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Trying to Regulate Twitter

I recently saw a bunch of people tweeting about a conference in Milan which was supposedly trying to regulate the use of Twitter at the medical meeting. It turns out that the post about what you should tweet about at the meeting was mostly a joke and the comments that were highlighted were largely taken out of context. Plus, it wasn’t the organizer of the event that did the post, but just a participant in the conference. Because of the stir up, the post was taken down, but Dr. Bryan Vartabedian captured a piece of the post in his commentary:

The social side of any conference is important, and Twitter, being part of the social media, will naturally show that side. There is, however, a danger that the orchestra’s symphony will be drowned out by foot-shuffling, program brandishing, and a general clucking and chattering.

Ironically, this story ends up being a case of where Twitter can go wrong. It’s easy to misconstrue what people mean in a blog post or on Twitter. I have it happen all the time with the blog posts I write. I’m often amazed at people’s responses to my blog post since they either miss the point of my post or they think I’m making a point which is definitely not the case. Over time I think I’ve gotten better at this, but with thousands of readers over thousands of blog posts there’s bound to be a miscommunication. The great thing is that once I engage them, there’s usually clarity. But I digress…

Regardless of the particular situation at the medical meetings in Milan, the discussion of regulating Twitter (feel free to insert other social media as well) is a really good one. Although, it doesn’t just apply to meetings. I’ve seen many people try and regulate what’s done on all sorts of hashtags or other social media. I find the efforts people make to control other people on social media entertaining.

I’m sure this says a lot about me, but when someone tries to regulate what’s said or done on a hashtag on Twitter (meeting or otherwise), it just makes me want to do the opposite. While I have that innate need to not be controlled (some might call it rebellion), the reality is that I take a much more pragmatic approach to people’s suggestions about what should be said or done with a hashtag. I use a simple measure: “Will their suggestion make me a better part of the community?” (Yes, communities come together around hashtags) If I think that someone’s suggestion is a good one that will make me a better part of that community, then I usually listen. If I don’t think their suggestion matters or actually detracts from the community, then I ignore. Do I make mistakes? Absolutely, but this is my approach to it.

My personal approach aside, the reality is that even if you want to control what happens on Twitter and with certain hashtags, you can’t! If someone wants to be a bad actor in a hashtag community, then they’re going to do it. Bad community actors aren’t usually listening to the other people in the community anyway. So, trying to police it usually just leaves you dirtying the conversation stream even more.

Personally, I love the diversity and freedom that’s seen by participants in a Twitter stream. It tells me a lot about the person or company. Plus, I like the human elements of Twitter as well. I love to see that someone’s excited about a conference, their puppy, a great meal, a certain vendor, etc. Those that only talk about these things I can easily block if needed, but the reality is that a tweet is so easily consumed I can skip over any that don’t interest me.

I know many people hate when a Twitter stream is overwhelmed with vendor tweets at a conference as well. This doesn’t bother me much. It tells me a lot about the vendor as well. If they don’t care enough to be thoughtful in their tweeting, do they also not care enough about their product? Plus, if they’re spamming the stream with sales tweets, is that how I’ll be treated as a customer? This is good for me to know and so I don’t mind seeing their true form on Twitter.

With that said, I have found that the quality of a hashtag Twitter stream is directly proportional to the number of humans that are tweeting on that hashtag. Social media is about connecting people and so it makes sense that when more people (as opposed to no personality companies) are participating, then it’s a better experience.

I’m sure many will still try and influence what’s done on a Twitter stream. More power to them, but it’s a losing battle. Instead of trying to regulate Twitter, I think we’re better served encouraging and promoting those people and tweets that are adding value to the hashtag community. Plus, we can contribute value to the stream ourselves. There are bad actors in every community in the world. However, if enough good people are on board adding value, then the bad actors fade into the background.

August 26, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

4 Health IT and EHR Blogs

As I’ve been putting together these blog posts about other Health IT and EHR bloggers, I’ve been astounded how many former bloggers have stopped blogging. I guess I was write to post one of my first blogger features as “EHR Blogger Attrition.” I imagine many previous bloggers are still sharing content, but have likely moved to other social media which is much easier to sustain. A tweet can be generated much more quickly than a blog post.

With that in mind, I feel grateful that I’m still able to blog and that enough people come and read my blog posts that I can provide for my family with my blogging. While some might define my blogging as micro blogging, I think there’s more value in a blog post than a tweet. You don’t have to dig into subjects in a tweet. People don’t go looking through your old tweets like they do blog posts.

Those musings aside, here are some other Health IT and EHR bloggers you might find interesting:
Health Blawg – David Harlow has a fascinating blog covering many of the various healthcare regulations that encumber our lives. Many lawyers are afraid to blog, but David has overcome that fear and created regular healthcare content that’s well worth following.

The Health Care Blog – While this blog isn’t exclusively health IT, a large portion o the topics are Health IT related. This blog never ceases to amaze me at the number of people they have contributing quality content to their site. It doesn’t have one voice, and that’s what makes the site so great. You might read a post about healthcare analytics and then one on value based contracts. Plus, it has one of the most active communities for comments. In fact, I often find myself more interested in the comments than the post itself.

Phil Baumann – While Phil is an RN by training, he’s more of a healthcare communicator and marketer than anything. Phil’s been doing this long enough that he doesn’t pull any punches. He just says it the way it is and isn’t afraid of saying things others aren’t comfortable saying. That makes for a good blog.

Galen Healthcare Solutions – I always like to feature at least one health IT company that’s creating great blog content. Galen Healthcare Solutions is definitely one of the best out there and they’ve been doing it consistently for a long time. Looks like their first blog post was in July 2008. I’m not sure who’s behind their consistency, but they deserve a lot of credit for the work they’ve done. It’s a great blog.

August 12, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Reputation Management – Doctors and Health IT Professionals

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about the challenge of reputation management. In the work I do, reputation management is a really big thing for both doctors and healthcare IT professionals. As part of my Healthcare IT job board and career resources, I wrote about managing your personal brand and the benefits of blogging. Both of them do a good job digging into some of the reasons why and ways you can manage your brand as a healthcare IT professional.

The reality is that many people don’t think of themselves as a brand. Maybe we’re not brands in the purest form, but we all have a profile whether we like it or not. What’s really interesting about the digital age is that our profile, “brand” if you will, is becoming more and more public and much easier for people to find. Plus, the age of social media means that other people are defining your personal brand whether you’re participating in the conversation or not.

Turns out that all of these principles apply to a doctor as well. In fact, there are dozens of companies that are creating online profiles for every doctor out there. They’re gathering hordes of publicly available data about your schooling, your location, your online profiles, your Medicare data, and much much more. Plus, we’re just getting started.

Many of these websites are also asking your patients to rank, rate, and review you. I’ve previously written my thoughts on these ranking and ratings websites. Despite my own views on the lack of value these websites provide, many patients don’t know the difference and so they can be a major driver to or away from your practice.

With all these changes, it’s becoming more and more important that doctors don’t ignore their online reputation. This doesn’t mean that the doctor has to be the one managing their online reputation. Some doctors enjoy doing it and so that’s great. However, this could very well be your office manager or you could even work with an outside company that’s skilled in managing physician’s online reputation. Just be careful on the later that they’re actually doing something to manage your reputation and not just saying they’re doing something.

As in most things in life, this concept isn’t new. We’ve always had to be conscious of what other people saw, said, and thought about us. It’s just the communication tools that people use to spread that information that have changed.

What are you or your organization doing to manage your reputation?

August 5, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

FDA’s Social Media Guidance Insights

I had a chance to watch parts of a Google+ hangout discussing the latest FDA social media guidance with David Harlow from Health Blawg. I’ve had a chance to work on a number of things with David and he’s a really smart guy that’s on top of a lot of the regulations that affect healthcare. I guess that’s a feature of being a healthcare lawyer. For those who missed it, you can check out the full video interview with David below:

For those who prefer the cliff notes version, David published some bullet points on his blog that do a great job summarizing the main points and key takeaways:

  • The draft guidance makes use of Twitter and platforms like Google Ads extremely unattractive, because the vast majority of the “real estate” must be given over to brand and generic names, indications for use, benefits, risks, and a link to fuller information about risks.
  • The FDA addressed itself to short-form communication without considering the way in which it is used most effectively – not as a canvas for ads, but as a forum for conversation.
  • Unbranded tweetchats, Facebook pages, and the like were OK before the draft guidance was issued, and they still are.
  • The correction of misinformation guidance lowers the regulatory bar for corrections (vs. marketing messages that must meet higher standards and may be subject to pre-review).
  • The misinformation guidance does not require a drug or device manufacturer to address all misinformation online about its products. Corrections must be focused responses to what others put out there on line, and should link to fuller information where appropriate, but corrections should not include or link to promotional material.
  • The misinformation guidance delineates an area of opportunity for drug and device manufacturers.

You can read more on his blog post including someone getting in trouble for liking a patient’s status. Think about that for a minute. Is it any wonder that pharma’s been really careful with social media?

July 23, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Study on the Economic Impact of Inefficient Communications in Healthcare

Efficient communication and collaboration amongst physicians, nurses and other providers is critical to the coordination and delivery of patient care, especially given the increasingly mobile nature of today’s clinicians and the evolution of the accountable care organization (ACO) model.

For healthcare IT leadership, the ability to satisfy the clinical need for more efficient communications technologies must be balanced with safeguarding protected health information (PHI) to meet compliance and security requirements. As a result, the industry continues to rely primarily on pagers, which creates inefficiencies that can have a considerable economic and productivity impact.

To quantify this impact, the Imprivata Report on the Economic Impact of Inefficient Communications in Healthcare worked with the Ponemon Institute to survey more than 400 healthcare providers in the U.S. about the typical communications process during three clinical workflows: patient admissions, coordinating emergency response teams and patient transfers.

This report is chalk full of good information on the communication challenges in healthcare. Here’s one example chart from the report:
Wasted Time in Hospitals Due to Poor Communication

While it’s good to see that 52% think pagers are not efficient, I’d hope that the number were much higher. I think that most don’t realize how inefficient a pager really is to their organization. It’s interesting that 39% don’t allow text messaging, but it would be interesting to see how many of the 61% that allow text messaging use a secure text message solution.

I think the use of technology to facilitate communication in healthcare is one of the most exciting opportunities out there today. Certainly we have to be careful to follow HIPAA, but we need to not use HIPAA as an excuse for why we don’t use the technology to facilitate better communication.

There’s a lot more in the report that’s worth a read. I’m sure I’ll be covering more details of the report in the future.

July 9, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

4 Healthcare IT Blogs

I’ve been having some fun highlighting some of my fellow health IT blogging colleagues (see 5 Health IT bloggers I highlighted previously). What’s been kind of sad about the experience is that so many health IT bloggers have stopped blogging. I started bookmarking the various EHR and health IT bloggers that I came across a few years back. As I’ve been going back through that list, it’s been really amazing how many stopped or even removed their blog completely.

Even so, there are still quite a few healthcare IT bloggers that are writing some great content. Here’s a look at 4 more health IT bloggers that I find interesting.

Venture Valkyrie – This blog is written by Lisa Suennen, but I have to admit that I didn’t even know that was her real name. I’ve just always seen her as Venture Valkyrie. With an awesome name like that, I’m not sure why she’d ever use the name Lisa. Anyway, Venture Valkyrie is a venture capital investor and healthcare industry consultant. She brings a lot of interesting perspective and insight into healthcare, investing, innovation, entrepreneurship and the role of women in all of these.

Dr. Mike Sevilla – Dr. Sevilla originally started his social media efforts as The Doctor Anonymous, before he came out from behind the cover of anonymity to share his thoughts on medicine, social media and life. Dr. Sevilla is a family practice doctor who’s been involved in social media since 2005. He’s tried to stop blogging and other social media and he can’t stay away. That’s just my kind of blogger.

HL7 Standards – This blog is run by the Corepoint Health team and is also home to the #HITsm Twitter chat topics. While Corepoint Health manages the blog, they do a good job connecting with outside experts (many they probably find through their hosting the #HITsm chat) to cover interesting topics on the blog. In fact, if i didn’t tell you the blog was run by Corepoint Health, you’d probably not even know it. I love that they’ve taken the thought leadership and relationship approach to blog marketing.

Schwartz MSL Blog – This isn’t a purely health IT blog, but it covers a lot of healthcare IT topics since many of Schwartz’s clients are healthcare IT companies. Along with covering their experience working in healthcare IT, they also offer some interesting insights into the PR, marketing and social media worlds that I’m sure many readers will find interesting and useful.

July 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Key Insights from Healthcare B2B Social Marketing Strategies #HITMC Twitter Chat

I previously posted the topics for the first #HITMC Twitter chat that was supported by @billians and @porterresearch. Billian put together a recap of the Twitter chat using storify which is worth checking out. My partner in Influential Networks, Shahid Shah (The Healthcare Guy), took notes during the Twitter chat and put together this really great discussion summary for the 5 questions.

Topic 1: How can healthcare B2B marketers use social selling to their advantage?

  • Most healthcare sales are “local” and selling is inherently social; using social to identify trends and implications is great start. #HITMC
  • When selling socially, audience development is key; use local topics/trends to draw community attention before discussing solutions. #HITMC
  • When selling socially, don’t try to broadcast messages applicable nationally – focus locally on what matters to specific audiences. #HITMC
  • When discussing products, draw clear lines from real customer problems to your solutions including how to operationalize. #HITMC
  • When describing solutions, figure out what kind of audience participation around objections and clarifications is necessary. #HITMC

Topic 2: What suggestions do you have for healthcare B2B marketers beginning on social?

  • Imagine creating an event and consider what kind of audience you’d like to talk with; develop messaging around that audience. #HITMC
  • In the imagined event think about why people would come to your event (social is about “events” and “audience”). #HITMC
  • Craft a simple marketing messaging document that considers audience participation and what you’d like to hear from them. #HITMC
  • Don’t just figure out what you want tell the audience, that’s not social. Community participation is social. #HITMC
  • Once you know your audience and how you’d like them to participate then choose medium – FB, LinkedIn, Twitter, Blogs, etc. #HITMC
  • Don’t choose medium first, create audience development and community participation plan, topics, trends, etc. first #HITMC

Topic 3: How can Facebook be of use to healthcare B2B marketing strategies?

  • FB is best used for B2C (patient) as opposed to B2B but is useful in certain B2B circles when dealing with healthcare staff. #HITMC
  • To reach healthcare company staff, FB is great to start audience-specific discussions around specific jobs and problems. #HITMC
  • B2B is still a person to person sale but the person you’re selling has an organizational responsibility to be considered. #HITMC
  • Once you know the organizational responsibilities and purchasing decision, budgeting, then use that to inform FaceBook content. #HITMC

Topic 4: How can healthcare B2B marketers ensure the success of content on social?

  • News & views content is less useful and not as evergreen as actionable advice or content meant to teach something. #HITMC
  • In B2B, focus on content that is meant to help someone get their job done, not entertain or enlighten to just give news. #HITMC
  • Successful content will saved, e-mailed, or shared in some way. If your content isn’t saved or shared consider it a failure. #HITMC
  • If you know your audience, their roles, their responsibilities, etc. you can teach them something or lighten their research load. #HITMC
  • All of us have jobs to do during the day; the content that helps eliminate some research we have to do or finish a job wins. #HITMC

Topic 5: Why is social listening an important factor in successful B2B marketing?

  • There is no such thing as social marketing or social selling without listening.  #HITMC
  • If you don’t listen, you’re talking. Usually when you talk without listening you focus on the wrong person (yourself). #HITMC
  • Listening allows you to demonstrate authenticity, which builds confidence in your brand, which makes you believable. #HITMC
  • People, especially B2B, only buys from you when you’re authentic and believable because mission critical jobs are at stake. #HITMC
  • Recognize that nobody cares about you or your company. Not listening confirms people’s suspicions about your inauthenticity. #HITMC
  • Listening allows you to develop a better audience and find out their problems; you can solve issues or provide better content. #HITMC
  • Listening allows audiences to inform your marketing calendar, event participation, tell you about problems, solutions sought, etc. #HITMC

Thanks to everyone who participated in the chat and contributed to the conversation. I was excited that the chat produced 279 tweets and almost 1.4 million impressions. You can find the full transcript of the chat here. If you have other comments on these subjects, please add them to the comments of this post.

June 30, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Healthcare B2B Social Marketing Strategies #HITMC Twitter Chat

I’m really excited to be hosting a twitter chat with the great people at @billians and @porterresearch. You’ll find me participating in the Twitter chat using @ehrandhit and @techguy. If you’d like to join in on the conversation, follow the hashtag #HITMC on Thursday, June 26th @ 1pm ET.

Using the link above you can follow along with the chat, but even better is for you to join in on the conversation. Just add #HITMC to your tweet and you’ll be part of the conversation. Nothing to it.

We’ve put together the following 5 healthcare B2B topics for tomorrow’s Twitter chat discussion. There are some meaty ones in there for those that care about healthcare B2B marketing.

Topic 1: How can healthcare B2B marketers use social selling to their advantage? 
Suggested Reading: Social Media in Healthcare Marketing: Making the Case

Topic 2: What suggestions do you have for healthcare B2B marketers beginning on social?
Suggested Reading: 5 (Relatively Simple) Steps To B2B Social Media Marketing Success

Topic 3: How can Facebook be of use to healthcare B2B marketing strategies?
Suggested Reading: Using Facebook for B2B Healthcare Marketing: 5 Top Tips

Topic 4: How can healthcare B2B marketers ensure the success of content on social?
Suggested Reading: Strategies for Effective B2B Healthcare Marketing Content Creation

 Topic 5: Why is social listening an important factor in successful B2B marketing?
Suggested Reading: Why Social Media Listening is Important for Brands

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts on the above topics. Should be a lively conversation similar to what we started at the Health IT Marketing and PR Conference.

June 25, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

How Doctors Can Make Use of Social Media?

The following is a guest blog post by Alex Tate.
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By using the right strategy doctors can gain a lot by making a proper use of social media to market themselves, share their rich experience and knowledge and carry out discussions with the colleagues in the industry.

Many of the doctors are afraid of the unknown and thus decide to remain silent over the social media due to privacy concerns. It is possible to create a good balance between having a transparent communication and matching to the necessary limitations of the industry.  Around 24% of physicians use social media at least once a day to post, share and seek medical information. The use of social media is still in its early years and it is a great opportunity to take advantage of these digital platforms and build credibility for your career as a doctor or a physician. The medical industry is very less saturated online as compared to other industries mainly due to the fear and apprehensions of health care organizations and professions as they would want to avoid liability issues related to social media related platforms.

As a doctor it is possible to make an effective and profitable social media strategy to market your practice and career. It will require a lot of time and effort but the results can have a far reaching effect for the long term success. If you are a physician or a doctor there are many ways you can make yourself stand out among others and effectively reach the right people in your social media.

  1. Set up personal account in Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn

Having social media accounts is one of the ways to increase your social footprint and expand it. Make a personal profile in all these three networks and optimize them to the fullest.

  1. Make Use of Visuals

Visuals are more effective in engaging people than text therefore include more pictures in your social media profiles on LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter. This is one of the important things to implement on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. When you are sharing content make sure you use original and non copyrighted photography in order to boost your engaging posts. Another way is to make use of photos in the blog posts, videos and articles when you are posting things on these networks.

  1. Share the knowledge

It doesn’t matter that which platform you are sharing your content on but make sure you whatever you are saying is helping you to make connections, followers and friends. Make use of your unique expertise and share the relevant information about what you know best.

Apart from joining the existing twitter chats, LinkedIn groups and relevant online discussion related to your area of expertise and industry, plan and start your own sharing hub on social media in order to bring the depth of knowledge to your professional interests.

Whether your knowledge hub is a LinkedIn Group, Twitter chats, Google plus profile or other relevant discussions online related to your industry, it is an important way of sharing what you know and build your credibility as you educate others.

As doctors it is important that you follow the rule of thumb to make sure you are providing the value to others and making use of your time spent on the social media networks. Doctor’s job is to make sure they share their expertise and execute their advice.

  1. Frequency of posting on LinkedIn

As one of the largest network of professionals online LinkedIn allow doctors to highlight each aspect of their career path using text and visuals. LinkedIn can offer lots of benefits to doctors because of its professional nature and a large network of likeminded people sharing and connecting with others. Begin by sharing the content from your profile that reflects your expertise and knowledge as a healthcare professional.

On LinkedIn content needs to be of a professional nature and little more reserved than the one shared on Facebook or Twitter. Share the links to those articles and other information that can be of some value to your connections and at the same time adding your own perspectives through commenting on posts.

  1. Follow other Healthcare Professionals on Social Media

Using Facebook and Twitter you can reach out to existing network of your contacts that you already know and you can find them by searching for colleagues, peers and friends working in the healthcare field. Follow and make connection with these individuals. After that you can use each networks search feature for to look for individuals in the similar role or industry. By connecting with a large number of people on these platforms you will have the like- minded people to interact with and share your views and experiences.

  1. Participate in conversations on twitter

Twitter is the best social media platform for having a public one to one conversation at the basic level. Start your conversation with doctors and medical professionals and discuss current trends in healthcare industry or new findings.

You can also find the conversations from other you have followed by searching through hashtags or keywords related to your interests a physician

  1. Join Useful Twitter Chats

In twitter chats, on particular topics and hash tags occurs weekly, monthly or quarterly. Search and discover what chats Twitter chats are available for medical professionals and join these conversations with other participants and learn new things. When participating in the twitter chat answer some of the questions asked by participants or posted by moderators by adding your views and opinions. Follow other participants and moderators in the chat and include proper hash tags in all of your tweets.

  1. Go For Accuracy

There is a large amount of misinformation online when it comes to medical field that confuses consumers and dilutes the effectiveness of accurate medial insights. As a doctor it is important that you act as the voice of reason when sharing important information about healthcare online. Go for accurate coverage of information on social media that could affect your credibility for the long term.

Spend a limited time on social media at a certain part of the day or few times a week to help you make your efforts to be more accurate. Again it needs to be quality over quantity when it comes to content sharing and the discussions that you are having online.

  1. Ask Questions

One of the benefits of having social media is the ability to have actual conversations online with your friends, family, peers and other connections in your network. As a doctor you should ask questions from your audience in order to get their feedback on some decision or a perspective on industry news.

As you will ask questions you will be able to learn the insights of your network. No one knows everything but still someone has something to share with others. Make use of your network on social media to get more insights and establish your credibility as respected and reputed doctor.

About Alex Tate

I am a health IT consultant with experience in management and training consultants across private and public sectors. I frequently write on Health IT for various blogs and websites. I am currently managing ehrsoftware.info website that helps practices and physicians select the right EHR. If you wish to connect with me follow me at https://twitter.com/alextate07

June 17, 2014 I Written By

Why Are So Many ER Doctors on Social Media?

Thanks to Greg Matthews for pointing out this article on 33 Charts that talks about why so many ER doctors are blogging and on social media.

Dr. Vartabedian brings up some interesting points about the early ER doc social media leadership, the FOAM movement and the resourcefulness of emergency medicine doctors. Those are good points, but I myself think that there are two reasons that ER doctors are so involved in social media.

First, an ER docs life is full of interesting stories. There’s a reason that so many medical TV dramas centered around the ER. While the drama of an ER isn’t ever as exciting as what they portray on TV, it is true that an emergency medicine physician has no idea what might come through the door next.

At the core of social media and especially blogging is the ability to tell a good story. ED docs have new stories entering their departments every single day. It’s much harder to write a great blog post about your 14th colonoscopy or 10th cough and cold.

Second, I think many ED physicians see themselves as a little bit renegade. There’s a reason why the ED is the only department in the hospital that continually can make the case for why they need their own EHR as opposed to the massive enterprise EHR which they’ve spent hundreds of millions of dollars to use. The culture of the ED is that we’re different and sometimes we have to do things that are different than the rest of the hospital.

While healthcare social media has become more mainstream, when it first started you had to be a little bit of a renegade to start using it. Most doctors were just afraid. I don’t think you can work in the ED and be afraid, can you?

Although the GuntDoc might have said it best in the comments, “ER docs are some of the most interesting people you’ll meet. There has to be a touch of something off in you to go into EM anyway.”

Social media definitely loves interesting!

June 4, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.