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Post-Acute Facilities Behind On IT Use

Posted on February 17, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @annezieger on Twitter.

A new report from research firm Black Book concludes that smart technology use will be essential to the health of post-acute facilities, which are struggling with Medicare reimbursement changes, more Medicaid patients and newly covered patients from insurance exchanges.

At present, post-acute facilities are still “stuck in a volume-based care mindset,” said Doug Brown, president of Black Book’s parent company, Brown-Wilson Group, in an announcement. “It is going to take a willingness to adapt and commit to using technology to confront the challenges ahead.”

Black Book surveyed 464 providers of long-term and post-acute care, including nursing homes, hospitals, short-term rehabilitation facilities, skilled nursing facilities and hospices in an effort to determine what strategic responses these facilities should make in response to a challenging reimbursement environment and higher demand for post-acute services.

The study, which focused on post-acute IT use, attempts to determine whether there are more efficient ways to improve such care using IT tools. The survey reported on health information exchanges (public and private), quality reporting, health analytics, workflow and care coordination, and patient engagement software/systems.

As things stand, 63% of all post-acute providers report extremely poor or non-existent use of information systems, technology and patient data exchanges, including 79% of all nursing homes and skilled nursing facilities. This is the case despite the fact that 92% of post-acute providers agree that IT platforms for patient data sharing a comprehensive care coordination would improve their organizations’ financial health, as well as improving their ability to function under accountable care systems and lower fee-for-service reimbursement.

To better manage the transition between inpatient care and post-acute environments, it will be necessary to connect physician practices, home health agencies, hospices, outpatient settings, skilled nursing facilities, rehabilitation centers, DME firms, and hospitals, said Brown.

Being Moral and Right, ACOs, and Medical Bills: #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on March 2, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Topic One: Will 2013 by the “Year Of The Great #EHR Switch” as predicted by Black Book Rankings. Why or Why not?

Topic Two: @Farzad_ONC told #healthIT vendors they must do what is “moral and right” or face consequences.” What acts cross the line?

Topic Three: A recent WSJ article said “#ACOs hold caregivers accountable without requiring patient accountability.” Do you agree?

Topic Four: What are your thoughts on the recent Time magazine article Bitter Pill: Why Medical Bills are Killing Us?

Topic Five: #HIMSS13 Free-For-All. What are your key sessions, conference suggestions and restaurant recommendations?

Top EMR Vendors – Solo Physician Practice – Black Book Rankings

Posted on August 19, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m always interested in ways to try and differentiate the various EMR and EHR vendors. I’m completely sympathetic with doctors who are sorting through the 300+ EMR Companies in the marketplace. Most doctors I know, don’t want to become software selection experts or at least don’t want to spend their free time doing it.

However, it’s amazing the various services out there that try and capitalize on this need that doctors have to narrow down the field of EHR vendors. I think that’s basically what the Black Book EMR Rankings (listed on Amazon even) are basically doing with their EHR rankings. Yes, I know Black Book’s been around for a while, but I just saw it again and had to post.

They try and say that they sent the survey out to 70,000 “physician leaders and non-clinical administrators of publicly traded hospital corporations, private hospitals, academic medical institutions, multispecialty medical group practices, small and multiple physician practices, hospitalist groups, emergency departments, institutional members and officers of various healthcare/medical and IT professional organizations, subscribers of our media partners and previously validated survey participants.”

The problem is that they only received “4502 validated respondents ranked 174 EMR suppliers.”[emphasis mine] I’m not a statistics guru, but I wouldn’t be putting my EMR selection on an average of 25 responses per EMR. Plus, for many EMR it was likely much lower than 25. Not to mention, they only had responses from 174 companies. What about the other 126+ EHR vendors that had 0 responses?

Plus, the Black Book breaks it down even further by size of practice. They have 6 categories in just the ambulatory side. That’s an average of just over 4 responses per EHR vendor per category size. Although, it’s less since they have a bunch of acute care categories as well.

When you look at the list, I see a lot of the major EHR companies and a bunch of companies I’ve never heard of before. Not to mention there are a lot of big time EHR players from companies that Black Book probably has never heard about that aren’t on the list.

Unfortunately, there’s no real quality source to differentiate the various EHR companies. If there was I’d shout it from the rooftops (or at least my blog). Until then, the only solution is the work of reviewing your needs and evaluating the various EHR software yourself.

Since I’m sure many will wonder what EHR vendors made the Black Book list, here’s the list of Top Ambulatory EHR companies by practice size after the break: Read more..

Late EHR buyers focused on vendor customer service

Posted on February 14, 2011 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @annezieger on Twitter.

A new user poll suggests that vendor support is more important than ever to providers  searching for EHRs.  New research from the Black Book Rankings concludes that late adopters of EHRs  are especially concerned about finding vendors who will support their products  through implementation.

Researchers surveyed roughly  30,000 medical  records professionals, hospital execs and medical practice administrators, asking them how vendors rated on 18 performance indicators useful  in comparing customer experience.

The study found that:

* CPSI, Healthland Clinicals  and HMS were rated as offering the best customer  experience for hospitals under 100 beds

* Cerner, Dell and Quadramed  got top rankings for community hospitals  of 101-249 beds

* Dell, Epic  and Siemens were rated best  among major medical centers of 250+ beds and academic medical centers

EHR vendors, are you ready to do a  lot of handholding?  If not, it seems you may get edged out by EHR developers who are. Consider yourself warned.