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Ten-year Vision from ONC for Health IT Brings in Data Gradually

This is the summer of reformulation for national U.S. health efforts. In June, the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) released its 10-year vision for achieving interoperability. The S&I Framework, a cooperative body set up by ONC, recently announced work on the vision’s goals and set up a comment forum. A phone call by the Health IT Standards Committeem (HITSC) on August 20, 2014 also took up the vision statement.

It’s no news to readers of this blog that interoperability is central to delivering better health care, both for individual patients who move from one facility to another and for institutions trying to accumulate the data that can reduce costs and improve treatment. But the state of data exchange among providers, as reported at these meetings, is pretty abysmal. Despite notable advances such as Blue Button and the Direct Project, only a minority of transitions are accompanied by electronic documents.

One can’t entirely blame the technology, because many providers report having data exchange available but using it on only a fraction of their patients. But an intensive study of representative documents generated by EHRs show that they make an uphill climb into a struggle for Everest. A Congressional request for ideas to improve health care has turned up similar complaints about inadequate databases and data exchange.

This is also a critical turning point for government efforts at health reform. The money appropriated by Congress for Meaningful Use is time-limited, and it’s hard to tell how the ONC and CMS can keep up their reform efforts without that considerable bribe to providers. (On the HITSC call, Beth Israel CIO John Halamka advised the callers to think about moving beyond Meaningful Use.) The ONC also has a new National Coordinator, who has announced a major reorganization and “streamlining” of its offices.

Read more..

August 25, 2014 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Rep. Phil Gingrey Comes After Healthcare Interoperability and Epic in House Subcommittee

On July 17th, the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s subcommittee on Communications and Technology and Health (that’s a mouthful) held a hearing which you can see summarized here. Brought into question were the billions of dollars that have been spent on EHR without requiring that the EHR systems be interoperable.

In the meeting Rep. Phil Gingrey offered this comment, “It may be time for this committee to take a closer look at the practices of vendor companies in this space given the possibility that fraud may be perpetrated against the American taxpayer.”

At least Rep. Gingrey is a former physician, but I think he went way too far when he used the word fraud. I don’t think the fact that many EHR vendors don’t want to share their healthcare data is fraud. I imagine Rep. Gingrey would agree if he dug into the situation as well. However, it is worth discussing if the government should be spending billions of dollars on EHR software that can’t or in more cases won’t share data. Epic was called out specifically since their users have been paid such a huge portion of the EHR incentive money and Epic is notorious for not wanting to share data with other EHR even if Judy likes to claim otherwise.

The other discussion I’ve seen coming out related to this is the idea of de-certifying EHR vendors who don’t share data. I’m not sure the legality of this since the EHR certification went through the rule making process. Although, I imagine Congress could pass something to change what’s required with EHR certification. I’ve suggested that making interoperability the focus of EHR certification and the EHR incentive money is exactly what should be done. Although, I don’t have faith that the government could make the EHR Certification meaningful and so I’d rather see it gone. Just attach the money to what you want done.

I have wondered if a third party might be the right way to get vendors on board with EHR data sharing. I’d avoid the term certification, but some sort of tool that reports and promotes those EHR vendors who share data would be really valuable. It’s a tricky tight rope to walk though with a challenging business model until you build your credibility.

Tom Giannulli, CMIO at Kareo, offers an additional insight, “The problem of data isolationism is that it’s practiced by both the vendor and the enterprise. Both need to have clear incentives and disincentives to promote sharing.” It’s a great point. The EHR vendors aren’t the only problem when it comes to not sharing health data. The healthcare organizations themselves have been part of the problem as well. Although, I see that starting to change. If they don’t change, it seems the government’s ready to step in and make them change.

July 30, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

The Impact of Meaningful Use on EHR Development

I’ve been getting a really strong response to my post calling for EHR vendors to expand their definition of customer service. Although, the title doesn’t do the post justice since I also talk about the impact of meaningful use on EHR development. Many of the readers of EMR and HIPAA (and if you don’t read EMR and HIPAA you should go subscribe to the emails now) have highlighted some important points I wanted to share with a broader audience.

First, Peggy Salvatore provides this insight about the impact of billions of dollars of EHR incentive money:

Almost 15 years ago, I wrote material for Intel (the computer chip company) based on research they were doing on physician workflow to make EHRs more usable. It was one of the early efforts to tackle this issue. I mention this to say that a lot of spade work has been done in this field but (in my humble opinion) government regulation has gotten in the way of software businesses trying to build electronic patient record products that work for the end users. Experience has shown time and again that customers will drive product improvements, and the same is true in the healthcare industry as in all others. The government has wasted tens of billions of dollars requiring systems be installed to meet timelines that were not realistic given the budgets and time available, or, to this point, to install products that were not really ready for prime time. Let the customers – in this case – the providers and the patients – drive development and you will end up with products that solve problems, not create them.

Brenden Holt, CEO of Holt Systems, offers this startling commentary on the EHR industry:

To me it is more clear. EHR Vendors, large and small and all points in between are currently working on the support nightmare (R&D and Direct Support) of Meaningful Use. It is the same when CCHIT was coming out, and not much different then the 100′s, if not 1000′s, of current copy cat products, all in one way or another a copy of the master Logician (GE).

Innovation does not bring in customers in the current environment. Government Adherence and more importantly relationships (Marketing and Sales) accomplish this. That is to say products need to be improved upon, but only to the extent of meeting the Government Regulatory Demands and the demands of the Large Organizations that are buying these things in bulk.

Innovation is available, but more then likely will take some time, as will thinking of how we document patient care as a whole, which is antequated methodology.

So as a CEO of a software company, one in the sea of many, I will say, innovation will happen when the phones get off the hook form highly demanding end users who want to make sure the MU is met and a Government Final Ruling that will get Government out of Development. Government is a terrible manufacture of innovation. One other major issue is that the end users don’t really want to pay for the innovation, if the EHR is working they are happy with the LOB application. That in and off itself is a issue, new features don’t translate to higher fees, the opposite is the case, less features in a Free Package can be much more attractive as both meet the basic LOB requirements.

We are the US, as much as the rest of the world tries, inguinity is what makes us great, our leading export, but in this vertical it is all but dead.

Catherine Huddle offered this insight about MU not just derailing EHR development innovation, but also possibly making things worse:

As for MU, as an EHR vendor I would agree that it and related government programs such as PQRS and PCMH have significantly derailed most other product development. Not only was Stage 2 a development “hog” but it brought in required changes that are often unnatural in a practice’s workflow and overly complicated.

MU has changed the goal from delivering what providers need to finding the best way to deliver MU to make it easiest for the providers and other staff – while still trying to make other improvements to the EHR. Unless the government repeals MU and the Medicare penalties the winning EHRs will be the ones that make MU as easy as possible.

While there’s plenty to be pessimistic about what’s happened with EHR, I’m still optimistic that we’ve passed through the meaningful use waters and that the future will bring forth opportunity for EHR development innovation. I’m hopeful (although not 100% certain) that the people in Washington have seen the toll that meaningful use has paid on the industry and they’ll lighten the load so that EHR vendors can start listening to end users instead of regulators.

July 22, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Meaningful Use Stage 2 Saves Doctors’ Time

I recently saw an older document from an EHR vendor that outlined some reasons why a doctor should take part in meaningful use stage 2. They suggested that meaningful use stage 2 would save our healthcare system money, save doctors’ and hospitals’ time and save lives.

All of these are noble goals worthy of consideration. If meaningful use could achieve this triple aim, then I think every doctor and healthcare organization would happily hop on this new triple aim. Let’s look at each and see how meaningful use stage 2 is doing with this meaningful use stage 2 triple aim:

Save Our Healthcare System Money – This one is interesting because many of the doctors I talk to are afraid that this is exactly what’s going to happen with meaningful use stage 2. They’re deeply afraid that meaningful use is really a way for the government to get access to a physician’s data so that they can pay the physician less. You have to remember that if we save the healthcare system money that means that some organization is going to get paid less.

While I think that the fear these doctors portray is a little overstated, it is true that the government wants the data to be able to pay people using that data. One could argue that a doctor doing good work has nothing to fear and it’s only the crooks that are over billing for their services are the ones that have to worry. Although, we know that data isn’t perfect and there will be collateral damage. I would just argue that the government doesn’t know what to even do with the data right now. So, we won’t see this change happen in the near future. We’ll see if they can achieve this goal long term.

Save Doctors’ and Hospitals’ Time – This suggestion is so ridiculous that I had to make it the title of the post. What I think is possible is that EHR adoption can save an organization time, but I think we need to be careful substituting EHR adoption with meaningful use. Sure, the EHR incentive money has pushed EHR adoption forward, but any time savings that has come from EHR adoption has been lost to the meaningful use check boxes that are required.

Save Lives – Once again, with this one you have to balance the idea of EHR adoption against meaningful use adoption. However, I am hopeful that things like clinical decision support, ePrescribing (ie. legible prescriptions) and a myriad of other things can save some people’s lives. This is hard to quantify, track and measure and so I don’t think we really know. I think there are anecdotal stories of times where care was improved and even lives saved because of something in an EHR. Certainly there’s also some evidence that EHRs can make care worse. Although, I think that is usually just as anecdotal as the lives saved. For now, I’d say this is a bit of a wash, but long term I like the potential of what EHRs can do to save lives. Although, I’m not sure that MU will be the basis for the lives saved.

July 21, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Comical Patient Portal Discussion

I’ve long been interested in how offices communicate their use of an EHR and patient portal to their patients. Long time readers might remember this EMR Under Construction sign that one office used.

I had a doctor send me this email exchange which isn’t necessarily a great suggestion for a practice, but it does illustrate many physicians view of what’s happening with EHR and patient portals:
Comical Patient Portal Comments
I’ll call back to Carl Bergman’s post asking “Has EHR Become a Bad Brand?” I think many doctors consider the EHR and patient portal as one thing. Of course they’re not always the same, but emails like this illustrate how the patient portal and EHR brand are doing…not so well. Although, my guess is that meaningful use has an even worse image in the eyes of doctors.

July 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Safety Issues Remain Long After EMR Rollout

The following is a bit depressing, but shouldn’t come as a surprise. A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association has concluded that patient safety issues relate to EMR rollouts continue long after the EMR has been implemented, according to a report in iHealthBeat.

Now, it’s worth noting that the study focused solely on the Veterans Health Administration’s EMR, which doubtless has quirks of its own. That being said, the analysis is worth a look.

To do the study, researchers used the Veterans Health Administration’s Informatics Patient Safety Office, which has tracked EMR safety issues since the VA’s EMR was implemented in 1999.  Researchers chose 100 closed patient safety investigations related to the EMR that took place between August 2009 and May 2013, which covered 344 incidents.

Researchers analyzed not only safety problems related to EMR technology, but also human operational factors such as workflow demands, organizational guidelines and user behavior, according to a BMJ release.

After reviewing the data, researchers found that 74 events related to safety problems with EMR technology, including false alarms, computer glitches and system failures. They also discovered problems with “hidden dependencies,” situation which a change in one part of the EMR system inadvertently changed important aspects in another part of the system.

The data also suggested that 25 other events were related to the unsafe use of technology, including mistakes in interpreting screens or human input errors.

All told, 70% of the investigations had found at least two reasons for each problem.

Commonly found safety issues included data transmission between different parts of the EMR system, problems related to software upgrades and EMR information display issues (the most commonly identified  problem), iHealthBeat noted.

After digging into this data, researchers recommended that healthcare organizations should build “a robust infrastructure to monitor and learn from” EMRs, because EMR-related safety concerns have complicated social and technical origins. They stressed that this infrastructure is valuable not only for providers with newly installed EMRs, but also for those with EMRs said that in place for a while, as both convey significant safety concerns.

They concede, however, that building such an infrastructure could prove quite difficult at this time, with organizations struggling with meaningful use compliance and the transition from ICD-9 to ICD-10.

However, the takeaway from this is that providers probably need to put safety monitoring — for both human and technical factors — closer to the top of their list of concerns. It stands to reason that both newly-installed and mature EMR implementations should face points of failure such as those described in the study, and they should not be ignored. (In the meantime, here’s one research effort going on which might be worth exploring.)

June 24, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @annezieger on Twitter.

What Does Direct Messaging Look Like for MU2?

I’m often asked what EHR integrations of Direct are supposed to look like.  In the simplest sense, I liken it to a Share button and suggest that such a button—typically labeled “Transmit”—be placed in context near the CCDA that’s the target of the transmit action, or in a workflow-friendly spot on a patient record screen.

Send a CCD Using Direct Messaging

Send CCD using Direct in OpenEMR

The receive side is similarly intuitive: the practice classifies how their incoming records are managed today and we map that process to one or more Direct addresses.  If we get stuck, I ask, “What is the workflow for faxes today–how many fax numbers are there, and how are they allocated?”  This usually helps clear things up:  as a starting point, a Direct address can be assigned to replace each fax endpoint.

The address structure raises an important question, because it is tightly tied to the Direct messaging user interface.  Should there be a Direct address for every EHR user?  Provider?  Department? Organization?  A separate address for the patient portal?  A patient portal that spans multiple provider organizations? One for every patient?

The rules around counting Direct messages for Transitions of Care (ToC) attestation do not require each provider to have their own Direct address, as long as the EHR can count transactions correctly for attestation.  As far as meaningful use is concerned, any reasonable address assignment method should be acceptable in ToC use cases (check the rules themselves, for full details).  Here are some examples.

records@orthodocs.ehrco-example.com is clearly an address that could be shared by multiple users, though it could be used by just one person, and might be used for both transitions of care and patient portal transmit.

janesmith@orthodocs.hisp-example.com could also be dual-purpose.  Jane might be the only authorized user of this address, or this address may be managed by a group of people at her practice that does not necessarily even include Jane.  Alternatively, this address could be used for Jane’s ToC transactions, while a patientportal@someother.domain-example.com address could be used for patient portal transmit.

So, any of the options proposed above are possible conventions for assigning Direct addresses.  Also, a patient does not need their own Direct address to Transmit from as part of the View, Download, Transmit measure (170.314(e)(1)), but might have their own address to transmit to.  Note that adding a little extra data can elevate a View, Download, Transmit implementation to BlueButton+ status.

It makes sense for patients and providers to have their own Direct addresses if they are using Direct for Secure Messaging – 170.314(e)(3) – for which Direct is an optional solution.  Or, if patients have their own Personal Health Record (PHR) and Direct address, Direct is a great way to deliver data to the PHR.  Incidentally, there are free services such as Microsoft HealthVault and many others that issue patient Direct addresses.

Direct addresses are nearly indistinguishable from regular email addresses, but a word of caution: Direct is incompatible with regular email, and has additional requirements beyond traditional S/MIME.  Although it’s not a requirement, you’ll often find the word “direct” somewhere in the domain part of a Direct address, to help distinguish a regular email address from a Direct address.

Now that you know what Direct is, and what Direct Messaging and Direct addresses look like, I’m sure you’ll start noticing Direct popping up in more and more places.  So, be a not-so-early adopter and go get yourself a Direct address!

June 11, 2014 I Written By

Julie Maas is Founder and CEO of EMR Direct, a HISP (Health Information Service Provider) whose mission is to simplify interoperability in healthcare through the use of Direct messaging EHR integration and other applications. EMR Direct works with a large developer community to enable Direct for MU2 and other workflows using a custom, rapid-integration API that's part of the phiMail Direct Messaging platform. Julie is passionate about improving quality of care and software user experience, and manages ongoing interoperability testing within DirectTrust. Find Julie on Twitter @JulieWMaas.

What is Direct?

John’s Update: Check out the full series of Direct Project blog posts by Julie Maas:

The specialist down the street insists he wants to receive your primary care doctor’s referrals, but only if it’s digital: “Sure, I’ll take your paper file referral sent via fax. But the service will cost an extra $20, to pay the scribe to digitize the record so I can properly incorporate the medical history.”

Does it really sound that far off? Search your feelings, Luke…

Will getting medical treatment using paper records soon be like trying to find somewhere to play that old mix tape you only have on cassette?  Sound crazy?  Try taking an x-ray film to a modern radiology department, and see if they still have a functioning light box anywhere to look at it.  It’s all digital now.

There are, of course, other factors.

Because MU2.

Because nobody, and I mean no small company and no large company, wants to be referred to as a data silo anymore.

Direct Exchange is a way of sending and receiving encrypted healthcare data, and certified EHRs must be able to speak it, beginning this year.  Adoption of Direct is increasing rapidly, and its secure transfer enables patient engagement as well as interoperability between systems that were previously dubbed silos.  Here is a brief overview of where Direct is currently required in the context of MU2 (please refer to certification and attestation requirements directly, for full details):

Certified ambulatory and acute EHRs need to use Direct for Transitions of Care (170.314(b)(1) and (b)(2)). They have to be able to Create a valid CCDA and Transmit it using Direct, and they have to be able to use Direct to Receive, Display, and Incorporate a CCDA. In the proposed MU 2015, the Direct piece may be de-coupled from the CCDA piece and modularized for certification purposes, but the end to end requirement would remain the same.

EHRs or their patient portal partner additionally need to demonstrate during certification that patients can View, Download, and Transmit via Direct their CCDA or a human readable version of it.  Yes, you heard correctly, I said patients.  As in patient engagement.

So, how does a healthcare provider get Direct?

1. Get a Direct account through your Direct-enabled EHR vendor

One way HIT vendors offer Direct is through a partnership with one or more HISPs (OpenEMR, QRS, Greenway, and others).  Others run their own HISPs (Cerner, athenahealth, and others).

2. Get a Direct account through an XD* HISP that’s connected to your EHR

HIT vendors alternatively enable access to Direct through an XD* plug-and-play (mostly) connector.  These “HISP-agnostic” EHRs allow healthcare organizations a choice between multiple XD*-capable HISPs when meeting MU2 measures (MEDITECH, Epic, Quadramed, and other EHRs have implemented Direct this way).  EMR Direct, MaxMD, Inpriva, and a few other HISPs offer XD* HISP services; not every HISP offers XD* service at this time.  Of course, there is a trade-off between this flexibility and the extra legwork required of the practice or hospital in setting up Direct.

3. Get a web-based or email client-based Direct account not tethered to an EHR or Personal Health Record (PHR)

 

Direct doesn’t have to be integrated into an EHR to transfer information digitally. Non-tethered accounts cannot attest to the sending side of (b)(2) nor the receiving side of (b)(1) on their own, but they can be Direct senders and receivers nonetheless, participating in Transitions of Care or data transfer for other purposes.  They may also be used to exchange health data with patients, billing companies, pharmacies, or other healthcare entities who are Direct-enabled. In fact, some very compelling use cases involve systems who may not have their own EHR, but want to receive digital transitions of care—one such example is skilled nursing facilities.

By the way, patients are also an integral part of the Direct ecosystem.  Several PHRs are already Direct-enabled, and more are on the way.

So, go digital and get your Direct address, and begin interoperating in the modern age!

June 10, 2014 I Written By

Julie Maas is Founder and CEO of EMR Direct, a HISP (Health Information Service Provider) whose mission is to simplify interoperability in healthcare through the use of Direct messaging EHR integration and other applications. EMR Direct works with a large developer community to enable Direct for MU2 and other workflows using a custom, rapid-integration API that's part of the phiMail Direct Messaging platform. Julie is passionate about improving quality of care and software user experience, and manages ongoing interoperability testing within DirectTrust. Find Julie on Twitter @JulieWMaas.

The Meaningful Use Revolution

Meaningful Use change is afoot in the world of EHR software. Many doctors, hospitals and EHR vendors were set up to step away from meaningful use stage 2. Many would have filed for an exception, others would have opted out of Medicare, and others would have just taken the penalties on the chin. It wouldn’t have been pretty and the people at CMS/ONC/HHS realized this was happening and had to do something to avoid the meaningful use stage 2 fall out. It wouldn’t have looked good to have billions of dollars of EHR incentive money sitting on the table with no one wanting it.

CMS decided to cover this wound with a bandaid fix that essentially delays meaningful use stage 2. There are still a lot of details of the proposed rule that are unclear. For example, can anyone attest to meaningful use stage 1 or is that option only available to those EHR vendors who aren’t ready for meaningful use stage 2? I’ve sent that question to CMS, but still haven’t gotten an answer.

Can you imagine the fallout if this is indeed the case? Basically they’d be saying, “All of you EHR vendors and organizations that were good and stayed up with the latest regulations are going to have to do more work and attest to the stricter MU2 criteria while we reward those EHR vendors and organizations that weren’t ready for MU2 with a simpler option.” Can you imagine the backlash that would occur if this is indeed what they decide to do? For that reason alone, I can’t imagine them keeping it that way. I think they have to just open up all the stages/certifications to anyone and everyone regardless of your EHR vendor’s readiness for MU2. (Note: I haven’t dug in to see if this is really a viable option or if a 2014 Certified EHR required changes to the software which make it so it can’t do both MU2 and MU1, but I think it should work out fine. For example, CQMs are tied to certification year and not MU stage. Update: Lynn Scheps from SRSSoft sent me the following update “Prior to the publication of the proposed rule, 2014 CEHRT was required for everyone who wanted to earn an incentive in 2014, so part of the certification requirements was that the EHR could be used for stage 1 or stage 2.”)

What’s even more important is that this is really just the start of the meaningful use revolution. I’ve pointed out my article to “blow up meaningful use” a few times before and that message is starting to be shared by other healthcare IT influencers. For example, the title of this post came from a post by EHR certification and Meaningful Use expert, Jim Tate’s post “You Say You Want a Meaningful Use Revolution” which was a great follow up to his “Meaningful Use Zombie Land” post.

It has become really clear that there’s a lot of confusion afoot. The thing people want most from government regulation is clarity and ICD-10 and now meaningful use are suffering from a lack of clarity. John Halamka summarizes this issue really well:

at some point we need to recognize that layering fixes on top of existing Meaningful Use regulation, some of which was written by CMS and some of which was written by ONC creates too much complexity. I have direct access to the authors of the regulations and email them on a daily basis. It’s getting to the point that even the authors cannot answer questions about the regulations because there are too many layers. I realize that we are reaching the end of the stimulus dollars, but as we head into Stage 3, I wonder if we can radically simplify the program, focusing on a few key policy goals such as interoperability, eliminating most of the existing certification requirements, and giving very clear direction to hospitals and professionals as to what must be done when.

I’m glad to see that John Halamka and myself are on the same page. We need to simplify meaningful use and focus on interoperability. That’s a simple and clear message that providers will understand. I was excited that EHR vendor athenahealth offered a similar view in their post “We Should Be Pushing Interoperability Boundaries, Not EHR Certification Timelines.”

Jim Tate has a good call to action to those who care about what’s happening with meaningful use. As of last night, only 8 comments had been made during the public comment period for the meaningful use stage 2 delay NPRM. You can submit your comments on the rule incredibly easy at the following link: http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=CMS-2014-0064-0002 I’ll be taking this post and my “blowing up meaningful use” and modifying them as my comments. I hope you’ll take the time and share your thoughts on the delay and the future of meaningful use.

May 29, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

TrueMU – When You Realize the MU Standards Are Too Low

I’ve been writing about meaningful use a lot lately and the path forward for meaningful use. You may want to check out my post about Meaningful Use Being On the Ropes as one example. Although, even more important is this post about how meaningful use missed the patient engagement opportunity. Plus, my next post on LinkedIn is going to be about blowing up meaningful use.

In some ways, people are looking at what I write as a call to dumb down meaningful use. I don’t think that’s what I’m trying to do at all. I don’t think we should lower our standards of what we expect to get from EHR software. I just think that we should make it more meaningful. That’s why the example of patient engagement is an important one. A slight tweak to the meaningful use requirements and we’d actually get more patient engagement out of meaningful use for the same price.

I saw a great example of what I want to achieve in something called TrueMU by HelioMetrics. I think this line from their page says a lot:

“Healthcare providers are achieving Meaningful Use and realizing that standards are lower than the goals that they would like to set for their organizations.”

One of the problems with setting an expectation for people is that they then often go into default mode and just try to meet the expectation. This is happening with meaningful use. People see that as the standard they need to meet to be updated in their use of technology. If this artificial bar weren’t there, many of them would strive for even higher results.

The great part is that we can recognize this and fix it. We can think more strategically in how we’re using technology and achieve well beyond what’s defined in meaningful use. We just have to strategically make this part of our thinking.

I actually saw a lot of this happening with ICD-10. Many organizations saw ICD-10 and didn’t just choose to organize around trying to meet the ICD-10 standard. Instead, they created entire clinical documentation improvement (CDI) programs that would improve the quality of their documentation regardless of which standard they chose to use (or in this case chose to delay).

I wonder what results organizations are seeing when they stop focusing so much on meaningful use and instead focus on ways technology and EHR software can improve their organizations. If you have a story like this, I’d love to hear it.

May 15, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.