Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

Generation Who Doesn’t Know Paper Chart World – EHR Natives

Posted on November 13, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I loved this insight from a doctor at EMA Nation, Modernizing Medicine’s EHR user conference. When making the comment, he was talking about how many MAs in his office don’t know how to keep the clinic going in a non-EHR world (ie. the EHR is down). Obviously, that’s an example of where dependence on EHR goes too far. However, I’ve found that a great leader in a practice can easily quell and comfort these MAs (and other clinical staff) when the EHR is down or otherwise unavailable. It’s never a fun experience, but it can be managed.

While dependence on EHR has its challenges, it also illustrates where the industry is headed. Very quickly not just the MAs, but the RNs, doctors and all of your staff will be EHR natives. What’s an EHR native? It’s someone who has only practiced medicine or worked in a clinic where an EHR was present.

The number of EHR natives is still rather small, but it’s starting to grow very quickly. Soon, we won’t even be having a discussion of going back to paper charts, because a large majority of users won’t even know what it was like to practice on a paper chart. In fact, they’ll likely not even understand how someone could practice medicine on a paper chart.

This is a dramatic cultural shift that is happening right before our eyes. However, the shift is slow and gradual, so many people don’t even realize that it’s happening. While it currently is important to talk about EHR acceptance, this will be gone forever with EHR natives. Many of the paper chart culture will just disappear from healthcare.

I personally look forward to this day. That’s not to say that many of the paper chart natives can’t learn EHR as well. They can and do. Although, I know the cost of learning something new and it’s high. Trust me. I just added snapchat to my cell phone. All I longed for was to go back to SMS, Facebook, and Twitter. It’s definitely hard to teach an old dog new tricks. It’s possible, but possible doesn’t mean it’s easy.

Darth Vader Diagnosis

Posted on November 12, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The creativity of humans will never cease to amaze me. Here’s a good example from a tweet from the Exponential Medicine conference:

I think I’ve seen ZDoggMD reference some of the clinical issues of Darth Vader before as well. I’m honestly not sure what value this has to your work, but it gave me a good laugh, so I thought you might enjoy a laugh too.

Healthcare Unbound Conference in San Diego

Posted on November 11, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This December in beautiful San Diego, CA (seriously, who wouldn’t want to be in San Diego in December?), they’re holding the 11th Healthcare Unbound conference. It’s impressive for a conference to reach a second year, let alone an 11th year.

Here’s a summary of the conference and what you can expect to find if you attend:

In 2002, Forrester Research coined the term “Healthcare Unbound” to encompass the trends toward self-care, mobile care, and home care. More specifically, Forrester describes Healthcare Unbound as “technology in, on and around the body that frees care from formal institutions.”

The Healthcare Unbound Conference will focus on technology-enabled consumer engagement and behavior change. Technologies to be discussed include wearables, mHealth, remote monitoring, eHealth and social media.

Moving beyond just a “cool technology” focus, this event will offer practical approaches for healthcare stakeholders and digital health companies. The program will address the reasons that the sustained adoption of digital health technology is below expectations and what can be done to change that, showing examples of successes and also highlighting lessons learned from failures. The conference is based on the premise that technology by itself is not the solution; the solution must be a combination of process (services), technology and business model (be it all combined in one company or via a network of partners) providing the end-to-end solution.

You can see the full agenda for the event, but all you really need to know is that Vince Kuraitis, JD, MBA, Principal, Better Health Technologies, and Patricia Salber, MD, MBA, CEO, Health Tech Hatch & Founder & Host, The Doctor Weighs In are the two chair people for the event, so you can be sure you’re going to get some great content. They are both people that are deeply and personally interested in the future of healthcare IT and are both people I respect greatly. Plus, I’m interested to hear how Gregg Masters’ session on Healthcare CEOs who Tweet or Won’t goes. Sounds like an interesting session.

If you want to get the early bird registration price for the event, you’ll need to register by Nov 17, 2014. Looks like it’s going to be a great event.

Open Source Electronic Health Records: Will They Support the Clinical Data Needs of the Future? (Part 1 of 2)

Posted on November 10, 2014 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Open source software missed out on making a major advance into health care when it was bypassed during hospitals’ recent stampede toward electronic health records, triggered over the past few years by Meaningful Use incentives. Some people blame the neglect of open source alternatives on a lack of marketing (few open source projects are set up to woo non-technical adoptors), some on conservative thinking among clinicians and their administrators, and some on the readiness of the software. I decided to put aside the past and look toward the next stage of EHRs. As Meaningful Use ramps down and clinicians have to look for value in EHRs, can the open source options provide what they need?

The oncoming end of Meaningful Use payments (which never came close to covering the costs of proprietary EHRs, but nudged many hospitals and doctors to buy them) may open a new avenue to open source. Deanne Clark of DSS, which markets a VistA-based product called vxVistA, believes open source EHRs are already being discovered by institutions with tight budgets, and that as Meaningful Use reimbursements go away, open source will be even more appealing.

My question in this article, though, is whether open source EHRs will meet the sophisticated information needs of emerging medical institutions, such as Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). Shahid Shah has suggested some of the EHR requirements of ACOs. To survive in an environment of shrinking reimbursement and pay-for-value, more hospitals and clinics will have to beef up their uses of patient data, leading to some very non-traditional uses for EHRs.

EHRs will be asked to identify high-risk patients, alert physicians to recommended treatments (the core of evidence-based medicine), support more efficient use of clinical resources, contribute to population health measures, support coordinated care, and generally facilitate new relationships among caretakers and with the patient. A host of tools can be demanded by users as part of the EHR role, but I find that they reduce to two basic requirements:

  • The ability to interchange data seamlessly, a requirement for coordinated care and therefore accountable care. Developers could also hook into the data to create mobile apps that enhance the value of the EHR.

  • Support for analytics, which will support all the data-rich applications modern institutions need.

Eventually, I would also hope that EHRs accept patient-generated data, which may be stored in types and formats not recognized by existing EHRs. But the clinical application of patient-generated data is far off. Fred Trotter, a big advocate for open source software, says, “I’m dubious at best about the notion that Quantified Self data (which can be very valuable to the patients themselves) is valuable to a doctor. The data doctors want will not come from popular commercial QS devices, but from FDA-approved medical devices, which are more expensive and cumbersome.”

Some health reformers also cast doubt on the value of analytics. One developer on an open source EHR labeled the whole use of analytics to drive ACO decisions as “bull” (he actually used a stronger version of the word). He aired an opinion many clinicians hold, that good medicine comes from the old-fashioned doctor/patient relationship and giving the patient plenty of attention. In this philosophy, the doctor doesn’t need analytics to tell him or her how many patients have diabetes with complications. He or she needs the time to help the diabetic with complications keep to a treatment plan.

I find this attitude short-sighted. Analytics are proving their value now that clinicians are getting serious about using them–most notably since Medicare penalizes hospital readmissions with 30 days of discharge. Open source EHRs should be the best of breed in this area so they can compete with the better-funded but clumsy proprietary offerings, and so that they can make a lasting contribution to better health care.

The next installment of this article will look at current support for interoperability and analytics in open-source EHRs.

Burned In EHR Workflows

Posted on November 7, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the hospital CIOs at The Breakaway Group focus group at the CHIME Fall Forum talked about what he called “Burned IN EHR Workflows.” I thought the concept was really interesting and no doubt something we can all relate with. We all know when the workflows we do are finally burned into our psyche. We often call it our daily routine and we all hate when our routine is disrupted.

As I thought about this idea, I wondered at what point the EHR workflow is finally “burnt in.” There are a lot of factors that go into burning in the EHR workflow. I’d say it rarely happens during EHR training. Although, with the right EHR training it could be the case. The key question is how well your EHR training emulates the actually environment and workflow of the user. Are you just training them on the EHR software or are you training them on the EHR workflow with the new EHR software? I always did the later and found it so much more effective.

As another CIO at CHIME said, “Users don’t want to know the 10 ways to do the same thing. They want to know the single most effective way to do it.” Of course, figuring out the most effective way to do something is the hard part and why so many EHR trainings fall short.

The good thing about burnt in EHR workflows is that if you’ve implemented a great workflow, then it’s great. The problem is that we often burn in sub optimal EHR workflows. I had this happen to me all the time. I’d ask one of my EHR users why they did something a certain way when it would be so much easier to do it another way. It was just the way the EHR workflow was burnt in.

Changing that already burned in EHR workflow is really hard. Although, it’s not impossible and is often necessary. You just have to burn in a new workflow. However, it also often requires an explanation of why the new workflow is better. Good luck changing someone’s workflow when they liked the old workflow. You better have a good reason or they’re unlikely to change.

Meaningful Use Audits and the Inconsistent Appeals Process

Posted on November 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you haven’t had the pleasure of a meaningful use audit yet, consider yourself lucky. They are not pretty, but I’ve never met anyone who actually enjoys an audit. Turns out that meaningful use appeals are even worse than most audits. It’s likely because the meaningful use appeals process are so new and they haven’t figured out their processes. However, if you’re a clinic on the wrong side of a new process, that’s not much consolation.

Meaningful Use expert, Jim Tate, has a fascinating look into the inconsistency of meaningful use appeals. Here’s one story he shares that will kind of blow your mind (or at least annoy and scare you).

“Two Set of Rules”: You are not going to believe this one, but it is true. I was contacted last week by a large practice. Two of their physicians had failed audits. Both appealed and won with the statement from CMS: “This is the final determination notice regarding your recent appeal….Based on our review of your Appeal Filing Request, supporting documentation and the Program policies, we have accepted the documentation your provided to support your appeal. Therefore, CMS upholds your appeal.” Sounds great, doesn’t it? However, two months later they received this from CMS: “CMS has reopened the review of your appeal and supporting documentation along with others from your practice. The documentation provided….is unsufficient to support the appeal and CMS is reversing….the decision to uphold your appeal. As a result, the final CMS decision denies your appeal and upholds the adverse audit finding. This decision is not subject to further appeal.” Is it just me or it this a little bit on the crazy side? They received from CMS a “final determination” that their appeal was upheld and then two months were told the “final determination” was being undone, the appeal would now be denied and “this decision is not subject to further appeal.” Both of the letters were signed by the same CMS official. Is it just me or do we need a little sunlight on the inner workings of this process?

Jim is right that there should be a clear process for meaningful use audits and appeals. It’s interesting that Jim tried to go to DC to visit with CMS about the process. Unfortunately, his request was denied. There’s nothing worse than hitting a dead end and people aren’t willing to listen.

Hopefully CMS will hear this story and act. It’s not fair to any organization to get stuck in a bad process.

Cracking Open the Shell on the Personal Health Record

Posted on November 5, 2014 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

The concept of maintaining your own health data enjoyed a brief flurry of activity a few years ago with Google Health (now defunct) and Microsoft HealthVault (still active but not popular). It has gotten a second chance with Apple HealthKit, Google Fit, and other corporate offerings explicitly tied in with the convenience of mobile devices. Microsoft itself has galvanized HealthVault with a Microsoft Health initiative similar to Apple’s HealthKit. Recently I’ve been talking to health care reformers about the business and political prospects for personal health records (PHRs).

Patient access to data was enshrined as a right back when HIPAA was passed and is still championed by the US government through Meaningful Use (whose Stage 3 may well focus on it) and other initiatives, and has been endorsed by the industry as well. But this requirement won’t be satisfied by the limited patient portals that hospitals and clinics are hanging out on the Web. Their limitations include:

  • Many provide only viewing data, not downloading or transmitting it (all of these are mandated by Meaningful Use).
  • Data maintained by providers can’t easily be combined into a holistic, comprehensive view, which is what providers need to provide good care.
  • Data on portals is usually a thin sliver of all the data in the record: perhaps prescriptions, appointments, and a few other bare facts without the rich notes maintained by clinicians.
  • You can’t correct errors in your own data through a portal.
  • Clinicians rarely accept data that you want to put in the record, whether personal observations or output from fitness devices and other technical enhancements.

All these problems could be solved by flexible and well-designed personal health records. But how does the health care field navigate the wrenching transition to giving people full control over their own data?

Dr. Adrian Gropper has investigated PHRs for years and even considered building a simple device to store and serve individual’s health data. Now he says, “I can’t recall any physician in my medical society that has ever said they wished their patient had a PHR. Nor do I, after many years on the Society for Participatory Medicine list, ever recall a patient praising the role of their PHR in their care. Today’s PHRs are clinically irrelevant.”

This is not a condemnation of PHRs, but of the environment in which vendors try to deploy them. Many health reformers feel that several aspects of this care environment must evolve for PHRs to be accepted:

  • PHR data must become appealing to doctors. This means that device manufacturers (and perhaps patients themselves) must demonstrate that the data is accurate. Doctors have to recognize value in receiving at least summaries and alerts. Many benefits can also accrue from collecting vital statistics, behavioral data, and other aspects of patients’ daily lives.
  • The doctor’s EHR must seamlessly provide data to the patient, and (we hope) seamlessly accept data from the patient–data that the doctor acts on. Currently, most manufacturers store the data on their own sites and offer access through APIs. Another programming step is required to get the data into the PHR or the doctor’s EHR.
  • Clinicians have to agree on how to mark and collect the provenance of data. “Provenance” deals with assertions such as, “this data was generated by a Fitbit on October 10, 2014″ or “this diagnosis was challenged by the patient and changed on August 13, 2010.”
  • Add-on services must make the data interesting and usable to both patients and physicians. For instance, such apps can alert the patient, clinician, or family members when something seems wrong, let them visualize data taken from the PHR and EHR over time, get useful advice by comparing their data to insights from research, and track progress toward the goals they choose.

“A critical force in increasing consumer engagement in digital health is the development of compelling, easy to use tools that make it simple to collect, understand and use health information to reach the goals consumers define for themselves, whether that’s managing a chronic condition, saving money, or fitting into their ‘skinny jeans’,” writes Lygeia Ricciardi, former director of the Office of Consumer e-Health at the ONC. “In an age of ‘one click purchasing,’ it must become incredibly easy for patients to access and share their own health information digitally–if it’s too complex or time consuming, most people probably won’t do it.”

In addition to sheer inertia, a number of disincentives keep PHRs from congealing.

  • Many doctors are afraid of letting patients see clinical notes, either because the patient will ask too many questions or will be upset by the content.
  • Hospitals and clinics want control over records so that patients will return to them for future treatment.
  • Marketing firms live off of rich data lodes on our health data.
  • Other organizations with dubious goals, commercial and governmental, want to track us so they can deny us insurance or control our lives in other ways.

Wait–what about the patients themselves? Why haven’t they risen up over the past several years to demand control over their data? Well, maintaining your health data is intimidating. The data is highly detailed and full of arcane medical concepts and terminology. Most patients don’t care until they really need to–and then they’re too sick and disabled to form an effective movement for patient control.

Still, several leaders in health care believe that a viable business model can be built on PHRs. The spark of hope comes from the success of apps that make people pay for privacy, notably SnapChat and Whatsapp. Although some sloppy privacy practicies render these services imperfect, their widespread use demonstrates that people care about protecting their personal data.

Private storage can be offered both in the cloud and by personal devices, using standardized services such as Direct and Blue Button. These will start out as high-end services for people who are affluent and have particular concerns about storing their own data and choosing how it is shared. It will then become commoditized and come down in price.

What about people who can’t afford even the modest prices for cloud storage? They can turn patient data into a civil rights issue. There’s a potent argument that everyone has the right to determine who can get access to their health data, and a right to have data generated during their daily lives taken into account by doctors.

We don’t need one big central service–that’s insecure and subject to breaches. Multiple services and distributed storage reduce security risks.

We’ll see change when a substantial group of people start to refuse to fill out those convoluted forms handed to them as them enter a clinic, saying instead, “Get it from my web site before you treat me.” Before that protest begins, there’s a lot of work in store for technologists and businesses to offer patients a usable record system open to the wide range of data now available for health.

Microsoft Joins Battle for Wearables Market

Posted on November 4, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Following the lead of several other companies big and small, Microsoft has jumped into the wearables healthcare market with a watch, a fitness tracker and a cloud-based platform that condenses and shares data.

It’s little wonder. After a few years of uncertainty, it seems pretty clear that the wearables market is taking off like a rocket. In fact, 21% of US consumers own such a device, according to research by PricewaterhouseCoopers. That’s slightly higher that the number of consumers who bought tablets during the first two years after they launched, PwC reports. Not only Microsoft, but Apple and Samsung, as well as smaller players with a high profile — such as Fitbit — are poised to take the sector by storm.

Microsoft’s new entry is called Microsoft Health, a platform letting users store health and fitness data. The date in question is collected by a Microsoft Health app, available on Android, iOS and Windows Phone. The platform also gathers data generated from the Microsoft Band, a smart and designed to work with Microsoft’s new platform.

The idea behind pulling all of this data into a single platform is to integrate data from different devices and services in a smart way that allows consumers to generate insights into their health. The next step for Microsoft Health, execs say, is to connect all of that data in the platform to the tech giant’s HealthVault, a Web-based PHR, making it easier for people to share data with their healthcare providers.

Other tech giants are making their own wearables plays, of course. Google, for example, has released Google Fit, a fitness-based app designed to help users track physical activity. Google’s approach is  Android smart phones, relying on sensors built into the smart phones to detect if the user is walking, running or biking. Users can also connect to devices and apps like Noom Coach and Withings.

Apple, for its part, has launched HealthKit, its competing platform for collecting data from various health and fitness apps.  The data can then be accessed easily by Apple users through the company’s Health app (which comes installed on the iPhone 6.) HealthKit is designed to send data directly to hospital and doctor charts as well. It also plans to launch a smart watch early next year.

While there’s little doubt consumers are interested in the wearables themselves, it’s still not clear how enthusiastic they are about pulling all of their activity onto a single platform. Providers might be more excited about taming this gusher of data, which has proved pretty intimidating to doctors already overwhelmed with standard EMR information, but it remains to be seen whether they’ll find fitness information to be helpful.

All told, it looks like there will be a rollicking battle for the hearts and minds of wearables consumers, as well as the loyalty of providers.  As for me, I think it will be a year or two, at minimum, before we get a real sense of what consumers and providers really want from these devices.

The Financial Need for Quality Improvement in Healthcare Infographic

Posted on November 3, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently received a well done infographic on the negative financial impact of poor quality healthcare on the health system. The infographic was created by Caradigm, a population health company. I think you’ll find some interesting insights in the benefits of quality healthcare in this infographic.
Need for Quality Improvement in Healthcare

Data Sources:
GE Healthcare. “Clinical Decision Support Decision: Defining our Problem Statement. 2011.
The Advisory Board. 2008. based on Kleven, RM. “Estimating Health Care-Associated Infections and Deaths in U.S. Hospitals 2002.” 2007.
The Advisory Board. “The Tip of the Iceberg: Adverse Events are Costing You More than Ever.” 2011.
GE Reports. “The Unknown Killer: Healthcare Associated Infections.” 2011. http://www.gereports.com/the-unknown-killer-healthcare-associated-illnesses/
NEMJ “Care in US Hospitals” July 2005.
HealthAffairs. Reducing Waste in Health Care. December 2012. http://www.healthaffairs.org/healthpolicybriefs/brief.php?brief_id=82
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, “National Patient Safety Initiative: Saving Lives Saving Money,”

Karen DeSalvo Remains as National Coordinator of ONC Along with New Position

Posted on October 31, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In case you missed it, last week it was announced that Karen DeSalvo had been appointed Assistant Secretary of Health focused on Ebola by HHS Secretary Burwell. In that same announcement Jacob Reider also announced his departure from ONC.

While the news was true that DeSalvo was taking on a new role at HHS as Assistant Secretary of Health, ONC also published a blog post that DeSalvo would stay on as National Coordinator of Health IT as well:

Dr. DeSalvo will serve as Acting ASH while maintaining her leadership of ONC. Importantly, she will continue to work on high level policy issues at ONC, and ONC will follow the policy direction that she has set. She will remain the chair of the Health IT Policy Committee; she will continue to lead on the development and finalization of the Interoperability Roadmap; and she will remain involved in meaningful use policymaking. She will also continue to co-chair the HHS cross-departmental work on delivery system reform.

Lisa Lewis will provide day to day leadership at ONC. Lewis served as Acting Principal Deputy National Coordinator before Dr. DeSalvo joined ONC, so she has had experience with all parts of our work. She will lead our extremely talented and very strong team during Dr. DeSalvo’s deployment to the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health.

But most importantly, the team that is ONC is far more than one or two leaders. The team of ONC is personified in each and every individual – all part of a steady ship and a strong and important part of HHS’ path toward delivery system reform and overall health improvement.

Seems like an awkward arrangement if you ask me. DeSalvo will be providing high level leadership on policy direction, but Lisa Lewis will handle the day to day leadership. That job description for DeSalvo sounds like something an Assistant Secretary of Health might do and Lisa Lewis’ job sounds like something the National Coordinator would do.

I’m sure there’s more to this story. Maybe moving DeSalvo to Assistant Secretary was a way for ONC to save money and keep DeSalvo on board working on healthcare IT. If ONC’s budget gets cut, then HHS still has a way to pay for DeSalvo. Maybe that’s why Lisa Lewis can’t be promoted to full National Coordinator. Then again, maybe it’s like I mentioned when we first heard the DeSalvo news, DeSalvo is more of a public health person than she is a healthcare IT person.

The fact that DeSalvo is remaining as National Coordinator is interesting. However, I just came back from CHIME (healthcare CIO conference) where DeSalvo was scheduled as one of the plenary session speakers. However, she didn’t show and so the whole session was cancelled. I guess you could make the case that she’s got Ebola to deal with right now, but it also illustrates how health IT will be playing second fiddle for her going forward. Likely says something about the future of ONC.