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Integrating Devices, Patients, and Doctors: HealthTap Releases an App for the Apple Watch

Posted on April 16, 2015 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Doesn’t HealthTap want the same thing as all the other web sites and apps crowding into the health space? Immediate and intimate connections between doctors and patients. Accurate information at your fingertips, tailored to your particular condition. Software that supports your goals where automation makes sense and gets out of the way at other times.

HealthTap pursues this common vision in its own fashion. This week, its announcement of an app for Apple Watch pulls together the foundations HealthTap has been building and cleverly uses the visceral experience that the device on your wrist offers to meet more of the goals of modern, integrated health care.
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Healthcare Enterprise Mobility Framework

Posted on March 19, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently saw the following healthcare enterprise mobility framework shared with me on Twitter by Clinic Spectrum.

Healthcare Enterprise Mobility Framework

While the image gives some interesting stats and the breadth of what an organization needs to do to really adopt mobile in their organization, I was struck by something else. In the bottom left it shows which organizations are “actively adopting mobility.” It’s quite the list of industries. However, I think you could put just about any industry there, no? Am I wrong? Is there an industry that’s not actively adopting mobile? It’s got to be a pretty niche industry (can you call it an industry if it’s so niche?) if it’s not adopting mobile.

Those in healthcare might also laugh about healthcare being listed as an industry that’s actively adopting mobility. There is a lot of mobile use in certain areas of healthcare, but in a lot of areas it’s still very immature.

Most important, this graphic is a reminder about the importance of mobility. Which reminds me, I need to finish working on the mobile optimized version of this website. We’ll be rolling that out soon.

Full Disclosure: ClinicSpectrum is a sponsor on EMR and HIPAA.

Parkinson’s Disease and Health Data: A Personal Story

Posted on March 5, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

For 20 years, I’ve been writing about clinical data management, analytics and what has now come to be known as Big Data. Like everyone else who follows this sector, I’ve been exposed to many examples of brilliant thinking about leveraging health data, and of late, a growing number of examples where data analytics has improved care and saved lives.

I’ve also reported on dozens of notable case studies in which combing EMRs for telltale signs of disease has resulted in finding dangerous or even life-threatening conditions, including heart disease, diabetes and to a more limited degree cancer. What’s even more remarkable is that we’re likely to see the list of conditions detectable by data analytics expand greatly, particularly if we make smart use of the growing flood of mobile health data.

The problem is, we’re still extremely far from achieving universal health data interoperability, and no amount of inspiring speeches by HIT thought leaders or Congressional bellyachers will achieve this goal on their own. We need a shift comparable to cultural transformation that fueled the astonishing progress of our space efforts. (Maybe someone should claim that the Russians are ahead of us in the interoperability race — we can’t let them Russkys achieve national health data interoperability before we do, durn it!)

And none of this will help me get the last few years of my life back.

You see, while the diagnosis hasn’t been all-out finalized, it appears that I have a case of early-onset Parkinson’s Disease. I won’t bore any clinicians with a detailed description of the illness, but suffice it to say that it’s neurological in origin, potentially disabling and at present, uncurable and unstoppable.  I can probably still live a good life, particularly if I respond well to standard drugs, but all told, this thing is a major buzz kill.

I’ve had signs and symptoms that fit the diagnosis for at least a couple of years, and I dutifully reported them to the caregivers I saw. That included several encounters with doctors associated with the large, high-quality health system which serves the region where I live.  The health system providers entered the symptoms into their jet-fueled Epic EMR, but it seems that despite that, they never put two and two together.  (And as is still the norm, the data gathered at PCP visits has been in no way connected to the data living in the hospital Epic system.)

Fortunately, picking up on the earlier signs of Parkinson’s — if that is indeed my condition — wouldn’t have done anything to slow the progression of the illness. (If I had a malignant cancer, of course, this would be a different story.)  But heaven knows I would have had the clarity I needed to make good self-care choices.

For example, I could have seen physical therapists to help with growing muscle weakness, occupational therapists to help me adjust my work style, joined patient groups to gather support and volunteered for clinical trials. (I live in the DC metro, not too far from NIH, so that may well have been an option.) And most importantly, as I see it, I wouldn’t have had to live with the vague but growing dread that something was Just Not Right for years.

Because I’m not a clinician, I’ll never know how likely it is that I could have been diagnosed earlier if all my caregivers had all of my health data.  But I’m confident that interoperability and the accumulation of population data will help with earlier diagnosis and treatment of many unpleasant, disabling or even fatal conditions.

So when you go about the business  of improving data analytics tools and interoperability, mining population health databases for trends and leveraging mHealth to improve chronic disease management, I invite you to think of me — not a tragic figure by any means, but someone who’s counting on you to keep connecting the dots.  Never doubt that the human value of what you do is extraordinary, but never forget that real people are waiting in the wings for you to supply insights that can give them their life back.

Millennials Reshaping Digital Health

Posted on February 26, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I thought that the infographic below was really interesting and a nice balance to Paul’s previous post Mobile Health and Me…I Think Not! The infographic is based on the report, “Healthcare Without Borders: How Millennials are Reshaping Health and Wellness”, which looked to study Millenial healthcare values. There’s clearly a large divide between generations when it comes to how they approach healthcare. It will be interesting how this divide impacts healthcare going forward.

how-millennials-are-reshaping-digital-health

Mobile Health and Me…I think not!!

Posted on February 20, 2015 I Written By

All that I read tells me, or at least tries to, that the future of healthcare is embedded in mobile healthcare. Through the magnificence of technology, I can see how my health is, test results were and when done, shop for a doctor to fix me if I’m broken. I have the opportunity to find the least expensive option for a cure or, when and if I have the time and after a self-diagnosis I can research my options on the care I need to fix whatever is broken. AND, I can do it all from my iPhone. Are you kidding??? You guys believe that there really are Super Heroes flying around out there, right??

I know that I am not a kid anymore. I know that even though my local hospital is rated as one of the best in the country, it and the doctors in it are a long, long way from the health technology I read so much about. Do we really want them to “compete” for our business?

Forsaking the fact that I live out in the pucker brush, if I get sick, I don’t want to find out about it because I researched the results of some tests, did a self diagnosis and went shopping for a cure. I want MY doctor to tell me what the problem is, if there is one and what can be done to fix it. If I agree with MY doctor, I want him to come up with a cure and whom I might need to be referred to to make it happen. I know that that is not technologically advanced, but it works.

That is one of my problems with all this and I guess I qualify for the title of Dinosaur. I can accept that, but I am also a parent. I take that responsibility very seriously.

One of my son’s is at the tail end of baby boomers and the other at the leading edge of Millennials. Both are very technology savvy. I think that the healthcare expectations I read about are nuts and even if it means being labeled a Dinosaur, I have to caution them about mHealth.

I watched my youngest son ignore the fact that the cold he was suffering from was very severe and getting worse. He finally went to one of those minute clinics and found out that he really had the flu and a touch of pneumonia to go with it. They suggested that he go to where I was trying to get him to go to. A real doctor. Had he done it originally he wouldn’t have lost three weeks because he was too sick to do much.

Then there is my very tech savvy baby boomer son. He understands HIT and mobile health better than most. Two times in the last three years he needed medical care. The first time he went to the minute clinic and they gave him Ibuprofen. It cured the hurt. The second time, he was doing an EHR implementation at a major university hospital. He spoke to one of the doctors he was working with, explained his issues, and was referred to the emergency room. They diagnosed him, treated him and sent him home because he was still contagious. He had also done a self diagnosis, on his smart phone. while sitting in an airport. His diagnosis was faulty.

Having gone through 3-4 life threatening illnesses in my life, the future methods of healthcare scares the heck out of me. It’s the future of medicine, I’m told. Iron Man, Bat Man, where are you when we need you?

Telehealth, or ‘How to Ditch the Waiting Room’

Posted on February 13, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Ryan Nelson, Director of Business Development for Medical Web Experts.

Navigating the doctor’s office for a non-emergency can feel like getting lost in a quagmire of lengthy routines. For those who choose to forego the experience for as long as possible, haphazardly browsing WebMD in the middle of the night is no better. This could all change soon.

Telemedicine is on the rise as health insurers and employers have become more willing to pay for online video consultations in recent years. Convenience (imagine not having to leave the comfort of your home for every service!) and positive health outcomes – not to mention significant cost savings for both employers and patients – are propelling online video consultations to the forefront of healthcare strategies.

Convenience
People don’t like driving far, and they don’t like spending 45 minutes in a waiting room only to be discharged in under 15. The average wait time for a doctor’s appointment is 20 days in the US. This is more than enough time to deter patients from booking appointments for conditions that could be minor. Doctors usually don’t get reimbursed for time spent taking phone calls, so they often nix the medium altogether. Virtual doctor visits can fulfill patients’ need for instantaneous advice, closing a potentially dangerous communication gap while opening a new business opportunity for healthcare professionals.

A recent Harris Poll survey commissioned by Amwell found that around 40% of consumers would opt for video appointments for both antibiotics and birth control prescriptions, while at least 70% would rather have an online video visit to obtain a prescription than travel to their doctor’s office. Telehealth also offers a good solution for patients with mobility issues or chronic conditions, and it gives patients and doctors in rural or remote communities more options for receiving and dispensing care.

Health Outcomes
Biomed Central’s systematic review of telehealth service studies revealed that health outcomes for telehealth and in-person appointments are usually similar. About one-third of studies showed improved outcomes and only two indicated that telehealth was less effective. One way that online video appointments can improve health outcomes for the general population is to filter out minor health concerns and free up ER staff to deal with more serious ailments in-house. Additionally, video consultations can make it easier for physicians to track the recovery of discharged patients and to monitor patient adherence in a time-sensitive manner.

Cost Savings
The Amwell survey revealed that 64% of patients are willing to attend virtual appointments, challenging the dated assumption that in-person interactions tend to be perceived as a better experience. Contributing to this popularity is the fact that virtual appointments cost much less than an ER visit and are cheaper than an urgent care center or most face-to-face consults, generally figuring in around $40 to $50.

Biomed Central also found that out of 36 studies, nearly two-thirds showed cost savings for employers and patients. Meanwhile, Towers Watson predicted that the number of employers offering telemedicine will increase by 68% in 2015, which would result in $6B in employer savings.

Consumer Concerns
Consumers are concerned about how doctors can thoroughly examine patients through video, according to Amwell. However, the proliferation of self-monitoring mobile devices that can be used in conjunction with video consultations suggests that doctors may be able to get much of the information they need online. Besides, it can be argued that during most medical appointments a doctor doesn’t have much time to perform a comprehensive examination or truly get to know a patient.

Amwell subjects also questioned how a patient can be certain that he or she is speaking to a real doctor; however, this can easily be addressed by medical web platforms that thoroughly screen physicians and can thus provide adequate proof of their qualifications.

Digital Relationships
Research has shown that online video communication improves patient satisfaction and increases efficiency and access to healthcare for all demographics, at all times. While the medium appeals to people across all age groups, it especially appeals to younger, tech-savvy patients. This demographic tends to prefer instantaneous communication for non-emergencies and is generally comfortable communicating despite physical distance.

Consumers already use technology to communicate with their friends and families. Finally, doctors – another one of every person’s most intimate relationships – can join the ranks.

References:
Amwell
Biomed
Towers Watson

A Rub On Tatoo for Diabetics

Posted on January 27, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been covering a lot of wearables and sensors over on Smart Phone Healthcare through the years. It’s been great to see the evolution and I still think we’re just at the very beginning of what is going to be possible with these health sensors. However, the leaks in the damn are starting to appear and soon we’ll have a tidal wave of amazing health data from these health sensors.

Don’t believe me? Check out this story on Gizmodo about a Rub On Tattoo that measures a person’s blood glucose levels. For those too busy to click over, here’s an excerpt:

Pricking your finger for a blood glucose test will never, ever be fun. Thankfully, scientists have been hard at work on a bloodless and needleless alternative: a rub-on temporary tattoo that, as weird as it sounds, gently sucks glucose through the surface of the skin.

The thin, flexible device created by nanoengineers at UCSD is based on the much bulkier GlucoWatch, a now-discontinued wristband that worked through the same glucose-sucking principal. But the electric current GlucoWatch used to attract glucose to the surface of the skin was too high, and wearers were not keen on the discomfort. This temporary tattoo gets around the problem by using a gentler but still effective current.

Unfortunately, we’re still a few years out from this becoming a market ready product, but it’s another illustration of the kind of research and ingenuity that’s being put into the health sensors marketplace. I’m personally concerned about my risk for diabetes, and so I’m extremely excited about new developments around diabetes. However, this is just one of many more developments that are going to change the world of healthcare as we know it.

What do you think of this new wave of sensors? How will the medical establishment integrate all this new data? What other changes are happening which we should keep an eye on? I don’t think most doctors, practices, hospitals, EMR companies, etc are ready for what’s happening.

Fitbit Data Being Used In Personal Injury Case

Posted on December 8, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Lately, there’s been a lot of debate over whether data from wearable health bands is useful to clinicians or only benefits the consumer user. On the one hand, there are those that say that a patient’s medical care could be improved if doctors had data on their activity levels, heart rate, respirations and other standard metrics. Others, meanwhile, suggest that unless it can be integrated into an EMR and made usable, such data is just a distraction from other more important health indicators.

What hasn’t come up in these debates, but might far more frequently in the future,  is the idea that health band data can be used in personal injury cases to show the effects of an accident on a plaintiff. According to Forbes, a law firm in Calgary is working on what may be the first personal injury case to leverage smart band data, in this case activity data from a Fitbit.

The plaintiff, a young woman, was injured in an accident four years ago. While Fitbit hadn’t entered the market yet, her lawyers at McLeod Law believe they can establish the fact that she led an active lifestyle prior to her accident. They’ve now started processing data from her Fitbit to show that her activity levels have fallen under the baseline for someone of her age and profession.

It’s worth noting that rather than using Fitbit data directly, they’re processing it using analytics platform Vivametrica, which uses public research to compare people’s activity data with that of the general population. (Its core business is to analyze data from wearable sensor devices for the assessment of health and wellness.) The plaintiff will share her Fitbit data with Vivametrica for several months to present a rich picture of her activities.

Using even analyzed, processed data generated by a smart band is “unique,” according to her attorneys. “Till now we’ve always had to rely on clinical interpretation,” says Simon Muller of McLeod Law. “Now we’re looking at longer periods of time to the course of the day, and we have hard data.”

But even if the woman wins her case, there could be a downside to this trend. As Forbes notes, insurers will want wearable device data as much as plaintiffs will, and while they can’t force claimants to wear health bands, they can request a court order demanding the data from whoever holds the data. Dr. Rick Hu, co-founder and CEO of Vivametrica, tells Forbes that his company wouldn’t release such data, but doesn’t explain how he will be able to refuse to honor a court-ordered disclosure.

In fact, wearable devices could become a “black box” for the human body, according to Matthew Pearn, an associate lawyer with Canadian claims processing firm Foster & Company. In a piece for an insurance magazine, Pearn points out that it’s not clear, at least in his country, what privacy rights the wearers of health bands maintain over the data they generate once they file a personal injury suit.

Meanwhile, it’s still not clear how HIPAA protections apply to such data in the US. When FierceHealthIT recently spoke with Deven McGraw, a partner in the healthcare practice of Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, she pointed out that HIPAA only regulates data “in the hands of, with the control of, or within the purview of a medical provider, a health plan or other covered entity under the law.”  In other words, once the wearable data makes it into the doctor’s record, HIPAA protections are in force, but until then they are not.

All told, it’s pretty sobering to consider that millions of consumers are generating wearables data without knowing how vulnerable it is.

By Supporting Digital Health, EMRs To Create Collective Savings of $78B Over Next Five Years

Posted on December 1, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Here’s the news EMR proponents have been insisting would emerge someday, justifying their long-suffering faith in the value of such systems.  A new study from Juniper Research has concluded that EMRs will save $78 billion cumulatively across the globe over the next five years, largely by connecting digital health technologies together.

While I’m tempted to get cynical about this — my poor heart has been broken by so many unsupportable or conflicting claims regarding EMR savings over the years — I think the study definitely bears examination. If digital health technologies like smart watches, fitness trackers, sensor-laden clothing, smart mobile health apps, remote monitoring and telemedicine share a common backbone that serves clinicians, the study’s conclusions look reasonable on first glance.

According to Juniper, the growth of ACOs is pushing providers to think on a population health level and that, in turn, is propelling them to adopt digital health tech.  And it’s not just top healthcare leaders that are getting excited about digital health. Juniper found that over the last 18 months, healthcare workers have become significantly more engaged in digital healthcare.

But how will providers come to grips with the floods of data generated by these emerging technologies? Why, EMRs will do the job. “Advanced EHRs will provide the ‘glue’ to bring together the devices, stakeholders and medical records in the future connected healthcare environment,” according to Juniper report author Anthony Cox.

But it’s important to note that at present, EMRs aren’t likely to have the capacity sort out the growing flood of connected health data on their own. Instead, it appears that healthcare providers will have to rely on data intermediary platforms like Apple’s HealthKit, Samsung’s SAMI (Samsung Architecture for Multimodal Interactions) and Microsoft Health. In reality, it’s platforms like these, not EMRs, that are truly serving as the glue for far-flung digital health data.

I guess what I’m trying to say is that on reflection, my cynical take on the study is somewhat justified. While they’ll play a very important role, I believe that it’s disingenuous to suggest that EMRs themselves will create huge healthcare savings.

Sure, EMRs are ultimately where the buck stops, and unless digital health data can be consumed by doctors at an EMR console, they’re unlikely to use it. But even though using EMRs as the backbone for digital health collection and population health management sounds peachy, the truth is that EMR vendors are nowhere near ready to offer robust support for these efforts.

Yes, I believe that the combination of EMRs and digital health data will prove to be very powerful over time. And I also believe that platforms like HealthKit will help us get there. I even believe that the huge savings projected by Juniper is possible. I just think getting there will be a lot more awkward than the study makes it sound.

A Little Digital Health Conference (#DHC14) Twitter Roundup

Posted on November 17, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m at the Digital Health Conference in NYC and the Twitter stream has been going strong (search #dhc14 on Twitter to see what I mean). Sometimes I forget how much more satisfying a conference is when there’s an active Twitter stream. It enhances a conference for me in so many ways. I thought it would be fun to point out a few of the tweets that struck me today (and there were a lot to choose from).


I do think New York has made a lot of progress with their HIE. Pretty amazing that they got $30 million of state funding for it. Do you know of other states that are making good progress on their state HIE?


Topol’s comment about cigarettes is interesting. I had to throw in the CVS reference. Right now it doesn’t seem that crazy, but I wonder if 10 years from now it will be just as crazy as Cleveland Clinic giving out cigarette pack holders.


I love imagery and this is great imagery that could inspire a lot of people. What I don’t think many tech people realize is that they’re going to need to work collaboratively with scientists, chemists and doctors to do surveillance on the blood stream. Talk about an area that needs multidisciplinary efforts.


The common error that we compare the new way against perfection as opposed to comparing the new way against the alternative (or the previous model). I’ve been seeing this problem come up over and over in healthcare IT.