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60 Minutes EHR Story, EMR Disconnect, and EMR Erector Set


I don’t know how many other people watched the 60 Minutes healthcare story tonight. It will be up on CBS.com tomorrow if you’re interested in seeing it. While, EHR wasn’t the complete focus of the story, it played a large part in the second half when it comes to trying to get doctors to admit more patients to the hospital. The core of the story was more around whether hospitals should set admission goals.

I’ll leave the admission goals to other healthcare people. When it comes to EHR suggesting admitting a patient, you’re walking a fine line. The future of EHR is going to be more artificial intelligence that works to inform the doctor in the process of giving care. This could certainly include standards of care which could include admitting a patient to the hospital based on an evidence based standard of care. I don’t think most doctors have any problem with this type of EHR suggestion as long as the doctor can also make an informed override of the suggestion.

In the 60 Minutes story they suggested that Health Management Associates (HMA) would “punish” those doctors who used the override when a hospital admission was suggested. Reviewing overrides is reasonable and acceptable, but when punishment is due to hospital revenue it crosses the line. This is what was suggested by the 60 Minutes story.

The other thing not discussed in the story is whether the hospital admission prompt in the EHR was created around evidence based medicine or if it was created around revenue plans. One ED doctor suggested the hospital admission alert was done by a non-doctor with no medical training. I’d be interested to learn more about how the hospital admission alerts were really created.

I’m sure we’re going to see a lot more discussion coming out of this 60 Minutes story on Health Management Associates (HMA).


This was an interesting tweet that displays the need in this highly connected world to be able to disconnect. I agree this is a problem, but I don’t think the technology is the problem. It’s the expectation that’s the problem. Once you deal with the expectation issues, then the technology is a benefit and not a weight on your life.


I heard someone else in the mHealth Summit Twitter hashtag talk about mHealth being a toddler when it comes to how far its developed. We’re probably only a 7-8 year old in the EHR world. So many more opportunities available for healthcare.

December 2, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Healthcare During and After 9/11

If you’re interested in reading a more personal post about 9/11, you can check out this post I did on EMR and HIPAA about teaching the new generation about 9/11.

As I’ve watched the various news stories, documentaries and memorials about 9/11, this 60 Minutes news story about a doctor caring for 9/11 survivors was incredibly fascinating. Turns out, he set up a free clinic for the survivors and also started doing interviews with these people so that their stories would be recorded for others to hear. If you didn’t see it, you should watch it below.

The opening to the 60 Minutes video had me wondering about how healthcare dealt with all the injuries in the aftermath of September 11th. It seems like so many angles of September 11th have been covered, I can’t remember ever seeing the stories of hospitals and other doctors trying to treat the influx of patients that no doubt overwhelmed their doors. If you know of some, I’d love to see them.

Maybe that’s not such a terrible thing that the focus hasn’t been on the healthcare stories. Maybe it’s better that we focus on the heroes who lost their lives that day. Although, I’m sure we’re going to hear more and more healthcare related stories about 9/11 illnesses as time passes. Too bad we don’t have an integrated EMR with HIE that could help to track all those that were exposed to the gases and dust that were found at ground zero. That might help their cause since the 9/11 First Responders bill is only for the next 5 years.

John Halamka also has a post up about the impact of 9/11 on Healthcare IT. He concludes that “Disaster recovery, security, and emergency support efforts will continue, inspired by the memories of those who perished 10 years ago.”

September 11, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.