their list can be a bit overwhelming. I think the two hashtags that will be most interesting are #IHeartHIT and possibly #HITWorks. I’m happy that the #HITMC hashtag was also listed by HIMSS for those interested in social media marketing and influencing. I guess this article would technically be appropriate for the #HIMSS15Hacks hashtag.

Shake Hands, Dance, Share a Meal – While I love social media as much as the next person, don’t forget to enjoy all of the in person stuff that happens at HIMSS was well. For me, social media often facilitates many of the in person meetings and events that I attend. However, the opposite can also be the case. If you sit down and meet someone over lunch or on the dance floor at the opening reception, share and connect with them on Twitter. I always love when a year or two later someone tweets me with “Do you remember when…” and then usually “I’ve been following you ever since and…” Twitter is a fantastic way to stay connected with people you meet throughout the show.

There’s a few tips or tricks to get the most out of your interactions on Twitter. If you have other suggestions or if you disagree, I’d love to hear it in the comments.

Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference – and the #HITMC Twitter Chat

Posted on January 21, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Regular readers likely noticed the banner ad at the top of EMR and EHR which links to the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR conference (HITMC) that we organize. This event is shaping up to be absolutely fantastic. We’ve just started adding the speakers to the conference website, but I’m thrilled by the quality and variety of speakers that we’ll be having at HITMC 2015.

For those not familiar with the event, we bring together a few hundred of the very best Healthcare IT marketing and PR professionals. This year we’ll be hosting it at the nicely remodeled SLS Las Vegas hotel. No doubt you’ll see members of the HITMC community all over the hotel throughout the two days of the conference. Plus, this year we’re doing some early bird social events to really give attendees a great opportunity to connect.

Along with connecting with your peers, HITMC 2015 will include two days of amazing content on a wide variety of topics. Some of these topics will include:

  • Content Marketing
  • Best Practices for Social Media Marketing, Email Marketing and Search Engine Optimization (SEO)
  • Lead Nurturing
  • Effective PR
  • Marketing Automation Tools
  • Event Marketing
  • Case Studies from Health IT Companies
  • Much much more…

If you’re interested in healthcare IT marketing and PR, you’ll absolutely love this event. Along with all the learning, connecting, and sharing at the event, we also have some fun together too. Early bird registration for the event ends on 1/31/15, so register now to save $500.

For those interested in getting a small flavor for the event, we’re hosting a #HITMC twitter chat on Tuesday, 1/27 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). We hope that many of you can join us as we chat about the challenges associated with healthcare IT marketing and PR.

At Least One Patient A Day

Posted on January 14, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of my ophthalmology friends posted this video. I’m sure that many doctors can relate to patients like this. It reminds me of someone who told me they wish their was a health grades where the doctor can rate the patients the same way that patient rate the doctors. That’s probably not a productive approach, but it definitely shares the sentiment of many doctors who have challenging patients. Like most things in life though, it only takes a few bad apples to spoil the bunch. I’m not sure what can be done to deal with these challenging patients. Either way, this video highlights one of the challenges of being a doctor: difficult patients.

Review of “Patient Engagement is a Strategy, Not a Tool” by Colin Hung

Posted on November 24, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Colin Hung (@Colin_Hung), Co-Host of #hcldr and SVP of Marketing at Patient Prompt.
Colin Hung
If Leonard Kish’s new eBook – http://www.hl7standards.com/kish-ebook/”>Patient Engagement is a Strategy, Not a Tool was a song, it would be categorized as a “mashup” – and that’s a good thing.

Never heard a mashup song before? Just go to youtube.com and type it into the search bar and you’ll find thousands (or try this one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zbrWu8XyAcM). Mashups are a unique form of music. To make one, DJs will take snippets (called samples) from other songs usually from different artists and combine them into a single piece and in so doing create a whole new song in the process.

When done properly a mashup is both familiar and fresh. It has elements which you know and love yet the composition as a whole feels new. That is exactly what Kish has done in his eBook. He expertly weaves together numerous ideas, themes and approaches from different people and different industries into a single cohesive arrangement.

Kish starts by laying down a central idea that is carried like a melody from page 1 through to the end:

“The key to [patient] engagement in early stages is to get people’s attention and to let them see what’s possible by using the tools available to improve their health. It’s a process and a strategy, not a data set or any one tool”

With that idea track locked in, Kish proceeds to mix in concepts from:

  • Marketing – target audiences, key messages and clear calls-to-action
  • Product Management – inclusive design and agile development
  • Behavioral Science – Maslow’s hierarchy, social interaction and motivation

The eBook starts off strong with a nice definition of patient engagement – a rather amorphous term in healthcare right now –  and gets stronger with examples of successful “attention grabbing” marketing campaigns that could be adopted by healthcare organizations.

One particular statement that stands out:

“Engagement requires what marketers know very well: motivation, context and messaging.”

As a person who works in HealthIT Marketing, I’m tickled by this statement…but I think Kish is giving those of us in Marketing a bit too much credit. Although it is true that marketers should have a good grasp of our target audiences (their needs, wants, motivations and fears) – we are not seers. In fact, it is common for marketers to be a little “off key” when approaching new markets or when working with new products.

Truly successful marketers are the ones who are open to being wrong…and who can quickly adapt their messages/approach based on real data and feedback from the target audience. Like a good DJ, you must read the reaction of the audience and change the tune in order to keep things hopping.

The idea of iterating, fitting engagement into the world of the patient (context) and using feedback are the themes that fill the middle portion of Kish’s eBook. Using anecdotes, quotes and statistics from a wide array of leaders he encourages readers to draw parallels with healthcare and to think critically on how that wisdom from outsiders can be applied successfully in their own organizations.

Fittingly there is a section that draws a parallel between healthcare and music. Kish quotes former Talking Heads singer David Byrne in a particularly memorable and interesting chapter.

The finale is where “Patient Engagement is a Strategy, Not a Tool” shines. Having laid the ground work in the prior chapters on why getting patients’ attention is so critical and how difficult it can be to turn that attention into meaningful behavior change, Kish closes by giving readers 10 concrete steps to follow to “win the attention war” in healthcare:

  1. Know what health problem you are trying to solve
  2. Know whose attention you’re trying to get
  3. Use social tools
  4. Know behavior models and behavioral economics
  5. Focus on goals and narratives
  6. Start Simple
  7. Try something and measure results
  8. Understand context
  9. Take an open approach
  10. Follow an analysis-driven implementation plan

I was hoping for a little more depth from Kish on the Agile approach, especially as it relates to A/B testing, iterative design and high reliance on real-user feedback – something that I believe could DEFINITELY be used in healthcare – but perhaps he is keeping these concepts for his next composition.

Overall, Kish’s eBook is a solid mix of familiar theories/approaches from other industries and new ideas/success stories from within healthcare. It offers insight and practical advice on how to change from a tools-based approach to patient engagement to a process and strategy based one. If you work in healthcare and are involved in your organization’s patient experience, access or engagement initiatives this eBook should be on your reading list.

I am looking forward to Kish’s next release – which I hope drops soon.

“Patient Engagement is a Strategy, Not a Tool” can be downloaded for free courtesy of the good folks at HL7 Standards (http://www.hl7standards.com/kish-ebook/)