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Healthcare Optimism and LinkedIn

Some of you might be wondering how I grouped these two topics together. It’s simple. I recently was invited to participate in LinkedIn’s Influencer program and so I’ve written a few posts on the LinkedIn platform to see how it works. It’s been a hit or miss experience so far, but I’m intrigued by what they’re doing.

It turns out, my first post on the LinkedIn Influencer platform was titled “Why We Should be Optimistic in Healthcare.” What’s amazing to me is that the post is still getting a ton of traffic and social media tweets. I think that I struck a chord.

I think if we’re honest, we often like to kind of dwell in the challenges that we face every day in healthcare. Sometimes it’s hard to take a look at what we’re doing and be optimistic about the future of healthcare. However, when you take a second to step back from the day to day grind and challenges, there is a lot to be optimistic about in healthcare.

If I hearken back to my first job in healthcare, I’m reminded of all the times I told someone about my new job. I always highlighted how cool it would be if something I did in healthcare could actually save someone’s life. An ambitious goal indeed, but it’s the reality of working in healthcare. Now that I’ve worked in healthcare a number of years, my view has slightly changed. I still love the idea that I could save someone’s life, but I love just as much the ability to make someone’s life better.

Let’s not forget the potential of the work we do. It’s incredibly important.

April 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Windows XP Is No Longer HIPAA Compliant

For those of you who missed it, thousands in healthcare are now out of compliance with HIPAA thanks to Microsoft’s decision to stop supporting Windows XP. I wrote about the details of Windows XP and HIPAA compliance previously. Microsoft stopped supporting the Windows XP operating system on April 8, 2014 and as Mac McMillan says in the linked post, OCR has been clear that unsupported systems are not HIPAA compliant.

I asked Dell if they had any numbers on the number of PCs out there that are still running XP. Here was their response (Note: These are general numbers and not healthcare specific)

The latest data I’ve seen shows that around 20-25% of PCs are still running XP (number vary depending on the publication). But most of those are consumer devices or very small businesses. Larger organizations seem to be complete, on track to completing by April, or have already engaged Dell (or competitor) to migrate them.

Dell also told me that globally, they have helped more than 450 customers (exact count is 471) with Windows 7 migration and automated deployment.

I’m not sure I agree with their assessment that the larger organizations have pretty much all upgraded beyond Windows XP. I agree that they’re more likely to have upgraded, but I’m sure there’s still plenty of Windows XP in large hospital systems across the nation. I’d love to hear from readers to see if they agree or disagree with this assertion.

I’ve heard some people make some cases for why Windows XP might not be considered a HIPAA violation if it was a standalone system that’s not connected to a network or if it was in a highly controlled and constrained use case. Some medical devices that still require Windows XP might force institutions to deal with HIPAA like this. However, I think that’s a risky situation to be in and may or may not pass the audit or other legal challenges.

I think you’re a brave (or stupid if you prefer) soul to still be running Windows XP in healthcare. Certainly there wasn’t a big disaster that occurred on April 8th when Windows XP was no longer supported. However, I’d hate to be your organization if you have Windows XP and get a HIPAA audit.

If you haven’t updated your HIPAA policies lately, you may want to do that along with updating Windows XP. This whitepaper called “HIPAA Compliance: Six Reality Checks” is a good place to start. Remember also that once an auditor finds one violation (like Windows XP), then they start digging for even more. It’s a bit like a shark that smells (or however they sense) blood in the water. They get hungry for more. I don’t know anyone that enjoys a HIPAA auditor, let alone one that really starts digging for problems.

April 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

EMR Customer Service, EMR Not Meeting ACOs Needs, and Patient Centered EMR Rollout


Zappos is in Las Vegas, and I can assure you that this story is true. I’ve always wondered how they’d scale that policy if thousands of people called for pizza. The key I think is that they do focused customer service. Chandresh asks an important question. Which EHR vendors have delightful customer service?


If EHR vendors don’t make the ACO possible, who will?


I’d be more interested in seeing an EHR roll out that considered the patient.

April 13, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Healthcare IT Innovation – #HITsm Chat Topics

I’m excited to be hosting this week’s #HITsm chat. For those not familiar with it, every Friday at Noon EST we all follow the #HITsm tag on Twitter and participate in a Twitter chat covering 4-5 questions. If you want to participate you can just watch, or chime in with your own thoughts and questions. To do so, just add the #HITsm tag to your tweets. I’m the host this week and so I chose the topic and questions.

I’ve had healthcare IT innovation on my mind a lot lately, and so I thought it would make for an interesting topic. It might be worth reading my first LinkedIn post called “Why We Should be Optimistic in Healthcare.” In that post I outline why I think there’s a lot of innovation in healthcare that’s about to happen and that’s why I’m so optimistic.

I hope you’ll join me and a few hundred others on Twitter for the #HITsm chat. Here are the topics we’ll be discussing. Feel free to start the discussion early in the comments.

Topic 1: Can innovation happen within the current healthcare beauracracy or will innovation have to replace our current model?

Topic 2: What’s the most innovative thing you’ve seen in healthcare IT in the last 6 months?

Topic 3: What type of results will we see from the tricorder Xprize? Does innovation come from contests like this?

Topic 4: If you had a million dollars you had to invest in health IT, where or how would you invest it?

Topic 5: Think 5-10 years out, what will be the most exciting innovation in healthcare?

April 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

5 Health IT Marketing Resources You Didn’t Know You Needed – #HITMC

The inaugural Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference concluded with tears of gratitude, many tweets of thanks and too many takeaways to list here. (I suggest you check out the #HITMC tweet stream before it disappears, or watch the recorded sessions, which will soon be available via the conference website.) I will take a moment to highlight several marketing resources and tools that I heard about from attendees and speakers – services and solutions actual HIT marketing professionals rely on to more easily create engaging campaigns that connect with prospects and customers on a Human2Human level.

TheShortCutts.com
Don’t know who Matt Cutts is? Neither did I until I attended Kristine Schachinger’s session on the realities and myths of SEO. Cutts is the man at Google who can make or break a website’s Google rankings. Officially, he is head of Google’s webspam team. No matter how you refer to him, he’s certainly worth paying attention to, especially if SEO is your thing. The folks behind ShortCutts.com provide easy to understand interpretations of Cutts’s videos, which he produces prolifically to help “struggling site owners understand their site in search.”

cutts

Smartsheets.com
Smartsheets seem to be about helping users better manage workflows via online tools that allow you to “assign tasks, attach files, share sheets, view timelines, set alerts, create rollups and go mobile.” It features specific marketing templates for event marketing, campaign tracking and product launches. I’m not quite sure how it works, only that it came highly recommended from the HITMC community. I also found this article from my local paper on the way Northeast Georgia Medical Center’s paramedics and cardiologists have used Smartsheets to improve cardiac care.

smartsheet

Whiteboard Animated Videos from JillAddison.com
One attendee recommended Jill Addison as her go to source for high quality yet cost-effective animated whiteboard videos.

whiteboard

Abukai.com
Abukai provides a free service that lets you snap photos of your receipts with your phone, and then automatically dump them into an expense report – perfect for healthcare IT marketers on the go.

abukai

Rev.com
Do you have any idea how laborious it is to transcribe a phone interview? It’s extremely time consuming, and can often cost big bucks to outsource. Imagine my pleasant surprise when someone mentioned Rev.com, which provides transcription services at $1 a minute. That is incredibly inexpensive, and worth its weight in gold if you’re in a time crunch.

rev

The Health IT Marketing and PR Community on LinkedIn
“A community of health IT marketing and healthcare IT PR professionals. First started after the inaugural Health IT Marketing and PR Conference as a place to collaborate with colleagues across the health IT marketing & PR community, but welcome to anyone interesting in healthcare IT marketing and PR.” This should serve as a great resource, and I’ve already submitted a discussion around a question I didn’t get a chance to ask panelists from Agency Ten22.

linkedin

April 9, 2014 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

What Happens in Vegas … will be Tweeted During #HITMC

And the excitement in healthcare IT continues. Whether you’re worried about ICD-10, our government’s proclivity for voice votes, or the lack of response from one industry group or another, there has been no shortage of water cooler topics this week.

The impending Healthcare IT Marketing & PR Conference is at the top of my list when it comes to discussion topics. Regular readers of HealthcareScene.com may already know that it kicks off Monday, April 7, in Las Vegas. I’m looking forward to networking with many of my #HITsm friends, and speaking on a panel about social media ROI with several leading experts. I find tremendous value in social networking before, during and after events like this, so I thought I’d offer a list of speakers’ Twitter handles to help those of us getting ready for Vegas jump into conversations early. (You may also consider it my handy list of #FF mentions.) For those not attending, do yourself a favor and follow the #HITMC hashtag over the next several days and register for the live video stream (Note: It’s Free). I will definitely try to cover session takeaways via Twitter on @JennDennard.

Shahid Shah@ShahidNShah

John Lynn@techguy and @ehrandhit

Warren Whitlock@WarrenWhitlock

Julia Goebel - @goebeljulia

Marcy Fleisher@fleish

Jodi Amendolajamendola

Kate Ottavio@kottavio

Sam Stern@mHealthMarketer

Mandi Bishop@mandibpro

Joy DiNaro@TheSocialJoy

Cari McLean@carimclean

Dr. Patricia Salber@docweighsin

Scott Collins@sscottcollins

Tim Tyrell-Smith@TimsStrategy

Michelle Boucher@medmastermind

Sunny Tara - @SunnyTaraVegas

Christine Slocumb@CLSlocumb

Shane Pilcher - @spilcher

Thomas Knoll@thomasknoll

Chandresh Shah@chandresh27

Stacy Goebel@stacygoebel

Beth Friedman@HealthITPR

Erin Wabol - @HealthITMktg

Brad Dodge@braddodge

Don Seamons@donseamons

Kristine Schachinger - @schachin

Jeff Walker@ContentCarnivor

Check out the conference website for more details about what the experts above will be speaking about. See you in Vegas, or via the #HITMC hashtag!

April 4, 2014 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

No Shortage of Excitement (This Week) in Healthcare IT

When I began contemplating the subject of this blog earlier in the week, I thought I’d make room for thoughts on recent improvements in EMR adoption in the small practice and physician community, and the general state of optimism and enthusiasm some op-ed pieces would have us believe is finally taking hold of the industry. But then came along the potential delay of ICD-10, which also begs a quick comment or two.

A bill that included an effort to delay the ICD-10 compliance date a full year was passed, but only after partisan drama over the fact that legislators received the proposed bill just a day before the vote on it was to take place. I tend to turn to AHIMA on ICD-10 matters, and its official stance is fairly obvious:

ahimaicd10tweet

Its reasoning is similar to that of the Coalition for ICD-10, which in a letter to the CMS, stated: “ … any further delay or deviation from the October 1, 2014, compliance date would be disruptive and costly for health care delivery innovation, payment reform, public health, and health care spending. By allowing for greater coding accuracy and specificity, ICD-10 is key to collecting the information needed to implement health care delivery innovations such as patient-centered medical homes and value-based purchasing.

“Moreover, any further delays in adoption of ICD-10 in the U.S. will make it difficult to track new and emerging public health threats. The transition to ICD-10 is time sensitive because of the urgent need to keep up with tracking, identifying, and analyzing new medical services and treatments available to patients. Continued reliance on the increasingly outdated and insufficient ICD-9 coding system is not an option when considering the risk to public health.”

AHIMA has even started a campaign to encourage its constituents to email their senators to urge them to also vote no when it comes to delaying ICD-10. At the time of this writing, the Senate vote is not yet scheduled. I don’t feel the need to restate my support of no further delay. You can read it here.

With regard to the other hot news items of the week, I was intrigued by the findings of the SK&A survey, which found that the EMR adoption rate for single physician practices grew 11.4%. One reason SK&A gave in the survey analysis was due to the “availability of more than 450 different solutions to fit their practice needs, size and budget.” Call me crazy, but I’m willing to bet that many solutions will not exist in the next three to five years thanks to market consolidation. What will these physicians do when their EMR vendor closes up shop? Time will tell, I suppose.

March 28, 2014 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

Why ICD-10?

At least half a dozen folks have asked me to explain why HHS is mandating the transition to ICD-10. So I thought I’d write a blog post about the subject.

First, I’ll examine some of the benefits that proponents of ICD-10 site. Then, I’ll examine the cost of transition from ICD-9 to ICD-10.

There are about a dozen frequently cited reasons to switch from ICD-9 to ICD-10. But they can be summarized into three major categories:

1) The US needs to catch up to the rest of the world.

2) The more granular nature of ICD-10 will lend itself to data analysis of all forms – claims processing, population health, improved interoperability, clinical trials, research, etc.

3) ICD-9 doesn’t support the latest diagnoses and procedures, and ICD-10 does.

Regarding #1, who cares? Coding standards are intrinsically arbitrary. Sequels are not necessarily better than their predecessors.

Although #2 sounds nice, there are a lot of problems with the supposed “value” of more granular data in practice. Following the classic 80-20 rule of life (80% of value comes from 20% of activity), the majority of codes are rarely used. By increasing the number of codes six-fold, the system is creating 6x the opportunities to inaccurately code. There is no reason to believe that providers will more accurately code, but the chances of incorrect diagnosis are now significantly higher than they were before. Garbage in, garbage out.

Below are some specific examples of how increasing the number of codes will affect processes in the healthcare system:

Payers – payers argue that making codes more granular will improve efficiency in the reimbursement process by removing ambiguity. There is nothing further from the truth. Payers will use the new granularity to further discriminate against providers and reject claims for what will appear to be no reason. With 6x the number of codes, there are at least 6x as many opportunities for payers to reject claims.

Clinical trials – ICD-10 proponents like to argue that with more granular diagnosis codes, companies like ePatientFinder can more effectively find patients and match them to clinical trials. This notion is predicated on the ability of providers to enter the correct diagnosis codes into EMRs, which is a poor assumption. Further, it doesn’t actually address the fundamental challenges of clinical trials recruitment, namely provider education, patient education, and the fact that most patients aren’t limited to trials by diagnosis codes, but rather by other data points (such as number of years with a given disease and comorbidities).

Public health – ICD-10 proponents also claim that the new coding system will help public health officials make better decisions. Again, this is predicated on accuracy of data, which is a poor assumption. But the greater challenge is that the most pressing public health issues of our time simply don’t need any more granularity in diagnosis codes. Public health officials already know what the top 20 public health problems are. Adding 6x the number of codes will not help address public health issues.

Regarding #3, why do we need to reinvent the entire coding system and make the entire system more granular to accommodate new diagnoses and procedures? Why can’t we continue to use the existing structure and simply create new branches of the ICD tree using alphanumeric characters? Why do we need to complicate every existing diagnosis and procedure to support new diagnoses and treatments? We don’t. There are plenty of letters left to be utilized in ICD-9 to accommodate new discoveries in medicine.

Next, I’ll provide a very brief summary of the enormity of the cost associated with transitioning from ICD-9 to ICD-10. The root of the challenge is that a string of interconnected entities, none of whom want to work with one another or even see one another, must execute in sync for the months and years leading up to the transition. Below is a synopsis of how the stars must align:

EMR vendors – EMR vendors must upgrade their entire client base to ICD-10 compliant versions of their systems in the next couple of months to begin testing ICD-10 based claims. Given the timescales at which providers move, the burden of MU2 on vendors, and the upgrade cycles for EMR vendors, this is a daunting challenge.

Providers – providers don’t want to learn a new coding system, and don’t want to see 6 times the number of codes when they search for basic clinical terms. Companies such as IMO can mitigate a lot of this, but only a small percentage of providers use EMRs that have integrated with IMO.

Coding vendors – like EMR vendors, auto-coding vendors must upgrade their clients systems now to one that supports dual coding for ICD-9 and ICD-10. They must also incur significant costs to add in a host of new ICD-10 based rules and mappings.

Coders – coders must achieve dual certification in ICD-9 and ICD-10, and must double-code all claims during the transition period to ensure no hiccups when the final cut over takes place.

Clearinghouses – clearinghouses must upgrade their systems to support both ICD-9 and ICD-10 and all of the new rules behind ICD-10, and must process an artificially inflated number of claims because of the volume of double-coded claims coming from providers.

Payers – payers must upgrade their systems to receive both ICD-9 and ICD-10 claims, process both, and provide results to clearinghouses and providers about accuracy to help providers ensure that everyone will be ready for the cut over to ICD-10.

The paragraphs above do not describe even 10% of the complexity involved in the transition. Reality is far more nuanced and complicated. It’s clear from the above that the likelihood that all of the parties can upgrade their systems, train their staff, and double code claims is dubious. The system is simply too convoluted with too many intertwined but unaligned puzzle pieces to make such a dramatic transition by a fixed drop-dead date.

Lastly, switching to ICD-10 now seems a bit shortsighted in light of the changes going on in the US healthcare system today. ICD-10 is already a decade old, and in no way reflects what we’re learning as we transition from volume to value models of care. It will make sense to change coding schemes at some point, but only when it’s widely understood what the future of healthcare delivery in the US will look like. As of today, no one knows what healthcare delivery will look like in 10 years, let alone 20. Why should we incur the enormous costs of the ICD-10 transition when we know what we’re transitioning to was never designed to accommodate a future we’re heading towards?

At the end of the day, the biggest winners as a result of this transition are the consultants and vendors who’re supporting providers in making the transition. And the payers who can come up with more reasons not to pay claims. Some have claimed that HHS is doing this to reduce Medicare reimbursements to artificially lower costs. Although the incentives are aligned to encourage malicious behavior, I think it’s unlikely the feds are being malicious. There are far easier ways to save money than this painful transition.

The ICD-10 transition may be one of the largest and most complex IT coordination projects in the history of mankind. And it creates almost no value. If you can think of a larger transition in technology history that has destroyed more value than the ICD-9 to ICD-10 transition in the US, please leave a comment. I’m always curious to learn more.

March 24, 2014 I Written By

Kyle is Founder and CEO of Pristine, a company in Austin, TX that develops telehealth communication tools optimized for Google Glass in healthcare environments. Prior to founding Pristine, Kyle spent years developing, selling, and implementing electronic medical records (EMRs) into hospitals. He also writes for EMR and HIPAA, TechZulu, and Svbtle about the intersections of healthcare, technology, and business. All of his writing is reproduced at kylesamani.com

Taking the Anxiety out of Healthcare IT (and Cost of Care)

I’m prone to anxiety when it comes to unexplained aches and pains, though I tend to internalize it in an effort to not come across as a hypochondriac. I’m sure I let my inner, extreme worrier come through just a tad during a recent doctor’s appointment. I was visibly relieved to learn that what I had been quietly fretting about for weeks was in fact quite normal. My relief must have been extremely visible, because my doctor was quick to explain that what patients often consider irregular, doctors treat as run of the mill. What I lose sleep over, they don’t bat an eye at. (If only her practice offered a patient portal with secure email, so that we could correspond about my health at our leisure.)

She then told me of a recent trip to the doctor with her mother, and that she had a newfound appreciation for the patient’s side of the visit as she saw things from her mother’s point of view. It was quite refreshing to hear. I might temper my anxiety before my next appointment by playing this mobile game, should it ever be made available in the app store. According to a recent study published in Clinical Psychological Science, 25 minutes of play reduces levels of stress and anxiety. Researchers are looking to see if the effects are the same with shorter bursts of playtime. It’s got to be a cheaper (and healthier) alternative than a prescription for Xanax, right?

Speaking of healthcare costs, I read with interest the news that not only did Castlight Health’s IPO perform better than expected, but that it also partnering with the Leapfrog Group to analyze hospital survey data. Castlight seems poised for success because it is striving to do what healthcare desperately needs done – to bring transparency to and better understanding of healthcare costs in this country. With the Leapfrog project, it seems they are set on tackling quality, safety and patient satisfaction, too. It would be nice, as a patient, to have one trusted resource to go to for consumer-friendly healthcare information so that we could make smart decisions for our families and ourselves.

It would be interesting for a company like Castlight to combine financial, quality, safety and satisfaction data with a notation as to whether hospitals and physicians use EHRs. I noticed that recent results from the latest NCHS Data Brief from CDC show that 42.8% of physicians in Georgia have EHRs – not significantly different than the national average, according to NCHS survey findings. Only nine states ranked above the national average for EHR usage.

I’m off on a tangent here, but I have to ask, when will all 50 states get above 50%? When will everyone be above the national average? With budgets tightening, hospitals closing, and IT deadlines looming, I have a feeling it will be later rather than sooner – if at all.

What do you think? When will your state reach 100%? How do you relieve stress before a doctor’s visit? Would knowing a physician had competitive prices and secure messaging impact your decision to book an appointment? Please share your thoughts in the comments below.

March 21, 2014 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

Is your company comfortable committing to a social media plan that will actually have impact?


The above video was shot by Chuck Webster (the man synonymous with EHR workflow) during the Social Media and Influencer session that I participated in at HIMSS. Chuck has done a nice job putting together the video clips of me talking during that session on his blog. Here’s a look at some of the other clips he’s put together:

“The key is — How are you interesting? And how are you valuable? — to the people you’re interacting with.”

“Why are you doing social media?” Sales, something broader, brand experience….?

On curation “We read everything so you don’t have to!” vs “If it’s great content, people will read it.”

“The beauty of social media is it shouldn’t cost you much to start.”

“Is your company comfortable committing to a social media plan that will actually have impact?”

“I love negative engagement!… It’s beautiful! … people will respect you even more.”

Thanks Chuck for recording the session. I hope that many of my readers get some value out of the videos. Plus, I’d be remiss if I didn’t also mention my upcoming Health IT Marketing and PR Conference. If you are interested in the topics I discuss in these videos, then come and enjoy 2 days hearing from a few of the brightest minds in the health IT marketing and PR world. Not to mention some bright minds from outside of health IT as well.

March 19, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.