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Quality Metrics Have A Negative Impact on the Quality of Care

Posted on October 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A few months ago I asked the question about whether ACOs were more about good accounting than they were improving care. Here’s a summary of the fear:

I think this is a massive challenge with value based reimbursement. We require certain data to “prove” that there’s been a change in how organizations manage patients. However, I can imagine hundreds of scenarios where the organization just spends time managing how they collect the data as opposed to actually changing the way they care for patients in order to improve the data.

I recently came across an article from HealthLeaders Media which says things may be even worse than I described. Not only do quality metrics not improve care, but they may actually have a negative impact on the care provided.

The article cites a survey by the Commonwealth Fund and Kaiser Family Foundation which highlights this result. Here’s an excerpt from the article:

Of the 1600 primary care physicians surveyed, 55% said the growing use of quality metrics to assess provider performance is having a negative impact on the quality of care. Less than a quarter said that quality metrics have a positive impact on healthcare quality.

Fifty-five percent of the nation’s primary care physicians are currently receiving financial incentives based on quality or efficiency measures. Fifty-two percent cited concerns around programs that impose financial penalties for unnecessary hospital readmissions.

Amy Mullins, MD from the American Academy of Family Physicians also has this zinger of a quote, “It often seems [payers] are measuring to measure, not measuring to improve quality.”

This is one of the major challenges associated with trying to legislate or regulate payment based on quality. If you get it right, then the incentives will encourage providers to improve care. If you get it wrong, doctors will jump through the hoops and care will not improve and may even get worse.

I recently wrote that Digital Health is Hard. I think building appropriate quality metrics that actually encourage improved quality care is even harder. Many say that this is the time when we learn from our experiences. I just feel bad for all the guinea pigs who are being tested on without a choice.

Outsourced Medical Billing #KareoChat on Twitter

Posted on August 26, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

On Thursday, August 27th at 9 AM PT (Noon ET), I’ll be hosting the #KareoChat where we’ll be discussing the good and bad of outsourced medical billing. You can follow along tomorrow on Twitter by watching the #KareoChat hashtag or by checking out my tweets on @ehrandhit.
Outsourced Medical Billing Twitter Chat
Here are the questions we’ll be discussing in tomorrow’s Twitter chat:

  1. Why are many practices choosing outsourced billing over in house?
  2. What are the disadvantages of outsourced billing?
  3. How will ACOs and value based reimbursement work with an outsourced billing company?
  4. How do you select a high quality outside billing company? What differentiates these companies?
  5. Does your outsourced billing company need to have tight integration with your EHR? Why or why not?
  6. What are the pros and cons of outsourcing your billing to your EHR vendor?

I’m particularly interested in people’s responses to question number 3. I think many in healthcare understand the good and bad of doing the billing in house or outsourcing it. Although, I’m pretty sure I’ll learn even more on the Twitter chat tomorrow. However, how things like ACOs and value based reimbursement will impact an outsourced billing company is still a really important topic of discussion. Will it drive more people towards outsourcing their billing or will it mean more practices bring their billing in house? I’ll be interested to hear people’s thoughts on tomorrow’s Twitter chat or feel free to start the discussion in the comments below.

Remote Patient Monitoring and Small Practices

Posted on February 18, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’ve started to see the proliferation of wireless health devices that can track a wide variety of health data and more of these devices are becoming common place in the home. Here’s a great tweet that contains an image of some of the popular devices:

While many of these devices are being purchased by the patients and used in the home, there are a number of other programs where healthcare organizations (usually hospitals) are purchasing the devices for the patients who then use the device at home. These programs are designed for hospitals to remotely monitor a patient and identify potential health issues early in order to avoid a hospital readmission.

For those who work in hospitals, you know how important (financially and otherwise) it is for hospitals to reduce their readmissions. While this is great for hospitals, how does this apply to small practices and general and family practice doctors in particular. There’s no extra payment for a small practice doctor to help reduce the readmission of their patient to the hospital. At least I haven’t seen a hospital pay a doctor for their help in this service yet.

What then would motivate a small practice doctor to leverage these types of remote patient monitoring tools?

Sadly, I don’t think there is much motivation for the standard small practice office to use them. It’s easy to see where a concierge doctor might be interested in these technologies. As a concierge doctor or direct primary care doctor, it’s in their best interest to keep their patient population as healthy as possible. As this form of care becomes more popular, I think these types of technology will become incredibly important to their business model.

The other trend in play is the shift to value based reimbursement and ACOs. Will these types of remote patient monitoring technologies become important in this new reimbursement world? I think the jury is still out on this one, but you could see how they could work together.

I’ve recently had a number of doctors hammering me on Twitter and in the comments of blog posts about how technology is not the solution to the problems and that technology is just getting in the way of the personal face to face connection that doctors have been able to make in the office visit of the past. Their concern is real and those implementing the technology need to take this into account. The technology can get in the way if it’s implemented poorly.

However, these people who smack the technology down are usually speaking from a very narrow perspective. EHR and other technology can and does disrupt many office visits. We all know the common refrain that the doctor was looking at the computer not at me. This is a challenge that can be addressed.

While the above is true, how impersonal is a rushed 10-15 minute office visit with a doctor? How impersonal is it for the doctor to prescribe a medication to you and never know if you actually filed it? How impersonal is it for a doctor to prescribed a treatment and never follow up with you to know if the treatment worked? How impersonal is it for the doctor to never talk or interact with you and your health unless you proactively go to that doctor because you’re sick?

Technology is going to be the way that we bridge that gap and these remote patient monitoring technologies are one piece of that puzzle. I believe these technologies and others make healthcare so much more personal than it is today. It changes a short office visit to treat a chief complaint into actually caring for the patient.

This is what most doctors I know would rather be doing anyway. They don’t want to churn patients anymore than the patient wants to be churned, but that’s how they get paid. Hopefully the tide is changing and we’ll see more and more focus on paying providers for using technology that provides this type of personal care.

Could Population Health Be Considered Discrimination?

Posted on August 19, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Long time reader of my site, Lou Galterio with the SunCoast RHIO, sent me a really great email with a fascinating question:

Are only the big hospitals who can afford the very expensive analytics pop health programs going to be allowed to play because only they can afford to and what does that do to the small hospital and clinic market?

I think this is a really challenging question. Let’s assume for a moment that population health programs are indeed a great way to improve the healthcare we provide a patient and also are an effective way to lower the cost of healthcare. Unfortunately, Lou is right that many of these population health programs require a big investment in technology and processes to make them a reality. Does that mean that as these population health programs progress, that by their nature these programs discriminate against the smaller hospitals who don’t have the money to invest in such programs?

I think the simple answer is that it depends. We’re quickly moving to a reimbursement model (ACOs) which I consider to be a form of population health management. Depending on how those programs evolve it could make it almost impossible for the small hospital or small practice to survive. Although, the laws could take this into account and make room for the smaller hospitals. Plus, most smaller hospitals and healthcare organizations can see this coming and realize that they need to align themselves to survive.

The other side of the discrimination coin comes when you start talking about the patient populations that organizations want to include as one of their “covered lives.” When the government talks about population health, they mean the entire population. When you start paying organizations based on the health of their patient population, it changes the dynamic of who you want to include in your patient population. Another possible opportunity for discrimination.

Certainly there are ways to avoid this discrimination. However, if we’re not thoughtful in our approach to how we design these population health and ACO programs, we could run into these problems. The first step is to realize the potential issues. Now, hopefully we can think about them going forward.

Population Health Polls

Posted on August 11, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was thinking about population health today. It’s become a hot topic of discussion now that a lot more healthcare data is available for population health management thanks to EHR adoption. Although, in many ways, the various value based reimbursement and ACO programs are a form of population health. I guess, for me I classify all of these efforts to improve the health of a population as population health.

I just wonder how many organizations are really working on these types of solutions and how much of the population health is just talk. Let’s find out in the poll below.

I’ll be interested to hear how organizations are approaching population health. Also, let’s do another poll to see how much people will be working on population health in the future.

I’d love to hear more details to your responses in the comments. If you are working on population health, what programs are you doing and what IT solutions are you using to support it?

What Software Will Replace EHR?

Posted on April 15, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m usually a very grounded and practical person. I’m all about dealing with the practical realities that we all face. However, every once in a while I like to sit back and think about where we’re headed.

I’ve often said that I think we’re locked into the EHR systems we have now at least until after the current meaningful use cycle. I can’t imagine a new software system being introduced in the next couple years when every hospital and healthcare organization has to still comply with meaningful use. Many might argue that meaningful use beyond the current EHR incentive money might lock us in to our existing EHR software for many years after as well.

Personally, I think that a new software will replace the current crop of EHR at some point. This replacement will likely coincide with the time an organization is up for renewal of their current EHR. The renewal costs are usually so high that a young startup company could make a splash during renewal time. Add in a change of CIO and I think the opportunity is clear.

My guess is that the next generation of healthcare documentation software will be one that incorporates data from throughout the entire ecosystem of healthcare. I’m not bullish on many of the current crop of EHR software being able to make the shift from being document repositories and billing engines into something which does much more sophisticated data analysis. A few of them will be able to make the investment, but the legacy nature of software development will hold many of them back.

It’s worth noting that I’m not talking about the current crop of data that you can find outside of the healthcare system. I’m talking about software which taps into the next generation of data tracking which goes as far as “an IP address on every organ.” This type of granular healthcare data is going to change how we treat patients. The next generation healthcare information system will need to take all of this data and make it smart and actionable.

To facilitate this change, we could really use a change in our reimbursement system as well. ACOs are the start of what could be possible. What I think is most likely is that the current system will remain in place, but providers and organizations will be able to accept a different model of payment for the healthcare services they provide. While I fear that HHS might not be progressive enough to do such a change, I’m hopeful that by making it a separate initiative they might be able to make this a reality.

What do you think? What type of software, regulations and technology will replace our current crop of EHR? I don’t think the current crop of EHR has much to worry about for now. However, it’s an inevitable part of a market that it evolves.

EMR Customer Service, EMR Not Meeting ACOs Needs, and Patient Centered EMR Rollout

Posted on April 13, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


Zappos is in Las Vegas, and I can assure you that this story is true. I’ve always wondered how they’d scale that policy if thousands of people called for pizza. The key I think is that they do focused customer service. Chandresh asks an important question. Which EHR vendors have delightful customer service?


If EHR vendors don’t make the ACO possible, who will?


I’d be more interested in seeing an EHR roll out that considered the patient.

EHR Upcoding, Meaningful Use Stage 2, Interoperability, EHR Consolidation, and ACOs Video – Burning Topics with Dr. Nick

Posted on October 24, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently sat down with Dr. Nick van Terheyden, CMIO of Nuance to talk about some of the Burning Health IT topics. In the following video Dr. Nick and I talk about EHR Upcoding, Meaningful Use Stage 2, Interoperability, EHR Consolidation, and ACOs. Enjoy and I hope you’ll extend our conversation in the comments.

Are EMRs As Great For ACOs As People Say?

Posted on March 13, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

For quite some time, talking heads have noted that EMRs will be an essential part of ACOs, so much so that most doubt you can have a successful ACO organization without one.  What I don’t see asked as often, however, is whether EMRs are shaping the future of the ACO movement, both negatively and positively.

What would an ACO look like, if it could exist at all, without an electronic record or HIE in place?

* There would even more mistakes and delays in sharing patient records, as one can hardly expect a larger group of institutions to make *less* mistakes

*  ACOs could launch without having to spend millions of dollars on EMR software, hardware, training and support

*  Clinical workflow would remain the same, generally, even if doctors were forced to include larger numbers of co-workers in their network

And how are ACOs working with EMRs in place?

*  Aside from limited case studies in individual institutions , it’s not clear whether EMRs are turning large, newly assembled care organizations into safer places to get care.

*  ACOs are forming more slowly than they might be, arguably, because a comprehensive EMR is part of t he cost of doing business

* New clinical workflow patterns are being forced upon clinicians, cutting across multiple institutions. While this might ultimately increase efficiency, it’s hard to ignore how many human hours are being invested (or wasted, depending on your position) on new technology.

As you can see, I come down on the “EMRs may not be all they’re cracked up to be for ACOs” side of things. Now, I’d concede that I haven’t been completely fair — I know EMRs have yielded great benefits for some groups of institutions– but I’d say the jury’s still out overall.

Accountable Care Organizations Becoming Action Thanks to Pioneer ACO Awardees

Posted on December 27, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I thought this blog post on the 3M blog made a good point about ACO’s finally having some action behind them thanks to the Pioneer ACO awards that were announced recently. Until now, we’ve basically just had people talking to each other about the idea of an ACO, how an ACO should take shape, etc etc etc. It’s nice to see us starting to move beyond discussion of ACO models and now starting to see some real people and companies that have to start taking some ACO action to see what they can create.

I have a feeling that much of this initial ACO work is going to be like most startup companies: failures. In the startup world, it’s just expected that at least 9 of 10 companies will fail. That’s part of the algorithm of innovation that has worked so well in the entrepreneurial environment we know as tech startup companies. I imagine we’ll see the same with a bunch of these ACO models in healthcare as well.

One major problem I do have with this comparison is that the ACO programs that we see now aren’t entrepreneur or market driven, but instead are driven by some sort of government money. This means that those that participate have a bunch of perverse incentives.

The blog post mentioned above provides some interesting suggestions on how to improve healthcare. In response I offered these thoughts in their comment section:

The suggestions you make are reasonable and interesting, but they seem to ignore the idea that what people are really going to do with ACO legislation is find the simplest way to extract the most amount of money out of the regulation. There will be some exceptions, but this is how it works with most government programs.

I imagine some will see this as a bit cynical. I personally just see it as realistic. If we want to talk about real solutions we have to talk about the stark realities that face us and not the idealized models that could happen “IF…” ACOs are no different. Enough with the IFs and let’s talk about action.