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NFL EMR and Patient Generated Data


We wrote previously about the NFL using eCW, but this tweet seemed appropriate on the day of the super bowl. It was interesting to think that they have multiple video angles available of the injury. I wonder how/if that changes the assessment of the injury by the doctor.


This is a great image and does show the partial disconnect between those using smart devices to track themselves and the sick patients who could really benefit from them. Word on the street is that the latest iOS8 from Apple will have a bunch of health and fitness tracking built in along with a new app called Healthbook. I’ve been waiting for the smartphone to basically do what all these other external tracking devices are doing. If Apple hops in, then we’ll see that happen.

February 2, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Epic EMR Training, Glucometer Workflow, New Media Meetup & MU Success


I think this is true for all EMR software, but particularly so for Epic. It’s always amazing how many skimp on EMR training and then pay the price for it later.


It’s a little hard to see, but illustrates the challenge associated with connecting these external data devices. It’s going to take a while for this to be commonplace and normal. I do find it interesting that they’re using Direct and the hardest interface to build (sending info to the EHR) is “Out of Pilot Scope.” I guess they don’t want to take on the hard stuff in the pilot.

These next 2 tweets are a little self serving since they point to posts on my EMR and HIPAA site. If you’re not subscribed to that site, you should go and do that now. Plus, one of these tweets is about a party at HIMSS, so I don’t imagine I’ll get any complaints there.


I hope to see many of you at HIMSS 2014!


I appreciate Dr. Webster recognizing this as a good one. While I’m biased, I think it’s a really important topic that needs more discussion. Although, I’m pretty sure it won’t be getting me an invite to any ONC dinner parties.

January 26, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

My #BlueButton Patient Journey – Laying the Groundwork

After taking the Blue Button Pledge, my next step is to get proactive with my medical records. As I may have mentioned in a previous post, I currently see four different doctors throughout the year. Three of those offer a patient portal. Two of them are in the same practice, and therefore use the same portal. Confused yet?

I think the key to being an engaged patient is to first make sure I can log in to each of these portals. I create bookmarks for them as well. I also make sure I know how to navigate through them and that all of my information is correct and up to date. I take care of the first two items by either looking back at papers given to me during my last office visit, or calling my PCP’s office to ask for a pin code.

Once I’ve looked through my information in each portal (powered by Cerner and athenahealth, respectively), I decide to go even further by messaging my PCP to let her know how my visit to a specialist went. If I don’t let her know now, I might forget many of the details when I see her again towards the end of the year. While I’m in there, I decide to look at my past bills to see why I’m still getting one for a balance I’m pretty sure I paid at my last office visit.

bluebuttondownload

Once those details are seen to, I decide to check out the portal used by two of my other doctors because I seem to remember seeing a Blue Button icon on one of the screens during my last log in. Sure enough, there is a link to “View, download or transmit health data.” Clicking this link takes me to a screen where I can “Support the Blue Button® initiative by downloading your health data and storing it in your personal records.”

I hit download and save them on my computer, but then I’m left wondering, “Now what?” I suppose uploading them to a thumb drive and taking them to whatever provider I see next might be helpful. But I have the sneaking suspicion they’d still prefer paper. Since my PCP’s portal doesn’t offer a Blue Button link to download my data, I decide to message my PCP again to let her know I’d like to see this offered. I wonder if she’ll appreciate the comment, and if she’s gotten the request from other patients.

I feel like my next step should be uploading my health data into some kind of personal health record, but which one? Where do I even start when it comes to selecting something like that? Honestly, the data entry involved with PHRs is off putting to me, which is probably why I haven’t created one up to this point.

What has worked for you and your family? Providers, are there PHRs you find easier to work with (assuming you interact with them at all?) I’d appreciate any reader suggestions and advice you’d care to give via the comments below.

January 16, 2014 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

Consumers Are Ready For Wearable Tech

Though they’re pretty, interesting and fun, I’ve never taken wearable devices that seriously as a force that could have impact on healthcare delivery in the here and now.  Well, it seems that I was wrong.  While it’s not certain that the health system can afford these devices — they don’t exactly come in at an easy consumer price point — it seems consumers are ready to use them if given the chance.

According to a new study by Accenture, more than half of consumers “are interested in buying wearable technologies such as fitness monitors for tracking physical activity in managing their personal health,” according to a report in Health IT Outcomes.

According to Accenture, consumers were primarily interested in devices like smart watches and wearable smart glasses such as Google Glass, even though these devices are not yet available commercially.  Consumers were also very interested in phablets, an emerging device category combining smart phone and tablet PC functions.

I can’t help think that this is a very positive trend.  For one thing, consumer wearables can be an important gateway to remote patient monitoring, something that’s less likely with devices that are used and put aside, like wired glucose monitors, pulse oximeters and blood pressure cuffs.

What’s more, wearables can fit into a healthcare ecosystem in which devices talk to one another and other wireless systems (such as their desktop, laptop or smart phone), whereas the other smart devices I’ve mentioned have less flexibility in that arena.

So, who pays for the wearables?  At least at first, it will probably make more sense for providers to invest in these devices and use them to conduct tests of remote patient monitoring and its impact on care.

But as consumers pick up the wearables themselves, providers might want to focus on building a network which seamlessly integrate these devices, as it seems almost a given that consumers will buy them when they’re available and affordable.  It will take years to get that right, so now it’s probably time to start. Get prepared for the Internet of everything!

January 15, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @annezieger on Twitter.

Why Secure Text Messaging Is So Much Better Than SMS

One of my most popular articles of 2013 was titled “Texting is Not HIPAA Secure.” Certainly HIPAA compliance is good enough reason for every healthcare organization to implement a secure text messaging solution in their office. Considering the number of organizations I hear are recklessly sending PHI over SMS, I expect this is going to come back and really hit some organization where it hurts. Plus, you won’t be able to hide since the carriers often save the SMS messages for easy discovery by a legal team (which is another reason why SMS isn’t HIPAA compliant). It might take a major HIPAA violation for the industry to wake up.

HIPAA violation issues aside, there are so many other reasons why a healthcare organization should consider using a secure text messaging solution as opposed to insecure SMS as many do today.

As most of you know, I’m adviser to secure messaging company, docBeat (Full Disclosure). As I’ve worked with docBeat, I’ve been amazed at how much more a secure messaging platform can do beyond the simple messaging that you get with SMS. All of these features make a secure messaging option not just a way to avoid a HIPAA violation, but also a better option than default SMS.

Here’s a look at some of the ways a secure messaging solution like docBeat is better than SMS:

Message Delivered/Read Status – I think this is one of the most underrated features of a secure message solution. With an SMS message you have no idea what’s happening with the message. You have no idea if the message has even been delivered to the recipient, let alone read. We’ve all had times where we receive a SMS message well after it was sent. In the case of docBeat, they have a status indication on each message so you know if the message has been delivered to the recipient and if it’s been read. A simple, but powerful feature.

Secure Text to Groups – While SMS is great for sending a message to one individual, it fails when you want to include an entire group in a conversation. The concept of group messaging is really powerful in so many areas of healthcare. Much like the reply to all in email, you have to be careful not to abuse a group text message, but it’s easier to manage since they’re usually short messages that are easily consumed. In docBeat, they offer this group text messaging to a predefined group of users or to an adhoc group that you create on the fly. I especially like this feature when you need help from any one of many doctors, but you’re not sure which is available to help.

Controlled Message Storage – While this has HIPAA implications, the ability to control and audit the messages that are sent is really valuable for an organization. In the wild world of SMS you have no idea what the carrier is doing with those messages. Once they’re on the phone, there’s not an easy way to wipe them off if something happens to the device. With a secure message solution you can control and audit the secure messages. This might include knowing how many messages are sent, how quickly the messages were read, where the messages are stored, etc.

Mobile and Web – In a healthcare organization there are often a lot of people you want to message who don’t have a mobile phone issued by the organization. This often means those people start using their personal device to SMS providers (not a good thing) or they just can’t participate in the messaging. docBeat runs on the iPhone, Android and the web. In most cases, the web option is a perfect way for the non mobile staff to participate in the messaging. Try making that a reality with SMS.

Quick Messages for Common Responses – While many people have gotten very fast at typing on their cell phone, it still takes some time. One way to streamline this is to use quick canned messages for responses you give all the time. It’s much easier to one click a message like “I’m on my way. Be there in a minute.” than to try and type that message into the phone.

Scheduled Messages – Considering the 24/7 nature of healthcare, there are often times when someone is working late at night, but the message doesn’t need to be read until the next morning. Scheduled messages are a perfect solution for this problem. You can create and schedule the message to get sent at a reasonable time rather than waking the doctor up needlessly.

Secure Attachments – While MMS mostly works, I’ve seen where some telcom providers don’t support attachments using MMS. Unfortunately, the telcom provider doesn’t tell you this and so you have no way of knowing that the attachment you sent never made it to the recipient. Plus, MMS works best for pictures. It doesn’t support the wide variety of document formats that a secure messaging provider can support.

Ability to Send Location with Text – While you have to be careful with this feature, it can be a really nice added value to your organization to know their location. Are they sending you a message at your hospital or at their kids soccer game? Knowing this little piece of information can change your workflow so the patient gets better care.

Message Expiration – We could call this feature the snapchat feature. As we saw with the popularity of snapchat, there are times when you may want a message to only live for a certain duration. As is the case with most data retention policies in healthcare, some organizations love this feature and some hate it. Of course, each institution can choose how they want to use this type of feature. In the SMS world, you don’t have a choice. You’re at the mercy of the telcom providers decisions.

Automatic Message Routing to On Call Individual – One of the great features of docBeat is the ability to identify the On Call individual in a group. This was originally applied to docBeat’s call forwarding functionality, but they recently applied it to their secure messaging as well. Now you can message a provider and if they’re not around it can be auto routed to the on call provider. A powerful concept that wasn’t possible before.

One Messaging Platform – This is going to take a while to see fully fleshed out, but those in healthcare are starting to get messages from a variety of sources: SMS, phone, EHR, HIE, Patient Portal, medical devices, etc. As it stands today, those messages have to be checked and responded to in a number of different ways and locations. Over time, I believe each of these messages will be integrated into one messaging platform. The beauty of a secure messaging platform like docBeat is that it can handle any type of message you throw at it. We’re not far off from the day where a doctor can check her docBeat message list and see messages from all of the sources above. The idea of a unified messaging platform is really beautiful and can’t come soon enough.

I’m sure I’m leaving off other examples that I hope you’ll share in the comments. As I look through this list of secure text messaging benefits over SMS, I think we’re at the point where many will choose a secure messaging solution in healthcare because of the added features and not just to try and avoid a HIPAA violation.

January 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

EMR for Analytics, HIT Marketing and PR Junkies, and Hospitals Without Walls


Jennifer is highlighting how challenging it is to get data out of an EHR in order to do healthcare analytics. This is certainly an issue and a challenge. Although, as much of a challenge is the integrity of the data that’s entered in the EHR.


I love Beth’s description of the Health IT Marketing and PR conference we announced. It’s been interesting to see people’s reaction to the conference. So many marketing and PR people are use to going to conferences, but they’re always going there to sell their products. It seems that they’ve rarely gone to a conference where they go to learn. It’s such a change in what the word “conference” usually means to them. By the way, the conference is coming together very nicely. It’s going to be a great event.


I love the concept of a hospital without walls. This is happening. A little slower than I’d like, but we’re getting there in a lot of areas. Of course, this will never replace hospitals, but it will be a great compliment to hospitals.

January 5, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Forrester’s Take On Computing Trends For Next Year

Recently, Forrester Research’s J.P. Gownder released a list of six broad tech trends he feels will dominate 2014. While they’re not healthcare-specific, I thought our readers would appreciate them, as they are relevant to the work that we do.

Mobility:  Gownder is arguing that this year coming will see a “sustained mobile mind shift.” He argues that customers and employees are beginning to expect that the data they touch will be available to them in context on any device at the exact what would’ve need. He argues that customers will actively shun businesses that lack mobile applications.

Fragmentation:  While vendors would like to see us, as consumers, stick to one vendor and operating system, Gownder argues that just the opposite will happen in 2014, with people trading off between multiple devices and thriving across operating systems. This movement, driven by the seeming infinity of new mobile devices, makes things more difficult for health IT administrators, to be certain.

Wearables:  While the wearables devices your editor has seen strike her mostly as toys, Gownder is far more enthusiastic. He argues that next year will see commercial availability of a range of once theoretical wearables — and that enterprise wearables have a particularly rich future ahead of them.

Intelligent assistants:  For me, services like Siri and Samsung’s S-Voice are entertaining, but hardly add anything to the mix when it comes to what your phone tablet or PC can do. Gownder, however, believes that intelligent assistance will rise to prominence in 2014 as they become more sophisticated, interesting and useful.

Gestural computing: Expect to see new applications and scenarios for gestural computing this year, Gownder predicts, driven by phenomena like the presence of XBox Kinect in tens of millions of homes, the emergence of Leap Motion and the emergence of a new device known as Myo from Thalmic Labs. In this case he isolates healthcare specifically as a strong use case, in which professionals manipulate and navigate medical imaging using gestures.

Stores recognize you: Here’s one I can see direct healthcare applications for; next year, Gownder predicts, will be the year in which you walk into a store and the store “recognizes you” and tailors your experience accordingly. I can see this being relevant in virtually any public-facing healthcare setting, including the ED, medical clinics and perhaps even EMT settings. Sounds very much like John’s description of a “biometrically controlled healthcare system.

So which of these trends do you think will be the most important next year? How are you adopting them, if at all, in your healthcare organization?

December 31, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @annezieger on Twitter.

All I Got for Christmas was a New Digital Health App

Last week, I wrote that “All I Want for Christmas is a Doctor’s Appointment.” Turns out what I got – a flu-like cold – put that need into perspective. As luck would have it, I had recently read an article by fellow Healthcarescene.com blogger Neil Versel about AskMD, a new app from the folks at Sharecare. Being a mother of two children who are both in school, and thus exposed to their fair share of colds, I thought I’d get good use out of the symptom checker, which Versel explains, enables users to “choose which symptoms they are feeling and then see which potential health issues they might have. The app then walks the user through a “consultation” in which the app will ask the user a series of questions to identify more specifically what the symptom feels like, when it started, and if there are any other symptoms accompanying it. After the “consultation,” the user can enter in any information about medications that they are taking. When users have finished entering information, AskMD generates a list of potential problems the user might have ordered by the commonality of the potential problems.”

Before rushing to try and make an appointment with my local primary care physician during Christmas break, I decided to give AskMD a whirl. Anything that could potentially save me a co-pay, crowding into a waiting room with other sick folks, and then ultimately being told by my kindly nurse practitioner that the only treatment is rest and fluids, would be beneficial. After entering in an initial main symptom, the app took me through a series of 19 questions, resulting in a list of 11 possible causes, plus a link to find physicians and prepare for my visit. The list of physicians was helpful, and I was surprised to see that Cartersville Medical Center, where I had surgery over the summer, sponsored the results. It’s promising to see small, community hospitals are recognizing the importance of digital health tools.

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While a nasty cold wasn’t something I had bargained for over the holiday, it’s nice to know that a digital health app can bring me some peace of mind as I decide whether to treat my symptoms at home, or ultimately go into the doctor’s office. What digital health app did this Christmas bring your way? Or perhaps a new EMR was on your wish list? Let me know what health IT tools you’ll be ringing in the new year with in the comments below.

December 26, 2013 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

Brazil Health IT Investment, ICD-10 Readiness, and Paper Rx


Leave it to Matthew Holt to bring the global Health IT perspective. We need someone to really take the international health IT coverage by the horn. There’s so much happening around the world and I don’t think we hear about most of it here in the US. So much is happening with tech in Brazil, that it doesn’t surprise me that they’re doing work in health IT as well.


This poll was created as part of my ICD-10 Tuesdays series. Please participate in the poll so we can get as much info as possible. Based on the current poll results it looks like people have really mixed feelings on whether their EHR vendor will be ready.


Paper is such a challenging competitor in so many ways. You’d think $100 million would buy you something better though.

December 8, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Is Remote Monitoring Data A Blessing, Or A Distraction?

This week, Venture Beat reported on some growing remote monitoring efforts in which a handful of Massachusetts hospitals are working to pull the data into their EMR. The hospitals are hoping to get their arms around a growing body of data which increasingly lives not only in wireless medical devices (such as glucometers and pulse oximeters) but also smartphones, smart wristbands, FitBit devices and other health-tracking technology.

One of the players involved in the new effort is Partners HealthCare, whose Center for Connected Health is focused on collecting and making use of such data. Its latest initiative sweeps patient data collected at home — such as blood pressure, weight and blood glucose — into the Partners EMR, making it accessible as part of routine clinical workflow. (The data collected by patients is transmitted wirelessly and automatically subsumed into the EMR.)  Patients can also review the data through a patient portal known as Patient Gateway.

According to Partners, this process is designed to change care delivery by allowing doctors to keep a close watch on patients when they’re not in the hospital or doctor’s office.

This is all well and good, especially for monitoring the chronically ill, whose condition may fluctuate dangerously and require timely intervention. But the question is, is this new flood of data going to be manageable for doctors?  Can a physician managing thousands of patients really give appropriate attention to every data point a FitBit or smartphone produces?  Certainly not.

Perhaps that’s why Kaiser Permanente recently told a conference that it was going to be rather picky as to what data flows into its EMR. According to Lead Innovation Designer Christine Folck:

“Don’t come to us telling us you can upload [data] into our electronic medical record. We don’t necessarily want it there. We have too much information in our electronic medical record. Kaiser Permanente was one of the first to go nationwide with our electronic medical record, we are fully integrated, but the problem is now everybody wants to upload into it. Our physicians don’t want it all there. They really don’t need to know how much exercise each of their patients is getting on a daily basis; they just don’t have time to process all of that.”

So, while there’s clearly benefit to tracking chronic conditions via remote monitoring, it seems clear that there will be some pushback from doctors, who can’t possibly absorb all of the data the healthier “quantified self” types are producing.  It looks to me like we’re going to have to narrow down what categories of data are actually helpful in an EMR and which aren’t.

August 1, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @annezieger on Twitter.