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Social Determinants of Health (#SDOH)

In a recent chat that I think was hosted by HIMSS, they used the hashtag #SDOH. I’ll admit that the hashtag wasn’t familiar to me, so I was glad that they included a link to resources on the HIMSS Future Care website that defined #SDOH as Social Determinants of Health. Had you heard of this hashtag or term before?

I’d never heard of Social Determinants of Health before, but I’d certainly heard of some of the concepts. I think there is a lot to be said about how our social interactions can be used to determine our health. I think the real challenge with it is taking it from a conceptual idea and turn it into a science. Not to mention turning it into a science where technology could be applied.

What I just described is the perfect opportunity for an entrepreneur. Some of the best new companies take something really challenging and make it simple for the end user. I think that’s exactly what will happen with social determinants of health. With the plethora of social signals that are easily available and accessible now, a large mix of entrepreneurs will be able to work on this challenge. That’s really exciting for me.

The real question I have with social determinants of health is whether they’ll just be a consumer based application or whether the healthcare system will embrace these notions as well. My guess is that it will start as a consumer focused application and then as the science of SDOH matures, the rest of the healthcare system will start to accept and use it as well.

Have you seen applications of SDOH? Do you think social signals aren’t very valuable in determining someone’s health? Can they be leveraged reliably? Will we eventually see SDOH in EMR and EHR software?

July 28, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

FDA’s Social Media Guidance Insights

I had a chance to watch parts of a Google+ hangout discussing the latest FDA social media guidance with David Harlow from Health Blawg. I’ve had a chance to work on a number of things with David and he’s a really smart guy that’s on top of a lot of the regulations that affect healthcare. I guess that’s a feature of being a healthcare lawyer. For those who missed it, you can check out the full video interview with David below:

For those who prefer the cliff notes version, David published some bullet points on his blog that do a great job summarizing the main points and key takeaways:

  • The draft guidance makes use of Twitter and platforms like Google Ads extremely unattractive, because the vast majority of the “real estate” must be given over to brand and generic names, indications for use, benefits, risks, and a link to fuller information about risks.
  • The FDA addressed itself to short-form communication without considering the way in which it is used most effectively – not as a canvas for ads, but as a forum for conversation.
  • Unbranded tweetchats, Facebook pages, and the like were OK before the draft guidance was issued, and they still are.
  • The correction of misinformation guidance lowers the regulatory bar for corrections (vs. marketing messages that must meet higher standards and may be subject to pre-review).
  • The misinformation guidance does not require a drug or device manufacturer to address all misinformation online about its products. Corrections must be focused responses to what others put out there on line, and should link to fuller information where appropriate, but corrections should not include or link to promotional material.
  • The misinformation guidance delineates an area of opportunity for drug and device manufacturers.

You can read more on his blog post including someone getting in trouble for liking a patient’s status. Think about that for a minute. Is it any wonder that pharma’s been really careful with social media?

July 23, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

4 Healthcare IT Blogs

I’ve been having some fun highlighting some of my fellow health IT blogging colleagues (see 5 Health IT bloggers I highlighted previously). What’s been kind of sad about the experience is that so many health IT bloggers have stopped blogging. I started bookmarking the various EHR and health IT bloggers that I came across a few years back. As I’ve been going back through that list, it’s been really amazing how many stopped or even removed their blog completely.

Even so, there are still quite a few healthcare IT bloggers that are writing some great content. Here’s a look at 4 more health IT bloggers that I find interesting.

Venture Valkyrie – This blog is written by Lisa Suennen, but I have to admit that I didn’t even know that was her real name. I’ve just always seen her as Venture Valkyrie. With an awesome name like that, I’m not sure why she’d ever use the name Lisa. Anyway, Venture Valkyrie is a venture capital investor and healthcare industry consultant. She brings a lot of interesting perspective and insight into healthcare, investing, innovation, entrepreneurship and the role of women in all of these.

Dr. Mike Sevilla – Dr. Sevilla originally started his social media efforts as The Doctor Anonymous, before he came out from behind the cover of anonymity to share his thoughts on medicine, social media and life. Dr. Sevilla is a family practice doctor who’s been involved in social media since 2005. He’s tried to stop blogging and other social media and he can’t stay away. That’s just my kind of blogger.

HL7 Standards – This blog is run by the Corepoint Health team and is also home to the #HITsm Twitter chat topics. While Corepoint Health manages the blog, they do a good job connecting with outside experts (many they probably find through their hosting the #HITsm chat) to cover interesting topics on the blog. In fact, if i didn’t tell you the blog was run by Corepoint Health, you’d probably not even know it. I love that they’ve taken the thought leadership and relationship approach to blog marketing.

Schwartz MSL Blog – This isn’t a purely health IT blog, but it covers a lot of healthcare IT topics since many of Schwartz’s clients are healthcare IT companies. Along with covering their experience working in healthcare IT, they also offer some interesting insights into the PR, marketing and social media worlds that I’m sure many readers will find interesting and useful.

July 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Key Insights from Healthcare B2B Social Marketing Strategies #HITMC Twitter Chat

I previously posted the topics for the first #HITMC Twitter chat that was supported by @billians and @porterresearch. Billian put together a recap of the Twitter chat using storify which is worth checking out. My partner in Influential Networks, Shahid Shah (The Healthcare Guy), took notes during the Twitter chat and put together this really great discussion summary for the 5 questions.

Topic 1: How can healthcare B2B marketers use social selling to their advantage?

  • Most healthcare sales are “local” and selling is inherently social; using social to identify trends and implications is great start. #HITMC
  • When selling socially, audience development is key; use local topics/trends to draw community attention before discussing solutions. #HITMC
  • When selling socially, don’t try to broadcast messages applicable nationally – focus locally on what matters to specific audiences. #HITMC
  • When discussing products, draw clear lines from real customer problems to your solutions including how to operationalize. #HITMC
  • When describing solutions, figure out what kind of audience participation around objections and clarifications is necessary. #HITMC

Topic 2: What suggestions do you have for healthcare B2B marketers beginning on social?

  • Imagine creating an event and consider what kind of audience you’d like to talk with; develop messaging around that audience. #HITMC
  • In the imagined event think about why people would come to your event (social is about “events” and “audience”). #HITMC
  • Craft a simple marketing messaging document that considers audience participation and what you’d like to hear from them. #HITMC
  • Don’t just figure out what you want tell the audience, that’s not social. Community participation is social. #HITMC
  • Once you know your audience and how you’d like them to participate then choose medium – FB, LinkedIn, Twitter, Blogs, etc. #HITMC
  • Don’t choose medium first, create audience development and community participation plan, topics, trends, etc. first #HITMC

Topic 3: How can Facebook be of use to healthcare B2B marketing strategies?

  • FB is best used for B2C (patient) as opposed to B2B but is useful in certain B2B circles when dealing with healthcare staff. #HITMC
  • To reach healthcare company staff, FB is great to start audience-specific discussions around specific jobs and problems. #HITMC
  • B2B is still a person to person sale but the person you’re selling has an organizational responsibility to be considered. #HITMC
  • Once you know the organizational responsibilities and purchasing decision, budgeting, then use that to inform FaceBook content. #HITMC

Topic 4: How can healthcare B2B marketers ensure the success of content on social?

  • News & views content is less useful and not as evergreen as actionable advice or content meant to teach something. #HITMC
  • In B2B, focus on content that is meant to help someone get their job done, not entertain or enlighten to just give news. #HITMC
  • Successful content will saved, e-mailed, or shared in some way. If your content isn’t saved or shared consider it a failure. #HITMC
  • If you know your audience, their roles, their responsibilities, etc. you can teach them something or lighten their research load. #HITMC
  • All of us have jobs to do during the day; the content that helps eliminate some research we have to do or finish a job wins. #HITMC

Topic 5: Why is social listening an important factor in successful B2B marketing?

  • There is no such thing as social marketing or social selling without listening.  #HITMC
  • If you don’t listen, you’re talking. Usually when you talk without listening you focus on the wrong person (yourself). #HITMC
  • Listening allows you to demonstrate authenticity, which builds confidence in your brand, which makes you believable. #HITMC
  • People, especially B2B, only buys from you when you’re authentic and believable because mission critical jobs are at stake. #HITMC
  • Recognize that nobody cares about you or your company. Not listening confirms people’s suspicions about your inauthenticity. #HITMC
  • Listening allows you to develop a better audience and find out their problems; you can solve issues or provide better content. #HITMC
  • Listening allows audiences to inform your marketing calendar, event participation, tell you about problems, solutions sought, etc. #HITMC

Thanks to everyone who participated in the chat and contributed to the conversation. I was excited that the chat produced 279 tweets and almost 1.4 million impressions. You can find the full transcript of the chat here. If you have other comments on these subjects, please add them to the comments of this post.

June 30, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Healthcare B2B Social Marketing Strategies #HITMC Twitter Chat

I’m really excited to be hosting a twitter chat with the great people at @billians and @porterresearch. You’ll find me participating in the Twitter chat using @ehrandhit and @techguy. If you’d like to join in on the conversation, follow the hashtag #HITMC on Thursday, June 26th @ 1pm ET.

Using the link above you can follow along with the chat, but even better is for you to join in on the conversation. Just add #HITMC to your tweet and you’ll be part of the conversation. Nothing to it.

We’ve put together the following 5 healthcare B2B topics for tomorrow’s Twitter chat discussion. There are some meaty ones in there for those that care about healthcare B2B marketing.

Topic 1: How can healthcare B2B marketers use social selling to their advantage? 
Suggested Reading: Social Media in Healthcare Marketing: Making the Case

Topic 2: What suggestions do you have for healthcare B2B marketers beginning on social?
Suggested Reading: 5 (Relatively Simple) Steps To B2B Social Media Marketing Success

Topic 3: How can Facebook be of use to healthcare B2B marketing strategies?
Suggested Reading: Using Facebook for B2B Healthcare Marketing: 5 Top Tips

Topic 4: How can healthcare B2B marketers ensure the success of content on social?
Suggested Reading: Strategies for Effective B2B Healthcare Marketing Content Creation

 Topic 5: Why is social listening an important factor in successful B2B marketing?
Suggested Reading: Why Social Media Listening is Important for Brands

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts on the above topics. Should be a lively conversation similar to what we started at the Health IT Marketing and PR Conference.

June 25, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

The Random Results of Clinical Trials

The following is a guest blog post by Andy Oram, writer and editor at O’Reilly Media.

For more than a century, doctors have put their faith in randomized, double-blind clinical trials. But this temple is being shaken to its foundations while radical sects of “big data” analysts challenge its orthodoxy. The schism came to a head earlier this month at the Health Datapalooza, the main conference covering the use of data in health care.

The themes of the conference–open data sets, statistical analysis, data sharing, and patient control over research–represent an implicit challenge to double-blind trials at every step of the way. Whereas trials recruit individuals using stringent critirea, ensuring proper matches, big data slurps in characteristics from everybody. Whereas trials march through rigid stages with niggling oversight, big data shoots files through a Hadoop computing cluster and spits out claims. Whereas trials scrupulously separate patients, big data analysis often draws on communities of people sharing ideas freely.

This year, the tension between clinical trials and big data was unmistakeable. One session was even called “Is the Randomized Clinical Trial (RCT) Dead?”

The background to the session is just as important as the points raised during the session. Basically, randomized trials have taken it on the chin for the past few years. Most have been shown to be unreproducible. Others have been repressed because they don’t show the results that their funders (usually pharmaceutical companies) would like to see. Scandals sometimes reach heights of absurdity that even a satirical novelist would have trouble matching.

We know that the subjects recruited to RCTs are unrepresentative of most people who receive treatments based on results. The subjects tend to be healthier (no comordities), younger, whiter, and more male than the general population. At the Datapalooza session, Robert Kaplan of NIH pointed out that a large number of clinical trials recruit patients from academic settings, even though only 1 in 100 of people suffering from a condition gets treated in such settings. He also pointed out that, since the federal government require clinical trials to register a few years ago, it has become clear that most don’t produce statistically significant results.

Two speakers from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory pushed the benefits of big data even further. Georgia Tourassi claimed that so far as data is concerned, “bigger can be better” even if the dat is “unusual, noisy, or sparse.” She suggested, however, that data analysis has roles to play before and after RCTs–on the one side, for instance, to generate hypotheses, and on the other to conduct longitudinal studies. Mallikarjun Shankar pointed out that we use big data successful in areas where randomized trials aren’t available, noticeably in enforcing test ban treaties and modeling climate change.

Robert Temple of the FDA came to the podium to defend RCTs. He opined that trials are required for clinical effectiveness–although I thought one of his examples undermined his claim–and pointed out that big data can have trouble finding important but small differences in populations. For example, an analysis of widely varying patients might miss the difference between two drugs, which may cause adverse effects in only 3% versus 4% of the population respectively. But for the people who suffer the adverse effects, that’s a 25% difference–something they’d like to know about.

RCTs received a battering in other parts of the Datapalooza as well, particularly in the keynote by Vinod Khosla, who has famously suggested that computing can replace doctors. While repeating the familiar statistics about the failures of RCTs, he waxed enthusiastic about the potential of big data to fix our ills. In his scenario, we will all collect large data sets about ourselves and compare them to other people to self-diagnose. Kathleen Sebelius, keynoting at the Datapalooza in one of her last acts as Secretary of Health and Human Services, said “We’ve been making health policy in this country for years based on anecdote, not information.”

Less present at the Datapalooza was the idea that there are ways to improve clinical trials. I have reported extensively on efforts at reform, which include getting patients involved in the goals and planning of trials, sharing raw data sets as well as published results, and creating teams that cross multiple organizations. The NIH is rightly proud of their open access policy, which requires publicly funded research to be published for free download at PubMed. But this policy doesn’t go far enough: it leaves a one-year gap after publication, which may itself take place a year after the paper was written, and the policy says nothing about the data used by the researcher.

I believe data analysis has many secrets to unlock in the universe, but its effectiveness in many areas is unproven. One may find a correlation between a certain gene and an effective treatment, but we still don’t know what other elements of the body have an impact. RCTs also have well tested rules for protecting patients that we need to explore and adapt to statistical analysis. It will be a long time before we know who is right, and I hope for a reconciliation along the way.

June 23, 2014 I Written By

Epic Joins IBM To Pitch DoD Contract

Hoping to be the lucky vendors that win a massive pending DoD deal, Epic Systems has team up with global technology giant IBM to compete for the DoD’s Healthcare’s Management Systems Modernization contract.

The new project comes after years of  struggles and changes of direction by the DoD, which has worked for years to integrate its system with the VA’s EMR. Back in 2009, the two giant federal agencies kicked off an effort to create an integrated medical record, the iEHR, which would offer every service member the ability to maintain a single EMR throughout their career and lifetime. But those efforts failed miserably, and the iEHR project was halted in February 2013.

Since then, the DoD has announced that it’s moving along with its iEHR plans once again, a sprawling project which the Interagency Program Office estimates the cost somewhere between $8 billion and $12 billion.

Meanwhile, the DoD Healthcare Management Systems Modernization is moving ahead, slated to replace the current Military Health System. The DHMSM should serve some 9.7 million beneficiaries.

The two partners certainly bring a strong bench to the table. Epic offers an interoperable platform which is one of the most adopted EMR systems in the country, and according to company officials,its open architecture supports more than 20 billion data transactions between systems every year.  Epic says that its customer community, which currently includes 100 million patients, exchanges more than 2.2 million records each month with of the EMR vendors, HISPs, HIEs, the VA, DoD and Social Security Administration.

IBM, meanwhile,is contributing its system integration, change management and expertise , ad experiments in delivering large-scale solutions in partnership with complementary software and services providers. IBM’s Federal Healthcare practice will lead the effort, backed by IBM global information technology,research and health care organizations which already collaborate with Epic in support of EMR solutions internationally.

Without a doubt, IBM is the grandfather of all big iron providers, so they don’t have a lot to prove.  And Epic is a clear leader in the enterprise EMR space, by some measures leading the pack by a considerable margin. It’s likely they’re a top contender for the job.

If the DoD does indeed choose the partnership of Epic and IBM to make its health IT transition, it seems likely that they’ll have recruited more than enough firepower to get the job done — though there’s always the question of whether Epic, which is used to bossing hospitals around, will function as well when the big bureaucracy of the DoD is calling the shots.

But what’s more worrisome is whether the DoD will work effectively with these two private sector companies, assuming t hey win the bid. As noted, the DoD’s track record with change management is nothing to write home about, to say the least, and bureaucratic waffling could conceivably undermine even the most expert efforts to bring DoD’s healthcare architecture into the future. As big and powerful as they are, IBM and Epic may be in for one heckuva ride. In fact, John’s even suggested that the best thing for Epic might be for them to not win the DoD EHR contract.

June 19, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @annezieger on Twitter.

How Doctors Can Make Use of Social Media?

The following is a guest blog post by Alex Tate.
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By using the right strategy doctors can gain a lot by making a proper use of social media to market themselves, share their rich experience and knowledge and carry out discussions with the colleagues in the industry.

Many of the doctors are afraid of the unknown and thus decide to remain silent over the social media due to privacy concerns. It is possible to create a good balance between having a transparent communication and matching to the necessary limitations of the industry.  Around 24% of physicians use social media at least once a day to post, share and seek medical information. The use of social media is still in its early years and it is a great opportunity to take advantage of these digital platforms and build credibility for your career as a doctor or a physician. The medical industry is very less saturated online as compared to other industries mainly due to the fear and apprehensions of health care organizations and professions as they would want to avoid liability issues related to social media related platforms.

As a doctor it is possible to make an effective and profitable social media strategy to market your practice and career. It will require a lot of time and effort but the results can have a far reaching effect for the long term success. If you are a physician or a doctor there are many ways you can make yourself stand out among others and effectively reach the right people in your social media.

  1. Set up personal account in Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn

Having social media accounts is one of the ways to increase your social footprint and expand it. Make a personal profile in all these three networks and optimize them to the fullest.

  1. Make Use of Visuals

Visuals are more effective in engaging people than text therefore include more pictures in your social media profiles on LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter. This is one of the important things to implement on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. When you are sharing content make sure you use original and non copyrighted photography in order to boost your engaging posts. Another way is to make use of photos in the blog posts, videos and articles when you are posting things on these networks.

  1. Share the knowledge

It doesn’t matter that which platform you are sharing your content on but make sure you whatever you are saying is helping you to make connections, followers and friends. Make use of your unique expertise and share the relevant information about what you know best.

Apart from joining the existing twitter chats, LinkedIn groups and relevant online discussion related to your area of expertise and industry, plan and start your own sharing hub on social media in order to bring the depth of knowledge to your professional interests.

Whether your knowledge hub is a LinkedIn Group, Twitter chats, Google plus profile or other relevant discussions online related to your industry, it is an important way of sharing what you know and build your credibility as you educate others.

As doctors it is important that you follow the rule of thumb to make sure you are providing the value to others and making use of your time spent on the social media networks. Doctor’s job is to make sure they share their expertise and execute their advice.

  1. Frequency of posting on LinkedIn

As one of the largest network of professionals online LinkedIn allow doctors to highlight each aspect of their career path using text and visuals. LinkedIn can offer lots of benefits to doctors because of its professional nature and a large network of likeminded people sharing and connecting with others. Begin by sharing the content from your profile that reflects your expertise and knowledge as a healthcare professional.

On LinkedIn content needs to be of a professional nature and little more reserved than the one shared on Facebook or Twitter. Share the links to those articles and other information that can be of some value to your connections and at the same time adding your own perspectives through commenting on posts.

  1. Follow other Healthcare Professionals on Social Media

Using Facebook and Twitter you can reach out to existing network of your contacts that you already know and you can find them by searching for colleagues, peers and friends working in the healthcare field. Follow and make connection with these individuals. After that you can use each networks search feature for to look for individuals in the similar role or industry. By connecting with a large number of people on these platforms you will have the like- minded people to interact with and share your views and experiences.

  1. Participate in conversations on twitter

Twitter is the best social media platform for having a public one to one conversation at the basic level. Start your conversation with doctors and medical professionals and discuss current trends in healthcare industry or new findings.

You can also find the conversations from other you have followed by searching through hashtags or keywords related to your interests a physician

  1. Join Useful Twitter Chats

In twitter chats, on particular topics and hash tags occurs weekly, monthly or quarterly. Search and discover what chats Twitter chats are available for medical professionals and join these conversations with other participants and learn new things. When participating in the twitter chat answer some of the questions asked by participants or posted by moderators by adding your views and opinions. Follow other participants and moderators in the chat and include proper hash tags in all of your tweets.

  1. Go For Accuracy

There is a large amount of misinformation online when it comes to medical field that confuses consumers and dilutes the effectiveness of accurate medial insights. As a doctor it is important that you act as the voice of reason when sharing important information about healthcare online. Go for accurate coverage of information on social media that could affect your credibility for the long term.

Spend a limited time on social media at a certain part of the day or few times a week to help you make your efforts to be more accurate. Again it needs to be quality over quantity when it comes to content sharing and the discussions that you are having online.

  1. Ask Questions

One of the benefits of having social media is the ability to have actual conversations online with your friends, family, peers and other connections in your network. As a doctor you should ask questions from your audience in order to get their feedback on some decision or a perspective on industry news.

As you will ask questions you will be able to learn the insights of your network. No one knows everything but still someone has something to share with others. Make use of your network on social media to get more insights and establish your credibility as respected and reputed doctor.

About Alex Tate

I am a health IT consultant with experience in management and training consultants across private and public sectors. I frequently write on Health IT for various blogs and websites. I am currently managing ehrsoftware.info website that helps practices and physicians select the right EHR. If you wish to connect with me follow me at https://twitter.com/alextate07

June 17, 2014 I Written By

Atul Gawande Ted Talk on How We Heal Medicine

Maybe I’m just excited about hearing Atul Gawande in person at ANI in a few weeks, but I just spent 20 minutes listening to his Ted talk on “How We Heal Medicine.” While he’s known for his work with checklists, I found his other insights into healthcare really refreshing. I’ve embedded the video below and pulled out some of his best quotes at the bottom of this post.

“We’re in the deepest crisis of medicines’ existence due to something you don’t normally think about when you’re a doctor concerned with how you do good for people, which is the cost of healthcare.”

“We have now found treatments for nearly all of the tens of thousands of conditions that a human being can have…We’ve now discovered 4000 medical and surgical procedures. We’ve discovered 6000 drugs that I’m now licensed to prescribe.”

“As Doctors, we can’t know it all. We can’t do it all by ourselves.”

“We in Medicine, I think, our baffled by this question of cost. We want to say, this is just the way it is. This is what Medicine requires.”

“Complexity requires group success.”

June 5, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

The Walking Gallery of Healthcare

I saw this Walking Gallery picture at Health Datapalooza and I wondered how many of my readers knew about the work that Regina Holliday started with the Walking Gallery. I don’t think I’d ever written about it before.

I was trying to find a way to give readers an understanding of the Walking Gallery, how it works and why they’re doing it. I found this video which does a great job of doing all of that:

The Walking Gallery of Healthcare from Eidolon Films on Vimeo.

Always fun to see someone from the Walking Gallery at the conferences. At one point I asked Regina what it takes for someone to become part of the Walking Gallery. As I recall, she said that you had to be worthy and have a story. I imagine I’d need a jacket as well ;-). One day I hope to have one of my own.

June 3, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.