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Government Involvement in Healthcare IT – How Meaningful Use Went Wrong

Posted on June 15, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I have about 150 draft blog posts on EMR and EHR. Most of them are ideas for future posts. Unfortunately, I get so many new ideas, a lot of the drafts remain draft blog posts for long periods of time. I probably should create a better process for tracking my blog post ideas, but this was worked so far. Plus, it’s fun to go back and see what past ideas I had for posts and then think about how things have changed or whether that insight has stood the test of time.

This post is an example of that and the draft blog post contained a tweet that Greg Meyer shared during a #HITsm Twitter chat back in December 2014. Here’s the tweet:

No doubt Greg’s tweet resonated with me back in 2014 and still resonates with me today. In meaningful use, the government got way too deep into the how and caused all sorts of unintended consequences. We’d be in a much better position if the government would have just defined the measures and functions and not how you actually got there.

What’s interesting is that this is more or less what I’ve been hearing from Andy Slavitt in regards to MACRA. I’m not sure CMS has executed this vision well, but it’s at least hopeful that their leader is espousing a similar approach to what Greg describes above.

I’d also point out an insight I believe I first heard from Dr. Michael Koriwchak. He espoused the principle that CMS shouldn’t require the collection of any data which it wasn’t going to actually use. Think about how meaningful use would have been totally different if they’d employed this rule. What value is there to healthcare if we collect a whole bunch of data that’s never actually used to improve care?

Do you think CMS will get this right with MACRA? Share your thoughts in the comments.

Telemedicine Coverage and Payment Parity

Posted on June 14, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently heard Nathaniel Lacktman from Foley & Lardner LLP give the best presentation on telehealth I’d ever seen. I’d never heard someone so familiar with the challenges and laws associated with telehealth. In fact, with that in mind, I’m hoping to get him on a Healthcare Scene interview in the future.

One of the key things he said about telehealth is the need for: Coverage and Payment Parity.

I thought it was the perfect synopsis of what’s holding telehealth back. If we had telehealth insurance coverage and payment parity, then telehealth services would go through the roof! Although, it’s worth pointing out that you need both of these things.

One problem I’ve seen with many telehealth initiatives is that a telehealth visit is treated like a second class citizen. Why would a doctor want to do a telehealth visit if they aren’t getting paid the same? This is why payment parity is so important and hasn’t been addressed nearly enough in the telehealth laws that have been passed.

The real question is why shouldn’t a telehealth visit be paid the same? If you’re able to document and code the telehealth visit to the same level as you would an in-person visit, why would we pay a doctor less for doing the same type of visit, just virtually?

There are a few states where they’re making progress with coverage and payment parity. It’s too bad we don’t have a national effort to get this in place. Telehealth is not the end all be all. It won’t replace all in-person visits to your PCP, but it could replace a lot of them. Plus, it will encourage a lot of early interventions that would have been delayed because a patient didn’t want to go to the hassle of an in-person visit to the doctor’s office.

Fixing Small Stress Inducing Moments Creates Magic

Posted on June 13, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I thought this was a really genius perspective that I heard at the WEDI Annual conference. Or at least it was the thought that was inspired at the conference. I think the speaker was referencing various apps like Uber or Lyft and how they took a whole set of small, individually stress inducing moments and solved them.

Using that example, it was stressful to wonder when the cab would come, it’s stressful to know if the cab will take credit cards, it’s stressful to know if the cab is taking a longer route to make you pay more, etc etc etc. None of these individually was all that stressful but combined they made for a pretty stressful experience. Uber and Lyft were able to look at all of those minor individual stresses and make a great customer experience by removing them.

It’s worth pointing out that these companies likely needed to solve more than one stress for their app to be successful. If they’d only solved one small stress, they likely wouldn’t be as popular today as they have been.

Now let’s apply this to healthcare IT. Ironically, I think many would argue that EHRs have taken a bunch of small stresses and turned them into large stresses. That’s the pessimistic viewpoint. Although, it’s pretty hard to argue that most EHR software has taken the stress out of the medical documentation experience. Is it any wonder that so many doctors hate EHR?

I guess I’m pretty pessimistic that EHR vendors will change and start taking the little stresses out of the healthcare experience. A few EHR vendors have done better than others but most of them are making so much money doing what they’re doing, they’re unlikely to change course. Does that mean we give up hope?

Not me. I’m optimistic about technology’s ability to make healthcare better. I just don’t think it’s going to come from EHR vendors. Instead, it’s going to come from entrepreneurs who do create magical experiences that take the small stresses out of a doctor’s or patient’s day. They may tie into the EHR, but they’ll build it separately.

What do you think? Where have you seen solutions that solve the “small” stresses in healthcare? We could use more “magic”.

Is CMS Listening to Doctors’ Thoughts on MACRA?

Posted on June 10, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I have to admit that I have a lot of respect for Andy Slavitt. He’s doing a really hard job as Acting Administrator of CMS and he’s been very vocal and open about his view of what they’re doing and their efforts to listen to those of us in healthcare. I’ve really appreciated his willingness to engage the community on challenging topics. Did you ever see this from previous CMS administrators?

This tweet illustrates Andy’s efforts to really listen to doctors when it comes to MACRA:

This illustrates why I previously wrote that Andy Slavitt was very much in touch with the pulse of what doctors are feeling and experiencing. Although, with that comment I also said that I hoped that the policies and programs they implemented would match that understanding.

I realize that this concept is much easier said than done. Andy Slavitt and his team at CMS are sometimes not able to make changes to things like MACRA even if they know it’s the right thing to do. They aren’t the ones responsible for making the legislation. Their jobs are to implement the legislation. It’s a tough balance which always leaves people wanting.

The only thing awkward about Andy Slavitt’s tweet above is that he says CMS has “trained nearly 60,000.” It’s quite interesting that he views these MACRA sessions as trainings. I thought they were more listening sessions than training sessions, but I guess I was wrong. Certainly you have to train a doctor on the MACRA legislation if you want to get the right feedback from them. So, I guess training and listening aren’t mutually exclusive, but it’s not surprising that many doctors don’t want to be “trained” on MACRA. For some doctors, anything less than a full repeal of MACRA will be less than satisfying and that’s not going to happen.

While you can complain about the way Andy might phrase things in a tweet, I don’t think that’s very productive. Although, I don’t think listening to (or should I say training) 60,000 physicians’ thoughts about MACRA is very useful either if we don’t see that feedback incorporated into the final MACRA rule. This tweet gives me some hope that the feedback has been heard and we’ll see some important changes to MACRA:

When the MACRA final rule comes out, I hope that along with the changes that were made we also get a look into the changes that people requested that CMS was unable to make because of the way the legislation was written. I’m not sure if CMS is allowed to be that transparent, but if we’re going to help push for better legislation it would be great to know which feedback was thwarted by legislation so that doctors can push for better legislation.

Patients’ Rights Videos

Posted on June 9, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

ONC and OCR recently released a number of videos that outline patients’ rights. Here’s one called “Individual’s Rights under HIPAA to Access their Health Information”:

What do you think of these videos? Will they effectively educate patients?

Makes me wonder what ZDoggMD would do with the content.

ICD-10 Deja Vu – End of Grace Period

Posted on June 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently came across this article by Aiden Spencer about the possibility that ICD-10 could still cause issues for healthcare organizations once the grace period ends. Here’s what he suggests:

The CMS grace period was a welcomed relief because it meant practices would still be reimbursed under Medicare Part B for claims that at least had a valid ICD-10 diagnosis code. This meant physicians and their staff could get up to speed without worrying about taking a huge hit to their revenue stream.

With only five months left until the grace period ends, industry experts are predicting that an ICD-10 crisis might still be coming for some providers. Will you be one of them? Are you currently implementing quality medical billing software, or will the system you’re using fail come October 1st?

This certainly feels like what we were talking about last October when ICD-10 went live. A bunch of fuss and very little impact on healthcare. Are we heading for another round of fear and anxiety over the end of the ICD-10 grace period?

My gut tells me that it won’t be a bit deal for most healthcare organizations. They’ve had a year to improve their ICD-10 coding and so it won’t likely be an issue for most. This is particularly true for organizations who have quality HIM staff that’s gone through and done audits of their ICD-10 coding practices to ensure that they were doing so accurately.

I saw one stat from KPMG that only 11 percent of healthcare organizations described the ICD-10 implementation as a “failure to operate in an ICD-10 environment” with 80% finding the move to ICD-10 to be smooth. I imagine we’ll have a similar breakout when the ICD-10 grace period ends. Just make sure you’re not part of the 11 percent.

New Effort Would Focus HIE Data Around Patients

Posted on June 7, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

In theory, doctors should be able to pull up all data available on a patient located within any networks to which they have access. In other words, not only should they be able to see any data on Patient A within the EMR where A’s care is documented, but also retrieve data on A from within any HIEs which connect with the EMR. But the reality is, that’s not always the case (in fact, it’s rarely the case).

To help weave together patient data strung across various HIEs, three exchanges have teamed up to pilot test the idea of a patient-centered data home (PCDH). While many health leaders have looked at the idea of putting patients in charge of their own data, largely by adding to or correcting existing records, getting patients involved in curating such data has been difficult at best.

In this model, Arizona Health-e Connection, western Colorado’s Quality Health Network and the Utah Health Information Network are testing a method of data sharing in which the other HIEs would be notified if the patient undergoes an episode of care within their network.

The alert confirms the availability and specific location of the patient’s clinical data, reports Healthcare Informatics. Providers will then be able to access real-time information on that patient across network lines by initiating a simple query. Unlike in other models of HIE data management, all clinical data in a PCDH will become part of a comprehensive longitudinal patient record, which will be located in the HIE where the patient resides.

The PCDH’s data sharing model works as follows:

  • A group of HIEs set up a PCDH exchange, sharing all the zip codes within the geographic boundaries that their exchanges serve.
  • Once the zip codes are shared, the HIEs set up an automated notification process which detects when there is information on the patient’s home HIE that is available for sharing.
  • If a patient is seen outside of their home territory, say in a hospital emergency department, the event triggers an automated alert which is sent to the hospital’s HIE.
  • The hospital’s HIE queries the patient’s home HIE, which responds that there is information available on that patient.
  • At that point providers from both HIEs and query and pull information back and forth. The patient’s home HIE pulls information on the patient’s out-of-area encounter into their longitudinal record.

The notion of a PCDH is being developed by the Strategic Health Information Exchange Collaborative, a 37-member HIE trade group to which the Utah, Arizona and Colorado exchanges belong.

Developing a PCDH model is part of a 10-year roadmap for interoperability and a “learning health system” which will offer centralized consent management and health records for patients, as well as providing national enterprises with data access. The trade group expects to see several more of its members test out PCDHs, including participants in Arkansas, Oklahoma, Indiana, Kentucky and Tennessee.

According to the Collaborative, other attempts at building patient records across networks have failed because they are built around individual organizations, geographies such as state boundaries, single EHR vendors or single payers. The PCDH model, for its part, can bring information on individual patients together seamlessly without disrupting local data governance or business models, demanding new technical infrastructure or violating the rights of local stakeholders, the group says.

Like other relatively lightweight data sharing models (such as the Direct Project) the PCDH offers an initial take on what is likely to be a far more complex problem. But it seems like a good idea nonetheless.

Specialty-Focused EHRs Re-Entering The Picture

Posted on June 6, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Over time, I’ve read a great deal on whether specialist clinicians should invest in EHRs designed for their area of practice or not. One school of thought seems to be that specialists can do just fine by buying broadly-based systems and implementing practice-specific templates, a move which also offers them a longer list of EHRs from which they can choose. Another, meanwhile, is that EHRs designed for use by all clinicians can undercut practice efficiency by forcing specialist workflow into a one-size-fits-all straightjacket.

But the arguments in favor of specialized EHRs seem to be taking hold of late. According to the latest data from Black Book, specialist surgical and medical practices have been switching over to specialty-driven EHRs in overwhelming numbers during the first half of this year. Its researchers found that during the first and second quarter of 2016, 86% of the 11,300 specialty practices it surveyed were in favor of switching from generalist to specialist EHRs.

According to the research firm, 93% of specialists surveyed felt that templates available in specialty EHRs offered a substantial benefit to patients who needed individualized documentation, especially in practices that see a high volume of predictable diagnoses.

If that’s the case, why did so many specialists start out with generalized EHRs?  Eighty-nine percent of respondents said that they bought the non-specialist EHR they had because they were focused on meeting Meaningful Use deadlines, which left them too little time to vet their original EHR vendor sufficiently.

Lately, however, specialist practices have decided that generic EHRs just aren’t workable, Black Book found. Nearly all respondents (92%) said that given their workflow needs, they could not afford to spend time need to shape all-purpose systems to their needs. When they switched over to purchasing a specialty-driven EHR, on the other hand, specialists found it much easier to support ultra-specific practice needs and generate revenue, Black Book reported.

That being said, specialists also switched from generalized EHRs to practice-specific systems for reasons other than clinical efficiency. Black Book found that 29% of specialists make the change because they felt their current, generic EHR was not achieving market success, raising the possibility that the vendor would not be able to support their growth and might not even be stable enough to trust.

Specialists may also be switching over because the systems serving their clinical niche have improved. Black Book researchers note that back in 2010, 80% of specialist physicians felt that specialized EHRs were not configurable or flexible enough to meet their needs. So it’s no surprise that they chose to go to with more robust multi-use and primary care systems, argues Black Book’s Doug Brown.

Now, however, specialized EHRs perform much better, it seems. In particular, improvements in implementations, updates, usability and customization have boosted satisfaction of specialist EHRs from 13% meeting or exceeding expectations in 2012 to 84% in the second quarter of 2016.

Still, practices that buy specialty EHRs do make some significant trade-offs, researchers said. Specifically, 88% of specialists said they were concerned about a lack of interoperability with other providers, particularly inpatient facilities. Respondents reported that specialty-specific EHRs aren’t fitting well within hospital network and regional health information exchanges, imposing a considerable disadvantage over large multispecialty EHRs.

And not surprisingly, investing in a replacement specialty EHR has proven to be a financial burden for specialist practices, Black Book concluded. Forty-eight percent of all specialty practices switching EHRs between June 2014 and April 2016 said that making such investment has put the practice in an unstable financial position, the research firm found.

My general sense from reading this research is that specialist practices have good reasons to replace their generalized EHR with a specialist EHR these days, as such products appear to have matured greatly in recent years. However, these practices had better be ready to deploy their new systems quickly and effectively, or the financial problems they’ll inherit will outweigh the benefits of the switchover.

Physician Burnout Graphic

Posted on June 3, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This was a really impactful graphic that seemed perfect for a Friday post on Physician Burnout:
Physician Burn Out Graphic

Thanks Rasu for sharing it.

Here’s the list of physician burnout items for those following along at home:

  • Patient Generated Data
  • Quality Metrics
  • Other Health Professionals
  • Telemedicine
  • Lack of Genomic Knowledge
  • Reimbursement
  • Retail Based Clinics
  • EHR Frustration
  • Transparency Office Notes
  • Algorithms
  • Super and Cloud Computing
  • Scorecards
  • Online Health Social Networks
  • Patient Satisfaction
  • Online Reviews; Getting Yelped
  • Relative Value Units

Was there something left off the list? Do we really need to add any more to the list to understand why physicians are getting burnt out? Do you see any relief on the horizon?

The Best Healthcare Conferences Coming Up in 2016

Posted on June 2, 2016 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Brooke Chaplan.

Healthcare facilities the world over have to constantly maintain competent and knowledgeable staff and need to be aware of recent health care advances, discoveries, and much more. Attending a health care conference allows you an educational experience that could be vital to your career. Listed below are multiple health care conferences that will be upcoming in the year of 2016 and are some of the best to attend (See also Healthcare Scene’s list of conferences).

Medical Informatics World Conference
Location: Boston at Seaport World Trade Center
Date: Register in 2016, but the conference is April 4-5th of 2017
The Medical Informatics World Conference focuses mainly on patient engagement and satisfaction. Another topic spoke during this conference is predictive analytics. Leading researchers, scientists, and technology experts will be speaking at this conference. This specific event is geared towards hospital/health care, government, and academic employees.

Quality Grampian Conference
Location: Suttie Centre at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. For the
(Americans reading this, traveling may be far, but you deserve a vacation, and though the 2016 date has passed, there are similar events already scheduled for January 2017 for robotic surgery and more!)
Date: May 23rd, 2016 at 8:45 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.
The Quality Grampian Conference focuses on quality and safety in the health care field. Quality Grampian’s fifth annual conference is geared specifically towards health care students and professionals. Quality Grampian is presented by the University of Aberdeen, NHS Grampian, and Robert Gordon University. There is absolutely no charge to attend this health care conference, except maybe some travel costs.

The Digital Health Summit Conferences
Location: Moscone Center, San Fransicso, CA
Date: June 6-7 2016
(This date may be coming up, but look for the Las Vegas Conference hosted in January 2017.)
The digital world is already changing so much about healthcare and jobs in the industry and this conference hopes to show new business owners and entrepreneurs the new world of digital, high-tech health. Full of insightful keynote speakers, panel engagements, workshop sessions and product launches this educational conference goes over the trends and needed technology for making a new venture or clinic successful.

The Future of Medicine – Technology and the Role of the Doctor in 2025
Location: Variable
Date: May 19th, 2016
This conference discussion focused on medicine and its evolving discoveries within the next 10 years. The event was aimed to educate health care professionals and employees and presentations were shown by leading health care experts and doctors. Your clinical staff who may only have bachelor degrees will benefit since it will be going into a lot of new technologies as well. Though it already happened, you can find reviews on what was discussed.

Attending a health care conference is an excellent way to maintain knowledge about leading health care advances. Continuing and furthering education shows true dedication to your profession, which is greatly appreciated no matter what industry you are in.

About Brooke Chaplan
Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most her time hiking, biking and gardening. For more information on improving health education or gaining a bachelor degree in health information management check out courses online at the University of Cincinnati. Brooke is available via Twitter @BrookeChaplan.