Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

Consumers Take Risk Trading Health Data For Health Insurance Discounts

Posted on August 28, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

When Progressive Insurance began giving car owners the option of having their driving tracked in exchange for potential auto insurance discounts, nobody seemed to raise a fuss. After all, the program was voluntary, and nobody wants to pay more than they have to for coverage.

Do the same principles apply to healthcare? We may find out. According to a study by digital health research firm Parks Associates, at least some users are willing to make the same tradeoff. HIT Consultant reports that nearly half (42%) of digital pedometer users would be willing to share their personal data in exchange for a health insurance discount.

Consumer willingness to trade data for discounts varied by device, but didn’t fall to zero. For example, 35% of smart watch owners would trade their health data for health insurance discounts, while 26% of those with sleep-quality monitors would do so.

While the HIT Consultant story doesn’t dig into the profile of users who were prepared to sell their personal health data today — which is how I’d describe a data-for-discount scheme — I’d submit that they are, in short, pretty sharp.

Why do I say this? Because as things stand, at least, health insurers would get less than they were paying for unless the discount was paltry. (As the linked blog item notes, upstart health insurer Oscar Insurance already gives away free Misfit wearables. To date, though, it’s not clear from the write-up whether Oscar can quantify what benefit it gets from the giveaway.)

As wearables and health apps mature, however, consumers may end up compromising themselves if they give up personal health data freely. After all, if health insurance begins to look like car insurance, health plans could push up premiums every time they make a health “mistake” (such as overeating at a birthday dinner or staying up all night watching old movies). Moreoever, as such data gets absorbed into EMRs, then cross-linked with claims, health plans’ ability to punish you with actuarial tables could skyrocket.

In fact, if consumers permit health plans to keep too close a watch on them, it could give the health plans the ability to effectively engage in post-contract medical underwriting. This is an unwelcome prospect which could lead to court battles given the ACA’s ban on such activities.

Also, once health plans have the personal data, it’s not clear what they would do with it. I am not a lawyer, but it seems to me that health plans would have significant legal latitude in using freely given data, and might even be seen to sell that data in the aggregate to pharmas. Or they might pass it to their parent company’s life or auto divisions, which could potentially use the data to make coverage decisions.

Ultimately, I’d argue that unless the laws are changed to protect consumers who do so, selling personal health data to get lower insurance premiums is a very risky decision. The short-term benefit is unlikely to be enough to offset very real long-term consequences. Once you’ve compromised your privacy, you seldom get it back.

Accenture: “Zombie” Digital Health Startups Won’t Die In Vain

Posted on August 24, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve been screaming for a while about how VCs are blowing their money on questionable digital health ventures. To my mind, their investment patterns suggest that the smart money really isn’t that smart. I admit that sorting out what works in digital health/mHealth/connected health is very challenging, but it’s far from impossible if you immerse yourself in the industry. And given how much difference carefully-thought out digital health tools can make, it’s exasperating to watch failing digital health startups burn through money.

That being said, maybe all of those dollars won’t be wasted. According to no less an eminence grise than Accenture, failing digital health ventures will feed the stronger ones and make their success more likely. A new report from Accenture predicts that these “zombie” startups — half of which will die within two years, it says — will provide talent and technology to their surviving rivals. (OK, I agree, the zombie image is a bit unsettling, isn’t it?)

To bring us their horror movie metaphor, Accenture analyzed the status of 900 healthcare IT startups, concluding that 51% were likely to collapse within 20 months.  The study looked at ventures cutting across social, mobile, analytics, cloud and sensors technologies, which include wearables, telehealth and remote monitoring.

While most researchers try to predict who the winners will be in a given market, Accenture had a few words to say about the zombie also-rans. And what they found was that the zombies have taken in enough cash to have done some useful things, collecting nearly $4 billion in funding between 2008 and 2013.

The investments are part of an ongoing funding trend. In fact, digital health dollars are likely to pour in over the next two years as well, with healthcare IT startups poised to take in $2.5 billion more over the next two years, Accenture estimates. Funding should focus on four segments, including engagement (25%), treatment (25%), diagnosis (21%) and infrastructure (29%), the study found.

So what use are the dying companies that will soon litter the digital health landscape? According to Accenture, more-successful firms can reap big benefits by acquiring the failing startups. For example, healthcare players can do “acqui-hiring” deals with struggling digital health startups to pick up a deep bench of qualified tech staffers. They can pick up unique technologies (the 900 firms analyzed, collectively, had 1,700 patents). And acquiring firms can harvest the startups’ technology to improve their products and services lineups.

Not only that — and this is Anne, not Accenture talking — acquiring healthcare firms get a wonderful infusion of entrepreneurial energy, regardless of whether the acquired firm was booking big bucks or not. And I speak from long experience. I’ve known the leaders of countless tech startups, and there’s very little difference between those who make a gazillion dollars and those whose ventures die. Generally speaking, anyone who makes a tech startup work for even a year or two is incredibly insightful, creative, and extremely dedicated, and they bring a kind of excitement to any company that hires them.

So, backed by the corporate wisdom of Accenture, I’ve come to praise zombies, not to bury them. While they may give their corporate lives, their visions won’t be wasted. With any luck, the next generation of digital health companies will appreciate the zombies’ hard work and initiative, even if they’re no longer with us.

WearDuino Shows That Open Source Devices Are a Key Plank in Personal Health

Posted on August 13, 2015 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

New devices are democratizing health. We see it not only in the array or wearable fitness gear that an estimated 21 percent of Americans own (and that some actually wear), but also in innovative uses for mobile phones (such as testing vision in regions that lack doctors or checking athletes for concussions) and now in low-cost devices that are often open source hardware and software. Recent examples of the latter include the eyeSelfie, which lets a non-professional take an image of his retina, and the WearDuino, a general-purpose personal device that is the focus of this article.

WearDuino is the brainchild of Mark Leavitt, a medical internist who turned to technology (as have so many doctors pursuing visions of radical reform in health care). I ran into Leavitt at the 2015 Open Source convention, where he also described his work briefly in a video interview.

Leavitt’s goal is to produce a useful platform that satisfies two key criteria for innovation: low-cost and open. Although some of the functions of the WearDuino resembles devices on the market, you can take apart the WearDuino, muck with it, and enhance it in ways those closed platforms don’t allow.

Traits and Uses of WearDuino
Technically, the device has simple components found everywhere, but is primed for expansion. A small Bluetooth radio module provides the processing, and as the device’s name indicates, it supports the Arduino programming language. To keep power consumption low there’s no WiFi, and the device can run on a cheap coin cell battery for several months under normal use.

Out of the box, the WearDuino could be an excellent fitness device. Whereas most commercial fitness wearables collect their data through an accelerometer, the WearDuino has an accelerometer (which can measure motion), a gyroscope (which is useful for more complex measurements as people twist and turn), and a magnetometer (which acts as a compass). This kind of three-part device is often called a “9-degree of freedom sensor,” because each of those three measurements is taken in three dimensions.

When you want more from the device, such as measuring heartbeat, muscle activity, joint flexing, or eye motion, a board can be added to one of the Arduino’s 7 digital I/O pins. Leavitt said that one user experimented with a device that lets a parent know when to change a baby’s diaper, through an added moisture detector.

Benefits of an Open Architecture
Proprietary device manufacturers often cite safety reasons for keeping their devices closed. But Leavitt believes that openness is quite safe through most phases of data use in health. Throughout the stages of collecting data, visualizing the relationships, and drawing insights, Leavitt believes people should be trusted with any technologies they want. (I am not sure these activities are so benign–if one comes up with an incorrect insight it could lead you to dangerous behavior.) It is only when you get to giving drugs or other medical treatments that the normal restrictions to professional clinicians makes sense.

Whatever safety may adhere to keeping devices closed, there can be no justification on the side of the user for keeping the data closed. And yet proprietary device manufacturers play games with the user’s data (and not just games for health). Leavitt, for instance, who wears a fitness monitor, says he can programmatically download a daily summary of his footsteps, but not the exact amounts taken at different parts of the day.

The game is that device manufacturers cannot recoup the costs of making and selling the devices through the price of the device alone. Therefore, they keep hold of users’ data and monetize it through marketing, special services, and other uses.

Leavitt doesn’t have a business plan yet. Instead, in classic open source practice, he is building community. Where he lives in Portland, Oregon a number of programmers and medical personnel have shown interest. The key to the WearDuino project is not the features of the device, but whether it succeeds in encouraging an ecosystem of useful personal monitors around it.

Doctors, Not Patients, May Be Holding Back mHealth Adoption

Posted on June 24, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Clearly, mHealth technology has achieved impressive momentum among a certain breed of health-conscious, self-monitoring consumer. Still, aside from wearable health bands, few mHealth technologies or apps have achieved a critical level of adoption.

The reason for this, according to a new survey, may lie in doctors’ attitudes toward these tools. According to the study, by market research firm MedPanel, only 15% of physicians are suggesting wearables or health apps as approaches for growing healthier.

It’s not that the tools themselves aren’t useful. According to a separate study by Research Now summarized by HealthData Management, 86% of 500 medical professionals said mHealth apps gave them a better understanding of a patient’s medical condition, and 76% said that they felt that apps were helping patients manage chronic illnesses. Also, HDM reported that 46% believed that apps could make patient transitions from hospital to home care simpler.

While doctors could do more to promote the use of mHealth technology — and patients might benefit if they did — the onus is not completely on doctors. MedPanel president Jason LaBonte told HDM that vendors are positioning wearables and apps as “a fad” by seeing them as solely consumer-driven markets. (Not only does this turn doctors off, it also makes it less likely that consumers would think of asking their doctor about mHealth tool usage, I’d submit.)

But doctors aren’t just concerned about mHealth’s image. They also aren’t satisfied with current products, though that would change rapidly if there were a way to integrate mobile health data into EMR platforms directly. Sure, platforms like HealthKit exist, but it seems like doctors want something more immediate and simple.

Doctors also told MedPanel that mHealth devices need to be easier to use and generate data that has greater use in clinical practice.  Moreover, physicians wanted to see these products generate data that could help them meet practice manager and payer requirements, something that few if any of the current roster of mHealth tools can do (to my knowledge).

When it comes to physician awareness of specific products, only a few seem to have stood out from the crowd. MedPanel found that while 82% of doctors surveyed were aware of the Apple Watch, even more were familiar with Fitbit.

Meanwhile, the Microsoft Band scored highest of all wearables for satisfaction with ease of use and generating useful data. Given the fluid state of physicians’ loyalties in this area, Microsoft may not be able to maintain its lead, but it is interesting that it won out this time over usability champ Apple.

“You can’t list your iPhone as your primary-care physician.”

Posted on June 2, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

iPhone as Primary Care Physician
“You can’t list your iPhone as your primary-care physician.”

This cartoon and more importantly the phrase below it has been going around a bunch on social media lately. I’m sure it makes the majority of doctors roll their eyes and get a little bit angry. Their immediate response is likely “Are you trying to say that my 15 years of school can be replaced by a smart phone?”

I think this question misses the point of the humor. Remember that it’s a cartoon and so it’s meant to be exaggerated. Let me clear the air though. I don’t think any smart phone or even technology is going to completely replace the human element of healthcare. I’m even someone that believes that love and affection can be shared using technology (I’ve seen it and experienced it), but technology can’t replace the human interaction completely. I’ve yet to see a gall bladder removed using a smart phone.

Yes, we’ll need doctors. However, that doesn’t hide the point of the cartoon, which is to highlight the ever increasing influence that our mobile phone will have over our healthcare. You can hide your head in the sand and act like it’s not happening if you want, but that doesn’t change the reality of how the smart phone is going to change healthcare as we know it. In many ways, it already is.

Wearables Trendsetters Don’t Offer Much Value

Posted on June 1, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Today I was looking over my Twitter feed and this tweet popped up:

The referenced article appeared on the corporate site of Qmed, a supplier to the medical device industry. I found this interesting, as it’s pretty obvious that wearables and other mHealth toys will evolve into medical-grade devices over time.

But the choices the article made for hottest wearable firms, while worth a look, demonstrate pretty clearly that few wearables makers can point to any real, meaningful healthcare benefit they offer. (That’s obviously not Qmed’s fault — none of this is aimed at the editor who pulled this piece together — but it’s still a significant point.)

Some of the wearables listed are half-hearted medical device plays, others are fashionable eye candy for upscale geeks, and still others are tadpoles evolving from some other industry into a healthcare mode. Here’s some examples from the list, and why I’m skeptical that they deserve a high five:

* The list includes Apple courtesy of  its Apple Watch.  Right now nobody seems to know quite how the Apple Watch, or any smartwatch for that matter, serves anyone except gadget geeks with extra cash. How, exactly, will having a smartwatch improve your health or life, other than giving you bragging rights over non-owners?

* There’s Fitbit, which is undeniably the wearables success story to beat all others. But just because something is cool doesn’t mean it’s accomplishing anything meaningful. At least where healthcare is concerned, I fail to see how its cursory monitoring add-ons (such as automatic sleep monitoring and heart rate tracking) move the healthcare puck down the ice.

* The list also includes Misfit, whose $850K success on Indiegogo has vaulted it into the ranks of hipster coolness. Admittedly, its Shine is a lovely piece of wearables jewelry, and the Flash is cool, but again, should healthcare leaders really care?

* I admit to a certain interest in Caeden, a Rock Health wearables firm which apparently started out making headphones. The Qmed article reports that the company, which got $1.6M in funding this year, is creating a screenless leather wristband which does health monitoring. But I’m critical of the “screenless” aspect of this product; after all, isn’t one of the main goals of monitoring to engage patients in the process?

I could go on, but you probably get the point I’m trying to make. While the devices listed above might have their place in the consumer health device food chain, it’s not clear how they can actually make patients do better or feel better.

I do have to offer kudos to one company on the list, however. Chrono Therapeutics has an intriguing product to offer which could actually save lungs and lives. The company, which took in $32M in financing last year, has created a slick-looking wearable device that delivers doses of nicotine when a smoker’s cravings hit, and tracks the doses administrated. Now that could be a game change for consumers trying to beat nicotine addiction. (Heck, maybe it could help with other types of addiction too.)

I only hope other wearables manufacturers pick a spot, as Chrono Therapeutics has, and figure out how to do more than be cool, look good or sell to trendies.

A “Collaborative Consult” Could Greatly Improve EMR Value

Posted on May 19, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Over the past several years, EMRs have taken some steps forward. At least in some cases, analytics have improved, vendors have begun offering cloud or on-premise install versions of their products and user interfaces have even improved.

But one problem with EMRs that seems to be nearly unfixable is the need for providers to stare at an EMR screen, leaving patients to fidget uncomfortably while they wait for a bit of face-to-face contact and discussion. Sure, you’ll see scribes in hospital emergency departments, allowing ED docs to speak to patients without interruption, but in the outpatient settings where patients spend most of their time, the EMR screen is king.

Such a focus on the EMR display isn’t unreasonable, given the importance of the data being entered, but as critics have noted countless times, it does make it more likely that the provider will miss subtle clues as to the patient’s condition, and possibly end up offering lower-quality care than they would have if they had an old-fashioned computerless encounter.

I have long thought, however, that there’s a solution to this problem which would be helpful to both the physician and the patient, one which would literally make sure that patients and doctors are on the same page. I’m speaking of a new group of settings for EMRs designed specifically to let patients collaborate with physicians.

Such an EMR setting, as I envision it, would begin with a section depicting a dummy patient of the appropriate gender.The patient would touch the areas of the body which were causing them problems, while the doctor typed up a narrative version of the problem presentation. The two (patient and doctor) would then zoom in together to more specific descriptions of what the patient’s trouble might be, and the doctor would educate the patient as to what kind of treatment these different conditions might require.

At that point, depending on what condition(s) the doctor chose as requiring further study, lists of potential tests would come up. If a patient wanted to learn what these tests were intended to accomplish, they’d have the liberty to drill down and learn, say, what a CBC measures and why.  The patient would also see, where possible, the data (such as high cholesterol levels) which caused the doctor to seek further insight.

If the patient had a known illness being managed by the physician, such as heart disease, a tour through a 3-D visual model of the heart would also be part of the collaboration, allowing the doctor to educate the patient effectively as to what they were jointly trying to accomplish (such as halting heart muscle thickening).

The final step in this patient-doctor process would come with the system presenting a list of current medications taken by the patient, and if appropriate, new medications that might address any new or recurring symptoms the patient was experiencing.

The final result would come in the form of a PDF, e-mailed to the patient or printed out for their use, offering an overview of their shared journey. The doctor might have to spend a few minutes adding details to their notes after the patient left, but for the most part, the collaborative consult would have met everyone’s needs.

Now you tell me:  Why aren’t we doing this now?  Wouldn’t it make much more sense, and take much more advantage of the powerful desktops, tablets and smartphones we have, than having a provider stare at a screen for most of their visit with a patient?

Customizable EMRs Are Long Overdue

Posted on May 5, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

EMRs can be customized to some extent today, but not that much. Providers can create interfaces between their EMR and other platforms, such as PACS or laboratory information systems, but you can’t really take the guts of the thing apart. The reality is that the EMR vendor’s configuration shapes how providers do business, not the other way around.

This has been the state of affairs for so long that you don’t hear too much complaining about it, but health IT execs should really be raising a ruckus. While some hospitals might prefer to have all of their EMR’s major functions locked down before it gets integrated with other systems, others would surely prefer to build out their own EMR from widgetized components on a generic platform.

Actually, a friend recently introduced me to a company which is taking just this approach. Ocean Informatics, which has built an eHealth base on the openEHR platform, offers end users the chance to build not only an EMR application, but also use clinical modules including infection control, care support, decision support and advanced care management, and a mobile platform. It also offers compatible knowledge-based management modules, including clinical modeling tools and a clinical modeling manager.

It’s telling that the New South Wales, Australia-based open source vendor sells directly to governments, including Brazil, Norway and Slovenia. True, U.S. government is obviously responsible for VistA, the VA’s universally beloved open source EMR, but the Department of Defense is currently in the process of picking between Epic and Cerner to implement its $11B EMR update. Even VistA’s backers have thrown it under the bus, in other words.

Given the long-established propensity of commercial vendors to sell a hard-welded product, it seems unlikely that they’re going to switch to a modular design anytime soon.  Epic and Cerner largely sell completely-built cars with a few expensive options. Open source offers a chassis, doors, wheels, a custom interior you can style with alligator skin if you’d like, and plenty of free options, at a price you more or less choose. But it would apparently be too sensible to expect EMR vendors to provide the flexible, affordable option.

That being said, as health systems are increasingly forced to be all things to all people — managers of population health, risk-bearing ACOs, trackers of mobile health data, providers of virtual medicine and more — they’ll be forced to throw their weight behind a more flexible architecture. Buying an EMR “out of the box” simply won’t make sense.

When commercial vendors finally concede to the inevitable and turn out modular eHealth data tools, providers will finally be in a position to handle their new roles efficiently. It’s about time Epic and Cerner vendors got it done!

Integrating Devices, Patients, and Doctors: HealthTap Releases an App for the Apple Watch

Posted on April 16, 2015 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Doesn’t HealthTap want the same thing as all the other web sites and apps crowding into the health space? Immediate and intimate connections between doctors and patients. Accurate information at your fingertips, tailored to your particular condition. Software that supports your goals where automation makes sense and gets out of the way at other times.

HealthTap pursues this common vision in its own fashion. This week, its announcement of an app for Apple Watch pulls together the foundations HealthTap has been building and cleverly uses the visceral experience that the device on your wrist offers to meet more of the goals of modern, integrated health care.
Read more..

Healthcare Enterprise Mobility Framework

Posted on March 19, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently saw the following healthcare enterprise mobility framework shared with me on Twitter by Clinic Spectrum.

Healthcare Enterprise Mobility Framework

While the image gives some interesting stats and the breadth of what an organization needs to do to really adopt mobile in their organization, I was struck by something else. In the bottom left it shows which organizations are “actively adopting mobility.” It’s quite the list of industries. However, I think you could put just about any industry there, no? Am I wrong? Is there an industry that’s not actively adopting mobile? It’s got to be a pretty niche industry (can you call it an industry if it’s so niche?) if it’s not adopting mobile.

Those in healthcare might also laugh about healthcare being listed as an industry that’s actively adopting mobility. There is a lot of mobile use in certain areas of healthcare, but in a lot of areas it’s still very immature.

Most important, this graphic is a reminder about the importance of mobility. Which reminds me, I need to finish working on the mobile optimized version of this website. We’ll be rolling that out soon.

Full Disclosure: ClinicSpectrum is a sponsor on EMR and HIPAA.