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E-Patient Update: Time To Share EMR Data With Apps

Posted on November 18, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Like most Americans, I’ve used many a health-related app, in categories including vitals tracking, weight control, sleep management, medication management and exercise tracking. While I’ve continued to use a few, I’ve dropped most after a few uses because they didn’t contribute anything to my life.

Now, those of you who are reading this might assume that I lost interest in the apps because they were poorly designed. I admit that this was true in some cases. But in others, I’ve ceased to use the apps because the data they collect and display hasn’t been terribly useful, as most of it lives in a vacuum. Sure, I might be able to create line graph of my heart rate or pulse ox level, but that’s mildly interesting at best. (I doubt physicians would find it terribly interesting either.)

That being said, I believe there is a way healthcare organizations can make the app experience more useful. I’d argue that hospitals and clinics, as well as other organizations caring for patients, need to connect with major app developers and synch their data with those platforms. If done right, the addition of outside data would enrich the patient experience dramatically, and hopefully, provide more targeted feedback that would help shape their health behaviors.

How it would work

How would this work? Here’s an example from my own life, as an e-patient who digitally manages a handful of chronic, sometimes-complex conditions.

I have tested a handful of medication management apps, whose interfaces were quite different but whose goals seem to be quite similar — the primary one being to track the date and time each medicine on my regimen was taken. In each case, I could access my med compliance history rather easily, but had no information on what results my level of compliance might have accomplished.

However, if I could have overlaid those compliance results with changes in my med regimen, changes in my vital signs and changes in my lab values, I have a better picture of how all of my health efforts fit together. Such a picture would be far more likely to prompt changes in my health behavior than uncontextualized data points based on my self-report alone.

I should mention that I know of at least one medication management app developer (the inspiration for this essay) which hopes to accomplish just this result already, and is hard at work enriching its platform to make such integration possible. In other words, developers may not need much convincing to come on board.

The benefits of added data

“Yes,” I hear you saying, “but why should I share my proprietary data?” The answer is fairly simple; in the world of value-based reimbursement, you need patients to get and stay well, and helping them better manage their health fits this goal.

Admittedly, achieving this level of synchronization between apps and provider data won’t be simple. However, my guess is that it would be easier for app developers to import, say, pharmacy or EMR data than the other way around. After all, app platforms aren’t at the center of nearly as many overlapping data systems as a health organization or even a clinic. While they might not be starting from zero, they have less bridges to build.

And once providers have synchronized key data with app developers, they might be able to forge long-term partnerships in which each side learned from the exchange. After all, I’d submit that few app developers would turn up the chance to make their data more valuable — at least if they have bigger goals than displaying a few dots on a smartphone screen.

I realize that for many providers, doing this might be a tall order, as they can’t lose their focus on cultivating their own data. But as a patient, I’d welcome working with any provider that wanted to give this a try. I think it would be a real win-win.

AMA Urges Med Schools To Cover Health IT Basics

Posted on November 17, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Despite the nearly universal use of health IT tools in medical practice today, the majority of med students make it through their medical school experience without having much exposure to such tools. In an effort to change this, the AMA is launching a new textbook designed to give med students at least a basic exposure to critical health IT topics.

To create the textbook, the AMA collaborated with its 32-school Accelerating Change in Medical Education Consortium. The collaboration generated a new “pillar” of medical education it dubs Health Systems Science, which members concluded should be taught alongside of basic and clinical sciences. This follows a recent study by the AMA concluding that its practicing physician members are quite interested in digital health.

In addition to covering key business concepts such as value in healthcare, patient safety, quality improvement, teamwork/team science and leadership, socio-ecological determinants of health, healthcare policy and health care economics, the textbook also addresses clinical informatics and population health.  And an AMA press release notes that many schools within the Consortium will soon use the textbook with the students, including Penn State College of Medicine and Brown University’s Warren Alpert Medical School.

The Brown program, for example, which received a $1 million AMA grant to support the change in this curriculum, has created a Primary Care-Population Medicine program. The program awards graduates both a Doctor of Medicine and a Master of Science in Population Medicine. The AMA describes this program is the first of its kind in the US.

It’s interesting to see that the AMA has stepped in and funded this project, partly because it seems to have been ambivalent about key health IT tools in the past, but partly because I expect to see vendors doing something like this. Honestly, now that I think about it, I’m surprised there isn’t a Cerner grant for the most promising clinical informatics grad, say, or the eClinicalWorks prize sponsoring a student’s medical training. Maybe the schools have rules against such things.

Actually, this is a rare situation in which I think getting vendors involved might be a good idea. Of course, med students wouldn’t benefit particularly from being trained exclusively on one vendor’s interface, but I imagine schools could organize regular events in which med school students had a chance to learn about different vendors’ platforms and judge the strengths and weaknesses of each on their own.

I guess what I’m saying is that while obtaining an academic understanding of health IT tools is great, the next step is to have med students get their hands on a wide variety of health IT tools and play with them before they’re on the front lines. That being said, adding pop health any clinical informatics is a step in the right direction

Portals May Not Reduce Calls To Medical Practices

Posted on November 16, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Initially, patient portals were rolled out to give patients access to their core medical information, with the hope that a more educated patient would be more likely to take care of their health. Over time, features like appointment setting and the ability to direct-email providers were added, with some backers predicting that they would make practices more efficient. And since providers began rolling out nifty new interactive portals, anecdotes have piled up suggesting that they are delivering the goods.

However, a new study suggests that this might not be the case — or at least not always. The researchers behind the study, published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, had predicted that when patients got access to a full-featured portal, clinic staffers’ workload would be cut. But they did not achieve the results they had expected.

The researchers, who were from the Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, compared portal adoption rates and the number of telephone calls received at four clinics affiliated with a university hospital between February and June 2014.

They found that despite growing adoption rates of the portal at all four clinics, call volumes actually increased at two of the clinics, which included a commercial, community-based health center and a university-based health center. Meanwhile, call volume stayed level at the two other clinics, a rural health center and a federally-qualified health center. In other words, in no case did the volume of phone calls fall.

The researchers attempted to explain the results by noting that it might take a longer time than the study embraced for the clinics to see portals reduce their workload. Also, they suggested that while the portal didn’t seem to reduce calls, it might be offering less-concrete benefits such as increased patient satisfaction.

What’s more, they said, the study results might have been impacted by the fact that all four clinics were implementing a patient centered medical home model. They seemed to think that PCMH requirements for care coordination and quality improvement initiatives for chronic illness, routine screenings and vaccinations might have increased the complexity of the patients’ needs and encouraged them to phone in for help.

As I have noted previously, patients seldom see your portal the way you do. In that previous article, I described my largely positive — but still somewhat vexing – experience using the Epic MyChart portal as a patient. In that case, while I could access all of the data held within the health system behind the EMR pretty easily, getting the health system employees to integrate outside data was a hassle and a half.

In the case described in the study, it sounds like the portal may not have been designed with patient workflow in mind. With the practices rolling out a patient-centered medical home model, the portal would have to support patients in activities that went well beyond standard appointment setting and even email exchanges with clinicians. And presumably, it didn’t.

Bottom line, I think it’s good that this research has led to questions about whether portals actually make make medical practices more efficient. While there is plenty of anecdotal evidence suggesting that they do — so much that investing in portals still makes sense — it’s good to see questions about their benefits looked at with some rigor.

Healthcare Orgs Must Do Better With Mobile Data Security Education

Posted on November 15, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

A new study finds that while most healthcare professionals use mobile messaging at work, many aren’t sure what their organization’s mobile messaging policies are, and a large number have transmitted Protected Health Information via insecure channels. In other words, it seems that health IT leaders still have a lot of work to do in locking down these channels.

According to a report by Scrypt, 65% of health professionals who use a mobile device at work also use the same device for personal use, the standard BYOD compromise which still gives healthcare CIOs the willies. Underscoring the security risks, 52% of respondents said that they had free reign over which applications they downloaded and used at work.

To be fair, virtually all respondents (96%) use at least one security method to protect the security of their mobile device. However, their one-factor efforts — usually passcode or PIN-based — may not be secure enough to protect such sensitive data.

The research also blows the whistle on the frequency with which health professionals share PHI using a mobile messaging clients (not surprisingly given that the vendor sells a secure mobile messaging solution). It notes that just a quarter of those who reported using mobile messages use a secure client, and that one in five have sent or received PHI via mobile message with names (24%), telephone numbers (19%) and email addresses (13%) included in the content.

Researchers found that 78% of healthcare professionals use mobile messaging at work. However, few understand how their organizations expect them to use these services. Fifty-two percent of respondents who use mobile messaging said they didn’t know or weren’t sure of what their organization’s policies were on the subject.

Showing some awareness of data security vulnerabilities, 56% of the survey respondents said they believe the organization could do more to educate employees on the rules around sharing PHI and HIPAA compliance. On the other hand, it seems like most consider this to be everybody else’s problem, as 80% of respondents reported that their own knowledge of HIPAA compliance was either good or very good.

Clearly, as self-serving as the vendor’s conclusion is, they’re onto something important. Not only are CIOs facing huge challenges in establishing a smart BYOD policy, they’re confronted with a major educational problem when it comes to sharing of PHI. While the professionals on their team may have been handed a mobile policy, they may not have absorbed it. And if they haven’t been given a policy, you have to be conservative and assume they’re not doing a great job protecting data on their own.

If nothing else, healthcare organizations can remind their staff members to be careful when texting at work – heck, why not text them the reminder so it’s in context? Bottom line, even highly intelligent and educated team members can succumb to habit and transmit PHI. So a nudge never hurts!

What the Final Rule Means for Small Practices – MACRA Monday

Posted on November 14, 2016 I Written By

This guest blog post by John Squire, President and COO of Amazing Charts, is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

With the long-awaited issuance of the MACRA Final Rule earlier this month, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) tried to soften the blow for small practices in the first year of the program. Depending on the 2017 data you submit by March 31, 2018, your 2019 Medicare payments will be adjusted up, down, or not at all. This flexible timeline casts a wide net and should get everyone to participate.

Here’s a breakdown of all the options for 2017, from opt-out to maximum bonus, open to a small practice using a 2014 Certified EHR Technology (CEHRT). As you’ll see the sections get longer as we progress since each stage becomes more complex.

Be excluded from Medicare’s Quality Payment Program
In the Final Rule, CMS increased the exclusion threshold from $10,000 or less in Medicare Part B allowed charges, to $30,000 or less in billings, or seeing fewer than 100 Medicare Part B patients during the 2017 calendar year.

CMS estimates that this change will exempt approximately 30 percent of eligible clinicians from the Quality Payment Program. If you fall below the threshold, CMS will automatically exclude you. If you don’t meet the exclusion criteria, keep reading.

Do nothing… and take a penalty
Unlike previous programs such as Meaningful Use, there is no opt out for MACRA. If you don’t meet the exclusion requirement above, you are subject to downward adjustments. The Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) is the most likely option for small practices.

MIPS has a scale of 100 points. If you don’t report on any 2017 data by March 31, 2018, you’ll earn zero points and receive a four percent downward adjustment on your Medicare payments in 2019. This penalty rises over time, becoming five percent in 2020, seven percent in 2021, and nine percent in 2022!

A small minority of providers might be willing to make this financial sacrifice, but the vast majority of small practices using CEHRT are more likely to take a few simple steps to avoid the penalty.

Test out for a neutral outcome
You can avoid a downward adjustment by reporting just one quality measure, attesting to one improvement activity, or attesting to the four required Advancing Care Information (ACI) measures (formerly Meaningful Use) – for any length of time period in the calendar year of 2017. You’ll earn three points and there will be no downward adjustment to your 2019 payments.

This is a no-brainer for most small practices. If you use a 2014 Certified EHR, you’re already doing many of these activities, such as e-Prescribing, today. Belong to a Health Information Exchange? You’ve just earned your three points.

Participate for a bonus
You can earn four to 100 points for the chance of a small, moderate, or high positive adjustment to your payments in 2019. Submit at least 90 days of data on more than the minimum (i.e. on two or more quality measures, two or more improvement activities or more than the required four advancing care information measures) to earn more than three points.

Basically, the more information you submit over the longer length of time translates to more points and the more points you earn, the larger a positive adjustment on your payments will be, up to the maximum of four percent.

To earn the most possible points, (1) report for a full year on at least six quality measures (or a measure set); (2) attest to improvement activities worth 20 or 40 points (depending on the geography, size and make up of your practice); and (3) attest to all four of the required ACI measures as well as the five optional ACI measures, plus the one bonus ACI measure. Every 2014 Certified EHR technology has the functionality to support all ten ACI measures.

It could be easier than you think
CMS allows you to get a bonus for ACI when you use 2014 CEHRT to complete one of 94 eligible activities from the eight improvement activities categories. These include telehealth services, care coordination, or any kind of population health management. It could be something as simple as setting a flag for regular check-ups for your Medicare/Medicaid dual-eligible patients. A complete list can be found at this excellent CMS resource: https://qpp.cms.gov/measures/ia.

Even better news: providers participating in a patient-centered certified medical home (PCMH) will automatically receive full credit for the practice improvement category of MIPS. Similarly, providers participating in an Advanced Alternative Payment Model (APM) like an accountable care organization (ACO) will receive 50 percent of the full score for the practice improvement category.

Don’t get complacent – start today
While the agency’s idea of implementing a transition period was necessary, providers in small practices can’t get complacent. The formula for success is going to change very quickly. January 1, 2018 brings the full-year reporting requirement on the expanded measures.  The quality measures will still be required and the cost measures (previously called “resource use”) are going to dial up.  The year 2022 is only six years away, so unless the provider prepares next year, they could start facing some rather significant penalties.

About John Squire
John Squire, President and COO of Amazing Charts, has more than 27 years of high tech industry experience, 15 of them in Health IT. Before joining Amazing Charts, John was Senior Director of Alliances and Cloud Strategy for Microsoft’s U.S. Health and Life Sciences Business Unit.

Be sure to check out all of our MACRA Monday blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

E-Patient Update: Bringing mHealth To The People

Posted on November 11, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Today, it’s standard for patients to travel to a central hub of some kind, spend as much as a half hour in the lobby and fill out a few minutes of paperwork to get a maximum of 15 minutes of time with their doctor. But thankfully, we’ve come to a time when care can return to the home. And it’s time we take full advantage of that fact.

I’d argue that it’s long overdue to bring the medical visit back to patient homes, not just for those in need of chronic care, but for all patients who are less than markedly stable. If we’re not quite at the point where we can provide every standard primary care service in a home, we’re pretty close, and it should be our goal to close the gap.

Consumers want convenience
While it might not be practical to roll out the service to everyone at once, we could start with patients who are healthy, but in higher risk categories due to age or condition. My mother comes to mind. At age 74, she has a history of cardiac arrhythmia, is slightly overweight and suffers from joint problems. None of these may pose an immediate risk to her health, but they are part of the complex process of aging for her, and all that goes with it.

I believe her health would be managed better if someone saw her “in her element,” taking care of my disabled brother, rushing around cooking dinner and climbing stairs. It would also be easier for clinicians to show her health information at her kitchen table, and get her engaged with making progress. (Kitchen tables are inherently less intimidating.)

Besides, there’s the issue of travel. Often, she finds it taxing to get organized and get to medical appointments, which take place 20 minutes away at the offices of her local health system. “I wish someone would bring a van with testing devices like an x-ray machine in it, bring their tablets into my house and do the check up at home,” she says. “There’s no reason for me to do all the traveling.” And believe me, folks, if a technophobe like my mom — who won’t touch a computer — is wondering why her physicians aren’t making better use of mobile healthcare tools, you can bet other patients are.

Mobile satisfaction
If you’re a health leader reading this, you may be flinching at the idea of reorganizing your services to hit the road. But it’s worth doing, particularly now that patients are demanding mobile health access. After all, rolling out a mobile-enhanced door to door primary care service would be an unbeatable way to differentiate yourself from your competitors and enhance patient satisfaction.

I believe that whatever investments you have to make would be modest in comparison to the benefits your patients would realize. If you come to them, not only are you getting to know them better, and as a result, you’re likely to improve care quality.

Now, I understand that if you’re traveling, you probably can’t pack four patient encounters into an hour, and that is certainly a financial consideration. But I believe patients would pay more to see their very own doctor (not a stranger, as with some startups) visit them at home. More importantly, I’d argue, a reworked system that puts patients at the center of their care would eventually save money, time and lives which is where value based reimbursement is headed anyway.

FDA Under Pressure To Deliver Clinical Decision Support Guidelines

Posted on November 10, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

The world of clinical decision support technologies may change soon, as the FDA may soon be releasing guidelines on how it will regulate such technology. According to a new report in Politico, the agency has been working on such guidelines since 2011, but it’s not clear what standards it will use to establish these rules.

Software vendors in the CDS business are getting antsy. Early this year, a broad-based group known as the Clinical Decision Support Coalition made headlines when it challenged the agency to clarify the scope of CDS software it will regulate, as well as what it will require from any software that does fall under its authority.

At the time, the group released a survey which found that one-third of CDS developers were abandoning CDS product development due to uncertainty around FDA regulations. Of CDS developers that were moving ahead despite the uncertainty, the only two-thirds were seeing significant delays in development, and 20% of that group were seeing delays of greater than one year.

The delay has caught the attention of Congress, where Sens. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Michael Bennet (D-Colo.) have filed the Medical Electronic Data Technology Enhancement for Consumers’ Health Act, legislation designed to resolve open questions around CDS software, but the problem still remains.

The FDA has had a research project in place since late 2014 which is creating and evaluating a CDS system for safe and appropriate use of antibiotics. The researcher-developed system generates alerts when a provider prescribes an antibiotic that poses a risk of serious cardiac adverse events for specific patients. Two of the 26 hospitals in the Banner Health network are participating in the study, one of which will use the system and the other which will not. The results aren’t due until April of next year.

It’s hard to say what’s holding the FDA up in this case, particularly given that the agency itself has put CDS guidance on his list of priority projects. But it could be a simple case of too much work and too few staff members to get the job done. As of late last year, the agency was planning to fill three new senior health scientist positions focused on digital health, a move which could at least help it keep up with the flood of new health technologies flooding in from all sides, but how many hours can they work?

The truth is, I’d submit, that health IT may be moving too quickly for the FDA to keep up with it. While it can throw new staff members at the problem, it could be that it needs an entirely new regulatory process to deal with emerging technology such as digital health and mobile device-based tools; after all, it seems to be challenged by dealing with CDS, which is hardly a new idea.

5 Tips to Help You Create Awesome Content to Market Your Healthcare Practice

Posted on November 9, 2016 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Alex Membrillo
alex-membrillo-head-shot
While the phrase “content is king” has surely worn out its welcome, there’s no denying that one of the most effective ways to get noticed, build an audience and grow your practice is to produce high-quality content.

The “blog” is still the most thought-of content type out there, but in more recent years, healthcare practitioners are testing out new waters, such as video marketing and podcasting.

Regardless of your preferred form of content, one of the biggest struggles the busy healthcare professional encounters when trying to market his/her practice is finding ideas to talk about.

These 5 tips should help you create awesome, high-quality content that will demonstrate your expertise and expand your reach to new prospects.

1. Look no further than your calendar
Each month marks at least one – if not a handful of – observances related to the healthcare industry. October, for example, is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. November is American Diabetes Month. June 27 is National HIV Testing Day.

Each of these observances provides a foundation and direction for you to create content around. For October, for example, you could create four blog posts (scheduled once per week) that discusses a different perspective of breast cancer.  For June 27, you could create an infographic that outlines what to expect when getting tested for HIV.

The benefit of turning to your calendar for content ideas is two-fold:

  1. You can plan your content well in advance, so that you’re never left scrambling at the last minute
  2. You can take advantage of the social conversations going on in places like Twitter and Facebook (using hashtags or tagging key influencers helps immensely)

You can turn to Healthfinder.gov to get a list of the observances taking place each year.

2. Tap into the existing news trends
One thing you can always count on is that health and sciences will always be covered in the news. Whether it’s a breakthrough drug, a new form of alternative care, a controversial surgery or statistics that demonstrate a trend in human health (such as obesity), health is always on the front-page, so to speak, of news.

This is a tremendous opportunity for you to create relative, real-time content that folks are talking about at this very moment.

If, for example, Good Morning America just aired a segment on the latest development on the Zika virus, you can be certain that millions of folks will be searching online – and on social media – for terms related to Zika.

By producing your own commentary or perspective on the matter, you can win over some of this traffic and come across as an expert and influencer.

3. Find out what your audiences want to know about
The whole purpose of creating quality content is to provide something of value for folks who conduct online searches.

What better way to produce relative content people actually care about than to go straight to the source?

You can do this a few different ways:

  1. Conduct a survey on your blog or through email, asking your readers what topics they’re most concerned about or would like for you to cover. Survey Monkey is a good free tool to use.
  2. Look at the blogs and social profiles of your local and national counterparts. What are they writing about that seems to have garnered audience response?
  3. Use keyword research. If you know who your audiences are, then you can figure out what search terms they use on Google. These key terms will serve as the subject matter of your content.

4. Don’t resist the list
One of the most effective types of blog posts is the “list.”

5 Ways to Reduce Stress at Home. 10 Reasons to Lower Your Salt Intake.

These types of articles speak directly to the human mind, which likes to group and classify things. A list article tells the reader: This is what you’re going to get, nothing more, nothing less. Readers like this, because they know they’ll be able to skim the list and absorb its value without having to commit to a ton of reading.

Just by thinking in “list” form, you’ll likely come away with a few story ideas. If, for example, you’re an orthopedic surgeon, think to yourself, what would my readers want to know? Perhaps you might come away with ideas such as:

  • Five Ways Runners Can Reduce Joint Pain
  • 7 Reasons Why You Don’t Need Back Surgery
  • The 3 Exercises You Can Do at Home to Strengthen Your Bones

5. Go ahead – reuse, recycle, repurpose!
If you’ve actively been producing content, then there’s no need to reinvent the wheel each and every time. Why not go back over your existing content and figure out a way to spin it into something new?

Is there a new angle you can focus on? Hospitals, for example, could take an article that highlights one field and rewrite it to focus on another one.

Perhaps an article you wrote last year is outdated and could benefit from the inclusion of the latest study or statistics. Create that new post, and link to the original one.

Let’s say, for example, you’re a plastic surgeon who wrote a popular blog post last year about the use of Botox for patients suffering from excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis). Since then, you’ve had a few clients see remarkable benefits from this procedure. You can then update your blog post with patient testimonials and promote it again across your digital channels.

Billions of content is produced daily – getting noticed can be a challenge

As a healthcare professional, your time is already extremely limited, but you know the importance of marketing in order to grow your practice.

Use these 5 tips above to help you quickly come up with high-quality pieces of content that’ll attract your prospects and demonstrate your expertise.

About Alex Membrillo
Alex Membrillo is the CEO of Cardinal Web Solutions, an award winning healthcare marketing agency based in Atlanta, GA. His innovative approach to digital marketing has transformed the industry and delivered remarkable results to clients of all sizes and markets. Visit www.CardinalWebSolutions.com to find out more about Cardinal Web Solutions.  

Follow him on Twitter @Alex_Membrillo

Should More Doctors Think About MACRA Like Med School? – MACRA Monday

Posted on November 7, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

While at the recent MGMA Annual conference I ran into Dr. Robert Wah at the CSC Health booth. Dr. Wah has a fascinating background as the former President of the AMA and was also the first Deputy National Coordinator for Health IT back in the Brailer days before now becoming Global Chief Medical Officer at CSC. No doubt he’s seen the full evolution of healthcare IT.

During our chat, Dr. Wah expressed some concern about doctors decision to not properly prepare for MACRA. Between the Pick Your Pace options which basically mean doctors don’t have to fully participate in 2017 and the MACRA final rule being published with a comment period, many doctors have decided to just sit back and not worry about MACRA for now. Those doctors argue that they should wait until the comment period is over to see if the final rule will be changed or they just figure they’ll worry about MACRA in 2018 when they have to fully participate.

Dr. Wah explained to me that this is a dangerous strategy for doctors to employ. He then compared this strategy to medical school. Dr. Wah said that medical students realize pretty early on that they can’t just cram for a class the day before the test in medical school. If students get behind in their studies, then it’s really hard for them to catch up before the test.

Dr. Wah argues that this is what many doctors are doing with MACRA and it could lead to problems. Much like in medical school, it won’t be possible to “cram” for MACRA right before a doctor must fully participate in 2018. Instead, doctors need to use 2017 to appropriately “study” for the MACRA test that’s coming in 2018.

Thanks to Pick Your Pace, CMS have given doctors a pretty big window to make sure that they’re ready for everything that’s required with the full MACRA requirements in 2018. Those that sit on their hands in 2017 will be complaining about how hard MACRA is in 2018. Those that fully participate in 2017 will likely not worry much about the MACRA requirements in 2018.

Be sure to check out all of our MACRA Monday blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

A 2 Prong Strategy for Healthcare Security – Going Beyond Compliance

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

As if our security senses weren’t on heightened alert enough, I think all of us were hit by the recent distributed denial of service attacks that took down a number of major sites on the internet. The unique part of this attack was that it used a “botnet” of internet of things (IoT) devices. It’s amazing how creative these security attacks have become and healthcare is often the target.

The problem for healthcare is that too many organizations have spent their time and money on compliance versus security. Certainly, compliance is important (HIPAA Audits are real and expensive if you fail), but just because you’re compliant doesn’t mean you’re secure. Healthcare organizations need to move beyond compliance and make efforts to make their organizations more secure.

Here’s a 2 prong strategy that organizations should consider when it comes to securing their organization’s data and technology:

Build Enough Barriers
The first piece of every healthcare organization’s security strategy should be to ensure that you’ve created enough barriers to protect your organization’s health data. While we’ve seen an increase in targeted hacks, the most common attacks on healthcare organizations are still the hacker who randomly finds a weakness in your technology infrastructure. Once they find that weakness, they exploit it and are able to do all the damage.

The reality is that you’ll never make your health IT 100% secure. That’s impossible. However, if you create enough barriers to entry, you’ll keep out the majority of hackers that are just scouring the internet for opportunities. Building the right barriers to entry means that most hackers will move on to a more vulnerable target and leave you alone. Some of these barriers might be a high quality firewall, AI security, integrated mobile device security, user training, encryption (device and in transit), and much more.

Building these barriers has to be ingrained into your culture. You can’t just change to a secure organization overnight. It needs to be deeply embedded into everything you do as a company and all the decisions you make.

Create a Mitigation and Response Strategy
While we’d like to dream that a breach will never occur to us, hacks are becoming more a question of when and not if they will happen. This is why it’s absolutely essential that healthcare organizations create a proper mitigation and response strategy.

I recently heard about a piece of ransomware that hit a healthcare organization. In the 60 seconds from when the ransomware hit the organization, 6 devices were infected before they could mitigate any further spread. That’s incredible. Imagine if they didn’t have a mitigation strategy in place. The ransomware would have spread like wildfire across the organization. Do you have a mitigation strategy that will identify breaches so you can stop them before they spread?

Creating an appropriate response to breaches, infections, and hacks is also just as important. While no incident of this nature is fun, it is much better to be ahead of the incident versus learning about it when the news story, patient, or government organization comes to you with the information. Make sure you have a well thought out strategy on how you’ll handle a breach. They’re quickly becoming a reality for every organization.

As healthcare moves beyond compliance and focuses more on security, we’ll be much better positioned to protect patients’ data. Not only is this the right thing to do for our patients, it’s also the right thing to do for our businesses. Creating a good security plan which prevents incidents and then backing that up with a mitigation and response strategy are both great steps to ensuring your organization is prepared.

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