Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

Unlocking EHR Data to Accelerate Clinical Quality Reporting & Enhance Renal Care Management

Posted on March 18, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest blog post by Christina Ai Chang from DaVita and Vaishali Nambiar from CitiusTech Inc.
Christina and Vaishali
When healthcare providers began achieving Meaningful Use (MU) — the set of standards, defined by CMS, that allows for providers to earn incentive dollars by complying with a set of specific criteria — a health IT paradox emerged. The reports required for incentive payments are built on data the EHR captures, however, EHRs don’t typically have built-in support for automated reporting. This places a time-intensive manual burden on physicians as they report for MU quality measures. In other words, a program intended to increase the use of technology inadvertently created a new, non-technical, burden. The need to manually assemble information for reports also extended to the CMS Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) incentive program. As with many providers, EHR reporting shortcomings for these CMS programs severely impacted the kidney care provider, DaVita Healthcare Partners, Inc. (DaVita).

As one of the largest and most successful kidney care companies in the United States, DaVita has constantly focused on clinical outcomes to enhance the quality of care that it provides to its patients. In its U.S. operations that include 550 physicians, DaVita provides dialysis services to over 163,000 patients each year at more than 2,000 outpatient dialysis centers. These centers run Falcon Physician, DaVita’s nephrology-focused solution that largely eliminates paper charting by capturing data electronically and providing a shared patient view to caregivers within the DaVita network.

Falcon Physician serves DaVita very well in its design: renal-care specific EHR capabilities and workflows to support patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, federal incentive programs like MU and Physician Quality Reporting System posed their own challenges. Falcon, like most EHRs, did not have the sophisticated data processing and analytics capabilities needed to meet the complex clinical quality reporting mandated by these programs. With limited built-in support for automated reporting, DaVita physicians had to manually calculate denominators and complete forms for submission to CMS for quality measures reporting, typically taking five to six days per report. With the organization averaging 800 encounters per physician each month, this placed a highly time-intensive and manual burden on physician offices. In addition, manual reporting often resulted in errors, since physician offices had to manage ten or more pieces of data to arrive at a single measure calculation, and do that over and over again.

The Need to Automate Reporting – But How?

To address the time and accuracy issues, DaVita recognized it would need to unlock the data captured by the EHR and use an effective data analytics and reporting tool. To begin evaluating options, the organization put together a team to explore two potential paths: creating a proprietary reporting capability within the EHR, or integrating a third-party solution.

It became clear that proprietary development would be challenging, mainly because of the technological expertise that would be needed to build and maintain sufficiently advanced analytics capabilities. It would require special skillsets to build the rules engine, the data mapping tools, and the visualizations for reporting. In addition, DaVita would need to maintain a clinical informatics and data validation team to assess the complex clinical quality measures, develop these measures, and test the overall application on an ongoing basis. Further, DaVita would also need to get this functionality certified by CMS and other regulatory agencies on a periodic basis.

While looking for a third-party solution that could easily integrate with Falcon, DaVita came across CitiusTech, whose offerings include the BI-Clinical healthcare business intelligence and analytics platform. This platform comes with pre-built apps for multiple reporting functions, including MU and PQRS. Its application programming interface (API) simplifies integration into software like Falcon. The platform aligned closely with DaVita’s needs, and with a high interest in avoiding the expense, time and skillset hiring needed to build a proprietary reporting function, the organization decided to move forward with third-party integration.

Accelerated Implementation and Integration

Implementation began with a small proof of concept that delivered a readily scalable integration in fewer than six weeks. DaVita provided the database views and related data according to the third-party solution’s specifications. This freed DaVita not just from development, but also from testing, installation, and configuration of the platform; thereby, saving time and money, and creating a more robust analytics platform for DaVita’s physicians. In the end, going with an off-the-shelf solution reduced implementation time and cost by as much as two-thirds.

Integration with the third-party platform enabled DaVita’s Falcon EHR system to completely automate the collection and reporting of clinical quality measures, freeing up tremendous physician time while improving report accuracy. With additional capabilities that go beyond solving the reporting problem, the new solution translates EHR data into meaning performance dashboards that assist DaVita physicians in the transition to pay-for-performance medicine.

The platform with which DaVita integrated is ONC-certified for all MU measures for eligible professionals (EPs) and eligible hospitals (EHs). Falcon was able to leverage these certifications and achieve both MU Stage 1 and Stage 2 certification in record time. This also enabled Falcon to accelerate its PQRS program and offer PQRS reporting and data submission capabilities.

Automated Reporting and Dashboards in Action        

Today, hundreds of DaVita physicians use the upgraded EHR, and the integrated business intelligence and analytics function eliminates the need for these doctors to perform manual calculations for MU and PQRS measures. Where manually creating reports used to take five to six days, pre-defined measure sets now complete reports and submit data almost instantly.

With the manual reporting problem solved, DaVita’s physicians now take automation for granted. What they see on a daily basis are the quality-performance dashboards. These dashboards give them a visual, easily understood picture of how they’re doing relative to quality measures, and the feedback has been extremely positive. Many powerful reporting features are highly appreciated, such as key measurements appearing in red when it’s time to change course in care provision to meet a particular measure. Such information, provided in real-time with updates on a daily basis, has led to very strong adoption of the new reporting capabilities among physicians.

Currently, DaVita is working to develop a benchmarking tool that can rate all physicians within a location. The focus on quality-measurement rankings relative to their peers, with drill-downs to specific indicators such as hypertension and chronic kidney disease progression, will allow physicians to focus on enhancing care delivery.

Unlocking data located in the EHR has helped DaVita comply with MU and PQRS. In the coming years, the upgraded EHR will help physicians comply with evidence-based guidelines and optimize increasingly complex reimbursement requirements.

Why Meaningful Use Should Balance Interoperability With More Immediate Concerns

Posted on March 12, 2015 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Frustration over the stubborn blockage of patient data sharing is spreading throughout the health care field; I hear it all the time. Many reformers have told me independently that the Office of the National Coordinator should refocus their Meaningful Use incentives totally on interoperability and give up on all the other nice stuff in the current requirements. Complaints have risen so high up that the ONC is now concentrating on interoperability, while a new Congressional bill proposes taking the job out of their hands.
Read more..

Meaningful Use Stage 3 to Come Out Before HIMSS15?

Posted on March 11, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Madelyn Kearns from Medical Practice Insider is reporting that we might see meaningful use stage 3 regulations before HIMSS. Here’s the exact quote from Robert Anthony, deputy director of CMS’ quality measurement and health assessment group:

“We will have two regulations that will come out in time to discuss meaningful use”

It’s hard to imagine that one of these 2 regulations will not be meaningful use stage 3. No doubt CMS and ONC will want to get some feedback from the HIMSS community on meaningful use stage 3. What better place than at the conference?

Madelyn aptly points out that Robert Anthony already has one session scheduled at HIMSS to discuss the meaningful use stage 3 requirements. I have a feeling that is going to be one of the really well attended sessions. Especially if the MU stage 3 rule does come out before HIMSS.

I realize that CMS is bound by laws on when they can announce the various rules and regulations, but I hope they’ve planned out the timeline better than they’ve done in the past. My colleague Neil Versel at Meaningful Health IT News has regularly pointed out how the rules always seem to go public on a Friday. He’s hypothesized that it was the case that they were trying to hide something. I think that’s true for many Washington news stories, but I think it was coincidence in meaningful use’s case.

Even worse than a Friday is the Friday before HIMSS. Talk about ruining the weekend before HIMSS. Although, if I remember right one time they announced the rule in the middle of HIMSS. I remember meeting with a number of EHR vendor’s government relations people who were grumbling about the late night reading of the meaningful use rule that they’d be consuming all night in the middle of the craziness of HIMSS.

Hopefully CMS has learned from past experience and has planned properly to be able to announce the meaningful use stage 3 rule well before HIMSS. Doing so will give people time to look over the rule so they can have a meaningful discussion of the rule at HIMSS as opposed to some frenetic review of what’s been proposed.

Either way, I’m very interested to see what meaningful use stage 3 will look like. My prediction is that it won’t be dramatically different from stage 2. It will be more of the same with maybe 1-2 additions. It’s too bad, because I’d still love to see them blow up meaningful use. Every doctor I know would love to see that as well. Instead I think we’ll be saying “more of the same.”

Should the Interoperability of Health Care Records Be the Law of the Land?

Posted on March 10, 2015 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

The upcoming three days may be critical to health care in the US. Representative Michael C. Burgess (R-Texas) has introduced a bill to promote the interoperability of health care records, and is accepting comments to his office only through March 13. This bill states valuable goals, but also embodies implications we should be wary of–and some real dangers.
Read more..

Small Meaningful Use Penalties for Small Practices

Posted on February 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Michelle has posted an interesting CMS analysis of the price of EHR penalties for physicians:

CMS reports that the majority of physicians who will be penalized this year for not having met MU requirements will lose less than $1,000 of their Medicare reimbursement; 34% of the penalties will be $250 or less, while 31% will exceed $2,000.

The adjustments will impact approximately 257,000 eligible providers. While no one likes losing money, the CMS penalty “stick” is pretty small compared to the overall cost of implementing an EHR.

Unfortunately her link to the CMS report seemed to be the wrong link. I’d love to dig into the 31% of doctors who will exceed $2000 in penalties. $2000 still isn’t very compelling to most doctors I know, but if it scales from there we could see how many doctors are really going to suffer from the EHR penalties.

What’s also not clear to me is if this includes the PQRS penalties as well. All of the penalties start to add up. I also heard one doctor talk about the feared 22% Medicare cut that’s been delayed for a decade or so (I lose track of the number of years). I’ll be surprised if those cuts aren’t delayed again, but it’s interesting that many doctors fear these cuts even if they’re likely to be delayed. Perception is still very important.

Back to the meaningful use penalties, $1000 penalty is not something most doctors will bat an eye at. Even those who have an EHR are opting out of meaningful use stage 2. The math doesn’t work out for small practices. $1000 of penalties certainly won’t balance the equation either. I expect a very small number of small practices to do meaningful use stage 2. Hospitals on the other hand are a different story.

Restructure and Reform Meaningful Use: Here’s a Way

Posted on February 12, 2015 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

It’s no secret that ONC’s meaningful use program’s a mess. I’m not sure there is an easy way out. In some respects, I wish they would go back and start over, but that’s not going to happen. They could do something to see daylight, but it won’t be either easy or simple. As I‘ll outline, ONC could adopt a graduated system that keeps the MU standards, includes terribly needed interoperability and usability standards, but does not drive everyone crazy over compliance.

MU’s Misguided Approach

ONC has spent much time and money on the MU standards, but has painted itself into a corner. No one, vendors, practioners or users is happy. Vendors see ONC pushing them to add features that aren’t needed or wanted. Practioners see MU imposing costs and practices that don’t benefit them or their patients. Users see EHRs as demonic Rube Goldberg creations out to frustrate, confuse and perplex. To boot, ONC keeps expanding its reach to new areas without progress on the basics.

Most the MU criticisms I’ve seen say MU’s standards are too strict or too vague. Compliance is criticized for being too demanding or not relevant. Most suggested cures tinker with the program: Eliminate standards or delay them. I think the problems are both content and structure. What MU needs is a return to basics and a general restructuring.

Roots of the MU Program’s Problems

It’s easy to beat up on ONC’s failures. Almost everyone has a pet, so I’ll keep mine short.

MU1: Missed Opportunities. MU’s problems stem from its first days. ONC saw EHRs as little more than database systems that stored and retrieved encounters. Data sharing only this:

Capability to exchange key clinical information (for example, problem list, medication list, medication allergies, diagnostic test results), among providers of care and patient authorized entities electronically.

Compliance only required one data exchange attempt. ONC relied on state systems to achieve interoperability. Usability didn’t exist.

MU2: Punting the Problems. ONC’s approach to interoperability and usability was simple. Interoperability was synonymous with continuity of care and public health reports. Every thing else was put off for future testing criteria.

ONC’s usability approach was equally simple. Vendors defined their usability and measurement. The result? Usability’s become a dead topic.

Interoperability

ONC has many good things to say about the need for interoperability. Its recent Roadmap is thoughtful and carefully crafted. However, the roadmap points out just how poor a job ONC has done to date and it highlights, to me, how much ONC needs to rethink its entire MU approach.

Changing ONC

In one of his seminal works on organizations, C. Northcote Parkinson said it’s almost impossible to change a failing organization. His advice is to walk away and sew salt. If you must persist, then you should adopt the heart of a British Drill Sergeant, that nothing is acceptable. Alas, only Congress can do the former and I’m way too old for military service, so I will venture on knowing it’s probably foolhardy, but here goes.

New Basic Requirements

A better approach to MU’s core and menu system would allow vendors to pick and choose the features they want to support, but require that all EHRs meet four basic standards:

  1. Data Set. This first standard would spell out in a basic, medical data set. This would include, for example, vitals, demographics, meds, chief complaints, allergies, surgeries, etc.
  2. Patient ID. A patient’s demographics would include a unique patient identifier. ONC can use its new freedom in this area by asking NIST to develop a protocol with stakeholders.
  3. Interoperability. EHRs would have to transmit and receive, on demand, the basic data set using a standard protocol, for example, HL7.
  4. Usability. Vendors would have to publish the results of running their EHR against NIST’s usability standard. This would give users, for the first time, an independent way to compare EHRs’ usability.

All current EHRs would have to meet these criteria within one year. Compliance would mean certification, but EHRs that only met these criteria would not be eligible for any funding.

Cafeteria Program. For funding, vendors would have to show their EHR supported selected MU2 and MU3 features. The more features certified, the more eligible they’d be for funding.

Here is how it would work. Each MU criteria would have a one to ten score. To be eligible for funding, a product would have to score 50 or more. The higher their score, the higher their funding eligibility.

Provider Compliance. Providers would have a similar system. ONC would assign scores of one to ten for each utilization standard. As with vendors, implementing organizations would receive points for each higher utilization level. That is, unlike current practice, which is all or nothing, the more the system is used to promote MU’s goals the higher the payments. This would permit users to decide which compliance criteria they wanted to support and which they did not.

Flexibility’s Advantages

This system’s flexibility has several advantages. It ends the rigid nature of compliance. It allows ONC to add new criteria as it sees fit giving it freedom to add criteria as needed or to push the field.

It achieves a major advancement for users. It not only tells users how products perform, but it also lets them choose those that best fit their needs.

Vendors, too, benefit from this approach. They would not only know where they stood vs. the competition, but would also be free to innovate without having to include features they don’t want.

Meaningful Use Is Dead?

Posted on January 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Over on EMR and HIPAA, I got the following passionate response on my post titled Meaningful Use Created A Big Need for Certified MAs that I thought many readers on this site would enjoy.

In the EP world, MU is dead. There are some larger groups, especially primary care still struggling to overcome the huge hurdles of MU2, but most I know have given up and running for the hills. There is a ginormous gap between what ONC is peddling in terms of numbers and real MU use.

This is good example of another hidden cost of trying to MU. We have some excellent MA’s, and I could not tell you which are and are not certified. Makes no difference. Sadly, CMS and ONC, do not realize that they are literally driving EPs from accepting Medicare patients, especially us specialists. And once we are gone, or severely limit new patients with Medicare, we are not coming back.

So the 17 times in 11 years fix for SGR, PQRS, VBM, MU, CPQ, ICD10, HIPAA, RAC audits, sequester cuts, etc. Its too much cost. clicking, paper work to take care of these patients. We actually had a serious discussion with our hospital about cutting back severely on doing Medicare total knees and hips next year due to all this. And the hospital initiated the conversation. So its not just us, even EHs are looking into this.

We all know that CMS and ONC want something, anything in terms of numbers to report anything to Congress, but this is the wrong way to do it. Again, everyone out there that is sitting in their cubicle Monday morning quarterbacking our care for these patients, will be very sad, very soon as we will just stop seeing them.

You can see by the numbers, if 250,000 EPs are taking the first MU hit this year, just wait until the rest give up. EPs can see that MU does not equate to better care, safer care, or more efficient care. We all may use an EHR, but could care less about attestations and audit risks and counting numerators/denominators forever. Again now that at least half the EPS are out, the rest will be right behind.

CMS and ONC need to realize that penalties NEVER work. Incentives like the heady days of MU1, got people to try EHR, but the costs are now piling up, big time. Everyone wants their piece of the pie. But as the incentives have gone away and the clerk like data entry has gone up, EPs have left the program. And are never, I mean never, coming back.

This provider makes an interesting assertion about meaningful use being dead. Do you think that MU is dead?

I thought this post’s timing was interesting given the announcement that CMS is changing the meaningful use stage 2 reporting period to 90 days. Correction…they intend to change it, but I think we all see that it’s going to happen. Just let the rule making process take it’s course.

Before this announcement, I would have largely agreed that meaningful use was pretty close to dead. I know some people have sifted through the meaningful use stage 2 attestations and have said it’s better than we thought, but I think those are the early birds and not the majority. With this announcement, I think the majority will take a much deeper look at taking on MU stage 2. If CMS can simplify some things, I could see many participating to get the incentive money, but to also avoid the penalties. Penalties aren’t the end all be all for doctors, but they represent a big chunk of money for many doctors.

I’d love to hear your thoughts. What are you seeing in the trenches?

ONC Annual Meeting – Who’s Going?

Posted on January 28, 2015 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

ONC’s Agenda – February 2-3, Washington, DC

Next Monday, ONC holds its annual meeting in downtown DC. I’m going, one small advantage of living here. Here’s the agenda. To see day two, click on the agenda header.

I’m particularly interested in these topics:

  • Adverse event reporting,
  • Interoperability standards,
  • Meaningful Use program’s future, and
  • Usability.

Looking at the agenda, I should stay busy with one exception. There isn’t much on usability. The word’s only on the agenda once. Not a surprise since ONC has pretty much relinquished any role to the vendors.

How important do you think the ONC meeting and also the ONC run Healthdatapalooza now that meaningful use has kind of run its course? Will these two meeting gain steam and influence or will organizations start to go other places? I’ll be interested to watch that trend as I attend the event.

If you can’t attend, you can follow on various webcasts and twitter. If you do plan to attend, I’d love to see you there. To email me, click on my name in my profile blurb, or at carl@ehrselector.com.

What Happens When An EHR Vendor is Acquired?

Posted on January 12, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

With meaningful use money running out, and as the EHR industry matures, we’re going to see more and more consolidation in the EHR market. Many EHR vendors are going to start running out of money. Other larger EHR vendors are going to want to try and buy up market share. In some ways this has already begun. See Greenway being purchased by Vitera Healthcare Solutions and Cerner acquiring Siemens to name some of the larger ones that have happened recently. Although, anyone that’s been a user of Bond EHR (people still miss that EHR software), Allscripts MyWay, Misys, etc etc etc knows the challenges of when your EHR vendor gets acquired.

While your EHR being acquired by another EHR vendor is almost never a good thing for your EHR software’s future, L Nelms visited this post on EMR and EHR News and offered an even worse story of an EHR being acquired and the fallout the doctors felt. I’ve removed the name of the vendors since the principle could apply to many vendors that get acquired.

After completing Stage one of Meaningful Use, I am now dropping out of the whole damn thing. This decision is based entirely on my continued dissatisfaction with the EMR program I chose. I started using EHR Vendor A in 2012. As many know, EHR Vendor A was subsequently bought by ABC corporation who refused to honor the original contract which promised no additional fees. ABC corporation, knowing that they had customers “right where they wanted them” — knowing that switching programs would incur tremendous costs and disruption to the practices’ work flow, immediately imposed a $250.00 monthly “support fee”, requiring automatic payments from the customers credit card. I do not know what constitutes “support” from this company, as I had problems with the program and attempted to contact them numerous times from Nov 19, 2014 to Dec 9, without a SINGLE reply in any form from them. On Jan 1, 2015, they increased this fee to $300.00.

They continue to inundate us with newsletters telling us how wonderful they are, including an alert urging us to “respond today” to arrange to get the new certified software installed. This was sent on Christmas Eve! They warned us repeatedly that we must be using the new software ON Jan 1,2015, in order to meet MU. What they didn’t mention until the day before the install, was that there is a “one-time installation fee of $99.00″ (charged immediately, of course, to you credit card).

I asked if I could do the install myself and was told “yes, but we’re not really charging for the install, we’re charging for the SQL server update (which actually can be done oneself ). But I was told I had to pay. And now, the new certified software, which is COMPLETELY different from the previous version, is a nightmare. It is agonizingly slow, painstakingly labor intensive, and heaven forbid I should require tech support who, on top of being nowhere to be found, are so disrespectful (the last one one I spoke to actually said — when I expressed my dissatisfaction with not being able to get my data when I terminate my contract — “well we didn’t force you to buy our program”

Which doesn’t explain why I feel so violated…..

I should clarify that my data from EHR Vendor A is “available”: after many cryptic replies from them over several days, I was finally told that I can access the data from the server, but then — and you all know the story– I must take out a second mortgage on my home to have the data converted to some semblance of a usable format. This may not be illegal (only because the the recklessness of the companies has not yet been regulated), but it is certainly of questionable ethicacy

I think this is a fear that many doctors have when selecting and purchasing their EHR software. It’s why many of them still choose to go with the big name EHR vendors. Stories like this one scare doctors away from a small EHR vendor with an uncertain future. Although, I’ve written previously about the uncertain future of large EHR vendors as well.

The EHR industry should do better than this. I hope this story is an aberration, but I’m afraid we’re going to see more and more stories like it as the EHR industry consolidates. There will still be many good EHR actors out there that are appalled by these stories like I am. Hopefully, more and more doctors will find those good actors who are sincere in their efforts to provide a quality product with a quality user experience for the doctor. They’re out there, but bad actors like what’s described above give the good apples a bad name.

The New Congressional Rider: Unique Patient ID Lemonade?

Posted on January 8, 2015 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

Note: Previous versions referred to Rand Paul as the author of the first congressional rider. That was in error. The first rider was authored by then Representative Ron Paul. I regret the error. CB

Last month, I posted that Ron Paul’s gag rule on a national patient identifier was gone. Shortly, thereafter, Brian Ahier noted that the gag rule wasn’t dead. It just used different words. Now, it looks as if we were both right and both wrong. Here’s why. Paul’s rider’s gone, but its replacement, though daunting, isn’t as restrictive.

The gag rules are appropriation bill riders. Paul’s, which began in 1998, was aimed at a HIPAA provision, which called for identifiers for:

…. [E]ach individual, employer, health plan, and health care provider for use in the health care system. 42 US Code Sec. 1320d-2(b)

It prohibited “[P]lanning, testing, piloting, or developing a national identification card.” This was interpreted to prohibit a national patient id.

As I noted in my post, Paul’s language was dropped from the CRomnibus appropriation act. Brian, however, found new, restrictive language in CRomnibus, which says:

Sec. 510. None of the funds made available in this Act may be used to promulgate or adopt any final standard under section 1173(b) of the Social Security Act providing for, or providing for the assignment of, a unique health identifier for an individual (except in an individual’s capacity as an employer or a health care provider), until legislation is enacted specifically approving the standard.

Gag Rule’s Replacement Language

Unlike Paul’s absolutist text, the new rider makes Congress the last, biggest step in a formal ID process. The new language lets ID development go ahead, but if HHS wants to adopt a standard, Congress must approve it.

This change creates two potential adoption paths. Along the first, and most obvious, HHS develops a mandatory, national patient ID through Medicare, or the Meaningful Use program, etc., and asks congress’ approval. This would be a long, hard, uphill fight.

The second is voluntary adoption. For example, NIST could develop a voluntary, industry standard. Until now, Paul’s rider stopped this approach.

NIST’s a Consensus Building Not a Rulemaking Agency

NIST’s potential ID role is well within its non regulatory, consensus standards development mandate. It could lead a patient ID building effort with EHR stakeholders. Given the high cost of current patient matching techniques, stakeholders may well welcome a uniform, voluntary standard. That would not solve all interoperability problems, but it would go a long way toward that end.

Congress has loosened its grip on a patient ID, now its up to ONC, NIST, etc., to use this new freedom.