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Medical Groups Can Use EHR Data To Analyze Clinical Workflows

Posted on October 17, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Typically, ambulatory care organizations don’t do workflow studies, as leaders assume they have neither the time nor the data available to make it happen.

They may have more options than they think, however. A group of researchers has concluded that timestamp data found in their EHR can be used to predict ambulatory workflow.

The research article, which appears in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, notes that workflow studies typically require large amounts of timing data which are too expensive to collect through observation or tracking devices. Historically, ambulatory care organizations have had to make do with observation and intuition rather than sophisticated interventions.

In fact, the relationship between health IT and ambulatory care workflow redesign hasn’t been a friendly one. A 2015 study by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality concluded that health IT implementations could make a mess of existing workflows. Problems included “a redistribution of clinicians’ and clinic staff’s time on different clinical tasks, repurposed usage of workspace, increased level of interruptions, multitasking, and off-hours work activities.”

According to the current group of researchers, however, these organizations may have the data they need at their fingertips. The study, which used EHR timestamp data to predict ambulatory workflow timings, suggests that this approach is valid.

To conduct the study, the researchers studied the workflow at four outpatient ophthalmology clinics associated with the Oregon Health and Science University, observing their workflows and timing each workflow step. They then mapped the EHR timestamps to workflow steps to see how they compared.

They found that workflow times generated by EHR timestamp analysis were within three minutes of observed times for greater than 80% of the appointments. What variance they did observe between observed times and timestamps seems to have been due to EHR use patterns.

Even giving these variances, ambulatory care organizations can get a lot of value out of EHR timestamp data, researchers said. “EHR timestamps…can be used to create simulation models, analyze HR use, and quantify the impact of trainees on workflow,” they concluded.

Even given this option, few ambulatory care organizations are likely to conduct formal workflow studies unless they’re backed by a deep-pocketed health system. Most medical practices have their hands full collecting what they’re owed by health plans and managing operations on a day-to-day basis.

This isn’t to suggest that they are unsophisticated, but rather, that workflow studies may require a level of time, commitment and resources that smaller practices simply don’t have. Most U.S. medical practices are small businesses.

Still, it’s good to know that if they choose, medical groups can use data already available in their EHR to make meaningful workflow improvements. Perhaps it’s time for vendors to step forward and support the use of EHRs for this purpose.

Increasingly, Physician Practices Paying Fees To Receive Electronic Payments

Posted on October 13, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Virtually no one would argue that health plan reimbursement levels are particularly high. Adding a fee if they want to get paid electronically seems like adding insult to injury, doesn’t it?

Unfortunately, one in six medical practices report being hit with these charges, according to research by the Medical Group Management Association. Its recent survey found that some practices are paying a meaningful percentage of total medical services payments to get paid via Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT).

Under rules created by the Affordable Care Act, designed to decrease healthcare administrative overhead, CMS created a standard for EFT transactions. Health plans have been required to offer EFT payments if providers request it since 2014.

Health plans’ payment policies seem to vary, however. A recent MGMA Stat poll, which generated responses from more than 900 medical practice leaders, found that while 50% of practices were not paying fees for receiving payments via EFT, others are absorbing big surcharges.

For one thing, health plans are increasingly offering practices a “virtual credit card” they can use to receive payments. While 32% of MGMA respondents said they weren’t sure whether they paid an electronic payments fee or not, other research suggests that many practices end up using virtual credit cards without knowing they would be charged 3-5% per payment received.

Meanwhile, 17% of respondents told MGMA they were definitely paying transaction fees, and of that group, almost 60% said that the health plans in question used a third-party payment vendor.

MGMA sees this as little short of highway robbery. “Some bad actors are fleecing physician groups by charging them to simply receive an electronic paycheck,” said Anders Gilberg, MGMA’s senior vice president for government affairs.

The MGMA is asking CMS to issue guidance preventing health plans and payment vendors from charging EFT-related fees. The group argues that such fees are counter to the goal of reducing healthcare administrative complexity, the stated purpose of requiring health plans to offer EFT payments.

Also, the American Hospital Association and NACHA, the electronic payments association, are asking CMS to set standards on when and how health plans can implement virtual cards, as well as making it easy for practices to move to EFT.

The imposition of fees is particularly unfair given that health plans benefit significantly from issuing EFT payments, the group says. For one thing, health insurers save millions of dollars by sending payments via EFT, MGMA notes. Not only that, sending payments via EFT allows health plans to automate the re-association of electronic payments with the Electronic Remittance Advice.

While it’s true that physician practices used to save time staff would’ve used to manually process and deposit paper checks, that doesn’t make the fees okay, the group argues. “Beyond the material administrative time savings for all sides, the time and resources that physician practices spend on billing and related tasks are better spent delivering healthcare to patients,” it said in a prepared statement.

In What Seems Like An Effort To Make Nice, eClinicalWorks Joins OpenNotes Initiative

Posted on October 12, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

eClinicalWorks has decided to try something new. The health IT vendor has announced that it will support the OpenNotes project, an initiative in which doctors share their notes with patients.

As most readers will know, it recently came to light that eClinicalWorks had gotten itself into some very hot water with the feds. eCW was forced to pay a $155 million settlement when the U.S. Department of Justice concluded that it had faked compliance with EMR certification standards.

Now, perhaps in an effort to make nice, eCW is making it possible for its customers to share visit notes using its patient portal. Actually, to be precise, the patient portal already had the ability to offer visit summaries to patients, but OpenNotes capabilities enhance these summaries with additional information.

OpenNotes, for its part, got its start in 2010, when Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Geisinger Health System and Seattle’s Harborview Medical Center decided to study the effects of letting patients read their medical notes via a portal.

The study, the results of which were published in the Annals of Internal Medicine in 2012, concluded that patients approved of note-sharing wholeheartedly, felt more in control of their care and had an easier time with medication adherence. Also, while some doctors reported changing documentation during this process, the study also found that doctors saw no significant changes in workload.

Perhaps most telling, at the end of the process 99% of patients wanted OpenNotes to continue, and none of the participating doctors opted out. A movement had been launched.

Since then, a long list of organizations has come on board to drive implementation of open notes, including Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Providence Health System, Salem Health and Oregon Health and Science University. This year, OpenNotes announced that 16 million Americans now had access to their medical notes online.

Back in 2012, I asked readers whether OpenNotes would eventually influence EMR design. Today, I would suggest that the answer is both “yes” and “no.”

On the one hand, I have little doubt that the project helped to advance the notion that patients should have on-demand access to their healthcare information, and moreover, to use it in managing their care. While some doubted this approach would work, OpenNotes can now be said to have sold the idea that health data transparency is a good idea. While the initiative had its doubters at its outset, today patient record access is far better accepted.

On the other hand, eClinicalWorks is the first EMR vendor I’m aware of to explicitly announce its support for OpenNotes. While it’s hard to tell what this means, my guess is that its competitors don’t see a need to take a position on the matter. While vendors are certainly being forced to take patient-facing data access into account, we clearly have a long way to go.

Bridging the Gap between What Patients Want and What Practices Offer

Posted on October 11, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Jim Higgins, Founder & CEO at Solutionreach. You can follow him on twitter: @higgs77

With the growing pressure of increasingly complex healthcare regulations, malpractice litigation, and expectations of quality care, modern-day medical practices face an unprecedented set of challenges when it comes to running a successful practice.

Throw in marketing, billing, scheduling, appointment reminders, and all of the other day-to-day aspects of running a practice, and many practices are maxed out.

But while practices are busy juggling this growing number of expectations, patient satisfaction has been falling.

Today’s patients have become accustomed to a buyer-centered approach in nearly every industry. Likewise, they expect the same from their healthcare professionals. Unfortunately, many practices have been slow to adapt.

The Patient-Provider Relationship Study recently found that the average medical provider with a panel of 2,000 patients could lose around 700 patients in the next couple of years. A large number of these patients are leaving due to dissatisfaction with their experience at a practice.

Much of the growing dissatisfaction from patients is in relation to practices not offering the services and technology that they have come to expect. Experts warn that the medical field lags behind every other industry in the adoption of new technology. This inevitably leads to a gap between what patients expect from their medical practice and what practices actually offer.

Perform a thorough gap assessment

According to the study, 60 percent of patients are not completely satisfied with practice logistics such as appointment scheduling, reminders, and communication. In fact, logistics is the area in which patients have the greatest overall dissatisfaction with their practice.

It is important that practices both understand what patients want the most and then complete an assessment to determine areas that need improvement.

The Patient-Provider Relationship Study found that patients want many additional touchpoints, including:

  • Text appointment reminders
  • Appointment alerts by email
  • Appointment alerts by text
  • Being able to text message back and forth with the practice
  • Allowing patients to initiate text messages to the practice

Unfortunately, a large number of practices do not offer these services. The following chart highlights how many practices offer each of these services, compared to a goal of 100 percent implementation.

With the majority of patients expressing dissatisfaction with the logistics offered by their medical practice, it is clear that changes need to be made. This requires the implementation of new, or more robust, technology.

Implement technology without distress

Practices want to be more efficient and provide an improved patient experience, but the fear of making the wrong choices around new technology can hold them back. Each of the aforementioned services have the potential to either improve processes and efficiency or make them more difficult. The outcome depends on the practice’s ability to carefully assess each piece of technology before moving forward.

There are steps you can take to eliminate some of the risk when choosing a new technology. One of the most important things you can do is to ask right questions before and during the selection process. Consider the following:

  1. Who will be impacted by this change?
  2. How will the technology affect your current workflow?
  3. Is the technology compatible with your current systems?
  4. Will the technology meet current and future compliance requirements?
  5. What will the implementation process include?
  6. How have other offices felt about the technology?
  7. What type of on-going customer service and training does the company offer?

When it comes to achieving high levels of patient satisfaction, it is critical that practices bridge the gap between what patients want and what is currently being offered. After performing a gap assessment and carefully vetting available technology, practices will be able to move forward in a way that will reduce the load on employees, create meaningful improvements in the practice, and boost the bottom line.

Solutionreach is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. As the leading provider of patient relationship management solutions, Solutionreach is dedicated to helping practices improve the patient experience while saving time for providers and staff. Learn more about the Patient-Provider relationship survey here.

Optimizing Your EHR for MIPS and Other Quality Payment Programs – MACRA Monday

Posted on October 9, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Meena Ande currently acts as Director of Implementation for Advantum Health. This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program (QPP) and related topics.

As quality reporting requirements ramp up under value-based payment programs like MIPS, healthcare organizations are busy retrofitting their EHRs to make way for new measures. In some settings, not much has changed by way of tech utilization since initial EHR investments were made. Many outpatient settings still lack the internal expertise needed to optimize their implementations.

The truth is many EHRs have the functionality providers need for quality reporting, but many providers don’t know that due to limited exposure to the system. Couple that stunted tech knowledge with the well documented lack of familiarity with MACRA and the recent rise of the service model in healthcare is no surprise. Many practice administrators are relying on their EHR vendor or engaging outside experts to help lead the charge on system reconfiguration to meet Quality Payment Program demands.

There are several EMR capabilities providers can take advantage of to support QPP reporting efforts. Here are a few tips to keep in mind as you customize your EHR for MIPS and other value-based models.

Don’t boil the ocean when selecting CQMs.

Most EHRs give the option of tracking more than what is required for quality reporting. Initially, track applicable measures that exceed reporting requirements. After three to four weeks you’ll know which are your strong areas. Pick the best of the litter and proceed.

Providers can be overwhelmed by too many measures, particularly in multi-specialty practice settings. While it can be difficult to find overlap in measures between specialties, taking advantage of shared metrics whenever possible can reduce reporting burdens. Sit down as early as possible and develop an EHR configuration that works for your practice’s various clinicians.

Case in Point:

A gastroenterologist and a cardiologist may work in the same multi-specialty organization and on the same EHR, but the clinical quality measures they care about differ. There is no reason to give the gastroenterologist access to the cardiology problem list in the EHR. Specialty views improve ease-of-use and support more complete documentation.

Most EHRs offer role-based and specialty-based customization. Administrators can enable or disable EHR features related to some quality measures at the practice level and sometimes at the individual provider level. Clinical quality measures are based on details about the patient, but what is captured at each point of care should be tailored to the specific provider role.

Consider the roles impacted by different CQMs.

Keep the role of the person who may be responsible for different quality measures and Advancing Care Information workflows in mind when selecting and carving out space for CQMs in your EHR. Select measures that spread reporting work across multiple roles to relieve clinicians of unnecessary burdens.         

Case in Point:

The insurance eligibility verification required under Meaningful Use is managed by the front office. Front-office staff members should be made aware of the processes they need to complete before a patient checks in, and where to document that task in the EHR.

Control what is included in MIPS denominators.

Like Meaningful Use, patient encounter volume is important under MIPS. The size of the patient pool under any given quality measure directly impacts your adherence percentage. While most primary care encounters do meet patient visit requirements under MACRA, that is not always the case in specialty settings. Clinicians can exercise some control in determining what is included in patient denominators when reporting under MIPS.

Case in point:

Some primary care visits can be omitted. Let’s say a two-physician practice sees 50 patients a day. Only 15 of those patients might be seen by a physician. The rest of the patients may be there for a simple procedure like a blood pressure screening, stress test, or echocardiogram, where quality reporting elements are not verified. Such visits should be excluded.

Evaluate your reporting paths.

MIPS offers both EHR-based and registry-based reporting paths. Most specialties can submit CQM data via their EHR while others will have to rely on paid registry reporting. Additional reporting options might include submitting through associations that member clinicians are affiliated with, or through registries created by large hospital affiliates to help related providers.

Another hurdle for clinicians is deciding whether to submit data as a group or independently. Groups interested in participating in MIPS via the CMS web interface or administering the CAHPS for MIPS survey had until June 30, 2017, to register. Beyond that, clinicians have until the March 31, 2018, MIPS submission deadline to decide whether to report independently or as a group.

Case in point:

Big groups with different levels of EHR proficiency among providers may be better suited reporting at an individual level. Individual reporting takes more time for attestation, but the advantage is that higher-performing clinicians can avoid a penalty if the group doesn’t collectively meet reporting criteria.

Each month, sample 10 percent of EHR CQM data, including instances where criteria have been met and where it has not. Catch outliers with trouble following through on processes and extend targeted training to the team members bringing numbers down.

Conclusion

Optimizing the EHR and other tech resources providers have in place can be a huge MIPS enablement factor. Up-front customization work helps providers meet reporting requirements and save time over the long run. EHR optimization also enables future value-based care initiatives and lays the groundwork for population health management programs. Gains made in EHR use benefit the life of the practice through increased efficiency and, at the end of the day, better patient care.

About Meena Ande
Meena Ande currently acts as Director of Implementation for Advantum Health where she manages Implementation of services along with EHR optimization, with emphasis on workflow management for value-based reporting.

Health System Sues Cerner Over Billing-Related Losses

Posted on October 5, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

If I asked you what issues cause the biggest conflicts between EMR vendors and their clients, you might guess that clinical data management disputes or customer service issues topped the list. But actually, in my experience the most common problems health systems encounter in their EMR rollouts are billing-related.

For example, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute just announced a $44.2 million operating loss for the third quarter of fiscal 2017. The Boston-based hospital attributes at least part of its losses to billing issues associated with its Epic system. Leaders at Dana-Farber said that these billing issues had cost the hospital roughly $25 million since it rolled out Epic in May 2015, according to Becker’s Hospital CFO Report.

Another instance comes from Healthcare IT News, which reports that Cerner is being sued by a health system accusing the vendor of selling it faulty billing software.

The suit, by Wisconsin-based Agnesian Healthcare, accuses Cerner of fraud and breach of warranty, and asserts that issues with Cerner’s revenue cycle software led to losses of more than $16 million. The hospital system contends that these problems have damaged its reputation and generated $200,000 a month in damages. (Cerner disputes these allegations, of course.)

According to HIN, the hospital system went live with Cerner’s RCM software in 2015, for which it paid $300,000. Agnesian’s suit says that problems with the Cerner package began shortly after rollout, generating widespread errors in its patient billing statements.

According to the health system, its billing process was so compromised that it had to send out statements by hand. (Yes, I can feel you cringing from here.) Given the delays inherent in relying on manual processes, Agnesian ended up with a huge backlog of unprocessed statements, some of which it deemed uncollectible and wrote off.

When the health system alerted Cerner about its concerns, the vendor got involved, and in 2016 it told Agnesian that problems have been addressed.  Nonetheless, this year the health system found “major additional coding errors” which led to another round of lost revenue, Agnesian says.

And brace yourself for more cringing: according to the suit, the Cerner RCM software had been writing off reimbursable charges without informing the health system. If you’re an RCM leader or CFO, this is the stuff of nightmares.

Ultimately, Cerner agreed that the RCM solution needed to be rebuilt given the depth of the coding errors found in the software, but that didn’t happen, the suit says. In a final indignity, the personnel tasked with rebuilding the RCM solution left Cerner before completing the rebuild.

Given all the aforementioned mishegas, it will be many a month before billing processes normalize even if Cerner fixes its RCM software, the health system says. And of course, it’s likely to end up writing off more bills under the circumstances, which has got to be very painful by this point.

Agnesian’s suit asks the court to cancel the Cerner contract and award it direct, indirect and punitive damages. Cerner, meanwhile, seems to want to go into arbitration. We’ll see which side blinks first.

#SHSMD17 in 17 Tweets – Perspectives on Healthcare Marketing

Posted on October 4, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

The AHA’s Society for Healthcare Strategists and Marketing Development recently held its annual conference – SHSMD17 – in Orlando Florida. For three full days, 1,500 attendees shared ideas and traded insights on the latest trends healthcare marketing trends. The 60+ concurrent sessions covered a variety of topics including:

  • Developing online support groups for patients
  • Successful blog-driven content marketing
  • Media relationships
  • Communication and preparedness during a crisis
  • Chatbots
  • Consumerism

For daily summaries of SHSMD17, check out these Day 1, Day 2 and Day 3 blogs. As well see this blog on the release of SHSMD’s Bridging Worlds 2.0 report during the conference.

If I had to pick an overall theme for SHSMD17 it would have to be “perspective”. The four keynote speakers and many of the session presenters urged the audience to break out of our boxes in order to truly “see” healthcare from multiple viewpoints – including patients, clinicians and government. Only by putting ourselves into the shoes of healthcare’s various stakeholders can we create effective marketing campaigns and hospital programs.

During the conference, there was a lot of live-tweeting and there were many conversations happening via social media with people who were not in attendance. I thought it would be fun to highlight 17 tweets from SHSMD17.

Here goes.

Fun SHSMD17 Tweets

 

CareCloud + First Data Partnership a Hopeful Sign of Things to Come

Posted on October 3, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Earlier today, CareCloud and First Data (NYSE: FDC) announced they have partnered to create Breeze, a new patient experience management platform. Built on First Data’s Clover infrastructure, Breeze’s mobile, web and kiosk based applications provide consumer-style convenience to patients while helping practices streamline workflows. Through Breeze, CareCloud customers will be able to offer patients the ability to book appointments, fill out medical forms, check-in remotely and manage payments from their phones.

“We looked outside of healthcare for inspiration on what patients want” says Juan Molina, VP of Strategy and Business Development at CareCloud. “What we found was that consumer interactions have changed from in-person transactions to online experiences. We wanted to give patients the same experience in healthcare that they are used to from the rest of the world through apps like Uber, OpenTable and Amazon.”

At a Breeze-enabled CareCloud practice, the “happy path” patient interaction would be as follows:

  • Patient is invited to Breeze by their doctor’s office through a text with a specific link
  • Patient downloads the Breeze app to their phone through that link
  • Patient books an appointment through the app
  • Prior to the appointment date, patient is reminded by the app to fill in paperwork which could include: demographic information, consent forms and insurance data (photo of insurance cards can be uploaded)
  • On the day of the appointment, patient can check in remotely
  • After the appointment, patient can manage payments through the app (credit card on file, Apple Pay, Android Pay or other options made available by the practice)

By automating parts of the appointment booking, patient intake and payment workflows, Breeze reduces the workload on front-line staff.

“From the moment that the patient walks in, they are happier, and my staff no longer has to spend time dealing with packets of registration papers. Our front office can now focus on patient care and delivering the excellent level of service that they deserve,” says Barbara Arbide, a practice manager who is using Breeze in her allergy practice in Coral Gables, FL.

The CareCloud and First Data partnership is encouraging. For many years now, EHR vendors have tried to build their own walled gardens where customers and partner companies could play nicely together. Unfortunately, a lack of useful application interfaces (APIs) and a high cost of entry for potential partners, resulted in a barren courtyard with high walls (aka a prison) for customers rather than a thriving garden.

By partnering with First Data, CareCloud is showing that it is a company willing to break from traditional EHR vendor thinking. They have opted to play in someone else’s ecosystem in order to bring more functionality to their customers at a faster pace.

First Data’s Clover platform already has hundreds of useful business apps built for it including employee scheduling tools, customer loyalty apps, inventory management systems and survey programs. By basing Breeze on Clover, CareCloud’s customers have access to this rich library of apps.

“After just two days of using Breeze,” Molina told EMRandEHR.com, “A practice in southern Georgia went and downloaded a time-and-attendance app for their system from the Clover library. This replaced a cumbersome Excel spreadsheet that they had been using. This helped the practice become more efficient and sophisticated.”

Could CareCloud have developed a time-and-attendance app on their own? I’m sure they could have. Would it have been a wise investment of their time? Probably not. Would it have been delivered in two days? Absolutely not. Although in theory CareCloud is forgoing potential revenue, their partnership with First Data allows them to focus on what truly matters – improving the clinical and practice operations side of their own platform.

What’s next for Breeze? According to Molina: “Patient expectations are only going to climb higher and higher as more and more consumer apps bring more sophistication into their lives. We have to pay attention to what’s happening outside of healthcare – how people are booking tickets online, speaking to Alexa, tracking their fitness with wearables and getting food from uberEats. Patients don’t want to be transported back to the 1980s when they come to a physician office where you have to fill out forms on a clipboard. With Breeze we have a flexible platform that can continue to grow and expand. We will be able to build new patient-centric applications faster, that help our clients with more and more of their workflows.”

Hopefully this new partnership is a sign of things to come.

MACRA Preparation, Are You Ready? – MACRA Monday

Posted on October 2, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program (QPP) and related topics.

I’ll admit that the timing of this week’s MACRA Monday is a bit rough for me given the tragedy that’s occurred in my town, Las Vegas. Instead of dwelling on the tragedy and the person who could do such an awful thing, it’s been amazing even in these early hours to see how many people in Las Vegas and around the world want to and are supporting the victims of this tragedy.

We heard that there was a need for blood and thought we could help. Turns out that hundreds of others had the same idea and the blood banks have their schedules full through Wednesday. We’ll go after that to replenish the blood banks that no doubt will take a while to replenish their supply.

Thanks to everyone on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media that have reached out to myself and the rest of us that live in Las Vegas. We’re in a bit of shock and it doesn’t feel real.

To keep with our tradition of MACRA Monday, I thought I could at least share this infographic from Integra Connect on how prepared specialty practices are for MACRA:

No doubt there are a lot of healthcare organizations that aren’t ready for MACRA and they are confused on how they should be ready. Hopefully, those who have read our weekly MACRA Monday posts feel better prepared than most. MACRA is upon us whether you’re ready or not. However, MACRA certainly seems much less important on this day of mourning in Las Vegas.

On this tragic day, it’s worth noting all the incredible stories I’ve heard about Las Vegas healthcare professionals that were prepared and ready for a tragedy like this. I read stories of UMC, a major Las Vegas hospital that was so full of victims that they asked to stop bringing people to UMC that didn’t have life-threatening injuries. I read of EMS people who were at home and went into the danger to help transport victims. No doubt there will be hundreds of other stories of heroism by healthcare professionals. Many that likely won’t be heard or seen, but saved people’s lives. We thank them for their preparation, care, and work that no doubt has saved hundreds of people’s lives.

A big thank you from Vegas to each of you for all of your support.

Physician Burnout Cartoon – Fun Friday

Posted on September 29, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you haven’t noticed, I love irony. That’s why this cartoon from Pediatrician and Cartoonist Dr. Maypole was perfect for a Fun Friday entry.

The sad part of this Fun Friday is that this is far too true for far too many doctors. The one good thing is that people are now recognizing it and working to address it in their workforce as Dr. Maypole suggests we do.