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What Does e-MDs and AdvancedMD Under the Same Private Equity Mean?

Posted on August 11, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The healthcare IT world has seen a lot of movement and investment lately. Kareo raised $55 million recently. Modernizing Medicine acquired gMed last month. Accolade secured $22.5 million in funding. medCPU closed $8 million in financing. BoardVitals raised $1.1 million to build the Wikipedia of Medicine. Premier acquired CECity. Plus, that doesn’t even mention the $1 billion acquisition of Merge healthcare by IBM. I’m sure that there are many more that people can share in the comments.

There’s a lot of investment going into healthcare IT. No doubt there’s a huge opportunity for health IT companies. However, I’ve been most interested in what’s happening with the EHR companies involved in these deals. For example, one recent transaction that I didn’t mention above was Marlin Equity Partners acquiring AdvancedMD from ADP. The ADP acquisition of AdvancedMD never seemed to work. The idea of doctors offices being small businesses and ADP offered a bunch of small business services kind of made sense, but most doctors offices treat their EHR purchase very different than other tech investments for their office. The EHR purchase is its own beast. So, it’s not surprising that ADP would divest itself of an EHR software company.

What’s more interesting about the deal is that Marlin Equity Partners had already acquired EHR vendor e-MDs in March of 2015 and merged it with MDEverywhere. Now Marlin Equity Partners has e-MDs and AdvancedMD under their umbrella. I asked them what their plans were now that they had two EHR vendors (competitors) in their portfolio. They declined to comment until the acquisition of AdvancedMD closed.

Something has to give. I can’t imagine Marlin Equity Partners continuing with two software companies. Hard to say whether e-MDs will win or AdvancedMD, but I expect we’ll see one of them being sunset in the next year or two. They’ll offerer a way to convert from one to the other, but switching EHR software is never fun. It’s even less fun when it’s being forced upon you by the vendor.

The crazy thing is that I think we’re just getting started with this kind of activity. 300 EHR vendors is not sustainable long term. I don’t think we’ll get to 5 EHR vendors like most suggest, but we could narrow it down to 100 and still have plenty of options. That’s a lot of doctors being left high and dry when their EHR gets consolidated.

A Thoughtful Approach to EHR Implementation – 5 Tips

Posted on May 9, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While many in the EHR industry have started moving beyond EHR implementation, it’s worth realizing that only 55% of physicians have adopted an electronic health record (EHR). Yes, that means that 45% of physicians are still working on selecting and adopting an EHR. Ok, it’s probably more like 40% of doctors are looking to implement an EHR. The other 5% will stick with their paper.

Plus, along with the 45% of doctors who don’t use EHR, there are a whole slew of existing EHR users that are selecting and implementing an EHR as well. For example, 2 days ago I was at my son’s cub scout event where an opthamologist friend of mine cornered me and asked me about how he should go about selecting an EHR for his practice. He had just decided to go out on his own and open his own opthamology practice. What a perfect time to select and implement an EHR.

With this in mind, today I came across this whitepaper by ADP AdvancedMD called A Thoughtful Approach to EHR Implementation. They provide a number of stats, charts, and graphs using data from the CDC about EHR satisfaction and EHR use. The most intriguing number to me was the number of physicians that reported accessing the patient chart remotely using their EHR. That’s an EHR benefit that I don’t see talked about very often.

The whitepaper also offered these 5 tips for a successful EHR Implementation:

  1. Stay committed to your goal, but flexible in your approach
  2. Don’t short-change your training opportunities
  3. Don’t underestimate the impact to your workflow
  4. To pilot or not to pilot
  5. Optimizing the EHR

A lot more could be said about each point and they cover each point in detail in the full whitepaper, but the first and third ones really stand out to me. EHR is a commitment, but requires some flexibility. The best way to have a failed EHR implementation is to not be committed or to be inflexible. Your workflow will be impacted, but if you take a thoughtful approach to your EHR implementation it can be impacted for good.

An Intriguing Twist, EMR And Payroll Vendor Come Together

Posted on March 2, 2011 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Today I caught wind of an interesting deal, in which giant payroll services vendor ADP acquired EMR/practice management vendor AdvancedMD.  Here’s how the two justify the deal:

“By leveraging the collective offering of AdvancedMD’s PM and EHR solutions, and combining that with ADP’s full set of services and long-standing history of serving medical professionals, ADP is now uniquely positioned as an integrated, single-source provider of Medical Practice Optimization.”

I’m not sure what they mean by “Medical Practice Optimization,” though it is a keen and catchy phrase, but let’s hazard a guess, shall we?

Even if high-deductible health plans never capture a large segment of the insured population, doctors still want their co-pays and deductibles immediately. This, of course, would not be handled by an EMR.

However, I can visualize some hybrid in which real-time care feedback from EMR improves the input into the practice management system, which improves coding and ultimately, improves the accuracy of patient billing.  Add real-time claims processing to the mix, and you’ve got the know-how for some greatly improved cash flow for practices.

However, I doubt it will be easy to roll up the knowledge an ADP has with a wide range of EMRs, so this may be a blip on the map. Though AdvancedMD is apparently used by 4,100 practices, they have more than a bit of competition for the small- to mid-sized EMR market, no?

In any event, I’m left wondering whether we’ll have revenue cycle management firms, banks or other financial entities buying EMRs. This could be worth watching.