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Women Executives in Telehealth American Telemedicine Association ATA2017

Posted on May 18, 2017 I Written By

Healthcare as a Human Right. Physician Suicide Loss Survivor.
Janae writes about Artificial Intelligence, Virtual Reality, Data Analytics, Engagement and Investing in Healthcare.
twitter: @coherencemed

Susan Dentzer, Charlotte Yeh, Janet McIntyre, and Janae Sharp at the American Telemed Women Executives in Telehealth Panel

One of the highlights of the American Telemedicine conference in Orlando Florida was excellent coverage of women in telemedicine and leadership.  They had a panel of women in leadership which focused on promoting women in telemedicine and had the best moderation of a panel I’ve seen at a conference.  Highlights of great advice for women in HealthIT were from that panel, and from speaking with women that were tasked with going to the conference as buyers in the telemedicine space.

Charlotte Yeh acted as moderator of the panel. She framed what the panel would cover and what they were not concerned with. She mentioned that we would not cover work life balance since that also applies to men and has been covered on many platforms.  Framing a conversation within the conference and healthcare setting made a huge impact.  Promoting women in telemedicine and HealthIT needs to have a specific framework.

Susan Dentzer, President and CEO of the Network for Excellence in Healthcare innovation suggested making an award for advancing women in leadership in Telehealth.  I’m a huge fan of medals for participation. Every day I get up and when I work out I suspect that I deserve a medal.  The medals for best contribution for advancing women next year should be an amazing ceremony at ATA.

Susan quoted Madeline Albright that “there’s a special place in hell for women who don’t support other women.” Think deliberately about creating something you want to be a part of. This year I’ve personally seen Max Stroud of Doyenne Connections simply create something she wanted to be a part of.

Julie Hall-Barrow invited leaders to find a young woman and become their mentor. Some of the women in leadership in healthcare are happy to promote other women but the promotion seems more strategic than like actual concern. Leaders should purposefully craft their ideal mentor relationship. ATA discussed creating a group dedicated to what women and companies in the telemedicine space would like to do with collaboration.

Paula Guy, when asked what she would tell a younger self, said “first of all I would tell myself not to get married so many times.” Her advice was hilarious and focused on not letting people tell you no. There is a power in knowing what you are capable of and surrounding yourself with other women who are also in that space. Paula’s advice was also to be part of a group that promotes mentors and other women working together.

Kristi Henderson spoke about not being afraid to push boundaries. Never settle until you get where you want to go. The advice and positive belief that women are capable of breaking through boundaries and leveraging their social connecting makes women poised for success despite being underrepresented.

Janet McIntyre, The Vice President of Professional services of the Colorado Hospital association, decided to approach Patrick Kennedy about coming to Colorado to help with the opioid epidemic there. He shared his family story and personal conviction about making a difference and Janet decided to invite him to help with her state.  Women need to be fearless in their ask and expect that people will want to help them succeed.

Rachel Dixon, director of Telehealth for AccessCare services, pointed out that women should have a safe space to discuss gender issues in their work. We can create a place to discuss which companies are working well with women in the telemedicine space and which ask about an older man partner or lack professionalism. I shared a story with her about a potential employer asking if he should consider my job only a work proposition.  Gender issues for a younger woman in leadership can be complex in navigating personal relationship. A soft intelligence network about how a company treats women is valuable for investors and employees.

I was impressed with the positive planning of women in healthcare leadership in telehealth. The thought leadership at this conference was one of the best organized in terms of giving organizations and individuals actionable plans for increasing female technology talent in leadership positions.

Telemedicine Not Connecting With EMRs

Posted on June 5, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

As smartphones and tablets become a standard part of healthcare as we know it, telemedicine is gaining a new foothold in medicine too.  In some cases, we’re talking off the cuff transactions in which, say, a patient e-mails a photo to a doctor who can then diagnose and prescribe.  But telemedicine is also taking root on an institutional level, with health systems rolling out projects across the country.

The problem is, however, that these telemedicine projects simply don’t integrate with EMRs, according to an article in SearchHealthIT.  The piece’s writer, Don Fluckinger, recently attended American Telemedicine Association’s 2013 Annual International Meeting & Trade Show, where complaints were rife that EMRs and telemedicine don’t interoperate.

I really liked this summary of the situation one executive shared with Fluckinger:

For now, the executive (who asked not to be named) said, telemedicine providers need to keep away from the “blast radius” of EHR vendor conflicts, lest their budgets get consumed by building interfaces to the various non-interoperable EHR systems.

Not only are health systems struggling to integrate telemedicine data with EMRs, telemedicine providers are in a bit of a difficult spot too, Fluckinger notes. As an example, he tells the tale of Seattle-based Carena Inc., a provider of primary care services to patients via phone and video, which provides after-hours support to physicians at Franciscan Health System in Tacoma, Wash.

Carena itself has an EMR which has the ability to share searchable PDF documents for use in patient EMRs, but Franciscan’s seven hospitals are bringing up an Epic implementation which can’t support this trick.  Top execs at Franciscan want to connect Carena’s data to Epic, but that won’t happen right away.  So Franciscan may end up setting up Carena’s after-hours service within Franciscan’s Epic installation to work around the interoperability problem.

This is just one sample of the interoperability obstacles healthcare organizations are encountering when they set out to create a telemedicine service. As telemedicine explodes with the use of portable devices, I can only imagine that this will impose one more pressure on vendors to conquer compatibility problems. (But sadly, I doubt it will force any real changes in the near future.)