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Apple EMR

Posted on August 24, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This tweet seems to have hit a nerve with me:

I realize that James Edwards was just being funny on Twitter, but I guess I’ve had too many people who seriously thought that Apple would get into the EMR business. They won’t. They never will. And I think it’s funny to think that just because Apple touches it, people think it will be all better.

Apple could pour its billions of dollars of cash into the EHR market and doctors would still complain about their solution. More and more I’m realizing that an EHR can only be so good because of the reimbursement and regulatory requirements that the EMR has to meet. Certainly, EHR software should be better than it is today, but it won’t be perfect until we see a sea change in the technology available (see my Video EHR idea) and/or the regulatory and reimbursement environment. Not even Apple can solve those.

However, beyond the fact that I don’t think Apple could make a beautiful EHR, I also think that Apple has no interest in being in the enterprise business. Yes, EHR software is an enterprise software and becoming more so every day. That’s not in Apple’s wheelhouse and they’re not going to get there either.

There are plenty of opportunities for Apple in healthcare. Consumer health devices and consumer health applications are the sweet spot for Apple and I could see them being a major player there. There’s so much opportunity there with their iPhone and iPad footprint. I think all of that is just a matter of time. Just stop talking about Apple entering the EHR space. It’s not going to happen.

PHR Interaction with Doctors, A Shakespearean Tangle, and an iPhone EHR

Posted on December 18, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I regularly like to do a post that highlights interesting tweets from around the EHR and Healthcare IT twittersphere. Plus, I add in a bit of my own commentary. I hope you enjoy.


We’ve all known this for a long time. Glad to see that most doctors are finally realizing it too. With that said, I think we still have a long way to go when it comes to how we interact with patients through a PHR. However, we’re finally getting comfortable with the idea.


You need this part of the link above to understand the tweet:

Is ownership of medical data or workflow a Shakespearean comedy (happy ending) or tragedy (sad ending). At this point in time, the end result is not clear nor can an ending really be predicted. However, recognizing the issues can help draw focus and hopefully influence a better outcome.

It’s a fun question to ask. I think for most people it will be a generally happy ending. We usually end up with the right thing after we’ve exhausted all of our options (to modify a similar famous quote about the US). My only caution is that there may not be an ending to this. It will likely be a battle that will rage forever with give and take that goes on at least for our lifetimes.


I found this tweet ironic since I’d just had some searches to my website looking for an iOS EHR. It might be worth linking to my previous Apple EHR post. DrChrono built its brand on the back of an iPad EHR, so this isn’t a surprise. Of course, the proof is in the pudding as they say. I’ll hold out my judgment until I can hear from the doctors who actually use their iPhone as their EHR. As for the comment in the tweet above, I’m not sure it changes everything. We’ll still hear plenty of complaints from doctors on Epic and Cerner that they can’t do their EHR on their iPhone.

Apple EHR

Posted on December 11, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


I love how everyone thinks that Apple touching something will somehow make it better. Not only does this forget about the various times Apple has had product fails, but it also assumes that Apple can fix everything. It’s possible that’s what’s broken with EHR is the system and not the people creating the software itself. In fact, that’s what many innovators and startup entrepreneurs see when they look at healthcare and then choose to stay away.

I read a quote from a VC recently that said something similar to this, “When you go into a market you expect it to act in a certain way. Healthcare doesn’t act like a rational market.”

Chew on that concept a little. However, the final part of the above tweet is what really gets under my skin. “Ability to customize every single deployed copy!” People who ask for this don’t really know what they want and it’s also not fair to say that everything on the iPhone, for example, can by customized. Turns out that most people that get an iPhone or iPad do very little customization. The out of the box experience is really quite incredible with very little customization required.

We’ve written about this before back in 2010. Software vendors have to find the right balance between a beautifully simple and effective “out of the box” experience and the long term ability to customize the EHR in any form or fashion they desire.

I’m sure all the hospital CIOs reading this are shaking their heads when I talk about the “out of the box” experience being great. When they look at the millions (sometimes hundreds of millions or even billions) that they’ve spent on EHR consultants to configure and customize their EHR software, they could clearly argue that their hospital EHR has the “ability to customize every single deployed copy.” In fact, it costs them millions of dollars to get it customized. I’ve heard many hospital CIOs wonder why their EHR needs so much configuration. In the ambulatory world you can get much closer to an out of the box experience. Although, even they like to complain about there being too much EHR configuration.

This conversation is actually going to get even more complex. When you look at evidence based medicine and various care guidelines, there’s a movement to try and standardize some of the ways we practice medicine. I’m reminded of when I heard the CMIO of Intermountain say, “If we allow physicians to do whatever they want, we’re allowing them the right to take improper care of patients.” This is going to drive organizations to use a much more standards based workflow as opposed to their own unique customizations.

Finding the balance between infinitely customizable and hard coding proper workflows is an extremely hard problem to solve and will likely never be fully solved. However, it’s the challenge of any software system.

As far as Apple doing an EHR or as one person suggested, Apple buying an EHR vendor…that’s never going to happen. Just look at how simple their approach to Apple Health Kit has been. They’re not going to tackle the true problems of healthcare.

What I do think Dino was trying to say in the tweet above is “I wish I loved my EHR as much as I love my Apple products.” Now that’s a concept I can get behind and would be a great aspiration for every EHR vendor.

Steve Jobs and Healthcare IT – EMR

Posted on October 7, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I like I’m sure many of you have been a bit overwhelmed by the amazing outpouring of love that’s happened after the passing of Steve Jobs. It was weird for me, because I knew that Steve Jobs health wasn’t good but I was still a bit shocked to see on Twitter that he’d passed away. Certainly a major loss for his family, but the effect will be felt well beyond them.

I’ve been touched by a number of posts throughout the healthcare IT and EMR blogosphere. Here’s a roundup of a few of the Steve Jobs posts I found.

Jim Tate did a post that considers what if Steve Jobs had developed an EHR. Here’s one section:

For the past 5 years I’ve kept hoping that Apple would develop an EHR. One that when someone first used it they would say: “Yes, this is how it should be”. Whatever he developed and released to the world didn’t even need an owner’s manual. It just worked in a very human way.

I know I’ve written about the possible Apple EHR as well and what it might look like. As I read Jim’s post I couldn’t help but wonder if the reason Steve Jobs didn’t take on a project like an EHR was because our regulations and reimbursement don’t work in a human way.

Dr. Liu on Kevin MD wrote a post about Steve Jobs as a physician mentor. I love the idea that Steve Jobs was his mentor even though they never met. He offered this heartfelt thought:

I as a doctor I’m incredibly sorry that medicine has not yet evolved to the point that a cure exists for the rare type of cancer Jobs. I’m sorry that he is so ill at an incredibly young age, in his mid 50s, when many people begin to contribute even more to society with all of the knowledge and experience they’ve acquired. The future might be a little less bright without Jobs leading his team at Apple on creating products and experiences none of us truly knew existed until he showed them to us.

It is such a shame that he died so young. In fact, I’d say that might be the hardest part of it all.

The self professed Mac Fan boy, John Moore from Chilmark research, paid a tribute as well. He highlights some of the key things that Steve Jobs did with Apple products:
-Design aesthetics combined with functionality rule
-Supporting a renegade
-Systems rather than parts
-Supporting innovation

Yep, Steve Jobs will be missed in healthcare and well beyond.