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NFL EMR and Patient Generated Data


We wrote previously about the NFL using eCW, but this tweet seemed appropriate on the day of the super bowl. It was interesting to think that they have multiple video angles available of the injury. I wonder how/if that changes the assessment of the injury by the doctor.


This is a great image and does show the partial disconnect between those using smart devices to track themselves and the sick patients who could really benefit from them. Word on the street is that the latest iOS8 from Apple will have a bunch of health and fitness tracking built in along with a new app called Healthbook. I’ve been waiting for the smartphone to basically do what all these other external tracking devices are doing. If Apple hops in, then we’ll see that happen.

February 2, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Android’s Advantage Over iPhone in Mobile Health Applications

The reports are all over the web comparing the Android market share to iPhone’s market share (see one example here). These numbers are important for anyone in the mobile health space that’s considering their strategy for developing a mobile health application. The same goes for EHR vendors that are working on their mobile EHR strategy.

The reality as I see the mobile phone market share numbers is that Android is taking the lead when it comes to market share. No doubt, iPhone still has an incredibly compelling offering and many loyal fans. This is particularly true in healthcare where a doctor having an iPhone is in many ways a bit of a cool “status” symbol for the doctor. However, in the long term I think that even healthcare will see a similar market share shift to the Android over the iPhone as well.

Why am I so bullish on the Android in healthcare despite healthcare’s current love affair with the iPhone?

The core reason that I think the Android phones (and much of this could apply to tablets as well) will do very well as mobile health applications is because of how much customization is possible with Android devices. In fact, pretty much anything is possible on an Android phone because of the open source nature of the software. I expect many mobile health applications will need and want to exploit the flexibility and openness of Android over the iPhone.

One concern I do have about this idea is that Android does pose its own challenges for developers. In the case of the iPhone, you basically only have to code your application to work across a small handful of iOS versions and handsets. In fact, Apple has smartly made sure that many things remained the same across every iPhone. This makes developers lives much easier. In the case of Android, you have hundreds of possible handset combinations you have to consider when developing your application. This can be really hard to test and can often lead to a bad user experience for some Android devices.

In some ways, the current Android environment reminds me of the challenges we use to face (and still do today in some ways) in creating a webpage that worked across all the various web browsers. A lot of effort went into making sure your website worked everywhere. However, over time the standards have developed and this is much less of an issue today than it was when the internet first started. I believe the same will be true for Android.

The reality is that Android and iPhones are both here to stay for the foreseeable future. Most mobile health applications are going to have to be able to support both platforms. Some might say that we should just be glad that it’s only two platforms we have to worry about. We had a lot more than two to think about back during the internet browser wars.

February 7, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

drChrono EHR Featured on Apple’s iPad Website

Carl Bergman recently sent me a link to a video on the Apple iPad website that profiles an urgent care center in St. Louis using the DrChrono EHR software. Here’s the intro about the urgent care facility using the iPad:

iPad makes the rounds with physicians.
Trained to handle any medical condition that comes in the door, emergency room physician Dr. Sonny Saggar treats everything from life-threatening issues to small cuts that need a few stitches. Dr. Saggar is also the medical director at Downtown Urgent Care in St. Louis, MO — and its sister location, Eureka Urgent Care in West St. Louis County. He and his staff rely on iPad to help them deliver efficient, high-quality health care. “We can often get patients precisely the care they need in less than 20 minutes,” he says.

I think it’s brave for any doctor to put a time on how long it takes to give care. Does DrChrono have a module that tells you average patient times. Did Dr. Saggar get those times from the EHR? Plus, he says that they often can which I guess could mean that they often can not? Of course, the above copy was probably written by some intern at Apple.

The page also offers these benefits to using an iPad EHR:
-Health records go paperless
-Better communication at the point of care
-Smooth operation
-More personalized care

Are these the benefits you see of using an EHR with the iPad?

We’ve written a lot about ipad EMR software on EMR and EHR. In fact, we were writing about the iPad together with EMR well before the iPad even was officially released. While doctors love the iPad, I’m still not seeing very many doctors use the iPad for their daily documentation needs. The challenge has and still is that the iPad is a great consumption device, but has yet to be a great documentation tool. I’ll be interested to see if someone will be able to crack that second nut.

August 6, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Reasons to Not Use Virtual Desktop Access to Your EMR on an Ipad

I found this great article which highlights a number of the reasons I’ve been saying that the iPad needs its own native EMR interface and not just some Virtual Desktop solution to access your EMR.

First it offers two reasons why the Virtual Desktop solution is a good option:
-Security
-Cost

The first benefit of security is a good once since as long as your virtual desktop and access to your virtual desktop are secured, then you don’t have to worry about healthcare related data on the iPad. The second benefit is mostly a benefit to the EMR software vendor. Sure, they could make the argument that the price to develop a native iPad app is passed on to the end user. However, most doctors won’t feel that cost. In most cases it just means that other features on the EMR development roadmap will just get pushed back. Although, even this can be a bad strategy if your developers are good at developing EMR software on your current platform, but aren’t familiar with developing a native iPad app. Then, it’s worth spending some money on an iOS developer who knows which features of the iPad they can really leverage.

Now on to the reasons the article suggests that you develop a native iPad app and not just do the virtual desktop solution:
-Doesn’t Make Use of Native iPad Functionality
-Requires Constant Connectivity
-Virtualized Apps are Not Optimized for the iPad

The first and third in the list are very much related and are the biggest reasons why a native iPad EMR app makes so much sense if you’re going to do something on the iPad. The second item actually doesn’t apply very well to an iPad EMR app which even when created as a native app will likely need to have internet connectivity to have any value. An EMR iPad app could be made that didn’t need connectivity, but I have yet to see one that’s done that.

December 8, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Black Friday Sales Boost mHealth App Predictions

The holiday season is officially upon us, or so said both of my daughters after they saw Santa Claus conclude the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade. Black Friday and Cyber Monday have come and gone – not unnoticed by the average American consumer if recently released retail figures are any indication. The economy seems on the verge of a slight upswing, if our holiday spending this early in the season is any indication.

How does healthcare fit into all this? Two holiday headlines recently caught my eye. The first, “Apple Breaks Black Friday Record,” notes that iPad sales “surged 68%” that particular day, breaking the company’s own purported predictions that it would achieve Black Friday sales four times higher than normal. The second, “Mobile Healthcare and Medical App Downloads to Reach 44 Million Next Year, Rising to 142 Million in 2016,” makes the prediction that “[a]cceptance of new healthcare practices like remote patient monitoring will come directly from consumers becoming engaged in mHealth through the smartphone.”

Forty-four million medical app downloads next year might not be such a high number to reach when you take Apple’s record one-day iPad sales into consideration. Physicians and healthcare consumers alike seem to not only be jumping onto the tablet bandwagon, but gearing up to race it to the finish line as well.

So now that we’ve established the healthcare connection, what’s all this got to do with EMRs? Will these predictions and likely outcomes coincide with an upswing in mobile EMR app development? As of yesterday, 60 apps popped up when I searched for “EMR” apps for the iPad in the iTunes store. Forty-seven results came up for “EHR,” many of them the same. I’ll be interested to see what this number is six months and then a year from now.

As this blog has well documented for some time now, healthcare’s love affair with the iPad was a slow burn at first, but has now become fast and furious. I can only imagine that EMR developers will take their relationships with the iPad to the next level in record time just to meet customer demand. While I won’t necessarily be waiting with baited breath for Practice Fusion’s launch next year of its iPad app, I will definitely check it out while at HIMSS, where I assume they’ll give it a Vegas-style launch.

I’d love to hear from physicians as to how inundated the market is likely to become with these types of technologies. And aside from EMR/EHR apps, will mobile health downloads really take off as predicted? Share your own predictions in the comments below.

Full Disclosure: Practice Fusion is an advertiser on this site, but they didn’t pay Jennifer to mention their iPad app. In fact, I’m not even sure if Jennifer knows they’re an advertiser.

December 1, 2011 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

Steve Jobs and Healthcare IT – EMR

I like I’m sure many of you have been a bit overwhelmed by the amazing outpouring of love that’s happened after the passing of Steve Jobs. It was weird for me, because I knew that Steve Jobs health wasn’t good but I was still a bit shocked to see on Twitter that he’d passed away. Certainly a major loss for his family, but the effect will be felt well beyond them.

I’ve been touched by a number of posts throughout the healthcare IT and EMR blogosphere. Here’s a roundup of a few of the Steve Jobs posts I found.

Jim Tate did a post that considers what if Steve Jobs had developed an EHR. Here’s one section:

For the past 5 years I’ve kept hoping that Apple would develop an EHR. One that when someone first used it they would say: “Yes, this is how it should be”. Whatever he developed and released to the world didn’t even need an owner’s manual. It just worked in a very human way.

I know I’ve written about the possible Apple EHR as well and what it might look like. As I read Jim’s post I couldn’t help but wonder if the reason Steve Jobs didn’t take on a project like an EHR was because our regulations and reimbursement don’t work in a human way.

Dr. Liu on Kevin MD wrote a post about Steve Jobs as a physician mentor. I love the idea that Steve Jobs was his mentor even though they never met. He offered this heartfelt thought:

I as a doctor I’m incredibly sorry that medicine has not yet evolved to the point that a cure exists for the rare type of cancer Jobs. I’m sorry that he is so ill at an incredibly young age, in his mid 50s, when many people begin to contribute even more to society with all of the knowledge and experience they’ve acquired. The future might be a little less bright without Jobs leading his team at Apple on creating products and experiences none of us truly knew existed until he showed them to us.

It is such a shame that he died so young. In fact, I’d say that might be the hardest part of it all.

The self professed Mac Fan boy, John Moore from Chilmark research, paid a tribute as well. He highlights some of the key things that Steve Jobs did with Apple products:
-Design aesthetics combined with functionality rule
-Supporting a renegade
-Systems rather than parts
-Supporting innovation

Yep, Steve Jobs will be missed in healthcare and well beyond.

October 7, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

iPad Adoption Slow in Healthcare

At least that’s the case that was made in this blog post on the Software Advice website. The post is a few months old which is centuries in the tech world, but I have to disagree with them on their take that EMR vendors are slow to move their products to the iPad platform. In fact, I mentioned in their comments that I think every single EMR vendor has an iPad strategy.

They do get it right that doctors are adopting the iPad at a really dramatic pace. Here’s my reasons why it’s been so popular:
1. Battery life that lasts a full shift
2. 3G and Wireless Connectivity
3. Intuitive interface
4. $500 price point

We’re still waiting on some enterprise features that it seems like the Blackberry Playbook is trying to implement for healthcare. However, I’m pretty sure they’ll get there in time or someone will create an app that will create those features anyway.

Back to the iPad, the article only states 2 companies that have an iPad EMR offering. There are many more than that. I’ve seen some from Practice Fusion, GE, and VitalHealth to just name a few.

What I haven’t yet seen is how well doctors like the use of their EMR iPad interface. Is it really that usable for a doctor doing his rounds? Does it work well for clinical documentation? Is it a nice compliment to a desktop environment?

Sadly, I still can’t give my first hand account of using an EMR on an iPad. I got my refund from HIMSS since despite all the free iPad giveaways I came home without one. Oh well, the iPad 2 is out now and it would have been a shame to only won a first generation iPad. I’m told by Christmas there may even be an iPad 3, but I digress.

What might even be more interesting than EMR use on an iPad is the other creative ways that people are using iPads in healthcare. For example, I’ve heard of people using an iPad as a check in device for their clinics. There’s something cool about handing over an iPad instead of a clipboard for your patients to fill out their paperwork. I’m sure some patients would hate it, but I for one would be much happier feeling out the stack of paperwork electronically.

March 24, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

iPad Mania in Healthcare

The iPad has been a regular topic on EMR and EHR since last year when we first wrote about the Apple iPad EMR. While it’s normal for there to be a lot of hype around the announcement of a device like an iPad, I must admit that the hype around the device hasn’t really slowed down any.

If you’re a blogger and want your article read, all you need to do is mention your iPad and people will click through to read about it. I’m not immune to it either. Just take a look at the list of giveaways at HIMSS. If you’re not giving away an iPad, then you probably don’t belong there.

One healthcare IT vendor on a HIMSS LinkedIn thread recently said they were giving away an iPod at HIMSS. Turns out that was mistake. Of course, he meant to say they were giving away…wait for it…an iPad. Think how lucky Apple is that hundreds of iPads will be given out at the largest Healthcare IT conference on the planet (30,000 people attending). Plus, Apple didn’t even have to pay for the promotion.

With all these free iPads hitting the healthcare IT world, I wonder how many more iPads will be purchased. Now some might wait to see what the second generation iPad will look like (I wonder if some creative vendor will giveaway the second generation iPad instead of the first generation), but no doubt there’s some mythical quality to the iPad. You see someone else using it and want one. At least I do. I’m not even sure why I want one, but I do. It’s not because everyone else has one cause I like to buck trends. However, there’s just something really nice about the form factor of the iPad tied with all its apps.

The real question is how well will the iPad do in an enterprise situation. I’ve started to see stories come out talking about the challenges of IT staff in supporting and deploying large numbers of iPads in their organizations. One such story had the CEO promise everyone iPads for Christmas. Then, the CIO had the amazing challenge to distribute and support thousands of iPads in their organization. You can’t take back a Christmas gift.

Since this is an EMR and EHR site, let’s just say that from my point of view, the EMR and EHR apps for the iPad still have a ways to go. I’ll be sure to do an informal poll of all the EMR companies I talk with at HIMSS about their “iPad EMR strategy.” I’m certain that they all have one. I’ll be interested to know EMR companies various approaches.

Of course, if you don’t like to run with the popular kids, maybe you should check out the Blackberry Playbook in Healthcare. I’ve heard it’s a great device and maybe they’ll actually care about the enterprise. I’m pretty sure the iPad is positioned that they won’t care all that much about the enterprise.

If you are going to HIMSS and want to learn about my giveaway. Tomorrow, I’ll post the details on EMR and HIPAA about how to win a 42″ HDTV. That’s over 4 times as big as the iPad’s little screen.

February 15, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Another EMR on the iPad

You know how I love to keep track of all the iPad EMR that are announced or marketed. Seems like the latest trend is to give the doctor a free iPad for selecting an iPad EMR. Not a bad strategy. Now if I could just get one of them to provide me a free iPad for reviewing their EMR *wink* *wink* but I digress.

I first read about this EMR that is available on the iPad on the Essinova site. This iPad EMR is being offered by Dr Chrono. Yes, another EMR vendor I’d never heard of before I saw this. Although, there site has them being on CNBC, Fox Business and The Wall Street Journal.

Dr Chrono’s approach is to provide a free iPad EMR app, but they take over the billing for you. Sounds a bit like Athena to me. They also say that they’re the only SureScripts certified ePrescribing app for the iPad. Maybe this was true when the video was made. I know that now there are others.

I guess maybe the next question is whether there’s an EMR vendor that won’t have something available on the iPad in the next 6 months.

November 9, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

iPad Won’t Transform Hospital IT, But Has Potential With EMR

i Medical Apps recently posted an article about Apple’s iPad falling short of transforming hospital Medical Care, but says it may have potential with EMR. We’ve discussed the iPad and EMR quite a few times on this blog with interesting responses.

The above article offers 3 reasons why their skeptical that the iPad will transform the way EMR software is done:
1) For a healthcare provider’s day-to-day use, the iPad doesn’t do anything better than an iPhone or a laptop/desktop.
2) Big hurdles face development of peripherals for more advanced healthcare functions
3) Safety

I guess for me the most important thing I’ve seen was a conversation I recently had with a doctor. This doctor is a HUGE Apple fan boy and always has the latest Apple gadget (like the iPad). I asked him now that he’s had the iPad for a while, what he thought about it.

He responded, “It’s a great toy.”

I think that basically summed it up for me. It is a great tool for doing a lot of things, but EMR is not likely one of them. I’ll still go back to my initial projection that the methods of input that the iPad are providing might be the basis for the future of data input. However, the iPad device itself isn’t what’s going to see the widespread adoption in healthcare IT and EMR.

It does make a great giveaway at conferences though.

September 17, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.