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Sometimes Health Is About A Simple Connection to the Right People

Posted on June 24, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

One of our biggest health care costs comes from our aging population. No doubt they’re a challenging group that often has multiple chronic conditions and is generally seen as anti-technology. While their medical conditions can be a challenge, it’s unfair to say that technology can’t have a great impact for good on even senior citizens.

In fact, one of the biggest health challenges senior citizens face is loneliness. It’s amazing the health impact being lonely can have on a person. The great thing is that technology as simple as a tablet can have a dramatic impact for good on senior citizens. Here’s a great video from Samsung and Breezie that illustrates this point:

I’ve seen a number of solutions like the Breezie tablets that have made the internet extremely accessible for senior citizens. It’s extraordinary to watch the impact for good that connecting to their friends and family on a tablet can have on a person. Plus, once their emotional state is in a better place, it’s often much easier for them to deal with their physical health challenges as well.

The amazing part is that these tablets don’t need some sort of complex health apps. They don’t need an AI generated dog to be their friend (Although, people are working on this). They don’t need dozens of healthcare sensors that are constantly monitoring their every health stat (Although, people are working on this too). All these seniors need is simple apps like Facebook where they can see pictures of their grandkids and email where they can communicate with their family and friends.

I’m sure that as things progress we’ll see more and more advanced health apps on these tablets. Many seniors have a challenge traveling to see their doctor, so you can easily see how a telemedicine app would be very convenient for both patient and doctor. Plus, sometimes you don’t even need video, but just a personal message from your trusted caregiver to help a patient feel better. All of this will come to the tablets, but we can start with something much simpler. A basic connection to the right people for that person.

I heard of one project where the patient improvement came as much from the daily call these lonely, elderly patients received as it was the actual study that was being conducted. While we could throw more people at the problem, that only scales so far. If we really want to scale this type of care to seniors, we’re going to need to utilize technology. These tablets designed for seniors are a great place to start. Then, we can build from there.

I don’t think it will be long before we see doctors prescribing tablets to patients. It’s not currently in doctors normal line of thinking, but maybe it should be.

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Google Health Resets…errr…Put on Ice?

Posted on May 12, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The always insightful John Moore (so many great John’s in Healthcare IT), posted a great blog post back in September of 2010 about Google Health hitting the reset button. The post was interesting as it tried to show Google Health going in a new direction. The irony was that almost a year ago John had posted about Google Health’s irrelevancy in the PHR market.

Despite the up downs of Google Health, today John put Google Health in Stasis. He sights a great list of yellow and dark orange flags that are a bad sign for those who love Google Health. Here’s one section from his post:

Beginning in late March 2011, we started hearing the rumors of the impending demise of Google Health once again (is this becoming some sort of annual thing with Google Health?). We waited a few weeks to see if the rumors would die down, they did not. We put a call into Google Health to set up a briefing, get an update. Response back was slow (one yellow flag). When they did get back to us, they said it will be at least a couple of weeks (two yellow flags). Next, our Google contact told us by email that they were going to hand Chilmark’s inquiry off to Google’s PR department (screaming dark orange flag). And now today, we received an email from one of Google Health’s most visible spokespersons, Missy Krasner that she is leaving Google.

He then projected that we shouldn’t “expect anything new out of Google Health for at least the next 5 years.” That’s quite the projection. However, I’d take it one step further. I don’t expect to see anything really mainstream out of PHR software for another 5 years either.

I do think that PHR software is going to have a strong showing in chronic patients. I could also see an interesting niche in secondary caretaker healthcare management using a PHR (I’ve got an interesting announcement about baby boomer healthcare coming soon). I definitely want an online means for tracking my parents healthcare. Not to mention, then all of my brothers and sisters could participate as well. A few other niches are likely to be successful as well. Not to mention, other consumer PHR-like applications for healthcare that will become popular like the Nike+.