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ONC Healthcare Interoperability Roadmap Infographic

Posted on February 5, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

There’s been a lot of talk around the 10 year ONC Healthcare Interoperability Roadmap. I think it’s a really great thing that they’re helping to drive a lot more discussion around interoperability. I’m very interested in doing the same.

For those who want the cliff notes version of the interoperability roadmap, I think this infographic does a pretty good job summarizing it:
ONC Healthcare Interoperability Roadmap Infographic

What do you think of the roadmap? Is it all conjecture and not much substance or will it make a big difference?

ONC Annual Meeting – Who’s Going?

Posted on January 28, 2015 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

ONC’s Agenda – February 2-3, Washington, DC

Next Monday, ONC holds its annual meeting in downtown DC. I’m going, one small advantage of living here. Here’s the agenda. To see day two, click on the agenda header.

I’m particularly interested in these topics:

  • Adverse event reporting,
  • Interoperability standards,
  • Meaningful Use program’s future, and
  • Usability.

Looking at the agenda, I should stay busy with one exception. There isn’t much on usability. The word’s only on the agenda once. Not a surprise since ONC has pretty much relinquished any role to the vendors.

How important do you think the ONC meeting and also the ONC run Healthdatapalooza now that meaningful use has kind of run its course? Will these two meeting gain steam and influence or will organizations start to go other places? I’ll be interested to watch that trend as I attend the event.

If you can’t attend, you can follow on various webcasts and twitter. If you do plan to attend, I’d love to see you there. To email me, click on my name in my profile blurb, or at carl@ehrselector.com.

The New Congressional Rider: Unique Patient ID Lemonade?

Posted on January 8, 2015 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

Note: Previous versions referred to Rand Paul as the author of the first congressional rider. That was in error. The first rider was authored by then Representative Ron Paul. I regret the error. CB

Last month, I posted that Ron Paul’s gag rule on a national patient identifier was gone. Shortly, thereafter, Brian Ahier noted that the gag rule wasn’t dead. It just used different words. Now, it looks as if we were both right and both wrong. Here’s why. Paul’s rider’s gone, but its replacement, though daunting, isn’t as restrictive.

The gag rules are appropriation bill riders. Paul’s, which began in 1998, was aimed at a HIPAA provision, which called for identifiers for:

…. [E]ach individual, employer, health plan, and health care provider for use in the health care system. 42 US Code Sec. 1320d-2(b)

It prohibited “[P]lanning, testing, piloting, or developing a national identification card.” This was interpreted to prohibit a national patient id.

As I noted in my post, Paul’s language was dropped from the CRomnibus appropriation act. Brian, however, found new, restrictive language in CRomnibus, which says:

Sec. 510. None of the funds made available in this Act may be used to promulgate or adopt any final standard under section 1173(b) of the Social Security Act providing for, or providing for the assignment of, a unique health identifier for an individual (except in an individual’s capacity as an employer or a health care provider), until legislation is enacted specifically approving the standard.

Gag Rule’s Replacement Language

Unlike Paul’s absolutist text, the new rider makes Congress the last, biggest step in a formal ID process. The new language lets ID development go ahead, but if HHS wants to adopt a standard, Congress must approve it.

This change creates two potential adoption paths. Along the first, and most obvious, HHS develops a mandatory, national patient ID through Medicare, or the Meaningful Use program, etc., and asks congress’ approval. This would be a long, hard, uphill fight.

The second is voluntary adoption. For example, NIST could develop a voluntary, industry standard. Until now, Paul’s rider stopped this approach.

NIST’s a Consensus Building Not a Rulemaking Agency

NIST’s potential ID role is well within its non regulatory, consensus standards development mandate. It could lead a patient ID building effort with EHR stakeholders. Given the high cost of current patient matching techniques, stakeholders may well welcome a uniform, voluntary standard. That would not solve all interoperability problems, but it would go a long way toward that end.

Congress has loosened its grip on a patient ID, now its up to ONC, NIST, etc., to use this new freedom.

Assessment Released of Health Information Exchanges (Part 2 of 2)

Posted on January 7, 2015 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

The previous installment of this article talked about the survivability of HIEs, drawing on a report released under ONC auspices. This installment delves into some other interesting aspects of information exchange.

Data Ownership and Privacy Raise Their Heads
Whenever data is a topic, policy issues around ownership and privacy cannot be dismissed. The HIE report does not address them directly, but they peek out from behind questions of how all this stuff gets stored.

Two essential strategies allow data sharing. In the simpler strategy, the HIE vacuums up data from all the providers who join. In a more subtle and supple strategy, known as a federated system, the HIE leaves the data at the providers and just provides connectivity. For instance, the HIE report explains that some HIEs store enough data to identify patients and list the providers who have data on them (this uses a master patient index, which solves the common problem of matching a patient). Once a patient is matched, the HIE retrieves relevant data from each provider.

The advantage of the vacuum suction strategy is that, once an HIE has all the data in one place, it can efficiently run analytics across a humongous data set and deliver the highly desirable analytics and planning that make the HIE attractive to clients. But this strategy brings significant risk as well.

Programmers and administrators in the computer field have long understood the classic problem of copying data: if you keep two or more copies of data, they can get out of sync. The HIE report recognizes this weakness, indicating that HIEs storing patient data can get outdated (p. 12). According to the report, “Stakeholders reported it is very damaging to the reputation of state efforts when provider queries return insufficient results, leading users to conclude the system is not useful.” (p. 17) In fact, some HIEs don’t even know when a patient has died (p. 20).

Another classic problem of copying data is that it forces the HIE to maintain a huge repository, along with enough server power and bandwidth to handle requests. This in turn raises costs and drives away potential clients. Success in such cases can be self-defeating: if you really do offer convenient query facilities and strong analytic power, demands will increase dramatically. Larger facilities, which (as I’ve said) are more attractive to HIEs, will also use data in more highly developed and sophisticated ways, which will lead to more requests banging on the HIE’s door. It’s no whim that Amazon Web Services, the leading cloud offering in the computer field, imposes limits on data transferred, as well as other uses of the system.

Thus the appeal of federated systems. However, they are technically more complex. More significantly, their success or failure rests on standardization more than a vacuum suction strategy. If you have a hundred different providers using a couple dozen different and incompatible EHRs, it’s easier to provide one-way channels that vacuum up EHR data than to upgrade all the EHRs to engage in fine-grained communication. Indeed, incomplete standards were identified as a burden on HIEs (p. 19). Furthermore, data isn’t clean: it’s entered inconsistently by different providers, or in different fields (p. 20). This could be solved by translation facilities.

What intrigues me about the federated approach is that the very possibility of its use puts providers on the defensive over their control of patient data. If an HIE gets a federated system to work, there is little reason to leave data at the provider instead of putting it under the control of the patient. Now that Apple’s HealthKit and similar initiatives put patient health records back on the health care agenda, patient advocates can start pushing for a form of HIE that gives patients back their data.

What Direction for Direct Project?
The Direct project was one of the proudest achievements of the health IT reforms unleashed by the HITECH act. It was open source software developed in a transparent manner, available to all, and designed to use email so even the least technically able health care provider could participate in the program. But Direct may soon become obsolete.

It’s still best for providers without consistent Internet access, but almost anyone with an always-on Internet connection could do better. The HIE report says that in some places, “Direct use is low because providers must access the secure messaging system through a web portal instead of through their EHRs.” (p. 11)

A recent article uncovered the impedances put up by EHR vendors to prevent Direct from working. The HIE report bolstered this assessment (pp. 19-20). As for DirectTrust (also covered by the article’s reporter), even though it was meant to solve connectivity problems, it could turn into yet another silo because it requires providers to sign up and not all do so.

Ideally, health information exchange would disappear quietly into a learning health care system. The ONC-sponsored report shows how far we are from this vision. At the same time, it points to a few ways forward: more engagement with providers (pp. 14, 25), more services that add value to patient care, tighter standards. With some of these advances, the health care field may find the proper architecture and funding model for data exchange.

Assessment Released of Health Information Exchanges (Part 1 of 2)

Posted on January 6, 2015 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Like my Boston-area neighbors who perennially agonize over the performance of the Red Sox, healthcare advocates spend inordinate amounts of time worrying about Health Information Exchanges (HIEs). Will the current round of exchanges work after most previous attempts failed? What results can be achieved from the 564 million dollars provided by the Office of the National Coordinator since 2009? Has the effort invested by the government and companies in the Direct project paid off, and why haven’t some providers signed up yet?

I too was consumed by such thoughts when reading a reported contracted by the ONC and released in December, “HIE Program Four Years Later: Key Findings on Grantees’ Experiences from a Six-State Review. Although I found their complicated rating system a bit arbitrary, I found several insights in the 42-page report and recommend it to readers. I won’t try to summarize it here, but will use some of the findings to illuminate–and perhaps harp on–issues that come up repeatedly in the HIE space.
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Who is Adopting EHRs and Why: ONC Turns up Some Surprises

Posted on December 15, 2014 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

A high-level view of the direction being taken by electronic health records in the U.S. comes from a recent data brief released by the Office of the National Coordinator. Their survey of physician motivations for adopting EHRs turns up some puzzling and unexpected findings. I’ll look at three issues in this article: the importance of Meaningful Use incentives and penalties, the role of information exchange, and who is or is not adopting EHRs.

Incentives and Penalties
The impact of the Meaningful Use bribes–sorry, I meant incentive payments–in the HITECH act are legendary: they touched off a mad rush to adopt technology that had previously aroused only tepid interest among most physicians, because they found the EHRs outrageously expensive, saw no advantage to their use, or just didn’t want to leave the comfort zone of pen and paper. The dramatic outcome of Stage 1, for instance, can be seen in the first chart of this PDF.

This month’s data brief reconfirms that incentives and penalties played a critical role during the period that Meaningful Use has been in play. In the brief’s Figure 3, incentives and penalties topped the list of reasons for adopting records, with nothing else coming even close (although the list was oddly chosen, leaving out credible reasons such as “EHRs are useful”).

The outsized role payments play is both strange and worrisome. Strange, because the typical $15,000 paid per physician doesn’t even start to cover the costs of converting from paper to an EHR, or even from one EHR to another. Worrisome, because the escalator (a favorite metaphor of former National Coordinator David Blumenthal) on which payments put physicians is leveling off. Funding in the HITECH act ends after Stage 3, and even those payments will be scrutinized by the incoming budget-conscious Congress.

In addition, Stage 2 attestations have been dismally low. Critics throughout the industry, smelling blood, have swooped in to call for scaling back, to suggest that meaningful use provisions be eased or weakened, or just to ask for a more concentrated focus on the key goal of interoperability.

The ONC knows full well that they have to cut back expectations as payments dry up, although penalties from the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services can still provide some leverage. Already, the recent House budget has level-funded the ONC for next year. Last summer’s reorganization of the ONC was driven by the new reality. Recent initiatives at the ONC show a stronger zeal for creating and urging the adoption of standards, which would be consistent with the need to find a role appropriate to lean times.

Health Information Exchange
I am also puzzled by the emphasis this month’s data brief puts on health information exchange. Rationally speaking, it would make perfect sense for physicians to ramp up and streamline the sharing of patient data–that’s exactly what all the health care reformers are demanding that they do. Why should somebody ask a patient to expose himself to unnecessary radiation because an X-Ray hasn’t been sent over, or try to treat someone after surgery without knowing the discharge plan?

Actually, most physicians would. That’s how they have been operating for decades. Numerous articles find that most physicians don’t see the value of information exchange, and can profit from their ignorance of previous tests and treatments the patient has received.

And that’s probably why, after taking hundreds of millions of dollars from governments, the heavy-weight institutions called Health Information Exchanges have repeatedly thrown in the towel or been left gasping for breath. At least two generations of HIEs have come and gone, and the trade press is still searching for their value.

So I’m left scratching my head and asking: if doctors adopt EHRs for information exchange, are they getting what they paid for? Redemption may have arrived through the Direct project, an ONC-sponsored standard for a low-cost, relatively frictionless form of data exchange. Although the original goal was to make HIE as simple as email, the infrastructure required to protect privacy imposes more of a technical burden. So the ONC envisioned a network of Health Information Service Provider (HISP) organizations to play the role of middleman, and a number are now operating. According to Julie Maas of EMR Direct, nearly half a million people were using Direct in July 2014, and the number is expected to double the next time statistics are collected next February.

So far, although isolated studies have shown that HIEs improve outcomes and reduce costs, we haven’t seen these effects nationwide.

What Hinders Adoption
Some of the most intriguing statistics in the data brief concern who is adopting EHRs and what holds back others from doing so. The main dividing line is simply size: most big organizations have EHRs and most small ones don’t.

I have explored earlier the pressures of health care reform on small providers and the incentives to merge. Health care technology is a factor in the consolidation we’re seeing around the country. And we should probabaly look forward to more.

Americans have trouble feeling good about consolidation in any field. We’re nostalgic for small-town proprietors like the pharmacist in the movie It’s a Wonderful Life. We forget that the pharmacist in that movie nearly killed someone by filling a prescription incorrectly. In real life, large organizations can pursue quality in a host of ways unavailable to individuals.

One interesting finding in the data brief is that rural providers are adopting EHRs at the same rate as urban ones. So we can discard any stereotypes of country hick doctors letting teenagers set up the security on their PCs.

Lack of staff and lack of support are, however, major barriers to adoption. This is the last perplexing question I take from the data brief. Certainly, it can be hard to get support for choosing an EHR in the first place. (The Meaningful Use program set up Regional Extension Centers to partially fill the gap.) But after spending millions to install an EHR, aren’t clinicians getting support from the vendors?

Support apparently is not part of the package. Reports from the field tell me that vendors install the software, provide a few hours of training, and tip their hats good-bye. This is poetic justice toward physicians, who for decades have sent patients out weak and groggy with a prescription and a discharge sheet. Smart organizations set aside a major percentage of their EHR funding to training and support–but not everybody knows how to do this or has grasped the need for ongoing support.

I certainly changed some of my opinions about the adoption of EHRs after reading the ONC data brief. But the statistics don’t quite add up. We could use some more background in order to understand how to continue making progress.

Treating a Patient with Partial Information

Posted on December 4, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In some recent discussions, I’ve heard arguments against HIEs and healthcare interoperability which say that it’s a bad thing because “What if the HIE doesn’t provide me all the patient info I need?” This is actually a really important question and one worthy of consideration. In fact, it could be extended to say, “What if the HIE provides me the wrong information?

While these are really important challenges for HIEs to address, it returns to the common fallacy that I see over and over again in healthcare. We compare the implementation of future technology against perfection as opposed to the status quo.

The reality is that doctors have been treating patients with partial and incorrect information forever. An HIE that can only provide partial or even incorrect information sometimes is similar to the situation that doctors face every day.

Think about how many patients have chosen not to tell their doctor something because they didn’t remember to tell them that info. How many patients have told their doctors the wrong information because they couldn’t remember the right information? Millions. There are even many patients who are afraid to give their doctor their health information based on privacy concerns. Once again, the doctor is treating the patient with partial information.

I imagine the reason it feels different is that we feel like their should be a different level of trust with an HIE. Maybe there is a different level of trust in data coming from an HIE versus a patient’s memory. However, that doesn’t mean that a doctor should put 100% trust in the data that an HIE provides. There’s nothing wrong with a bit of healthy skepticism with any third party data source. No doubt there are varying degrees of trust with all third party data sources that are used by a doctor. The HIE needs to be at the high end of the trust spectrum, but its inability to be perfect shouldn’t hinder its use anymore than the imperfect EHR data hinders its use.

Over time these HIE systems will do a much better job of measuring the confidence of the data their providing. Ok, that might be pretty optimistic. Instead, it’s more likely that doctors will learn how confident they should be in the data they get from an HIE.

Doctors already have created a culture of appropriate skepticism with patient provided data. I think something similar is the right approach with HIE data. Plus, doctors are smart enough to evaluate when a medical situation requires confirmation of data and when it requires further investigation. They’re making these types of decisions all of the time.

Open Source Electronic Health Records: Will They Support Clinical Data Needs of the Future? (Part 2 of 2)

Posted on November 18, 2014 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

The first part of this article provided a view of the current data needs in health care and asked whether open source electronic health records could solve those needs. I’ll pick up here with a look at how some open source products deal with the two main requirements I identified: interoperability and analytics.

Interoperability, in health care as in other areas of software, is supported better by open source products than by proprietary ones. The problem with interoperability is that it takes two to tango, and as long as standards remain in a fuzzy state, no one can promise in isolation to be interoperable.

The established standard for exchanging data is the C-CDA, but a careful examination of real-life C-CDA documents showed numerous incompatibilities, some left open by the ambiguous definition of the standard and others introduced by flawed implementations. Blue Button, invented by the Department of Veterans Affairs, is a simpler standard with much promise, but is also imperfectly specified.

Deanne Clark, vxVistA Program Manager at DSS, Inc., told me that VistA supports the C-CDA. The open source Mirth HIE software, which I have covered before, is used by vxVistA, OpenVista (the MedSphere VistA offering), and Tolven. Proprietary health exchange products are also used by many VistA customers.

Things may get better if vendors adopt an emerging HL7 standard called FHIR, as I suggested in an earlier article, which may also enable the incorporation of patient-generated data into EHRs. OpenMRS is one open source EHR that has started work on FHIR support.

Tolven illustrates how open source enables interoperability. According to lead developer Tom Jones, Tolven was always designed around care coordination, which is not the focus of proprietary EHRs. He sees no distinction between electronic health records and health information exchange (HIE), which most of the health IT field views as separate functions and products.

From its very start in 2006, Tolven was designed around helping to form a caring community. This proved useful four years later with the release of Meaningful Use requirements, which featured interoperability. APIs allow the easy development of third-party applications. Tovlen was also designed with the rights of the patient to control information flow in mind, although not all implementations respect this decision by putting data directly in the hands of the patient.

In addition to formats that other EHRs can recognize, data exchange is necessary for interoperability. One solution is an API such as FHIR. Another is a protocol for sending and receiving documents. Direct is the leading standard, and has been embraced by open source projects such as OpenEMR.

The second requirement I looked at, support for analytics, is best met by opening a platform to third parties. This assumes interoperability. To combine analytics from different organizations, a program must be able to access data through application programming interfaces (APIs). The open API is the natural complement of open source, handing power over data to outsiders who write programs accessing that data. (Normal access precautions can still be preserved through security keys.)

VistA appears to be the EHR with the most support for analytics, at least in the open source space. Edmund Billings, MD, CMO of MedSphere, pointed out that VistA’s internal interfaces (known as remote procedure calls, a slightly old-fashioned but common computer term for distributed programming) are totally exposed to other developers because the code is open source. VistA’s remote procedure calls are the basis for numerous current projects to create APIs for various languages. Some are RESTful, which supports the most popular current form of distributed programming, while others support older standards widely known as service-oriented architectures (SOA).

An example of the innovation provided by this software evolution is the mobile apps being built by Agilex on VistA. Seong K. Mun, President and CEO of OSEHRA, says that it now supports hundreds of mobile apps.

MedSphere builds commercial applications that plug into its version of Vista. These include multidisciplinary treatment planning tools, flow sheets, and mobile rounding tools so doctor can access information on the floor. MedSphere is also working with analytic groups to access both structured and unstructured information from the EHR.

DSS also adds value to VistA. Clark said that VistA’s native tools are useful for basic statistics, such as how many progress notes have not been signed in a timely fashion. An SQL interface has been in VistA for a long time, DSS’s enhancements include a graphical interface, a hook for Jaspersoft, which is an open source business intelligence tool, and a real-time search tool that spiders through text data throughout all elements of a patient’s chart and brings to the surface conditions that might otherwise be overlooked.

MedSphere and DSS also joined the historical OSEHRA effort to unify the code base across all VistA offerings, from both Veterans Affairs and commercial vendors. MedSphere has added major contributions to Fileman, a central part of VistA. DSS has contributed all its VistA changes to OSEHRA, including the search tool mentioned earlier.

OpenMRS contributor Suranga Kasthurirathne told me that an OpenMRS module exposes its data to DHIS 2, an open source analytics tool supporting visualizations and other powerful features.

I would suggest to the developers of open source health tools that they increase their emphasis on the information tools that industry observers predict are going to be central to healthcare. An open architecture can make it easy to solicit community contributions, and the advances made in these areas can be selling points along with the low cost and easy customizability of the software.

A Little Digital Health Conference (#DHC14) Twitter Roundup

Posted on November 17, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m at the Digital Health Conference in NYC and the Twitter stream has been going strong (search #dhc14 on Twitter to see what I mean). Sometimes I forget how much more satisfying a conference is when there’s an active Twitter stream. It enhances a conference for me in so many ways. I thought it would be fun to point out a few of the tweets that struck me today (and there were a lot to choose from).


I do think New York has made a lot of progress with their HIE. Pretty amazing that they got $30 million of state funding for it. Do you know of other states that are making good progress on their state HIE?


Topol’s comment about cigarettes is interesting. I had to throw in the CVS reference. Right now it doesn’t seem that crazy, but I wonder if 10 years from now it will be just as crazy as Cleveland Clinic giving out cigarette pack holders.


I love imagery and this is great imagery that could inspire a lot of people. What I don’t think many tech people realize is that they’re going to need to work collaboratively with scientists, chemists and doctors to do surveillance on the blood stream. Talk about an area that needs multidisciplinary efforts.


The common error that we compare the new way against perfection as opposed to comparing the new way against the alternative (or the previous model). I’ve been seeing this problem come up over and over in healthcare IT.

Which Comes First in Accountable Care: Data or Patients?

Posted on September 30, 2014 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

The headlines are stark and accusatory. “ACOs’ health IT capabilities remain rudimentary.” “ACOs held back by poor interoperability.” But a recent 19-page survey released by the eHealth Initiative tells two stories about Accountable Care Organizations–and I find the story about interoperability less compelling than another one that focuses on patient empowerment.
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