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#SHSMD17 in 17 Tweets – Perspectives on Healthcare Marketing

Posted on October 4, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

The AHA’s Society for Healthcare Strategists and Marketing Development recently held its annual conference – SHSMD17 – in Orlando Florida. For three full days, 1,500 attendees shared ideas and traded insights on the latest trends healthcare marketing trends. The 60+ concurrent sessions covered a variety of topics including:

  • Developing online support groups for patients
  • Successful blog-driven content marketing
  • Media relationships
  • Communication and preparedness during a crisis
  • Chatbots
  • Consumerism

For daily summaries of SHSMD17, check out these Day 1, Day 2 and Day 3 blogs. As well see this blog on the release of SHSMD’s Bridging Worlds 2.0 report during the conference.

If I had to pick an overall theme for SHSMD17 it would have to be “perspective”. The four keynote speakers and many of the session presenters urged the audience to break out of our boxes in order to truly “see” healthcare from multiple viewpoints – including patients, clinicians and government. Only by putting ourselves into the shoes of healthcare’s various stakeholders can we create effective marketing campaigns and hospital programs.

During the conference, there was a lot of live-tweeting and there were many conversations happening via social media with people who were not in attendance. I thought it would be fun to highlight 17 tweets from SHSMD17.

Here goes.

Fun SHSMD17 Tweets

 

The Positive Impacts of EHRs and MACRA on Patient Care – #KareoChat

Posted on July 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you were to look at the Twittersphere or read a lot of the healthcare IT publications out there, you might think that nothing good has come from EHRs or MACRA. While there are plenty of points of criticism that are worthy of discussion about both of these things, I think the negative discussion overwhelms many of the positive things that have come out of EHRs and MACRA (and it’s predecessor meaningful use).

With this in mind, I recently did a blog post for Kareo which looked at some of the ways EHRs and MACRA can improve patient care. The intro to the post summarizes what’s happening well:

When healthcare pundits talk about MACRA they often offer a basic analysis of how the move to value-based reimbursement will be a good thing for healthcare, since then we are only spending money on care that provides value. Many doctors disagree and suggest that value-based reimbursement won’t create the value it purports to create. Either of these analyses overlooks many of the benefits that MACRA and the move to EHR software offer healthcare. The reality is that many of the most exciting initiatives in healthcare would not be happening today and would not even be possible if it weren’t for programs like MACRA and the implementation of EHR software. Let’s take a look at some of these improvements.

Be sure to check out the full blog post to read about a number of ways we’re benefiting from EHRs and MACRA.

This idea became a theme for me this month and so when Kareo asked me to host their weekly #KareoChat I thought it would be a great topic of conversation for the larger healthcare IT Community as well. I’m sure many of you can offer a lot of great perspectives on how patient care has been improved sthanks to these programs and technology. If you’d like to join the discussion, I’ll be hosting the #KareoChat on Thursday, July 27th at 9 AM PT. Just hop on Twitter and join in!

During the #KareoChat we’ll be discussing the topic of “The Positive Impacts of EHRs and MACRA on Patient Care.” Here are the 5 questions that will serve as the framework for the discussion:

1. Are you planning to participate in MACRA? At what pace? And why or why not?

2. Where do you see MACRA having a positive impact on patient care?

3. What are the short term benefits to patient care from having an EHR?

4. What are the long term benefits to patient care from having an EHR?

5. What other things beyond MACRA and EHR can we do to improve patient care?

I have a feeling that this chat is going to be a challenge for many. It’s so easy for us to see the negative. It takes much more work to see the positives. I think that’s largely because we start to take the positives for granted. Hopefully, during this chat we’ll take a step back and realize all the positives of EHRs and MACRA.

Full Disclosure: Kareo is a sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Clinical Insights from Social Media Data: Amplifying Patient Voice with Symplur

Posted on May 31, 2017 I Written By

Healthcare as a Human Right. Physician Suicide Loss Survivor.
Janae writes about Artificial Intelligence, Virtual Reality, Data Analytics, Engagement and Investing in Healthcare.
twitter: @coherencemed

What data from social media can help healthcare organizations?

One of the biggest challenges of online and social data is the sheer volume of unstructured data. Can your physician read all your tweets and postings? Hopefully not. Physicians have data and work overload, a daily report of steps taken from activity trackers or online social media use hurts their ability to treat patients. HealthIT solutions can help process this data and find patterns and changes.

I had a conversation with Audun Utengen about actionable insights into healthcare from his company, Symplur. At Datapalooza he participated in a panel and mentioned the rich amount of patient data that can be found on twitter (shocked gasp followed by a furrowed brow). Symplur signals tracks online engagement.  You can find healthcare insights from conversations really quickly. They provide tools that help healthcare providers get patient insights where they are naturally interacting. There is value in meeting patients where they are, and patients are discussing their healthcare online.

Originally, the assumption was that patients would not say things online. Sensitive topics do not naturally show up in social media use- fewer people are discussing gonorrhea online than receive treatment for gonorrhea. Providers assumed that things which are protected patient information would not show up on twitter. They were wrong. As most social media users know- it’s shocking what people will post online. Not every aspect of health is on twitter but patients want to engage online.  They go to twitter because they want their voices to be heard. They want things to change. They can’t be ignored on twitter. They want their voices to be heard by people in decision-making positions.

Patient’s online discussion have positive impacts on organizations. The key is to be proactive about patient engagement online. Stanford did a study looking about patients’ engagement at conferences. Typically, you will find 1 patient in the top 1 percent of influencers. While this number is low, conferences which have a higher percentage of patients active as top influencers have a greater reach. Want to increase your Healthcare voice and conference audience? Engage patient advocates online. Engaging patients is commercially valuable in amplification. Future patients get more insight as well.  Audun Utengen and I looked at the data from Datapalooza and found that 11 of the top 100 influencers were patients.  That is way ahead of the median number for all healthcare conferences- in 2016 the average number of top influencers that were patients at a conference was one.

“They did a great job giving patients a voice at the conference. I am impressed.”

-Audun Utengen, Co-Founder of Symplur

Healthcare Stakeholder breakdown of the top 100 influencers ranked by the Healthcare Social Graph Score.

Datapalooza had a higher than average reach and a unique blend of participants. Audun Utengen described some of the unique features of the conference:

“The social conversation from the conference was very dynamic. From the 9,366 tweets, 80% included at least one mention. Lot’s of connections were made and we witnessed the typical “flattening of healthcare” that social media is known for by breaking down the barriers between the stakeholder groups. Below is a network analysis graph showing the flattening and the conversational patterns between Twitter account and their healthcare stakeholder groupings.”

Conversations blend between different stakeholders in the healthcare conversation at Datapalooza

The ability for many stakeholders to access information and interact with each other in one place is one of the advantages of twitter. Using hashtags can help stakeholders learn about content about a specific topic quickly. One of the things Symplur is allows is the visualization of keywords surrounding conversations on twitter. When looking at the conversations from Datapalooza the topic of “patients” was very high. Unsurprisingly, “data” is the topic of focus. Patient, Health and Patients rounded out the top conversation topics.

Keyword Frequency Analysis Graph

Symplur Signals have been used for over 200 healthcare studies. They partner with academic research centers seeking more information from online conversations. Companies can also look at competitors in their area and see how they compare. Does a nearby provider have more positive mentions on social media?

Data from online interactions can also give insights into patient health. Social usage has unique implications for mental health. Frequently, online behavior change can predict mental health change. Pediatricians and Providers are in a position to see online behavior in their area and help families understand the implications. If bullying is a problem in your area providers can know their patients will have higher stress levels and provide resources and support. Certain behaviors and even emojis indicate a higher risk of depression. A suicide that will predictably happen based on social data will not show up in clinical records. Listening to what patients want us to hear will help provide greater support.

The sheer volume of social data can mask its usefulness. Online activity and data can be difficult to process for many clinicians. In a world of ever-increasing data and patients reporting everything from steps taken a day to now online behavior many providers have data overload. Data insight tools such as Symplur filter data into a format that allows physicians and systems to use it to improve patient outcomes.

Patient Engagement and Patient Experience

Posted on May 24, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I got tied up on some big projects today and so for today’s post I’m going to point you to some really great resources being shared around patient engagement and patient experience from the Patient Engagement Summit hosted by the Cleveland Clinic.

Here are two images that were shared from the summit which give you a flavor for the types of conversations and knowledge that was being shared at the Patient Engagement Summit.


Note: Adrienne Boissy, MD, MA, noted that the chart above comes from this article.

You can find more great content like this by checking out the hashtag #PESummit on Twitter.

Finding New Patients for Your Practice

Posted on May 9, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In many practices, one of the biggest challenges they face is finding new patients for their practice. In some ways, technology has helped the situation, but in many ways technology has made this a real challenge for doctors.

Some recent data from Accenture Health provides an interesting look at one element of how patients find a medical practice.

When I saw this number I was shocked that it was so low. In the past, this number has been so much higher since finding a doctor from your health insurance company was the simple, logical way to make sure you were choosing a doctor which would take your insurance. Times are a changing.

When you look at the full report and the graph on how people find doctors, we learn even more:

Coming as no surprise is that highly digital patients leverage social media, internet searches and health websites to find a doctor at a much higher rate than those whom are less digital. However, what’s shocking to me is how much less the highly digital patient trusts the medical professional versus those that are less digital.

Not surprising is that friends and family is one of the most important factors for finding a doctor regardless of digital skills. Of course, it’s worth noting that in many cases, social media is really synonymous with friends and family. Social media is just the next generation of friends and family influence and communication.

What’s important to realize about these charts is that patients are quickly shifting from the less digital to the more digital category. So, 5 years from now we’re going to see a massive shift with how people find doctors. Social media, internet searches, health websites, and online ratings and review sites are going to continue to grow and become more important to practices looking for new patients.

What are you doing to prepare for this future?

The Personalization of Healthcare and Healthcare Chatbots

Posted on April 20, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

At HIMSS 2017, I did a plethora of videos where I was interviewing people and even more where people were interviewing me. Many of those videos are just now starting to leak out onto the internet. One of those videos where I was interviewed was with the team from Availity. They had a great team there that interviewed a bunch of the HIMSS Social Media Ambassadors including me.

I’ll admit that I was pretty tired when I did this interview at the end of the day, right before the New Media Meetup at HIMSS. However, I think the interview shares some high-level views on what’s happening in healthcare IT and important topics coming out of the conference. Check out the full video to learn the details:

I like that I talked about the personalization of healthcare and then healthcare chatbots in the same video interview. Some people might see these as opposites. How can talking with a healthcare chatbot be more personal than a human?

The answer to that question has two parts. First, a chatbot can quickly analyze a lot more information to personalize the experience than a human can do. Notice that I said personalization and not personal. There’s a subtle but important difference in those two words. Second, I didn’t clarify this in the video, but the healthcare chatbot will not fully replace the care provider. Instead, it will just replace the care provider from having to do the mundane tasks that the providers hate doing. Done correctly, the healthcare chatbot will fee up the providers to be able to focus on providing patients a more personalized and personal experience. That’s something we would all welcome in healthcare.

All of this health data we are amassing on patients is going to make both the healthcare chatbot and the human healthcare provider better able to give you a personalized experience. That’s a great thing.

Since in the video I also recommended that people follow Rasu Shrestha, MD, you may also want to check out the video interview Rasu did with Availity:

I love the idea that we go to conferences to not just learn something, but to unlearn things. Rasu is great!

First Time HIMSS: Parker Redding, Banyan Social

Posted on March 10, 2017 I Written By

Healthcare as a Human Right. Physician Suicide Loss Survivor.
Janae writes about Artificial Intelligence, Virtual Reality, Data Analytics, Engagement and Investing in Healthcare.
twitter: @coherencemed

One of the main themes of HIMSS was using digital tools to manage your patient engagement and social engagement online. Banyan Social was there for their first conference introducing their digital solution for storing patient permissions to post reviews or photos online. I spoke with Parker Redding from Banyan Social. They were a first time Exhibitor at HIMSS and I wanted to hear what their impressions were from the conference.  Banyan Social is a platform with marketing tools for providers including digital storage of HIPAA forms and integration with Google reviews. From their website:  “Extend your reach and grow your practice with real-time reviews, HIPAA-compliant social media posts and automated practice listings.”

What was your first health IT conference like?

“Honestly, I thought it was pretty cool. It was almost overwhelming how many people were there. It was the biggest event I’ve ever been to. It was cool to see how many people are in the Health IT space. We were constantly busy at our booth and with how many people came to our booth we didn’t really have the opportunity to explore in depth. We are unique in the Health IT space and aren’t always the perfect fit for these database guys and those kinds of people but they were always willing to refer us to the right people and who to talk to.

One thing that I liked about this event is that even if they don’t think it’s a good fit everyone is willing to be open and have a conversation. Everyone there is trying to learn more and share knowledge it’s not just “I’m trying to get my CE credits and leave.”  It’s about learning something new – about gaining knowledge.

A lot of the people who were first time exhibitors that we talked to told us how it was crazy how big it was and how many people were there. The conference was really diverse in terms of experts from different countries.  It was cool to see the big EMR or the IBM booth and to see how much effort they put into their space.

What were your goals?

Our main goal was to create partnerships with other companies in the healthcare industry and to learn more about the healthcare IT industry and how our business fits in with this. We wanted to share our HIPAA approved social media app and how doctors/clinics can use social media and reviews to engage patients.

What was your favorite part of HIMSS?

Honestly, speaking with a pediatrician that owns multiple practices the last day and learning about why he’s been in the medical industry.  Learning about how much he cared about his patients and how he knew he could make more money in another industry. It’s amazing to see how passionate people are about healthcare and being positive. He gives up money because he’s passionate about helping with children.

What did you learn about Health IT?

Bunch of nerds.  Just kidding.  I love the nerds and the developers those are my people.

What do you wish you could do differently?

I would bring more people to have at our booth. We had a consistent flow of people stopping to talk with us that we didn’t get to spend the time we wanted to connect with other companies and learn more about the IT healthcare world. You can’t complain about having a busy booth.  I would take an Uber to the conference. Trying to find a parking spot and walking a mile to get to your booth was difficult.

“We’re All Patients”

Posted on February 15, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Ever since the first #HITsm Chat of the year, I’ve been rolling around the idea of “We’re All Patients.” It was kicked off by what I think was probably a well-intentioned tweet by Andrey Ostrovsky, MD who asked to hear from patients:

This led someone to say “Aren’t we all patients at some point?” which got this response from Erin Gilmer along with a whole firestorm of other comments:

First, let’s applaud Dr. Ostrovsky for asking for the patient perspective and let’s not let the firestorm of defining patients overwhelm the fact that he wanted to hear from patients. That’s a dramatic shift from the past where patients might have been an afterthought. Dr. Ostrovsky was asking for patient input 11 minutes into a 1 hour chat. That’s a big improvement.

Second, if you look at the literal definition of patient, it says “a person receiving or registered to receive medical treatment.” By pure technical definition, it’s true that we’re all patients. Hard to imagine an adult that hasn’t received medical treatment at some point. However, when we say that “We’re all patients” it misses the point of why I think Erin Gilmer and Carolyn Thomas, who wrote the post that Erin linked to, said that we’re not all patients.

The reality is that even if we’ve all been to a doctor before, it doesn’t mean that we’re talking from our view as a patient. Many times when you go to a conference or are participating on a Twitter chat, you’re not having a discussion from your view as a patient. Often you’re talking from a work perspective or from a provider perspective and not from a patient perspective.

We know this happens a lot because you’ll often hear at conferences “This isn’t what I want personally, but this is my perspective on it.” Just because you have been a patient at one point doesn’t mean you’re speaking from that perspective at a conference, Twitter chat, blog post, etc. That’s true for me too when writing these blog posts. I’ll write from a wide variety of perspectives depending on the topic and post. It’s often not from the patient perspective.

Along with not necessarily speaking from your own patient perspective, it’s fair to say that just because you were a patient for some “injury or episode of illness”, it doesn’t mean you can share the perspective of a patient with a chronic condition. That’s a very different situation and one that largely has to be lived to fully comprehend.

The reality is that we need to involve as many different patient voices in our discussions as possible if we want to create solutions that benefit patients the most. On that, I think almost everyone agrees. Studies have shown that having a wide diversity of viewpoints, opinions, and perspectives provides a much better solution.

At the end of the day, we can all only share our own personal experience. I don’t want chronic patients talking for me. Chronic patients don’t want non-chronic patients talking for them. In fact, many chronic patients don’t want other chronic patients talking for them. etc etc etc

Instead, we should do everything we can to incorporate multiple perspectives into all the work we do. That’s where we’ll get the best results. We shouldn’t be so arrogant that we try to speak for someone else. However, we also shouldn’t demonize someone that tries to show empathy and raises the voice of another’s perspective either. The reality of complex problems is that we can all be right depending on perspective. So, let’s embrace as many perspectives as possible. We are all humans and most of us want healthcare to be better.

UPDATE: In a great discussion on Twitter with Erin Gilmer that was prompted by this post, Erin highlights a point that I didn’t cover well in the above commentary. She pointed out that many chronic patients’ voices have been marginalized in the past. I’d take it even a step further and say they’ve not only been marginalized but often ignored.

The reality is that the “healthy” patients have more voices making sure their (my) needs are heard. Chronic patients are smaller in number and so it’s more challenging to have their voices heard. Not to mention the last thing you want to do when you’re dealing with chronic illness is make your voice heard. However, in an impressive manner, many patients with debilitating illnesses do just that.

Erin also made a good point that we shouldn’t use “We are all patients” as an excuse to not involve expert patients at the table. We should definitely elevate their voices. As an advisor to many health IT startup companies and having written about thousands of companies, the challenge of incorporating all these voices and perspectives into a product is impossible. There are always gives and takes with limited resources. However, far too many don’t even make a sincere effort. That’s what’s sad.

This post is about elevating more patient voices from a wide variety of perspectives. That produces the best outcomes and discussions.

What’s It Take to Be a Great Thought Leader – #HITsm Summary

Posted on January 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

At last Friday’s #HITsm Chat, we had a lively discussion hosted by Juliana Ruiz from Bryte Box Consulting (@BryteBox) where we talked about Healthcare IT Influencers and Thought Leaders. If you missed the chat, you can read the whole transcript here.

I thought the first question summarized the chat really well as it talked about the key attributes of a thought leader.

Greg Meyer started the chat off nicely with this observation:


Greg was spot on with his comparison to a minion. We want to listen to someone who says something interesting and thoughtful and not just someone who spits out content like a robot.

His comment about thought leaders not being afraid to make mistakes drew some interesting discussion with some agreeing that mistakes are part of thought leadership, but others saying that social media and other things hold it against many leaders who make mistakes. Although, most agreed that mistakes were ok because it was part of growth.

I did argue that it really depends how the thought leader treats mistakes. Humility matters a lot when you make mistakes:

The concept of humility seemed to be an important concept for thought leaders as was illustrated by these tweets from Greg and @hospitalEHR:

Steve Sisko and @WHAMGlobal also chimed in on the importance of thought leaders to be consistent and have a clear voice and style.

Our host wrapped up the discussion of what makes a great thought leader with this insight:

I love these principles, because they apply to individuals and organizations. They apply online and offline. They apply in your work life and your personal life. There are so many opportunities for us to be thought leaders. By doing so we can impact a lot of people for good and help a lot of people. There’s nothing better in life than doing something that helps someone else.

Be sure to join us at next week’s #HITsm chat hosted by Bill Esslinger (@billesslinger) from @FogoDataCenters on the topic of “Key Components of Health IT Strategy and Disaster Recovery“.

#HIMSS17 Mix Tape

Posted on January 24, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.


On February 19th 2017, the annual HIMSS conference (#HIMSS17) will be held in Orlando FL. It will once again be the largest gathering of Healthcare IT folks in North America with over 45,000 people expected.

Every year I look forward to HIMSS. It is the best place to see what is happening in the industry, hear the challenges that lay ahead and see what the smart minds in #healthIT are investing in. Although the sessions, keynotes and exhibit hall are all amazing, the best part of the conference is meeting people face to face – especially at the meetups and spontaneous get-togethers. I love catching up with friends that I haven’t seen in a year and meeting new ones for the first time.

For the past couple of years, I have used HIMSS as an opportunity to compile a soundtrack for healthcare – a Mix Tape that can be enjoyed during the conference (see last year’s Mix Tape here). This annual HIMSS Mix Tape is a fun way to reflect on where we have been and where we are going. As with prior years, I asked friends and colleagues on social media for the song they believe best represents healthcare. I also asked them to explain their selection.

Below are the songs chosen for the #HIMSS17 Mix Tape. What would your selection be? Let us know in the comments.

Enjoy.

You’ll be back – Hamilton. Chosen by Regina Holliday @ReginaHolliday.

Because that song could be the words of any doctor who wants his patient compliant and silent and any government that denies care. Hence we must have revolution.

Shine – Camouflage. Chosen by Nick Van Terheyden @drnic1.

After many potential choices ranging from the deep and dark Wadruna by Helvegen through “America” by Young the Giant that celebrates the immigration to the uplifting dance song that captured what seemed to transpire for the year was “Don’t Stop the Madness” by DJ Hush and featuring Fatman Scoop (what an awesome name) I settled on Shine. That captured the spirit of what I need this year: This is the world where we have to live / there’s so much that we have to give / so try to Shine Shine Shine within your mind / Shine from the Inside / if you Shine Shine Shine within your mind.

Can’t you hear me knockin – Rolling Stones. Chosen by Linda Sotsky @EMRAnswers.

In my own life, I started my Mothers  fight for data 17 years ago. As collective patients, caregivers and advocates we are STILL  knockin and screamin “give me my damned data” Can’t you hear us knockin?

Faith – George Michael. Chosen by Rasu Shrestha MD @RasuShrestha.

My HIMSS17 playlist is inspired by some of the best singers we said goodbye to in the last 12 months – an acknowledgement that, even as we continue to push the envelope in healthcare in so many ways, life is fragile, beautiful and melodious in every one of our ups and downs. Other finalists: When Doves Cry (Prince), Rebel Rebel (David Bowie) and The Heat is On (Glenn Frey)

We’re not Gonna Take It – Twisted Sister. Chosen by Mandi Bishop @MandiBPro.

The disenfranchised, the chronically or severely ill, the caregivers, and the underserved communities will rise up and be heard in the face of healthcare weaponization. We will not remain silent. We will not take it.

Sit Still Look Pretty – Daya. Chosen by Geeta Nayer MD @gnayyar

I chose this to represent the HIT chicks movement in health tech. Increasingly women are coming to the table and taking senior leadership roles in health tech which we so very much need as women remain the primary healthcare decision maker in the home with “doctor mom” being the go to for any and every illness first! Spouses rely on their wife to be the care takers when parents get older and when kids are sick and need to run to the pediatrician etc. Also, HIMSS for the first time is giving the women in tech awards which itself is a big statement.

Bring on the Rain – Jo Dee Messina and Tim McGraw. Chosen by John Lynn @techguy

We’ve got challenges all around us in healthcare, but I say “Tomorrow’s Another day, and I’m thirsty anyway, so Bring on the Rain.”  Things will get better in healthcare because so many amazing people work in healthcare and battle through the rain.

Cautionary Tale – Dylan LeBlanc. Chosen by Steve Sisko @ShimCode

A cautionary tale is a story with a moral message warning of the consequences of certain actions, inactions, or character flaws. Healthcare players – CMS, other government agencies, large vendor companies, special interest groups and others – seem to be stuck in a continual cycle of Dictate, Demand, Deviate and Destroy. Half-baked programs, ‘standards,’ reimbursement schemes, “quality measures,” and other mandates are dictated to providers, health plans and others on the receiving end.  Then revisions, waivers and deviations are made over the course of a year or two before they’re eventually destroyed. When will we learn from these cautionary tales? Don’t offer up help that you know that I won’t be needin’ / Cause I do it to myself, like I never get tired of bleedin’

You Can’t Always Get What You Want – Rolling Stones. Chosen by Don Lee @dflee30

Too often in healthcare we only want to look at solutions that solve for 100% of the possibilities, have proven ROI and that are already being used by our peers. That severely limits the possibilities for improvement. There’s no such thing as a sure thing. So, for 2017 I hope we can break this cycle and focus on incremental improvements. Take some shots. Be willing to fail. Think: “what can I do today that won’t require a huge budget and 1000 meetings, but might make something 5, 10 or 20% better?”.5% better today is better than “we might possibly be able to be 100% better 36-48 months from now”. So, “you can’t always get what you want, but if you try, sometime you find, you get what you need”

Livin’ On The Edge – Aerosmith. Chosen by Matt Fisher @Matt_R_Fisher

The whole healthcare industry is balancing on a razor’s edge in many respects. What will happen with the ACA, can EMRs meet their promise and what will value based cared do? All of these unanswered questions mean that these lyrics hold true: Tell me what you think about our situation / Complication, aggravation / Is getting to you

One Step Away – Casting Crowns. Chosen by Jennifer Dennard @JennDennard

While it’s a praise song at its core, its title makes me think of how close the healthcare industry is to interoperability. And yet there are still a few “small” hurdles we need to overcome. (Plus, my daughter is singing this song in her school talent show, so I have developed quite a soft spot for it!)

Record Year – Eric Church. Chosen by Joe Lavelle @Resultant

In hope that all my #HealthIT / #PatientAdvocate / #SoMe / #ThoughtLeader colleagues ignore and overcome the nonsense of the current political climate to keep making HUGE progress on the most important healthcare initiatives like Telemedicine, Interoperability, a National Patient ID,  Care Coordination, alternate payment models like Direct Primary Care, and more.  Let’s all have a Record Year in 2017!

Fight Song – Rachel Platten. Chosen by Max Stroud @MMaxwellStroud

This goes out to all the people in HealthIT that are working diligently for their vision of the future of healthcare.   In a year of major political shifts and possible policy changes, it will be important to maintain focus on our passions and continuing to move toward innovation and improvement of HealthIT.   This goes out to patient advocates from #epatients to the walking gallery, To the folks living the #startupgrind because of thier passion for a better tomorrow, and to the #HealthITChicks working towards gender parity. Like a small boat / On the ocean / Sending big waves / Into motion / Like how a single word / Can make a heart open / I might only have one match / But I can make an explosion”

Crosseyed and Painless – Talking Heads. Chosen by David Harlow @healthblawg.

There was a line/ There was a formula. But we are now in a post-factual environment. Facts all come with points of view/ Facts don’t do what I want them to/ Facts just twist the truth around. We need to focus on achievable goals, on implementing solutions that make sense independent of regulatory engines that have driven so much of health IT over the past eight years.

What Do You Mean – Justin Bieber. Chosen by Lygeia Ricciardi @Lygeia

There’s a lot of talk in health IT that you can’t take it at face value. For example, everyone says they support interoperability, and yet… we’re not there yet. Also, there’s a lot of talk about patient engagement, but is it really about involving patients in their care… or just getting them to better “comply”? Finally, is Trump really going to get rid of Obamacare, or just rebrand it? What *do* you mean?

Addicted to Love – Raymond Penfield. Chosen by Charles Webster MD @wareFLO

Raymond Penfield was 94 when he recorded Addicted to Love and became an Youtube sensation. He made it to 98. Here is his obituary. BTW he was a graduate from the University of Illinois as was I! I hope I have as much energy and spirit and health into my 90s!

Video Killed the Radio Star – Buggles. Chosen by Joe Babaian @JoeBabaian

Why? Because times are changing and status quo is being cast aside.

Truckin’ – Grateful Dead. Chosen by Brian Ahier @ahier

Because this ♫♪♪♪♫♪? ♫♪ What a long strange trip it’s been ♫♪♪♪♫♪?

Under Pressure – David Bowie and Queen. Chosen by Colin Hung @Colin_Hung

Healthcare in the US and around the world has never been under more pressure than it has now. Patients are expecting more (as they should!), governments are trying to regulate everything from drug prices to reimbursements, employers are looking to curb healthcare costs and there is tremendous pressure on the healthIT industry to work together. To me, this song is the perfect collaboration – an example of what happens when two amazing artists come together. We need more of this type of collaboration in healthcare. Plus there is one verse that is very applicable to 2017: And love dares you to care for / The people on the (People on streets) edge of the night / And loves (People on streets) dares you to change our way of / Caring about ourselves

For a full #HIMSS17 Mix Tape Playlist on Spotify, click here or play the embedded player below.