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Providers Still Have Hope For HIEs

Posted on July 10, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Sometimes, interoperability alone doesn’t cut it.  Increasingly, providers are expecting HIEs to go beyond linking up different organizations to delivering “actionable” data, according to a new report from NORC at the University of Chicago. The intriguing follow-on to the researchers’ conclusions is that HIEs aren’t obsolete, though their obsolescence seemed all but certain in the past.

The study, which was written up by Healthcare Informatics, conducted a series of site visits and 37 discussions with providers in Iowa, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Vermont, Utah and Wyoming. The researchers, who conducted their study in early 2014, hoped to understand how providers looked at HIEs generally and their state HIE program specifically. (The research was funded by ONC.)

One major lesson for the health IT types reading this article is that providers want data sharing models to reflect new care realities.  With Meaningful Use requirements and changes in payment models bearing down on providers, and triggering changes in how care is delivered, health IT-enabled data exchange needs to support new models of care.

According to the study, providers are intent on having HIEs deliver admission, discharge, and transfer alerts, interstate data exchange and data services that assist in coordinating care. While I don’t have comprehensive HIE services research to hand, maybe you do, readers. Are HIEs typically meeting these criteria? I doubt it, though I could be wrong.

That being said, providers seem to be willing to pay for HIE services if the vendor can meet their more stringent criteria.  While this may be tough to swallow for existing HIE technology sellers, it’s good news for the HIE model generally, as getting providers to pay for any form of community data exchange has been somewhat difficult historically.

Some of the biggest challenges in managing HIE connectivity identified by the study include getting good support from both HIE and EMR vendors, as well as a lack of internal staff qualified to manage data exchange, competing priorities and problems managing multiple funding streams. But vendors can work to overcome at least some of these problems.

As I noted previously, hospitals in particular have had many beliefs which have discouraged them from participating in HIEs. As one HIE leader quoted in my previous post noted, many have assumed that HIE connection costs would be in the same range as EMR adoption expenses; they’re been afraid that HIEs would not put strong enough data security in place to meet HIPAA obligations; and they assumed that HIE participation wasn’t that important.

Today, given the growing importance of sophisticated data management has come to the forefront, and most providers know that they need to have the big picture widespread data sharing can provide. Without the comprehensive data set cutting across the patient care environment — something few organizations are integrated enough to develop on their own — they’re unlikely to mount a successful population health management initiative or control costs sufficiently. So it’s interesting to see providers see a future for HIEs.

Survey: Physician EHR Satisfaction and EHR Productivity

Posted on July 8, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Chip Hart from Pediatric EHR Solutions sent me the results of the Physicians’ Alliance of America EHR survey results. The chart that’s most interesting to me is this one that shows Productivity Levle with an EHR:
EHR Productivity Chart

If you look at this chart, it clearly illustrates that most doctors see EHR as damaging to their productivity level. No doubt, this chart has a strong connection with why many doctors dislike EHR. However, it’s worth also noting that this chart shows a doctors’ perceived productivity. Many times people think it’s more, but we aren’t great at actually measuring how much time it takes to do something. Plus, most doctors quickly write off the time they spent chasing down charts and other time savings that should also be associated with their productivity. Instead, they just focus on the time spent charting in paper against the time spent charting in an EHR. Unfortunately, there isn’t a really easy way to measure how the actual productivity level changed.

Regardless of whether EHR has really killed productivity level or not, perception is reality and so perception is very important. What’s even more interesting about this chart is that despite the perception that EHR hurts their productivity, 80% of those surveyed said they prefer electronic to paper. This figure seems at odds with the graph above.

I think this illustrates the reality of the future of EHR. It’s not going anywhere. Doctors aren’t leaving EHR to go back to paper. So, now we’re faced with the reality that we need to optimize our current EHR implementations so that they can be a productivity benefit to a practice in both perception and reality. Can we do that with meaningful use stage 3 continuing to kill EHR innovation?

Will Meaningful Use Stage 3 Continue to Kill EHR Innovation?

Posted on July 7, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In my recent post on EMR and HIPAA titled “The Current EHR Reality,” L Parada, a product manager at an EHR vendor, offered this insightful and scary comment:

Looking at the 137 proposed certification requirements for MU3, I again see all innovation in 2016 slipping through the fingers of all specialty EHR companies. That stings.

I’ve occasionally mentioned that we’re finally at a more stable place with meaningful use that EHR vendors might be able to have some breathing room to innovate. Is that time frame for innovation going to be limited to 2015? Will meaningful use stage 3 ruin EHR innovation in 2016? I also don’t think that it just applies to specialty EHR companies either. That many government requirements is going to kill innovation at every EHR company of every size.

This would make me really sad. I’m tired of writing blog posts about the lack of EHR innovation. Can we just let the 300 EHR vendors get to work on listening to their customers and doing some creative solutions to really improve the efficiency of healthcare and improve doctors’ outcomes?

I think we all might feel different if we thought that the meaningful use stage 3 requirements were innovative and really pushing forward amazing initiatives that were going to transform healthcare. I don’t know anyone who really feels that way. At best they see it as a good step forward towards some noble goals. Should we kill innovation in the entire EHR industry for that?

With meaningful use stage 3 around the corner, it’s starting to feel a lot like meaningful use groundhog day. Does it feel that way to anyone else?

Is Meaningful Use For Mental Health Providers On The Way?

Posted on June 10, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

If you look at the policy statements issued by ONC, it sounds as though the organization is a big fan of putting behavioral health IT on the same footing as other aspects of care. As the agency itself points out, 46% of Americans will have a mental health disorder over the course of their lifetime, and 26% of Americans aged 18 and older live with a mental health disorder in any given year, which makes it imperative to address such issues systematically.

But as things stand, behavioral health IT initiatives aren’t likely to go far. True, ONC has encouraged behavioral health stakeholders on integrating their data with primary care data, stressed the value of using EMRs for consent management, supported the development of behavioral health clinical quality measures and even offered vendor guidelines on creating certified EMR tech for providers ineligible for Meaningful Use. But ONC hasn’t actually suggested that these folks deserve to be integrated into the MU program. And not too surprisingly, given their ineligibility for incentive checks, few mental health providers have invested in EMRs.

However, a couple of House lawmakers who seem pretty committed to changing the status quo are on the case. Last week, Reps. Tim Murphy (R-Pa.) and Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-Texas) have reintroduced a bill which would include a new set of behavioral health and substance abuse providers on the list of those eligible for Meaningful Use incentives.

The bill, “Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act,” would make clinical psychologists and licensed social workers eligible to get MU payments. What’s more, it would make mental health treatment facilities, psychiatric hospitals and substance abuse mistreatment facilities eligible for incentives.

Supporters like the Behavioral Health IT Coalition say such an expansion could provide many benefits, including integration of psych and mental health in primary care, improved ability of hospital EDs to triage patients and reduction of adverse drug-to-drug interactions and needless duplicative tests. Also, with interoperable healthcare data on the national agenda, one would think that bringing a very large and important sector into the digital fold would be an obvious move.

So as I see it, making it possible for behavioral health and other medical providers can share data is simply a no-brainer.  But that can’t happen until these providers implement EMRs. And as previous experience has demonstrated, that’s not going to happen until some version of Meaningful Use incentives are available to them.

I imagine that the bill has faltered largely over the cost of implementing it. While I haven’t seen an estimate of what it would cost to expand eligibility to these new parties, I admit it’s likely to be very substantial. But right now the U.S. health system is bearing the cost of poorly coordinated care administered to about one-quarter of all U.S. adults over age 18. That’s got to be worse.

Allscripts (MDRX) At Important Moment In Its History

Posted on May 21, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Allscripts has announced plans to move more of its software development and operations to India, while cutting 250 jobs in the U.S., or about 3.5% of its 7,200-member workforce.  While this is significant enough as it is, it’s an even more important leading indicator of how Allscripts may perform going forward. Here’s how I think things will net out.

Making a “rebalancing”:  The company has called the changes a “rebalancing” of staff which will allow it to respond more effectively and efficiently to shifts in its software design and product dev plans.

But the decision didn’t happen in a vacuum, either. Allscripts recently reported taking a $10.1 million loss for the first quarter ending March 31. That’s down from a loss of $20.7 million for Q1 2014, but the company still appears to be struggling. Allscripts’ overall revenue dropped 2% to $334.6 million for the quarter ending March 31, compared with Q1 of 2014.

What’s next? What should providers draw from these numbers, and Allscripts’ plan to shift more development work offshore? Let’s consider some highlights from the vendor’s recent past:

* Despite some recent sales gains, the vendor occupies a difficult place in the EMR vendor market — neither powerful enough to take on enterprise leaders like Epic and Cerner directly, nor agile enough to compete in the flexibility-focused ambulatory space against relentless competitors like athenahealth.

* According to an analysis of Meaningful Use data by Modern Healthcare, Allscripts is second only to Epic when it comes to vendors of complete EMRs whose customers have qualified for incentives. This suggests that Allscripts is capable of being an effective provider business partner.

* On the other hand, some providers still distrust Allscripts since the company discontinued sales of and support for its MyWay EMR in 2012. What’s more, a current class action lawsuit is underway against Allscripts, alleging that MyWay was defective and that using it harmed providers’ business.

* Partnering with HP and Computer Sciences Corp., Allscripts is competing to be chosen as the new EMR for the U.S. Department of Defense’s Military Health System, and is still in the running for the $11 billion contract. But so are Epic and Cerner.

The bottom line: Taken together, these data points suggest that Allscripts is at a critical point in its history.

For one thing, cutting domestic staff and shifting dev operations to India is probably a make or break decision; if the change doesn’t work out, Allscripts probably won’t have time to pull back and successfully reorient its development team to current trends.

Allscripts is also at a key point when it comes to growing place in the brutal ambulatory EMR market. With players like athenahealth nipping at its heels from behind, and Epic and Cerner more or less controlling the enterprise market, Allscripts has to be very sure who it wants to be — and I’m not sure it is.

Then when I consider that Allscripts is still in the red after a year of effort, despite being at a peak level for sales, that tears it.  I’m forced to conclude that the awkwardly-positioned vendor will have to make more changes over the next year or two if it hopes to be agile enough to stay afloat. I believe Allscripts can do it, but it will take a lot of political will to make it happen. We’ll just have to see if it has that will.

Meaningful Use Stage 3 Success Could Rely On Vendors

Posted on May 20, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Today I was reading a report on the Health IT Policy Committee’s review of pending Meaningful Use Stage 3 rules — which would ordinarily be as about as exciting as watching rocks erode — when something leapt out at me which I wanted to share with you, dear readers.

The overview, brought to us courtesy of Medical Practice Insider, noted that proposed plans for the Stage 3 rule would allow providers to attest in 2017, though attesting wouldn’t be mandatory until 2018. What this means, editor Frank Irving notes, is that it would be up to EMR vendors to be ready for providers wishing to attest a year early.

The folks overseeing this discussion, the Advanced Health Models and Meaningful Use Workgroup, seem (wisely) to have had their doubts that vendors could be relied upon to meet the 2017 deadline. At the session, workgroup members proposed a couple of alternative ways of addressing this timeline. One was to make the 2017 deadline go away, requiring instead that EMRs have full 2015 certification by 2018. Another was to allow optional attestation in 2017, but if need be, with 2014 EMR certification.

I don’t know about you, but this whole thing makes me nervous. By “whole thing,” I mean adjusting the rules to deal with the likely resistance vendors will exhibit to keeping their roadmap in synch with federal requirements.

After all, consider the history of EMR vendors’ relationship with providers. As we’ve noted, HHS has paid out about $30B in Meaningful Use incentives under HITECH without insisting that vendors provide interoperability. And what have EMR vendors done?  They’ve avoided developing shared standards for interoperability with an alacrity which amazes the eye.

In fact, some EMR vendors — including top contender Epic Systems — have been slapping providers with fees for data sharing (even if they’ve kind of dropped them for now), at prices which could leave them millions in the hole. If that isn’t dead opposite to what those in public policy hope to see happen, I don’t know what is.

Bottom line, if the good people overseeing Meaningful Use want to see Stage 3 accomplish good things, they’ll need to see to it that the new rules give regulators some leverage when it comes to controlling vendors.

As the whole sad interoperability saga has demonstrated, vendors will not take actions that advance health IT on their own. Unlike in other IT markets, where interoperability and meeting regulatory deadlines have been the signs of a winner, EMR vendors actually have strong incentives to ignore providers’ business imperatives.

With any luck, however, between tougher rules on Stage 3 and public pressure to achieve interoperability, EMR vendors will do the right thing.  They’ve certainly had long enough.

HHS’ $30B Interoperability Mistake

Posted on May 8, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Sometimes things are so ill-advised, in hindsight, that you wonder what people were thinking. That includes HHS’ willingness to give out $30 billion to date in Meaningful Use incentives without demanding that vendors offer some kind of interoperability. A staggering amount of money has been paid out under HITECH to incentivize providers to make EMR progress, but we still have countless situations where one EMR can’t talk to another one right across town.

When you ponder the wasted opportunity, it’s truly painful. While the Meaningful Use program may have been a good idea, it failed to bring the interoperability hammer down on vendors, and now that ship has sailed. While HHS might have been able to force the issue back in the day, demanding that vendors step up or be ineligible for certification, I doubt vendors could backward-engineer the necessary communications formats into their current systems, even if there was a straightforward standard to implement — at least not at a price anyone’s willing to pay.

Now, don’t get me wrong, I realize that “interoperability” is an elastic concept, and that the feds couldn’t just demand that vendors bolt on some kind of module and be done with it. Without a doubt, making EMRs universally interoperable is a grand challenge, perhaps on the order of getting the first plane to fly.

But you can bet your last dollars that vendors, especially giants like Cerner and Epic, would have found their Wilbur and Orville Wright if that was what it took to fill their buckets with incentive money. It’s amazing how technical problems get solved when powerful executives decide that it will get done.

But now, as things stand, all the government can do is throw its hands up in the air and complain. At a Senate hearing held in March, speakers emphasized the crying need for interoperability between providers, but none of the experts seemed to have any methods in their hip pocket for fixing the problem. And being legislators, not IT execs, the Senators probably didn’t grasp half of the technical stuff.

As the speakers noted, what it comes down to is that vendors have every reason to create silos and keep customers locked into their product.  So unless Congress passes legislation making it illegal to create a walled garden — something that would be nearly impossible unless we had a consensus definition of interoperability — EMR vendors will continue to merrily make hay on closed systems.  It’s not a pretty picture.

Annual Evaluation of Health IT: Are We Stuck in a Holding Pattern? (Part 1 of 3)

Posted on April 13, 2015 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

I don’t think anyone has complained of excessive long-term thinking among health care providers. But an urgent lack of planning has worsened in the past few months as key drivers of the health IT field search for new directions. Given today’s issues with Meaningful Use Stage 3, the FHIR data exchange standard, Accountable Care Organizations, medical device regulation, and health IT staffing, I expect the next several months to be a time of waiting.

This article will look over what has happened during the past year and try to summarize large-scale trends. I used to report annually from the HIMSS conference, the largest health IT gathering in the US, but stopped going because my articles were always cynical, cantankerous, and depressed. So I figure I just write up a cynical, cantankerous, and depressed summary of what’s happening in health IT from home.

Meaningful Use Stage 3: Shoot the Moon?

There are clear indications that the Meaningful Use program has gone off the tracks. I don’t consort with those who disparaged Meaningful Use from the start and claimed that it held back progress in the IT field. What little progress has occurred can be credited to Meaningful Use, because frankly, the health care industry was totally mired before. Choose your favorite metaphor: deer in the headlights (of oncoming disruptive competitors), ostrich in the sand, even possum in the road.

And no one can challenge that Stage 1 met its (very limited) goals. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) just reported that the vast majority of hospitals have attested to Stage 1 (with rural and children’s hospitals lagging significantly). In fact, while defining Stage 3, CMS could remove some of its requirements because they have “topped out,” meaning that almost everybody already does them.

All the sharper is the contrast between Stage 1 and Stage 2, which was supposed to be incremental but apparently broke the camel’s back for many EHR vendors as well as providers, a lot of whom have thrown in the towel.

Interoperability was certainly a big stumbling block. Two different EHRs can claim to support a standard (such as the C-CDA) while not actually being able to exchange data in a useful manner, for reasons ranging from outright errors to differing interpretations of a fuzzy standard.

But the most whining from providers in Stage 2 arose over a requirement that patients view, transmit, or download (VDT) data from a patient portal. Even though providers needed only 5% of their patients to take a look at the site, they complained bitterly that they were being judged for something that relied on somebody else’s behavior (their patients).

The VDT measure is indeed a responsibility that depends on the behavior of outsiders (as are the interoperability requirements). But health providers seem slow to grasp the whole idea of “pay-for-value,” which means they won’t be rewarded in the future for doing stuff–they’ll be rewarded for results. Not that patients will get healthier just by viewing or transmitting data. But we need something measurable to mark progress, and since everybody issues paeons to patient engagement, the VDT measure is a natural one.

Calls have come from around the industry to water down or otherwise “simplify” Meaningful Use for Stage 3. A common request is to eliminate clinical quality measures (such as how many patients smoke) and focus on interoperability, which I oppose.

To muddy the Meaningful Use landscape further, Congress has started weighing in with complaints that the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) hasn’t done enough to achieve its goals. One proposed bill overrides ONC and CMS to mandate changes in health care policy. There are rumors that Congress (who of course created the Meaningful Use provision in the first place) will take it back and do some serious micromanagement, perhaps as part of a bill on a totally different topic, the “doc fix” that is supposed to regularize Medicare payments.

In the midst of this turmoil, the ONC and CMS recently released Stage 3 recommendations, and it looks like they haven’t pulled their punches on a single thing. Interoperability is central, but the clinical quality measures still appear in full force. The requirement that patients engage with the technology has been softened, but still requires patients to take some action such as using a portal or uploading their own data.

Perhaps the boldest stake that CMS put in the ground was to force all providers onto a single schedule in Stage 3, a tremendous departure from the gentle steps offered by the first two stages. This has touched off a provider frenzy. They’ve been lobbying for years to slow Meaningful Use down, and notoriously ran to Congress to delay adoption of ICD-10 disease coding. But putting everyone on the same track makes eminent sense, particularly at this stage. If you’re really serious about data exchange and coordinated care, everybody has to equally capable. Otherwise we’re back to finger-pointing and claims that technology lapses have prevented compliance.

So what are ONC and CMS up to? Are they shooting the moon–hoping to make the big leap to their maximal goals in one bold play? Are they floating an audacious wish list that they know will be cut back in the course of negotiation? Are they even taunting resistant industries to go to Congress, knowing that Congress recently has been making even more radical noise than the Administration about the drawbacks of health IT? Something along these lines seems to be in the works.

To return to the theme of this article, I’m afraid that health care providers, insurers, EHR vendors, and all their business associates will freeze up while waiting for Congress and the various branches of Health and Human Services to determine which behaviors to prescribe and which to punish. So that’s my take on meaningful use–more on other developments in health IT in the next installments.

Unlocking EHR Data to Accelerate Clinical Quality Reporting & Enhance Renal Care Management

Posted on March 18, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest blog post by Christina Ai Chang from DaVita and Vaishali Nambiar from CitiusTech Inc.
Christina and Vaishali
When healthcare providers began achieving Meaningful Use (MU) — the set of standards, defined by CMS, that allows for providers to earn incentive dollars by complying with a set of specific criteria — a health IT paradox emerged. The reports required for incentive payments are built on data the EHR captures, however, EHRs don’t typically have built-in support for automated reporting. This places a time-intensive manual burden on physicians as they report for MU quality measures. In other words, a program intended to increase the use of technology inadvertently created a new, non-technical, burden. The need to manually assemble information for reports also extended to the CMS Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) incentive program. As with many providers, EHR reporting shortcomings for these CMS programs severely impacted the kidney care provider, DaVita Healthcare Partners, Inc. (DaVita).

As one of the largest and most successful kidney care companies in the United States, DaVita has constantly focused on clinical outcomes to enhance the quality of care that it provides to its patients. In its U.S. operations that include 550 physicians, DaVita provides dialysis services to over 163,000 patients each year at more than 2,000 outpatient dialysis centers. These centers run Falcon Physician, DaVita’s nephrology-focused solution that largely eliminates paper charting by capturing data electronically and providing a shared patient view to caregivers within the DaVita network.

Falcon Physician serves DaVita very well in its design: renal-care specific EHR capabilities and workflows to support patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, federal incentive programs like MU and Physician Quality Reporting System posed their own challenges. Falcon, like most EHRs, did not have the sophisticated data processing and analytics capabilities needed to meet the complex clinical quality reporting mandated by these programs. With limited built-in support for automated reporting, DaVita physicians had to manually calculate denominators and complete forms for submission to CMS for quality measures reporting, typically taking five to six days per report. With the organization averaging 800 encounters per physician each month, this placed a highly time-intensive and manual burden on physician offices. In addition, manual reporting often resulted in errors, since physician offices had to manage ten or more pieces of data to arrive at a single measure calculation, and do that over and over again.

The Need to Automate Reporting – But How?

To address the time and accuracy issues, DaVita recognized it would need to unlock the data captured by the EHR and use an effective data analytics and reporting tool. To begin evaluating options, the organization put together a team to explore two potential paths: creating a proprietary reporting capability within the EHR, or integrating a third-party solution.

It became clear that proprietary development would be challenging, mainly because of the technological expertise that would be needed to build and maintain sufficiently advanced analytics capabilities. It would require special skillsets to build the rules engine, the data mapping tools, and the visualizations for reporting. In addition, DaVita would need to maintain a clinical informatics and data validation team to assess the complex clinical quality measures, develop these measures, and test the overall application on an ongoing basis. Further, DaVita would also need to get this functionality certified by CMS and other regulatory agencies on a periodic basis.

While looking for a third-party solution that could easily integrate with Falcon, DaVita came across CitiusTech, whose offerings include the BI-Clinical healthcare business intelligence and analytics platform. This platform comes with pre-built apps for multiple reporting functions, including MU and PQRS. Its application programming interface (API) simplifies integration into software like Falcon. The platform aligned closely with DaVita’s needs, and with a high interest in avoiding the expense, time and skillset hiring needed to build a proprietary reporting function, the organization decided to move forward with third-party integration.

Accelerated Implementation and Integration

Implementation began with a small proof of concept that delivered a readily scalable integration in fewer than six weeks. DaVita provided the database views and related data according to the third-party solution’s specifications. This freed DaVita not just from development, but also from testing, installation, and configuration of the platform; thereby, saving time and money, and creating a more robust analytics platform for DaVita’s physicians. In the end, going with an off-the-shelf solution reduced implementation time and cost by as much as two-thirds.

Integration with the third-party platform enabled DaVita’s Falcon EHR system to completely automate the collection and reporting of clinical quality measures, freeing up tremendous physician time while improving report accuracy. With additional capabilities that go beyond solving the reporting problem, the new solution translates EHR data into meaning performance dashboards that assist DaVita physicians in the transition to pay-for-performance medicine.

The platform with which DaVita integrated is ONC-certified for all MU measures for eligible professionals (EPs) and eligible hospitals (EHs). Falcon was able to leverage these certifications and achieve both MU Stage 1 and Stage 2 certification in record time. This also enabled Falcon to accelerate its PQRS program and offer PQRS reporting and data submission capabilities.

Automated Reporting and Dashboards in Action        

Today, hundreds of DaVita physicians use the upgraded EHR, and the integrated business intelligence and analytics function eliminates the need for these doctors to perform manual calculations for MU and PQRS measures. Where manually creating reports used to take five to six days, pre-defined measure sets now complete reports and submit data almost instantly.

With the manual reporting problem solved, DaVita’s physicians now take automation for granted. What they see on a daily basis are the quality-performance dashboards. These dashboards give them a visual, easily understood picture of how they’re doing relative to quality measures, and the feedback has been extremely positive. Many powerful reporting features are highly appreciated, such as key measurements appearing in red when it’s time to change course in care provision to meet a particular measure. Such information, provided in real-time with updates on a daily basis, has led to very strong adoption of the new reporting capabilities among physicians.

Currently, DaVita is working to develop a benchmarking tool that can rate all physicians within a location. The focus on quality-measurement rankings relative to their peers, with drill-downs to specific indicators such as hypertension and chronic kidney disease progression, will allow physicians to focus on enhancing care delivery.

Unlocking data located in the EHR has helped DaVita comply with MU and PQRS. In the coming years, the upgraded EHR will help physicians comply with evidence-based guidelines and optimize increasingly complex reimbursement requirements.

Why Meaningful Use Should Balance Interoperability With More Immediate Concerns

Posted on March 12, 2015 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Frustration over the stubborn blockage of patient data sharing is spreading throughout the health care field; I hear it all the time. Many reformers have told me independently that the Office of the National Coordinator should refocus their Meaningful Use incentives totally on interoperability and give up on all the other nice stuff in the current requirements. Complaints have risen so high up that the ONC is now concentrating on interoperability, while a new Congressional bill proposes taking the job out of their hands.
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