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Another EHR Glass Implementation

HealthTech has a really terrible write up of the latest EHR vendor to put out a Google Glass EHR implementation. The iPatientCare EHR application is called miGlass. However, the article states that it’s the first wearable EHR App for glass, but we’ve already written about one from DrChrono and Kareo’s Google Glass implementation was probably the first one that I saw. Plus, there are a number of hospital based EHR implementations that have happened as well. Maybe iPatientCare was the first and they just didn’t get any coverage until now.

Timing aside, the article lists the technology available on this new Google Glass EHR application, miGlass:

  • Web browser based EHR and PM System
  • Microsoft .net Technology
  • Services Oriented Architecture
  • HL7 CCD and ASTM CCR for Interoperability
  • HL7 Integration with leading Lab
  • Information Systems
  • SureScripts/RxHUB Certified ePrescribing
  • Reporting & Analytics using Cognos and Business Objects
  • Available on iPhone and iPad

Maybe the article just made a mistake (I make them all the time as you know), but that list seems like a list of EHR technology and not Google Glass application functionality. iPatientCare also has a video that’s not even worth linking to since it doesn’t say anything about what the Google Glass application really does.

While I love to see EHR vendors experimenting and testing the integration of Google Glass into their EHR, I still haven’t seen the killer use case in action. Although, there are a few hospital EHR Google Glass implementations that I’d like to see in action. I do love the potential of Google Glass. There’s something beautiful about an always on, always connected application that’s sitting there waiting for you when it’s needed. Plus, as the camera recognition technology gets better, the workflow will get better as well.

Imagine walking into an exam room and as you do it, your Google Glass scans a QR code on the door and pulls up the patient waiting for you in the room. Hopefully that’s the naive and simplistic view of where the technology is going to be taken. As more EHR vendors tinker with the technology it will be really interesting to see what becomes a reality.

July 18, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Risk of Interoperability is Worse Data

I’m a huge fan of healthcare interoperability. I think it needed to happen yesterday and that we could solve a number of our cost issues with healthcare data interoperability and we could save lives. Both of these are very worthy goals.

While I’m a huge fan of healthcare data interoperability, we also have to be careful that we do it right. While there are huge potential benefits of exchanging healthcare data, there are also huge risks involved in it as well. We have to address those risks so that interoperability doesn’t get a black eye because it was poorly implemented.

A great example of the potential risk of interoperability is making sure that we process and connect the data properly. Some might argue that this isn’t that big of an issue. Healthcare organizations have been doing this forever. They get a medical record faxed to their office and the HIM team lines up that medical record with the proper patient. I’m sure the medical records folks could tell us all sorts of stories about why matching a faxed medical record to a patient is a challenge and fraught with its own errors. However, for this discussion, let’s assume that the medical records folks are able to match the record to the patient. In reality, they’re certainly not perfect, but they do a really amazing job given the challenge.

Now let’s think about the process of matching records in an electronic world. Sure, we still have to align the incoming record with the right patient. That process is very similar to the faxed paper record world. For the most part, someone can take the record and attach it to the right patient like they did before. However, some EHR software are working to at least partially automate the process of attaching the records. In most cases this still involves some review and approval by a human and so it’s still very similar. At least it is similar until the human starts relying on the automated matching so much that they get lazy and don’t verify that it’s connecting the record to the correct patient. That’s the first challenge.

The other challenge in the electronic world is that EHR software is starting to import more than just a file attached to a patient record. With standards like CCDA, the EHR is going to import specific data elements into the patient record. There are plenty of ways these imported data elements could be screwed up. For example, what if it was a rule out diagnosis and it got imported as the actual diagnosis? What if the nurse providing care gets imported as a doctor? Considering the way these “standards” have been implemented, it’s not hard to see how an electronic exchange of health information runs the risk of bad health data in your system.

Some of you may remember my previous post highlighting how EMR perpetuates misinformation. If we import bad data into the EMR, the EMR will continue to perpetuate that misinformation for a long time. Now think about that in the context of a interoperable world. Not only will the bad data be perpetuated in one EMR system, but could be perpetuated across the healthcare system.

Posts like this remind me why we need to have the patient involved in their record. The best way to correct misinformation in your record is for the patient to be involved in their record. Although, they also need a way to update any misinformation as well.

I look forward to the day of healthcare data interoperability, but it definitely doesn’t come without its own risks.

July 17, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Healthcare IT and EHR Conferences – Fall 2014

I’m regularly asked which Health IT and EHR conferences I’ll be attending and also asked for suggestions on which conferences people should attend and sponsor. After thinking about the best way to let everyone know the answers to these questions, I decided to create a page of Health IT and EHR Conferences and events that I’ll update regularly.

As you’ll see, I’ve broken the page into three sections: conferences I’m attending, important annual conferences, and user conferences. This is not meant to be an all inclusive list. There are some other people who do that pretty well. Instead, I wanted to focus on those events that are annual events that I attend or would like to attend regularly (I’m trying to limit my travel, but that’s not working so well. Although, you’ll see the bias towards Vegas events since I live in Vegas.). Plus, we’ll include discount codes to the events when we can.

I’d love to hear if there are other events that you think we should add to the list. I especially would like to know about the various Health IT and EHR user conferences that are happening. I’ve really fallen in love with those events because you get so many of the in the trenches users at the events.

I love to connect with readers, so if you’re at one of these events let me know so we can meet and say hi. I’ll also likely be speaking at some of the events as well, but I’m finalizing the details of that now.

Hopefully you’ll find this list useful. Also, you’ll notice that Healthcare Scene readers can get a discount to the Digital Health Conference in New York City. Just use the discount code “HCS” when you register and you’ll get a 20% discount on your registration. It’s a great event and one I look forward to every year.

Looks like it’s going to be a fun fall full of too much travel, but worth it to meet with hundreds of amazing people. I hope to see you at one of the events. Let me know what events you have on your list for Fall 2014.

July 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Have You Ever Tried to Cancel an EHR?

A caller’s attempt to cancel their Comcast service is going around the internet. About 10 minutes into the call, the husband got on the line and started recording the call for all of us to see how the Comcast retention rep acted. You can listen to it embedded below.

I imagine most of us have had an experience trying to cancel our service at one time or another. It’s not a fun experience. Although, I know some people who call to cancel their cable service every 3 months in order to have the customer retention representative give them a lower cost deal. You know that offering you a 3 month lower cost (or something like that) is one way they try to retain you as a customer.

As I listened to the call, I was thinking about some of the experiences I’ve read and heard about clinics cancelling their EHR service. Unlike a cable or TV service where it’s quite easy to switch services, switching EHR software is a much more involved process. In many cases EHR vendors hold you “hostage” more than the Comcast retention rep above.

In most cases, the EHR vendor will go radio silent on you or responses to your inquiries will take a really long time. Plus, when you ask for access to your EHR data, you’ll often get hit with a hefty price tag. It’s a shameful practice that many EHR vendors employ to try and lock their customers in and prevent them from switching EHRs. We’re entering the era of EHR switching and this is going to impact a lot of practices going forward.

I’ve debated for a while now creating an EHR “naughty” and “nice” list which outlines the good and bad business practices by EHR vendors. One of the challenges is defining what’s naughty and what’s nice. There’s a lot of grey area in the middle. Although, I think that aggregating this type of information would be really valuable. I’m just afraid that many EHR vendors won’t want to share.

I’ve written posts before about why I think holding a practice’s EHR data hostage is a terrible business practice. The medical community is small and an EHR vendor that tries to do this will definitely suffer from negative word of mouth. What do you think? Should we create a list of EHR vendors and their policy on EHR cancellations?

July 15, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Comical Patient Portal Discussion

I’ve long been interested in how offices communicate their use of an EHR and patient portal to their patients. Long time readers might remember this EMR Under Construction sign that one office used.

I had a doctor send me this email exchange which isn’t necessarily a great suggestion for a practice, but it does illustrate many physicians view of what’s happening with EHR and patient portals:
Comical Patient Portal Comments
I’ll call back to Carl Bergman’s post asking “Has EHR Become a Bad Brand?” I think many doctors consider the EHR and patient portal as one thing. Of course they’re not always the same, but emails like this illustrate how the patient portal and EHR brand are doing…not so well. Although, my guess is that meaningful use has an even worse image in the eyes of doctors.

July 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Is Full Healthcare Data Interoperability A Pipe Dream?

It’s always been very clear to me that healthcare interoperability is incredibly valuable. I still wish most organizations would just bite the bullet and make it a reality. Plus, I hope meaningful use stage 3 is blown up and would just work on interoperability. I think there are just so many potential benefits to healthcare in general for us not to do it.

However, I had a really interesting discussion with an EHR vendor today (Side Note: they questioned if interoperability was that valuable) and I asked him the question of whether full healthcare interoperability is even possible.

I’d love to hear your thoughts. As we discussed it more, it was clear that we could have full interoperability if the data was just exported to files (PDFs, images, etc), but that’s really just a glorified fax machine like we do today. Although it could potentially be a lot faster and better than fax. The problem is that the data is then stuck in these files and can’t be extracted into the receiving EHR vendor.

On the other end of the spectrum is full interoperability of every piece of EHR data being transferred to the receiving EHR. Is this even possible or is the data so complex that it’s never going to happen?

The closest we’ve come to this is probably prescriptions with something like SureScripts. You can pull down a patient’s prescription history and you can upload to it as well. A deeper dive into its challenges might be a great study to help us understand if full healthcare data interoeprability is possible. I’m sure many readers can share some insights.

I’m interested to hear people’s thoughts. Should we trim down our interoperability expectations to something more reasonable and achievable? We’ve started down that path with prescriptions and labs. Should we start with other areas like allergies, family history, diagnosis, etc as opposed to trying to do everything? My fear is that if our goal is full healthcare data interoperability, then we’re going to end up with no interoperability.

July 11, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Hospital CIOs Cutting Back on Non-Essential Projects

Generally speaking, cutting back on IT projects and spending is a tricky thing. In some cases spending can be postponed, but other times, slicing a budget can have serious consequences.

One area  where cutting budgets can cause major problems is in preparing to roll out EMRs, especially cuts to training, which can lead to problems with rollouts, resentment, medical mistakes, system downtime due to mistakes and more.  Also, skimping on training can lead to a domino effect which results in the exit of CEOs and other senior leaders, which has happened several times (that we know of) over the past couple of years.

That being said, sometimes budgetary constraints force CIOs to make cuts anyway, reports FierceHealthIT Increasingly projects other than EMRs are falling in priority.

A recent survey of hospital technology leaders representing 650 hospitals nationwide published by HIMSS underscores this trend. Respondents told HIMSS said that despite increases in IT budgets, they still struggled to complete IT projects due to financial limitations. In fact, 25 percent said that financial survival was their top priority.

What that comes down to, it seems, is that promising initiatives fall by the roadside if they don’t contribute to EMR success.  For example, providers are stepping back from HIE participation because they feel they can’t afford to be involved, according to a HIMSS Analytics survey published last fall.

Instead, hospitals are taking steps to enhance and build on their EMR investment. For example, as FierceHealthIT notes, Partners HealthCare recently chose to pull together all of its EMR efforts under a single vendor.  In the past, Partners had used a combo of homegrown systems and vendor products, but IT leaders there  felt that this arrangement was too expensive to continue, according to Becker’s Hospital Review.

This laser focus on EMRs may be necessary at present, as the EMR is arguably the most mission-critical software hospitals have in place at the  moment. The question, as I see it, is whether this will cripple hospitals in the future. Eventually, I’d argue, mobile health will become a priority for hospitals and medical practices, as will some form of  HIE participation, just to name the first two technologies that come to mind. In three to five years, if they don’t fund initiatives in these areas, hospitals may look  up and find that they’re hopelessly behind .

July 10, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @annezieger on Twitter.

Study on the Economic Impact of Inefficient Communications in Healthcare

Efficient communication and collaboration amongst physicians, nurses and other providers is critical to the coordination and delivery of patient care, especially given the increasingly mobile nature of today’s clinicians and the evolution of the accountable care organization (ACO) model.

For healthcare IT leadership, the ability to satisfy the clinical need for more efficient communications technologies must be balanced with safeguarding protected health information (PHI) to meet compliance and security requirements. As a result, the industry continues to rely primarily on pagers, which creates inefficiencies that can have a considerable economic and productivity impact.

To quantify this impact, the Imprivata Report on the Economic Impact of Inefficient Communications in Healthcare worked with the Ponemon Institute to survey more than 400 healthcare providers in the U.S. about the typical communications process during three clinical workflows: patient admissions, coordinating emergency response teams and patient transfers.

This report is chalk full of good information on the communication challenges in healthcare. Here’s one example chart from the report:
Wasted Time in Hospitals Due to Poor Communication

While it’s good to see that 52% think pagers are not efficient, I’d hope that the number were much higher. I think that most don’t realize how inefficient a pager really is to their organization. It’s interesting that 39% don’t allow text messaging, but it would be interesting to see how many of the 61% that allow text messaging use a secure text message solution.

I think the use of technology to facilitate communication in healthcare is one of the most exciting opportunities out there today. Certainly we have to be careful to follow HIPAA, but we need to not use HIPAA as an excuse for why we don’t use the technology to facilitate better communication.

There’s a lot more in the report that’s worth a read. I’m sure I’ll be covering more details of the report in the future.

July 9, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

4 Healthcare IT Blogs

I’ve been having some fun highlighting some of my fellow health IT blogging colleagues (see 5 Health IT bloggers I highlighted previously). What’s been kind of sad about the experience is that so many health IT bloggers have stopped blogging. I started bookmarking the various EHR and health IT bloggers that I came across a few years back. As I’ve been going back through that list, it’s been really amazing how many stopped or even removed their blog completely.

Even so, there are still quite a few healthcare IT bloggers that are writing some great content. Here’s a look at 4 more health IT bloggers that I find interesting.

Venture Valkyrie – This blog is written by Lisa Suennen, but I have to admit that I didn’t even know that was her real name. I’ve just always seen her as Venture Valkyrie. With an awesome name like that, I’m not sure why she’d ever use the name Lisa. Anyway, Venture Valkyrie is a venture capital investor and healthcare industry consultant. She brings a lot of interesting perspective and insight into healthcare, investing, innovation, entrepreneurship and the role of women in all of these.

Dr. Mike Sevilla – Dr. Sevilla originally started his social media efforts as The Doctor Anonymous, before he came out from behind the cover of anonymity to share his thoughts on medicine, social media and life. Dr. Sevilla is a family practice doctor who’s been involved in social media since 2005. He’s tried to stop blogging and other social media and he can’t stay away. That’s just my kind of blogger.

HL7 Standards – This blog is run by the Corepoint Health team and is also home to the #HITsm Twitter chat topics. While Corepoint Health manages the blog, they do a good job connecting with outside experts (many they probably find through their hosting the #HITsm chat) to cover interesting topics on the blog. In fact, if i didn’t tell you the blog was run by Corepoint Health, you’d probably not even know it. I love that they’ve taken the thought leadership and relationship approach to blog marketing.

Schwartz MSL Blog – This isn’t a purely health IT blog, but it covers a lot of healthcare IT topics since many of Schwartz’s clients are healthcare IT companies. Along with covering their experience working in healthcare IT, they also offer some interesting insights into the PR, marketing and social media worlds that I’m sure many readers will find interesting and useful.

July 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

I Want to Thank the Academy, Err, the Hospital CIO: EHR Hospital Market Share

We’re always interested in who’s up and who’s down. Whether it’s TV shows, Senate races, book sales or baseball stats, we want to know who’s up, who’s down and who’s going nowhere.

We’re big on trends, shares and who’s going where. The closer the race, the more avid the interest – My Nats would be sitting pretty if only the Braves weren’t so pesky. The EHR market place is no exception for interest, even if the numbers are a lot harder to follow than the National League East.

In my last foray into EMR market share, I looked at SK&A’s stats from their rolling survey of US medical practices.

Another company, Definitive Healthcare similarly tracks the hospital EHR marketplace. They’ve generously shared their findings with Healthcare Scene and I’ve used them here. Please note: Any errors, mistakes or other screw-ups with their numbers are mine alone. With that said, here’s what I’ve found.

How Many Divisions Does the Hospital Market Have?

Definitive divides the hospital market into several categories that can be daunting to follow. That’s not their making. It’s the nature of the market.

The major division that Definitive reports on is inpatient versus ambulatory systems. You might think that ambulatory systems are only for non hospital setting, but hospitals, of course, have many outpatients and use ambulatory EHR systems to serve them.

The Inpatient Marketplace

Among inpatient systems, EPIC leads with a 20 percent share shown in Tables I and II. The market is highly concentrated with EPIC, Cerner and Meditech commanding 54 percent. The remaining 46 percent scatters with no one breaking double digits.

Table I All Inpatient Hospitals EHR Vendor Market Shares

Table II All Inpatient EHR Shares

 The Ambulatory Hospital Marketplace

The picture for hospital ambulatory systems used is notably different. See Tables III and IV. While EPIC and Cerner vary slightly from their inpatient share, the other vendors shift all over the place. Allscripts barely registers 4 percent in inpatient, jumps to third place with 14 percent.

Siemens and HMS drop off the top ten being replaced by eClinicalWorks and NextGen. At 22 percent is the catchall, Other EHRs. This is up 8 percent from its inpatient 14 percent.

Table III All Ambulatory Hospitals

Table IV All Amb Hospitals

Inpatient EHRs: Health Systems and Independent Hospitals

Definitive also breaks down inpatient hospitals by health system hospitals v independents. Almost a majority of health systems, 47 percent, choose EPIC and Cerner. See Tables V and VI. Indeed, the top four vendors, EPIC, Cerner, Meditech and McKesson astoundingly have a 74 percent share. The other vendors are at 7 percent or less.

Table V Inpatient Healthcare Systems Hospitals

Independent hospitals differ a bit from this pattern. Non major vendors have 12 percent and open source Vista has 5 percent, but otherwise the pattern is similar.

Table VI Inpatient Independent Hospitals

Inpatient Hospitals by Size: Under and Over 100 Beds

Hospitals with 100 plus beds, no surprise, favor EPIC, Cerner and Meditech. These three have a monopolistic 64 percent. See Table VII.

Table VII Inpatient Hospitals with =>100 Beds

Small, Inpatient Hospital Systems: A More Competitive Market

Small hospitals are a different story. The top five vendors are bunched around 14 percent each. See Table VIII. The mix of vendors is starkly different. Meditech and Cerner lead with EPIC third. However, Epic drops nine percent from the prior group to 14 percent in this.

In the prior tables, the top three vendors have a market majority. In this group, 65 percent of the market belongs to the third through tenth vendors. You can see the difference in competition in Tables VIII and IX.

Table VIII Inpatient Hospitals =>100 Beds

Table IX Inpatient Hospitals <100 Beds

Hospital Ambulatory EHR Systems by Bed Size

The ambulatory market for hospitals with 100 plus beds is similar to the inpatient market. EPIC, Cerner and Allscripts have a 53 percent share.

The remaining share is split among several vendors, with eClinicalWorks, and athenahealth making an appearance. Significantly, Other EHRs ranked second.

Smaller hospitals’ ambulatory systems, as with smaller inpatient hospitals, show a competitive market. The category Other EHRs actually leads with a 21 percent share. Tables X and XI show the difference between these two markets.

Table X Ambulatory Systems =>100 Beds Table XI Ambulatory Systems <100 Beds

Market Shares: What’s the Conclusion?

In this and previous posts, I’ve looked at EHR vendor market shares sliced up in several ways. I’ve used what I consider reliable, independent data sources from SK&A and Definitive Healthcare. I used their information because they are careful to include all practices in their surveys not just those that bother to reply.

I also used them for the simple reason that they were freely available to us. There are other sources, such as KLAS, that produce market surveys, but they charge about $2,500 for their analysis. Moreover, they keep all but the most general findings behind their paywall.

What then is the message from all these numbers? It’s this: there is a competitive market, but it’s only robust among small practices. Those with three or less practioners have the most competitive market with eClinicalWorks in the lead. Within major segments, EPIC, Cerner and Meditech dominate. The non hospital market is more mixed, but EPIC, Cerner, etc., share increases as practice size grows.

For these larger practices, it’s monopolistic competition. If you’re looking for an EHR and you have ten or more docs, you can find any number of vendors. It’s most likely you’ll end up choosing among just a few big guys.

This reminds me of when we shopped for kitchen cabinets and counter tops. We were impressed with some dramatic possibilities. The sales rep, who we got to know well, laughed:

“When folks start out they focus on the avant garde. Then they realize they’re choosing for several years. Suddenly they get more conventional.”

If you come by our place, you’ll see our oak cabinets and white tile counter top. I think it goes that way with hospital execs choosing EHRs. They may toy with something different, but in the end, they’ll go with what they know. After all, no one every got fired for buying EPIC. Well, almost no one.

Next: Attribution and Market Share

If you still haven’t got your fill of market numbers, I have one more topic to explore. I’m interested in knowing how market share relates to MU attestations. That is, does a high market share guarantee a high attestation rate? The next post in this series will look at that.

If you have questions on market share, please post a comment or write me at: carl@healthcarescene.com

July 7, 2014 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.