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Facebook in Healthcare

Posted on October 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A story on Reuters reported late last week that Facebook is making an entry into the healthcare space. Here’s an excerpt from the article about Facebook’s plans for healthcare:

The company is exploring creating online “support communities” that would connect Facebook users suffering from various ailments. A small team is also considering new “preventative care” applications that would help people improve their lifestyles.

In recent months, the sources said, the social networking giant has been holding meetings with medical industry experts and entrepreneurs, and is setting up a research and development unit to test new health apps. Facebook is still in the idea-gathering stage, the people said.

This move is especially interesting when paired with the announcements of Apple Health, Samsung Health, and Google Fit (and a few other Google health initiatives like Calico). It’s not the first time that big corporations have seen an opportunity in healthcare (See Microsoft HealthVault and Google Health). However, we have yet to see any of these big corporations really make a dent on healthcare.

The reality for many of these large corporations is that they don’t realize the crazy complexities that exist in healthcare. Many like to site the healthcare privacy argument as a reason for their failure. No doubt, HIPAA and privacy are a challenge for these organizations. In fact, I can already hear the outcry of people talking about Facebook and privacy of their health data. Many don’t trust Facebook with privacy and with good reason. However, privacy is the least of the reasons why these big corporations have a challenge entering the healthcare space.

Remember that healthcare is a complex beast with the largest customer being the government (ie. Medicare and Medicaid). Healthcare is not a rational market. The government, employer owned health insurance, health insurance plans, etc etc etc all make healthcare extremely complex to navigate full of perverse incentives. Plus, how do you do an ROI on the value of saving someone’s life?

While I’m skeptical of any large corporation entering healthcare, I’m actually quite interested in what Facebook could do to help healthcare. No doubt, a lot of healthcare already exists on Facebook.

Just a few weeks ago I was running up an escalator to catch a flight and sliced my big toe from top to bottom (you should see the pics). Luckily TSA was really helpful and I made my flight. Once I got home, I assessed the damage and wasn’t sure if I should go get sutures or not. I turned to Facebook where I posted a picture of my toe and tagged a few of my doctor friends. Long story short, my doctor friends told me I should go to the doctor and quickly, because if I waited until the next day they wouldn’t be able to suture it.

This is a small example, but Facebook was really effective for me. In fact, I posted a follow up picture a few days later (you know how men always like to show off their scars) and a doctor friend told me it was healing well. Of course, many might say that it was a small flesh wound and so that’s not as big a deal to post on Facebook. Would I post me health details if I had some chronic condition?

The interesting thing is that chronic patients are more than happy to give up all privacy in search of a cure. Unfortunately, they have nothing to lose and everything to gain. It’s part of the reason why Patients Like Me has been so successful. Plus, Patients Like Me has proved that we want to take part in online support communities for our conditions.

We’ll see if Facebook can really execute on online support communities like they have on Patients Like Me. It will be a real challenge for them because it’s not the focus of the company. However, they’re obviously well connected to a lot of people that could and would benefit from these types of healthcare communities. No doubt many people on Facebook don’t visit or even know about sites like Patients Like Me.

I’ll be interested to see what Facebook does in this space. I think they’d be smart to roll it off into a separate product that focuses on things like privacy and security. Being tied to the Facebook brand is a huge liability in this case. Plus, the value of Facebook to a Facebook created healthcare community is not in the Facebook brand, but in the Facebook audience and reach.

Besides creating various healthcare communities similar to Patients Like Me, I think Facebook has a huge opportunity to use social pressure to influence healthcare decisions. Changing behavior is an extremely hard thing to accomplish. However, never underestimate the power of positive peer pressure. Peer pressure can be one of the most powerful ways to change people’s behavior. Unfortunately, it works for good and bad. Facebook has all of your peers mapped to you. Can Facebook use that to help you become healthier? If they can, they’ll be on to something.

What do you think of Facebook possibly entering healthcare?

Health IT Thought Leadership

Posted on October 3, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the big trends I see happening in the Health IT world is that every company wants to be a thought leader in the industry. It’s a powerful thing to provide thought leadership to your potential customers. It can also be an extremely challenging thing for an organization to sell that type of investment to their executive leadership team.

With that in mind, we’ve been working on some really compelling thought leadership marketing packages for health IT companies. It’s literally a fully integrated marketing package which integrates with our existing readership, email marketing, social media mentions (Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Google Plus, etc), and ongoing traffic from search engines and related posts. Plus, you can use that thought leadership content in your own marketing efforts.

You can see some of the companies who’ve been sponsoring content on our network of Healthcare IT blogs. Barry Haitoff from Medical Management Corporation of America has been doing a series of posts focused on ways ambulatory practices can improve revenue. The Breakaway Group has sponsored a series of posts called Breakaway Thinking which focuses on ways to really improve what we’re doing in healthcare and break away from the competition. Vishal Gandhi from ClinicSpectrum has done an amazing job with the Cost Effective Healthcare Workflow Series. I love the way Vishal merges both technology and people into the optimal workflow.

I love the win win that these sponsored series provide. They allow us to keep the lights on here at Healthcare Scene, while still meeting our primary goal of providing value to the readers. We’d love for you to Contact Us if you’re interested in sponsoring your own series of blog posts.

Along with the sponsored series, we’re also extremely grateful for the various advertisers that have supported the site as well. Here are a few of the advertisers that have renewed their ad recently. Take a look at them and see if one of them could help you in your job.

Ambir (Advertiser since 1/2010) – I appreciate Ambir since they’ve been a sponsor for so long. I have one of their scanners on my desk and it’s worked great for me. Plus, they’re working on some really interesting workflow iPad applications that are really exciting too. Check them out to see what they’re working on.

Digital Health Conference (Advertiser since 7/2011) – This is the 4th year the Digital Health Conference, organized by NYeC, has advertised with us to promote there event in November. I’ll be at the event (see my full Fall HIT Conference schedule), so let me know if you plan to attend. Plus, you can get 20% off your registration if you use the discount code: HCS. Hopefully I’ll get to see many of you readers at the event.

Cerner (Advertiser since 9/2011) – Another great long term supporter of the site. Cerner Ambulatory EHR really needs no introduction. If you’re looking for an EHR, check them out. Their iPad application still had the coolest EHR iPad application feature I’ve seen: one swipe prescription refill.

gMed (Advertiser since 8/2013) – I had a really great chance this summer to get to know gMed on a much deeper level when they invited me to give the Keynote on the future of EHR at their EHR user conference. They certainly do make a compelling case for their Gastro specific EHR software. There are things they do because they’re specialty specific that you’ll really never see from a general EHR vendor.

Modernizing Medicine (Advertiser since 1/2014) – This is another specialty specific EHR vendor that takes a really unique approach to how you document a visit. If they are in your specialty (Dermatology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, Plastic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Gastroenterology, Urology, Rheumatology, Cosmetics), be sure to get a demo and see what makes them unique. I’ve also been invited to speak at their EHR user conference in November.

Finally thanks to the 3.6 million times this website’s been loaded by a reader and the 2166 people who subscribed to EMR and EHR and read the almost daily emails. To those who haven’t yet subscribed, here’s a link to subscribe to all the Healthcare Scene blogs you find interesting. It’s really hard to believe that we’re well over 5 years and 1,344 blog posts into this journey and in some ways it feels like we’re just getting started.

Physician Bandwidth is Tapped Out

Posted on October 2, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I look at the healthcare industry, I run into a lot of doctors that are totally fed up with the healthcare system and where it’s headed. They’ve basically reached a point where they’ve run out of bandwidth and many are ready to tap out.

I’d be less concerned with this trend if I didn’t see it across the whole spectrum of doctors. The older doctors are crying for the “good ole days” when it was fun for them to practice medicine. The middle aged doctors are trying to figure out if they have enough time to make a bunch of career changes or if they need to grind it out until retirement. The new doctors enter the workforce not realizing how screwed up the business of medicine has become. No doubt, every new doctor since the start of time has been blown away by the business of medicine, but never to the extent that we see today.

A lot of people like to point to EHR software as the real problem with physician dissatisfaction. I’ve seen some of the EHR implementations out there, and there is plenty for them to complain about when it comes to EHR. However, I think far too often the EHR takes the blame for all the other healthcare regulations that it’s required to implement. The EHR is just the messenger and it’s much easier to blame the messenger.

Think about some of the insane reimbursement requirements that exist in healthcare. Is the EHR the reason that these are so terrible. No. In fact, if the EHR didn’t have to worry about reimbursement, it would make for a much simpler workflow. HIPAA is another example. While I think HIPAA is often inappropriately used as an excuse for an organization not to do something, it does add some overhead to the work a doctor does.

Of course, we can’t talk about this without bringing up the overhead that meaningful use adds to an EHR system. Yesterday I commented that it was meaningful use that has required so much more physician time. That’s not the EHR’s fault.

Layer in things like medical malpractice risk, changing patient populations, etc etc etc to everything listed above and it’s a really trying time for a doctor practicing medicine. The single best thing we could do to change this situation would be to simplify healthcare. Unfortunately, I see almost nothing out there that’s heading this direction. In fact, I see the potential for it to get even more complex (see ACOs).

Has EHR software and the move away from paper to digital charts caused some physician stress? Absolutely! Is it the only reason physician bandwith’s tapped out? Definitely not. Props to all the physicians out there that are grinding through this mess and still provide amazing patient care. Knowing how many great physicians there are out there gives me some hope that we’ll find ways to improve the situation.

Poorly Done Report that Physicians Lose 48 minutes a Day to EHR

Posted on October 1, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

There’s been a study that’s been pandered around making the assertion that Physicians lose 48 minutes a day to EHR. This story in Medical Economics is just one example of many. A comment on that story from Dr. Rah describes generally my feelings about the study:

I find it disappointing that such drivel is even reported. #1. A 2012 survey! Data is > 2 yrs old. #2. 411 respondents is a very small N; hardly significant in that there are at least a million users now of EMRs. #3. You can do better–why report such meaningless info??

Of course, this only begins to describe the flaws in this study. First, they were just asking physicians for their perceived views on how long something took with the EHR as opposed to actual time. As humans, we’re really bad at judging the amount of time that’s passed. Not to mention that many of the respondents were trainees who had no history with which to compare. I could go on and on, but I’ll stop there.

I’m not arguing whether EHR saves doctors time or whether it takes more time. I’ve seen places where both sides of the coin have occurred. So, I think that you could write an article that EHR saves doctors time and another article that talks about how EHR takes more time. You can find both experiences out there. There are hundreds of factors at play that influence the answer to this question.

One thing I don’t think anyone would disagree with is that meaningful use has required a lot more time from doctors. So, when you layer on a new EHR with the meaningful use requirements, then you’re probably going to be spending more time documenting in the EHR. Although, is that the EHR’s fault or meaningful use?

It would be nice for someone to do a high quality study on EHRs and the time a doctor spends. However, when you think about the factors that could influence the time spent: EHR software, specialty, location, tech skill of doctor, meaningful use, not meaningful use, etc etc etc, you can see why we haven’t seen a proper study on the impact of EHR on efficiency. There are too many variations for which you’d have to test.

Which Comes First in Accountable Care: Data or Patients?

Posted on September 30, 2014 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

The headlines are stark and accusatory. “ACOs’ health IT capabilities remain rudimentary.” “ACOs held back by poor interoperability.” But a recent 19-page survey released by the eHealth Initiative tells two stories about Accountable Care Organizations–and I find the story about interoperability less compelling than another one that focuses on patient empowerment.
Read more..

Which Parts of an EHR Implementation Should Be Their Own Project?

Posted on September 29, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A really great discussion has been started on this post about staged patient portal implementations. Here’s one comment that really struck a chord with me:

I think that on a lot of strategic roadmaps “patient portal” is listed as a goal…a one time deadline without understanding how the patient portal works; what information flows into a fully functioning portal and to the patient; and what the system, risk, and security requirements are to consider.

This will require C level suite and decision makers to ask questions that might be getting them “into the weeds” a bit or questions that they may not know to ask. This is why a several strong consultants that are specialists in individual subject matter might be needed – instead of one project manager expected to move the project plan forward on the road map and to know everything.

This comment is right that the patient portal is often seen as a line item on a project plan that just needs to be completed. That couldn’t be farther from the truth. As one person said, sometimes you can get a grand slam, but most of the time you have to do a bunch of little things along the way. A patient portal is a great example of this. You don’t just implement a patient portal one time and then it will run forever. There’s more you can do to leverage a patient portal for your institution.

Are there other parts of an EHR implementation that exhibit similar characteristics? Maybe you implement them, but there’s always more that could be done to improve its use in your organization? Templates and workflow are one that come to mind. There should be an ongoing evaluation of your templates and workflow in order to ensure that it’s as optimized as possible.

What other pieces of your EHR project could benefit from a separate staged project plan? Of course, this assumes you’re starting to think more strategically than just trying to check off the MU check boxes.

ACO by ACO Savings and Payments Report

Posted on September 26, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of my favorite former CMS people, Travis Broome, recently shared a link to the ACO Savings and payment report. It provides an interesting view into the year 1 results of the Medicare Shared Savings Program (Medicare ACO program if you prefer).

It’s interesting to see which ACOs and other organizations got paid, but probably even more interesting to see ones that didn’t get paid at all. My guess is that many of them dropped out. If I’m reading the report properly, I could only find one organization that incurred a loss. It seems that Dean Clinic and St. Mary’s Hospital ACO in Wisconsin owes $3.96 million. Looks like they took the high risk-high reward option and lost. I’d love to talk to someone from that organization and hear what happened.

Travis Broome offered a number of other insights into the ACO report:

What do you think of the ACO program? I think it’s a bad sign that so many organizations fell out of the program. However, the trend and move towards this reimbursement is going to happen. I really don’t see how it could stop.

What Would You Do If your EHR Vendor Shut Off Access to Your EHR?

Posted on September 25, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Anne Zieger at Healthcare Dive has an interesting summary of a practice who just had their EHR access shutdown by an EHR vendor. Here’s the summary of what happened:

*A small medical practice in northern Maine has been blocked from accessing patient medical records because its EMR vendor has shut them off.
*Vendor CompuGroup says the practice, Full Circle Health Care, won’t get access to its records back until it pays $20,000 in overdue charges to the vendor.
*The medical group acknowledges that it stopped paying CompuGroup $2,000 per month in monthly fees 10 months before the July shut off, but said that was after months of attempting to address what the practice considered to be exorbitant, unexpected maintenance fees and charges for hardware that didn’t arrive.

This is a really challenging situation. No doubt the vendor wants to make sure it gets paid and needs some sort of recourse. Although, if you’ve ever had an EHR on which you relied, you know how important it can be to the care you provide. Just ask anyone who has had their EHR go down. Unless you have great EHR downtime procedures it can get a little crazy. Now just imagine that your EHR was taken down with no sign of when it will be back up.

Of course, we’re a little short on the exact details of what happened with Full Circle Health Care and CompuGroup. I’d love to know how many warnings CompuGroup gave Full Circle Health Care before they turned it off. If they gave them the right number of warnings over a certain period, then I don’t begrudge them for making the decision they made. If they just pulled the plug without very specific warnings about what was going to happen, then CompuGroup should get some of the blame.

This would make for an interesting court case. I imagine there’s previous case law from other industries that would illustrate what would happen. Although, in healthcare we’re not just talking about lost business and financial impact. Turning off someone’s EHR could literally kill someone. That’s pretty scary to consider.

I’m surprised that CompuGroup hasn’t gotten ahead of the story. That’s what I’d want to do if I were in their shoes. Unless the facts don’t put CompuGroup in a very nice light. However, it’s hard to put them in a worse light than they already are in with the story above.

Do you think it’s ok for an EHR vendor to turn off someone’s EHR if they stop paying? Should there be laws that say that an EHR vendor can’t do that? What would you do if you were in this practice’s situation?

For me this is really hard to think about, because if I were at that practice I would never let it get to this point. I’ve heard of a few cases where EHR vendors have become a black hole of unresponsiveness. However, that’s really rare and usually only happens when other really major and scarier things are happening at the company.

Jonathan Bush Loves Health Data–But How Will We Get As Much As He Wants?

Posted on September 24, 2014 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://radar.oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

The fervent hope of health care reformers is that someday we will each know as much about our bodies–our vital signs, the health of our organs, the contents of our genomes-as corporations know about our marketing habits. One of the recent expressions of this dream comes in Jonathan Bush’s engaging and readable account of the healthcare system, Where Does It Hurt?.

Bush is a tireless advocate for bottom-up, disruptive forces in healthcare, somewhat in the same camp as Vinod Khosla (whose Health Datapalooza keynote I covered) and Clayton Christensen (who wrote the forward to Bush’s book). What Bush brings to the discussion is hands-on experience at confronting the healthcare behemoth in an explicitly disruptive way (which failed) as well as fitting into the system while providing a bit more light by building athenahealth (which succeeded).

Bush’s book tours the wreckage of the conventional health care system–the waste, errors, lack of communication, and neglect of chronic conditions that readers of this blog know about–as well as some of the promising companies or non-profits that offer a way forward. His own prescription for the health care system rests on two main themes: the removal of regulations that prevent the emergence of a true market, and the use of massive data collection (on physicians and patients alike) to drive a rational approach to health care.

Both government and insurers would have a much smaller role in Bush’s ideal health care system. He recognizes that catastrophic conditions should be covered for all members of society, and that the industry will need (as all industries do) a certain minimum of regulation. (Bush even admitted that he “whined” to the ONC about the refusal of a competitor to allow data exchange.) But he wants government and insurers to leave a wide open field for the wild, new ideas of clinicians, entrepreneurs, and software developers.

Besides good old-fashioned human ingenuity, the active ingredient in this mix is data–good data (not what we have now), and lots of it. Bush’s own first healthcare business failed, as he explains, through lack of data along with the inconsistency of insurance payments. A concern for data runs through this book, and motivates his own entrance into the electronic health records market.

What’s missing from the Where Does It Hurt?, I think, is the importance of getting things in the right order: we can’t have engaged patients making free choices until an enormous infrastructure of data falls into place. I have looked at the dependencies between different aspects of health IT in my report, The Information Technology Fix for Health: Barriers and Pathways to the Use of Information Technology for Better Health Care. Let’s look at some details.

Bush wants patients to have choice–but there’s already a lot of choice in where they get surgery or other procedures performed. As he points out, some of the recent regulations (such as accountable care organizations) and trends in consolidations go in the wrong direction, removing much of this choice. (I have also written recently about limited networks.) One of Bush’s interesting suggestions is that hospitals learn to specialize and pay to fly patients long distances for procedures, a massive extension of the “medical tourism” affluent people sometimes engage in.

But even if we have full choice, we won’t be able to decide where to go unless quality measures are rigorously collected, analyzed, and published. Funny thing–quality measures are some of the major requirements for Meaningful Use, and the very things that health IT people complain about. What I hear over and over is that the ONC should have focused laser-like on interoperability and forgone supposedly minor quests like collecting quality measurements.

Well, turns out we’ll need these quality measures if we want a free market in health care. Can the industry collect these measures without being strong-armed by government? I don’t see how.

If I want a space heater, I can look in the latest Consumer Reports and see two dozen options rated for room heating, spot heating, fire safety, and many other characteristics. But comparable statistics aren’t so easy to generate in health care. Seeing what a mess the industry has made of basic reporting and data sharing in the data that matters most–patient encounters–we can’t wait for providers to give us decent quality measures.

There’s a lot more data we need besides provider data. Bush goes into some detail about the Khosla-like vision of patients collecting and sharing huge amounts of information in the search for new cures. Sites such as PatientsLikeMe suggest a disruptive movement that bypasses the conventional health care system, but most people are not going to bother collecting the data until they can use it in clinical settings.

And here we have the typical vicious cycle of inertia in health care: patients don’t collect data because their doctors won’t use it, doctors say they can’t even accept the data because their EHRs don’t have a place for it, and EHR vendors don’t make a place for it because there’s no demand. Stage 3 of Meaningful Use tries to mandate the inclusion of patient data in records, but the tremendous backward tug of industry resistance saps hope from the implementation of this stage.

So I like Bush’s vision, but have to ask: how will we get there? athenahealth seems to be doing its part to help. New developments such as Apple’s HealthKit may help as well. Perhaps Where Does It Hurt? can help forward-thinking vendors, doctors, health information exchanges, entrepreneurs, and ordinary people pull together into a movement to make a functioning system out of the pieces lying around the landscape.

Celebrating Simple Solutions

Posted on September 23, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Yesterday I had a chance to tour the beautiful Samford Health facility in Fargo, ND. What a thoughtful patient design and use of tracking technology. Plus their Disney like approach to front of house and back of house was fascinating. I recommend the tour if you’re ever in the area.

However, there was a really simple extra chair solution that caught my eye:
image

You often need an extra chair in the room. What a great little implementation that saves the space when you don’t need the chair, but it’s there when you need it. I love simple little design solutions.