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E-Patient Update: The Kaiser Permanente Approach To Consumer Health IT

Posted on May 19, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Usually, particularly when I have complaints, I don’t name the providers or vendors who serve my healthcare needs, largely because I don’t want to let my personal gripes overshadow my analysis of a particular health IT issue.

That being said, I thought I’d veer from that rule today, as I wanted to share some details on how Kaiser Permanente, my new provider and health plan, supports consumers with health IT functions. Despite having started with Kaiser – in this case the DC metro division – less than a week ago, being an e-patient I’ve had my hands all over its Web – and mobile-based options for patients.

I’m not going to say the system is perfect by any means. There are some blind alleys on the web site, and some problems in integrating clinical information into consumer records, but so far their set-up largely seems thoughtful and well-managed.

Having allegedly spent $4 billion plus on its Epic rollout, it’s hard to imagine how Kaiser could have realized that big a return even several years later, but it seems that the healthcare giant is at least doing many of the right things.

Getting enrolled

My first contact with Kaiser, after signing up with Healthcare.gov, was a piece of snail-mail which provided us with our insurance cards and a summary of our particular coverage. The insurance cards included my health plan ID/medical record number.

To enroll on the core Kaiser site, kp.org, I had to supply the record number, my birth date and a few other basic pieces of information. I also downloaded the KP app, which offers a far-more-elegant interface to the same functions.

Medical appointments

Once logged in, it was easy to choose a primary care doctor and OB/GYN by searching the site and clicking a selection button. If you wished you could review physician profiles and educational history as well as testimonial quotes from patients about that doctor before you chose them.

Having chosen a doctor, booking an appointment with them online was easy.  As with Zocdoc.com, you entered a range of dates for a possible consult, then chose the slot that worked for you. And if you need to cancel one of those appointments, it’s easy to do so online.

Digital communication

I was glad to see that the Kaiser portal allows you to email your doctor directly, something which is less common than you might think. (My last primary care group wouldn’t even put their doctors on the phone.)

Not only that, everyone I’ve talked to at KP so far– three medical appointments, as I was playing catch-up — has stressed that the email function isn’t just for show. My new providers insisted that they do answer email messages, and that I shouldn’t hesitate to write if I have questions or concerns.

Another way KP leverages digital communications is the simple, but effective, device of texting me when my prescriptions are due for a refill. This may not sound like much, but convenience matters! (I can also check med reminders by logging in to a custom KP meds app.)

Data sharing

Given that everyone at Kaiser uses the same Epic EMR, clinicians are of course more aware of what their colleagues are doing than my past gaggle of disconnected specialists. They seem quite serious about reading this history before seeing me, something which past physicians haven’t always done, even if I was previously seen by someone else in their practice.

KP also uses Epic’s Care Everywhere function, which allows them to pull in a limited summary of care from other Epic-based providers. While Care Everywhere has limits, the providers are making use of what they can.

One small wrinkle was that prior to two of my visits, I filled out a questionnaire online and when asked to submit it to my electronic patient record, did so. Nonetheless, I was asked to fill out the same questionnaire again, on paper, when I saw a specialist.

Test results

KP seems to be set up appropriately to share standard test results. However, I’ve already had one test, a mammogram, and in doing so found out that their data sharing infrastructure isn’t quite complete.

After being scanned, I was told that I’d receive my results via snail-mail, in about two weeks. I’m glad that this was a routine screening, rather than a test to investigate something scary, as I would have been pretty upset with this news if I was worried.

My conclusions

I don’t want to romanticize Kaiser’s consumer HIT services. After all, looked at one way, KP is only doing what integrated health systems are supposed to do, and not without at least a few hitches.

Still, at least on first view, on the whole I’m pretty happy with how Kaiser’s interactive functions are deployed, as well the general attitude staff members seem to have about consumer use of HIT tools. Generally speaking, they seem to encourage it, and for someone like me that’s quite welcome.

As I see it, if providers outside of the Kaiser bubble were as married to a shared infrastructure as KP providers are, my care would be much improved. Let’s see if I still if I still feel that way after the new health plan smell has worn off!

Dogged By Privacy Concerns, Consumers Wonder If Using HIT Is Worthwhile

Posted on May 17, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

I just came across a survey suggesting that while we in the health IT world see a world of possibilities in emerging technologies, consumers aren’t so sure. The researchers found that consumers question the value of many tech platforms popular with health execs, apparently because they don’t trust providers to keep their personal health data secure.

The study, which was conducted between September and December 2016, was done by technology research firm Black Book. To conduct the survey, Black Book reached out to 12,090 adult consumers across the United States.

The topline conclusion from the study was that 57 percent of consumers who had been exposed to HIT through physicians, hospitals or ancillary providers doubted its benefits. Their concerns extended not only to EHRs, but also to many commonly-deployed solutions such as patient portals and mobile apps. The survey also concluded that 70 percent of Americans distrusted HIT, up sharply from just 10 percent in 2014.

Black Book researchers tied consumers’ skepticism to their very substantial  privacy concerns. Survey data indicated that 87 percent of respondents weren’t willing to divulge all of their personal health data, even if it improved their care.

Some categories of health information were especially sensitive for consumers. Ninety-nine percent were worried about providers sharing their mental health data with anyone but payers, 90 percent didn’t want their prescription data shared and 81 percent didn’t want information on their chronic conditions shared.

And their data security worries go beyond clinical data. A full 93 percent responding said they were concerned about the security of their personal financial information, particularly as banking and credit card data are increasingly shared among providers.

As a result, at least some consumers said they weren’t disclosing all of their health information. Also, 69 percent of patients admitted that they were holding back information from their current primary care physicians because they doubted the PCPs knew enough about technology to protect patient data effectively.

One of the reason patients are so protective of their data is because many don’t understand health IT, the survey suggested. For example, Black Book found that 92 percent of nurse leaders in hospital under 200 beds said they had no time during the discharge process to improve patient tech literacy. (In contrast, only 55 percent of nurse leaders working in large hospitals had this complaint, one of the few bright spots in Black Book’s data.)

When it comes to tech training, medical practices aren’t much help either. A whopping 96 percent of patients said that physicians and staff didn’t do a good job of explaining how to use the patient portal. About 40 percent of patients tried to use their medical practice’s portal, but 83 percent said they had trouble using it when they were at home.

All that being said, consumers seemed to feel much differently about data they generate on their own. In fact, 91 percent of consumers with wearables reported that they’d like to see their physician practice’s medical record system store any health data they request. In fact, 91 percent of patients who feel that their apps and devices were important to improving their health were disappointed when providers wouldn’t store their personal data.

Researcher Puts Epic In Third Place For EMR Market Share

Posted on May 16, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

A new research report tracking market share held by EMR vendors puts Epic in third place, behind Cerner and McKesson, a conclusion which is likely to spark debate among industry watchers.

The analyst firm behind the report, Rockville, MD-based Kalorama Information, starts by pointing out that despite the hegemony maintained by larger EMR vendors, the competition for business is still quite lively. With customers still dissatisfied with their systems, the hundreds of vendors still in the market have a shot at thriving, it notes.

Kalorama publisher Bruce Carlson argues that until the larger firms get their act together, there will still be plenty of opportunity for these scrappy smaller players: “It’s still true to say no company, not even the largest healthcare IT firms, have even a fifth of this market,” Carlson said in a published statement. “We think that is because there’s still usability, vendor-switching, lack of mindshare in the market and customers are aching for better.”

In calculating how much each vendor has of the EMR market, the analyst firm estimated each vendors’ hardware, software and services revenue flowing directly from EMRs, breaking out the percentage each category represented for each vendor. All projects were based on 2016 data.

Among the giants, Kalorama ranks Cerner as having the biggest market share, McKesson as second in place and Epic as third. The report’s observations include:

  • That Cerner is picking up new business, in part, due to the addition of its CernerITWorks suite, which works with hospital IT departments, and Cerner RevWorks, which supports revenue cycle management functions. Kalorama also attributes Cerner’s success to the acquisition of Siemens IT and its having won the Department of Defense EMR contract.
  • That McKesson is building on its overall success as a health IT vendor, which puts it in a good position to build on its existing technology. For example, it has solutions addressing medication safety, information access, revenue cycle management, resource use and physician adoption of EMRs, including Paragon, Horizon, EHRM, Star and Series for hospitals, along with Practice Partners, Practice Point Plus and Fusion for ambulatory care.
  • That Epic serves giant customers like Kaiser Permanente, as well as holding a major share of new business in the EMR market. Kalorama is predicting that Epic will pick up more ambulatory customers, which it has focused on more closely of late.

The report also lists Allscripts Healthcare Solution, which came in fourth. Meanwhile, it tosses in GE Healthcare, Athenahealth’s Intersystems, QSI/NextGen, MEDITECH, Greenway and eClinicalWorks in with a bundle of at least 600 companies active in the EMR market.

The report summary we editors got didn’t include some details on how the market components broke down. I would like to know more about the niches in which these vendors play.

For example, having seen a prediction earlier this year that the physician practice market would hit $17.6 billion worldwide within seven years, it would be interesting to see that dot connected with the rest of the market share information. Specifically, I’d like to know how much of the ambulatory EMR market included integrated practice management software. That would tell me something about where overall solutions for physicians were headed.

However, I still got something out of the information Kalorama shared.  As our esteemed publisher John Lynn often notes, all market share measurements are a bit, um, idiosyncratic at best, and some are not even that reliable. But as I see it the estimates are worth considering nonetheless, as they challenge us to look at the key moving parts in the EMR market. Hey, and it gives us something to talk about at tradeshow parties!

Where Do Doctors Turn for the Latest Innovations?

Posted on May 11, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

At last month’s Health IT Marketing and PR Conference, I hosted a panel of customers to talk about what type of marketing tactics work for them. We had a broad range of people on the panel, so there was a wide variety of perspectives on how they discovered new innovations for their organization.

However, one thing stood out to me for one of the doctors that practiced in a relatively small 5 person group practice. He honestly didn’t have any great places to turn when he had a problem he needed to be solved. You got the feeling that he went to Google as much as he did anything else. Although, bewilderment was really his first response.

After some time he did come out with some common answers such as when he attends his association conferences and when he talks to his peers. No doubt doctors largely trust the opinions of their peers. However, there’s not nearly as much peer sharing as you might think. I remember another doctor I know in this physician’s practice which bought season tickets to the local college team’s basketball games. His idea was that he could go to the games with his peers. He couldn’t get any of them to go with him.

With these thoughts in mind, we’re chewing on how we at Healthcare Scene can help these practices out. One idea we have is to essentially create knowledge centers that will list all of the various companies and products that could help a small practice be more effective and efficient. We did this with EMR and EHR vendors in the past as many were looking for that type of list. We’re asking ourselves if we can do the same for other categories of software and services that could help doctors be more effective at what they do.

We’d love to hear your thoughts on this idea and any other ways we can help doctors discover new innovations. It’s a challenging idea since it isn’t like there’s one healthcare IT market for small practices. The needs vary by specialty, group size, location, etc etc etc. However, we’ll do our best. Plus, we’ll do like we always do and iteratively improve the lists over time.

One other idea I’m hoping to execute is to do as many origin stories for the products we list as possible. I think it’s extremely powerful to know the origin of a company and how they ended up with the solution they offer. Did they start this way? Did they acquire a company to get into the business? Did they start with another product and then pivot to what they’re doing today when they saw the opportunity? Knowing this information is powerful.

Hopefully in the future we can point to a vast library of knowledge centers that can better help a practice know about companies that can help them work more effectively and efficiently.

Using AI To Streamline EMR Workflow For Clinicians

Posted on May 10, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Understandably, most of the discussion around AI use in healthcare focuses on data analytics for population health management and predictive analytics. Given the massive scale of the data we’re collecting, that’s no surprise.

In fact, one could argue that using AI technologies has gone from an interesting idea to an increasingly established parto the health IT mix. After all, few human beings can truly understand what’s revealed by terabytes of data on their own, even using well-designed dashboards, filters, scripting and what have you. I believe it takes a self-educating AI “persona,” if you will, to glean advanced insights from the eternity of information we have today.

That being said, I believe there’s other compelling uses for AI-fueled technologies for healthcare organizations. If we use even a relatively simple form of interpretive intelligence, we can improve health IT workflows for clinicians.

As clinicians have pointed out over and over, most of what they do with EMRs is repetitive monkey work, varied only by the need to customize small but vital elements of the medical record. Tasks related to that work – such as sending copies of a CT scan to a referring doctor – usually have to be done in another application. (And that’s if they’re lucky. They might be forced to hunt down and mail a DVD disc loaded with the image.)

Then there’s documentation work which, though important enough, has to be done in a way to satisfy payers. I know some practice management systems that integrate with the office EMR auto-populate the patient record with coding and billing information, but my sense is that this type of automation wouldn’t scale within a health system given the data silos that still exist.

What if we used AI to make all of this easier for providers? I’m talking about using a predictive intelligence, integrated with the EMR, that personalizes the way data entry, documentation and follow-up needs are presented. The AI solution could automatically queue up or even execute some of the routine tasks on its own, leaving doctors to focus on the essence of their work. We all know Dr. Z doesn’t really want to chase down that imaging study and mail it to Albany. AI technology could also route patients to testing and scans in the most efficient manner, adjusted for acuity of course.

While AI development has been focused on enterprise issues for some time, it’s already moving beyond the back office into day-to-day care. In fact, always-ahead-of-the-curve Geisinger Health System is already doing a great deal to bring AI and predictive analytics to the bedside.

Geisinger, which has had a full-featured EMR in place since 1996, was struggling to aggregate and manage patient data, largely because its legacy analytics systems couldn’t handle the flood of new data types emerging today.

To address the problem, the system rolled out a unified data architecture which allowed it to integrate current data with its existing data analytics and management tools. This includes a program bringing together all sepsis-vulnerable patient information in one place as they travel through the hospital. The tool uses real-time data to track patients in septic shock, helping doctors to stick to protocols.

As for me, I’d like to see AI tools pushed further. Let’s use them to lessen the administrative burden on overworked physicians, eliminating needless chores and simplifying documentation workflow. And it’s more than time to use AI capabilities to create a personalized, efficient EMR workflow for every clinician.

Think I’m dreaming here? I hope not! Using AI to eliminate physician hassles could be a very big deal.

Finding New Patients for Your Practice

Posted on May 9, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In many practices, one of the biggest challenges they face is finding new patients for their practice. In some ways, technology has helped the situation, but in many ways technology has made this a real challenge for doctors.

Some recent data from Accenture Health provides an interesting look at one element of how patients find a medical practice.

When I saw this number I was shocked that it was so low. In the past, this number has been so much higher since finding a doctor from your health insurance company was the simple, logical way to make sure you were choosing a doctor which would take your insurance. Times are a changing.

When you look at the full report and the graph on how people find doctors, we learn even more:

Coming as no surprise is that highly digital patients leverage social media, internet searches and health websites to find a doctor at a much higher rate than those whom are less digital. However, what’s shocking to me is how much less the highly digital patient trusts the medical professional versus those that are less digital.

Not surprising is that friends and family is one of the most important factors for finding a doctor regardless of digital skills. Of course, it’s worth noting that in many cases, social media is really synonymous with friends and family. Social media is just the next generation of friends and family influence and communication.

What’s important to realize about these charts is that patients are quickly shifting from the less digital to the more digital category. So, 5 years from now we’re going to see a massive shift with how people find doctors. Social media, internet searches, health websites, and online ratings and review sites are going to continue to grow and become more important to practices looking for new patients.

What are you doing to prepare for this future?

Myth: Healthcare Is Different From Other Industries

Posted on May 5, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you don’t follow David Chou on Twitter, then you’re missing out on some really great content. This is particularly true if you’re a healthcare leader. A good example of this was the following tweet that David shared:

The topic of whether healthcare is different from other industries is an important one that’s worth discussing. The chart above and the research by McKinsey&Company would suggest that healthcare isn’t all that different from other industries. However, I think there’s a nuance in their reality check.

The nuance is that healthcare have similar expectations of healthcare as they do with other non-healthcare companies. However, that doesn’t assume that healthcare consumers act the same as they do in other industries.

There are great examples of this. When you’re in the back of an ambulance after a heart attack, you’re not acting like much of a consumer. They’re taking you to the hospital of their choice and you’re going to largely get the care that the ED feels you need. In what other industry does this occur? There are other examples like elective procedures in healthcare that are very much an experience like other industries.

What the study illustrated above does teach us is that even if the consumer decision making process in healthcare is different, there are core expectations that we have regardless of how we chose to interact with the healthcare system or not. There are some universal tenants and expectations that healthcare should remember:

  • Providing great customer service
  • Delivering on expectations
  • Making life easier
  • Offering great value

I’ve started to see more and more healthcare organizations worry about these tenants of a great patient experience. When you see it broken out like the above, it sounds so simple. Implementing the ideas can be amazingly tricky. However, this is exactly where I see healthcare headed.

Various Medical Practice Model Types

Posted on May 3, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The EHR vendor (and many other services), Kareo, has put out a practice model guide which they call “Practice Models: The ABCs from ACOs to Concierge and Everything in Between.” With this guide they shared this picture that includes various practice models:

When I see an image like this I’m torn on if this is an extremely exciting time for physicians or if it’s a miserable time to be a physician. One thing is clear, times are a changing. The medical practice models of the past are going to be blown up by new models.

Take for example Telemedicine. Can you imagine any healthcare future where telemedicine is not part of that future? I can’t.

I’m still personally torn on concierge practices. I can see why they’re appealing to so many. I love the idea of unlimited primary care and getting insurance out of primary care. However, it’s not clear to me that this idea can scale across the entire healthcare system. Certainly the rich can do it no problem. Can the concierge model work for the middle and lower class? Many fans of concierge tell me it can. I’m still not so sure.

I know a lot of doctors that are part of ACOs. I don’t know very many that are excited by the work ACOs are doing. Most of them just feel like they need to be part of it to understand the future of medicine. They’re not joining ACOs because they think it’s something that shows a lot of promise for their patients.

I’m probably coming off a little more cynical than I am about these shifts. A number of these changes are really exciting to see happening. However, I’m also not blind to the challenges that many of these medical practice models face.

Needless to say, it’s an exciting and challenging time to be in medicine. The structure of how we pay for healthcare is being questioned and new models are being explored. This can be really exciting if you find yourself tracking the right wave. However, if you miss the wave, then you can be stuck out in the middle of the ocean wondering how you missed out.

Is It Time To Divorce Your HIT Vendor?

Posted on May 2, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Few organizations are totally satisfied with their technology vendors. Even if they’re doing their best, their relationship with you can be disrupted by issues like staff turnover, changes in the product roadmap or an acquisition. Depending on how well your partnership worked in the first place – and how dependent you are on their technology – you may choose to ride out such issues.

But there are times that you have to make some hard decisions about your future with a vendor, particularly if their overall strategy diverges from yours. If you’re wondering how to sort out whether you need to part ways, you might want to consider some suggestions from Dick Taylor, MD, executive vice president with healthcare IT consulting firm MedSys Group. Dr. Taylor’s “Signs Your Vendor’s Not That Into You” include:

  • The new upgrade comes with sticker shock: If the new software calls for a costly “forklift upgrade,” and all told will create a lot of expense and issues, be concerned.
  • Their technology is very dated: If the vendor hasn’t adopted current technologies like virtualization, web services and the cloud – or at least considered whether they’re appropriate for customer needs — it’s a bad sign. Remember that part of your maintenance fees should go to long-term planning by the vendor that incorporates emerging tech as needed.
  • They haven’t stayed in touch post-sale: Expect for not only sales people to touch base, but also experts from R&D, support engineering and implementation to check in and ask about your needs and concerns. If they don’t, maybe they just see you as a revenue stream.
  • Their engineering staff has been gutted: Some vendors reduce their engineering roster, particularly if they’ve acquired the product in question, seemingly in the belief that their source code will maintain itself. This will not end well.
  • They don’t have customers like you on board anymore: You don’t want to be part of a dying customer base. In fact, you want to make sure other customers like you – such as, say, other large health systems – are still part of the mix. Otherwise, it’s unlikely developers will address your specific interests.
  • They’ve lost their focus: Given the rapid pace at which new healthcare technologies emerge, it’s easy for vendors to get distracted. Of course, it’s all well and good that they’re aware of cutting-edge technologies. That being said, make sure they don’t plan to rush in a new direction and ignore your needs.

Other vendor warning signs that came to mind for me included:

  • They don’t respond promptly to service requests
  • The people who interact with you are rude or poorly trained
  • Their new contract has hidden “gotchas” in it that they won’t consider addressing
  • The product can no longer do the job for which you acquired it, and they don’t seem capable of fixing it to your satisfaction

In some ways, important vendor relationship are like marriages in that every situation is different and that some give and take is involved. But if your relationship isn’t working, or undermining your plans, you’ve probably reached the end of the road.

JCAHO Parody Video – Fun Friday

Posted on April 28, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s Friday, so time for a little humor. Every week we could likely choose one of ZDoggMD‘s videos. Ever since he lost his job running a clinic, he’s been on a tear creating healthcare videos. What else is a doctor with no clinic going to do when he’s in Vegas? Now we know the answer.

I could have chosen a ton of different videos, but I think this one is going to really hit home with a lot of people who’ve had to deal with JCAHO in their organization.

Here are two lines from the video which made us laugh the most:

“JCAHO, I wrote an entire note, using only poo emojis”

and

“I got an email from a lovely gentleman, who was a Nigerian prince…Having some financial difficulties…And I gave him my EHR password.”

Only ZDoggMD!