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Survey: ICD-10 Business Areas of Concern

Posted on April 30, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Each year, NueMD does a survey of providers around ICD-10. 2015 was no exception. You can see the full results of their ICD-10 survey here. They had over 1000 respondents to the survey with the majority of them coming from small practices and 43% of them coming from patient care (DO, MD, DC, NP, RN, etc).

You should take a minute to check out the full results, but this chart from the survey results really caught my eye:

ICD-10 Business Areas of Concern for Doctors

Regardless of whether you’re interested in the results or not, the list of possible areas of concern is worth considering for your organization: Training/Education, Payer Testing, Software Upgrade Cost, Claims Processing, and Compliance Timelines/Deadlines. Are any of these areas a cause for concern with your practice when it comes to ICD-10? My guess is that it has many of you concerned about the switch to ICD-10.

I was glad to see that claims processing was the biggest concern. It should be a concern for doctors and you better prepare for it to be an issue. If you don’t, it’s very likely that you could run into a cash flow issue for your practice.

All signs seem to be pointing towards no more ICD-10 delays. Although, I did hear someone tell me that Congress had 15 (at least somewhere in that range) more opportunities to slip in language to delay ICD-10 again. That’s not likely comforting for healthcare organizations out there. However, I think at this point, organizations need to assume that it’s coming and prepare accordingly. Not doing so could have some dire circumstances come October.

Great ICD-10 Image and Poll

Posted on March 25, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I saw this great graphic on Twitter today which made me laugh:

I have friends in DC with AHIMA trying to make the case to their representatives in Congress that they shouldn’t delay ICD-10. Word on the street is that as of now (subject to change as we saw last year), the SGR fix bill doesn’t contain an ICD-10 delay. Of course, the real challenge with ICD-10 now is the uncertainty of it all.

I thought it might be interesting to see what the readers of EMR and EHR predict for ICD-10. So, here’s a simple ICD-10 poll about whether ICD-10 will be delayed or not.

5 Features to Look for in a Medical Billing Company

Posted on March 4, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Harold R Gibson, Chief Financial Officer at M-Scribe Technologies, LLC.
Harold Gibson
A full-service medical billing company does more than code and file medical insurance claims. While that may still make up the bulk of a company’s output, a good medical billing company should offer additional services to help a practice achieve both profitability and compliance goals. Look for the following main features in a medical billing company:

  1. With the transition from ICD-9 to the new ICD-10 coding system in place, a billing company’s coding, billing and other EHR staff should be trained and experienced to ensure optimum accuracy – the foundation of compliance, and therefore improved timely payment. Since many practices have less time or budget for training billing staff in all aspects of the newer, more complex coding system, it falls to the medical claims processing service to fill in any gaps in the EHR process. A company which carefully monitors the EHR content entered will improve the accuracy of the codes and therefore ensure better compliance and payment as well as lessen the chances of an audit. Duplicate claims, payments included in a previously-billed service or procedure already adjudicated and non-covered charges are some of the most common reasons for claim denials. Make sure your practice doesn’t make these billing mistakes by letting a professional medical billing services company handle the workload.
  1. Accurate medical documentation is critical to having claims paid on time, with no rejection due to errors or incomplete filings. This is especially true of Medicare claims, whereby a Certificate of Medical Necessity and other required documentation must be correct and current to merit payment without multiple resubmissions. The right medical billing services company should use  technology and experience when entering only claim-relevant content data, correct procedure (CPT) and diagnosis codes (ICD-9 and ICD-10). These should then be entered into the EHR charts, providing convenience, increased efficiency and cost reduction.
  1. Specialty-specific billing services are available to group practices and clinics as well as individual physicians. Whether your practice uses billings systems such as eClinicalWorks, Greenway, Kareo, NextGen or other popular systems, the right service should be able to help. Whether your practice specializes in Surgical, Dermatology, Nephrology, Orthopedic, Radiology or anything else this should not be a problem for your billing provider. As a bonus, full-service billing companies can provide other services to you, including patient scheduling, verification of eligibility, performing patient demographics, coding and claims submission.
  1. Pre-RAC audit-related support: Complying with the complexities of Medicare and Medicaid regulations can be challenging even for an experienced billing staff in many practices – even more so for smaller or solo practitioners, who often have just one or two staffers handing billing as well as other duties. On the other hand, offering pre-audit support can be tricky for smaller, less experienced billing companies.  An experienced medical billing company can help with preparing a pre-audit checklist to supply requested audit information.
  1. Training webinars for billing and coding staff are another service designed to reduce the chance of errors caused by unfamiliarity with the new coding system as well as keeping abreast of regulatory and other changes. Offered free of charge, these webinars explore the history of ICDs, a comparison of ICD-9 and ICD-10, coding guidelines and formats as well as a step-by-step plan for implementation. These webinars can help solve the dilemma of not enough time or money to send busy staff to expensive, days-long ICD-10 training classes.

If you are looking for a medical billing company, it is important to choose a company that houses the above five features and remember to look for a company that will help with profitability and compliance goals.

About Harold R Gibson
Harold R Gibson is the Chief Financial Officer at M-Scribe Technologies, LLC, an accomplished healthcare professional with extensive experience in the medical billing and coding industry. You can find him on Twitter @mscribetech. He is interested to get your feedback/suggestions. Please email him at H.Gibson@m-scribe.com.

Mr Spock’s ICD-10 Codes

Posted on February 27, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

How about a little Fun Friday post on a crazy busy Friday for me? Although, it’s not fun that Mr. Spock passed away. As one tweet I read said, “He lived long and prospered.” Have a great weekend.

#ICD10Matters Meme

Posted on February 4, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’d seen some tweets and other messages on social media about the #ICD10Matters tweetup that was happening today. It was organized by AHIMA and has HIM professionals all over the country reaching out to their representatives in Congress to encourage them to not delay ICD-10 again. You can see that the Twitter stream for #ICD10Matters has been very active. I’ll be interested to know how many senators take note of all these tweets.

Along with tweets to representatives in Congress, you also have people tweeting great ICD-10 content, but they’ve also started an #ICD10Matters meme with images talking about it. Here’s a look at some of the ones I’ve found entertaining:

I’m not sure how well these images will talk to congress, but they might be able to engage the mass of HIM professionals to engage on the topic. We’ll see the power of grumpy cat in action.

Athenahealth Goes After Hospitals and Tavenner Steps Down

Posted on January 22, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

There were two big pieces of news this week that I thought I’d discuss. Hopefully you’ll also add your thoughts and insights in the comments.

1. Athenahealth Moves Into Hospital Market With Acquisition Of Atlanta Startup RazorInsights
I thought the announcement of this acquisition was really interesting. Literally the day before this came out, someone asked me what I thought of Athenahealth. After some discussion, they said do you think they’ll take on Epic and Cerner. I quickly responded, “Well, they don’t have an inpatient EHR, so they don’t have a dog in the fight.” Well, now they do have a dog in the fight. Of course, RazorInsights still isn’t a big competitor of Epic and Cerner. However, if I know Jonathan Bush, that’s the ambition. At least that’s what his numerous cloud rants lead you to believe that he thinks he can take down Epic and Cerner with one single word: Cloud. We’ll see what RazorInsights can do under the Athenahealth umbrella.

2. CMS Leader Marilyn Tavenner Steps Down
Neil Versel has a great article covering Tavenner’s departure. His comments are pretty interesting when it comes to her staying low-profile and away from the media during her tenure at CMS. She’s certainly taken a lot of heat from the botched rollout of Healthcare.gov and other programs.

Personally, I’ll most remember her for her promise at HIMSS 2014 that ICD-10 was going to happen and that healthcare organizations better be ready. Of course, we know how that story played out with Congress passing a few lines in the SGR bill to delay ICD-10 another year. Given Tavenner’s promise, I’m quite sure she was blind sided by Congress’ move as well.

I’m not sure her departure is a good or a bad thing for healthcare. I’m sure that the healthcare behemoth will move along like it always has. Best of luck to her wherever she lands. No doubt working in the government in a high profile position is a rather thankless job that usually pays below market wages.

Who do you think will take Tavenner’s position at CMS? Does it matter?

Looking Back at 2014: Thermidor for Health Care Reform?

Posted on December 29, 2014 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

As money drains out of health care reform, there are indications that the impetus for change is receding as well. Yet some bright spots in health IT remain, so it’s not yet time to announce a Thermidor–the moment when a revolution is reversed and its leaders put to the guillotine. Let’s look back a bit at what went right and wrong in 2014.
Read more..

The Real Problem with ICD-10 Delay or ICD-10 #NoDelay

Posted on December 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today, AHIMA put together a really interesting Twitter campaign (they called a Twitter chat, but it wasn’t as much of a chat as a Twitter campaign in my book) where they tweeted about the need for no more delay to ICD-10. You can see what they did by checking out the #nodelay and #ICD10Matters hashtags. They were hitting a number of congressmen really hard. No doubt, their social media people will have seen these messages. We’ll see if that trickles up to the senators and representatives themselves.

On the opposite side is the AMA which is pushing congress for a 2 year delay to ICD-10. Modern Healthcare just published a story that the ICD-10 delay bill was “dead on arrival.” However, that seemed like a link bait headline. When you read the actual story, they suggest that the ICD-10 bill might be dead when it comes to the lame duck session of congress (now through the end of the year). However, it doesn’t address whether congress will choose to incorporate another ICD-10 delay into the SGR fix in 2015 like they did in 2014. That story is still waiting to be played out.

The real problem with all of this is a topic that we’ve discussed over and over here on EMR and EHR. It applied to meaningful use and EHR certification and now it applies just as well to the implementation of ICD-10. No doubt there are proponents and opponents on each side of the ICD-10 debate. Personally, I’ve seen both arguments and I think both sides have an interesting case to make. I don’t think the decision is as clear cut as either sides makes it out to be. If you delay ICD-10 many organizations will be hurt. If you move forward with ICD-10 many organizations will be hurt.

Uncertainty around ICD-10 is the real problem.

What’s worse than going ahead with ICD-10? Uncertainty about whether ICD-10 is going forward or not. What’s worse than delaying ICD-10? Uncertainty about whether ICD-10 is going forward or not. ICD-10 uncertainty is costing healthcare much more than either an ICD-10 delay or a hard and fast ICD-10 go live date.

The US government (yes, that includes all parts of the US government) needs to make a firm decision on whether ICD-10 should be implemented or not. If ICD-10 is going to be the US medical coding future, then we should bite the bullet and implement ICD-10 on schedule. Another delay won’t improve that implementation. If ICD-10 is not of value, then let’s offer some certainty and do away with it completely. Either way, the certainty will be more valuable than our current state of uncertainty.

I’ll admit that I’m not an expert on DC politics. However, I’ve wondered if there’s something the US government could do that would provide this certainty. In 2014, CMS had done everything they could do to provide that certainty. It turns out, they didn’t have the power to make such a promise. Congress undercut them and they got left with egg on their face.

Could Congress pass a bill that would either set the ICD-10 implementation in stone or banish ICD-10 forever? Would that provide healthcare organizations the certainty they need to plan for ICD-10? Or would they just be afraid that the President would do some executive order to delay ICD-10 again? Is there anything that can be done to communicate a clear message on ICD-10’s future?

My gut tells me that if ICD-10 isn’t delayed in the SGR Fix bill next year, then ICD-10 will probably go forward. You’ll notice that probably was the best I could say. Can anyone offer more certainty on the future of ICD-10? I don’t think they can and that’s the problem.

What I do know is that ICD-10 uncertainty is costing healthcare a lot!

ICD-10 Ebola Infographic

Posted on October 21, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In my post on funny ICD-10 codes ruining the ICD-10 brand, I briefly commented how there’s no ICD-9 code for Ebola, but that there is one for ICD-10.

Beth Friedman from Agency Ten22 shared a link to this ICD-10 Ebola Infographic that I thought readers would find really interesting.

Ebola ICD-10 Infographic

One more reason to finally implement ICD-10 in the US.

If I Were AHIMA and Wanted to Ensure ICD-10 Wasn’t Delayed Again

Posted on September 12, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been working on my schedule for the AHIMA conference happening at the end of the month (officially I think they call it the AHIMA Convention). As I’ve looked over the various meetings and topics that will be discussed, I’m once again faced with the ICD-10 discussion.

I’ll admit that the ICD-10 discussion feels a little bit like the movie Groundhog Day. A little reminder of the movie (man I need to rewatch it):

Much like Bill Murray, I think we’re entering the same ICD-10 cycle that we were in last year. People warning about the impending implementation of ICD-10. People talking about the need to train on ICD-10. The impact of ICD-10 on revenue, productivity, software, etc etc etc. If it feels like we’ve been through these topics before, it’s because we have.

I previously posted an important question, “What Would Make Us Not Delay ICD-10 in 2015?” Unfortunately, I think the answer to that question is that right now nothing has changed. All of the reasons that someone would want ICD-10 to go forward and all of the reasons that ICD-10 should be delayed are exactly the same. I’d love to hear from people that disagree with me. Although, so far people have only come up with the same reasons that were the same last year.

That doesn’t mean it’s a lost cause for organizations like AHIMA that really want ICD-10 to go forward. They could do something that would change the environment and help ensure that ICD-10 actually happens in 2015. (Note: When we’re talking about DC and congress, nothing is certain, but I think this strategy would change the discussion.)

If I were AHIMA and wanted to push forward the ICD-10 agenda, I’d leverage your passionate community and be sure that the story of ICD-10 was told far and wide. The goal would have to be to create the narrative that delaying ICD-10 would cause irreparable harm to healthcare and to millions of people.

I imagine a series of videos with HIM people telling their stories on the impact of ICD-10 delays. These stories aren’t hard to find. Just start by looking at the AHIMA LinkedIn thread about the 2014 ICD-10 delay. Then engage the AHIMA community in social media and provide them the tools to spread these videos, their own stories, and other pro ICD-10 messages far and wide. Don’t underestimate the power of storytelling.

Also, you have to change the conversation about the impact of ICD-10. Far too many proponents of ICD-10 just talk about how it’s going to impact them individually. These individual stories are powerful when creating a movement, but the people in Washington hear those stories all day every day. They don’t usually change decisions based on a few heartbreaking stories. So, you have to illustrate to those in Washington that the impact of another ICD-10 delay is going to cause some harm to the healthcare system. This is not an easy task.

A well organized effort by AHIMA and other organizations could really gather steam. Enough calls, messages, and letters into Congress and they have to take note. It’s a feature of the way their systems are done. Although, a few responses won’t work. It has to be a real grassroots wave of people talking about how delaying ICD-10 is going to cause major issues. The biggest challenge to this is that it was delayed this year and what was the impact?

Of course, the other option is to hire a lobbyist. They’re going to tell the same story, but in a much more direct way. If AHIMA and other ICD-10 proponents don’t work hard to change the narrative of ICD-10 through a lobbyist or a grass roots campaign, then I don’t see any reason why ICD-10 won’t be delayed again. The good part is that any effort to do this will likely be supported and amplified by organizations like CMS. The bad part is that other organizations like the AMA are fighting the opposite battle. However, being quiet means that the other side wins by default.