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The Exciting Future of Healthcare IT #NHITWeek

Posted on September 28, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One time I went to my wife’s OB/GYN appointment and I was in shock and awe with how well the doctor remembered my wife’s past pregnancies. Literally down to the tear that occurred. The reason I was in shock was that she prefaced her memory of my wife’s medical history with “Your old chart is off in storage, but as I recall you had a…”

While year later I’m still impressed with this OB/GYN’s ability to remember her patients, I know that this is not always the case. Doctors are humans and can’t possibly remember everything that occurred with every patient. Humans have limits. In fact, doctors deserve credit that they’ve provided such amazing medical care to so many patients despite these limits.

My esteem for doctors grows even greater when I think of the challenges associated with diagnosing computer problems (Yes, I am the nerd formerly known as @techguy). It’s not easy diagnosing a computer problem and then applying the fix that will remedy the problem. In fact, you often find yourself fixing the problem without really even knowing what’s causing the problem (ie. reinstall or reboot). While fixing computers is challenging, diagnosing and treating the human body has to be at least an order and probably two or more orders of magnitude more complex.

My point is that the work doctors do is really hard and they’ve generally done great work.

While I acknowledge the history of medicine, I also can’t help but think that technology is the pathway to solving many of the challenges that make doctors lives so difficult today. It seems fitting to me that IT stands for Information Technology since the core of healthcare’s challenges revolve around information.

Here are some of the ways technology can and will help:

Quality Information
The story of my wife’s OB/GYN is the perfect illustration of this potential. Doctors who have the right information at the point of care can provide better care. That’s a simple but powerful principle that can become a reality with healthcare IT. Instead of relying on this OB/GYN’s memory, she could have had that information readily available to her in an EHR.

Certainly, we’re not perfect at this yet. EHR software can go down. EHR can perpetuate misinformation. EHRs can paint the incorrect picture for a patient. However, on the whole, I believe an EHRs data is more accessible and available when and where it’s needed. Plus, this is going to get dramatically better over time. In some cases, it already is.

Deep Understanding of Individual Health Metrics
Health sensors are just starting to come into their own. As these health sensors create more and more clinically relevant data, healthcare providers will be empowered with a much deeper understanding of the specific health metrics that matter for each unique patient. Currently, doctors are often driving in the dark. This new wave of health sensors will be like turning the lights on in places that have never seen light before. In some cases, it already is.

Latest Medical Research
Doctors do an incredible job keeping up on the latest research in their specialty, but how can they keep up with the full body of medical knowledge? Even if they study all day and all night (which they can’t do because they have to see patients), the body of medical knowledge is so complex that the human mind can’t comprehend, process, and remember it all. Technology can.

I’m not suggesting that technology will replace humans. Not for the forseeable future anyway. However, it can certainly assist, inform, and remind humans. My phone already does this for me in my personal life. Technology will do the same for doctors in their clinical life. In some cases, it already is.

Patient Empowerment
Think about how dramatic a shift it’s been from a patient chart which the patient never saw to EHR software that makes your entire record available to patients all the time. If that doesn’t empower patients, nothing will. I love reading about how many kings use to suppress their people by suppressing information. Information is power and technology can make access to your health information possible.

Related to this trend is also how patients become more empowered through communities of patients with similar conditions and challenges. The obvious example is Patients Like Me, but it’s happening all over the internet and on social media. This is true for chronic patients who want to find patients with a rare condition, but it’s also true for patients who are finding the healthcare system a challenge to navigate. There is nothing more empowering than finding someone in a similar situation that can help you find the best opportunities and solutions to your problems.

In some cases, patient empowerment is already happening today.

Yes, I know that many of the technologies implemented to date don’t meet this ambitious vision of what technology can accomplish in healthcare. In fact, many health technologies have actually made things worse instead of better. This is a problem that must be dealt with, but it doesn’t deter me from the major hope I have the technology can solve many of the challenges that make being a doctor so hard. It doesn’t deter me from the dream that patients will be empowered to take a more active role in their care. It doesn’t deter me from the desire to leverage technology to make our healthcare system better.

The best part of my 11 years in healthcare IT has been seeing technology make things better on a small scale (“N of 1” –@cancergeek). My hope for the next decade is to see these benefits blow up on a much larger scale.

Duplicate Work in Healthcare

Posted on July 7, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of my favorite stories is the time we implemented an EHR in the UNLV health center. At first, we decided to do a phased implementation in order to replace some legacy bubble sheet software that was no longer being supported. So, we just implemented enough of the PM system to handle the patient scheduling and to capture the charge data in the EHR. Of course, we were also a bit afraid if we implemented the full EHR, the staff would revolt.

A week or two into the partial implementation, something really amazing happened. First, some of the providers started to document the patient visit in the EHR even though they still had to document it in the paper chart as well. I asked them why and they just said, “It was there and I thought it would be good to have my info in the note.”

Second, some of the providers started asking me why they had to do duplicate work. They really hated having to enter the diagnosis and charge codes into the EHR and then document them again in the paper chart. Plus, they followed up that they could see the other section of the notes in the EHR and “why couldn’t they just use that instead of the paper chart.” The reality was: Doctors hated doing duplicate work!

Once I heard this, I ran to the director of the Health Center’s office and told her what they’d said. We both agreed, why wait? A week or so later we’d moved from paper charts to a full EHR implementation.

There were a lot of lessons learned from this experience. First, it’s amazing how people want to use the new system when they can see that it’s possible. They basically drove the EHR implementation forward. However, what was interesting to me was the power of “duplicate work.” We all hate it and it was a driving force for using technology the right way.

While we used the concept of duplicate work for good, there’s a lot of duplicate work in healthcare which drives patients and healthcare staff totally nuts. However, we don’t do anything about it. This was highlighted perfectly in a recent e-Patient update from Anne Zieger. Go and read her full account. We’ll be here when you get back.

What’s astounding from her account is how even though doctors hate duplicate work for themselves, we’re happy to let our patients and support staff do duplicate work all the time. I’ve seen some form of Anne’s experience over and over. Technology can and should solve this. This is true across multiple clinics but is absolutely true in the same clinic where you handle the workflow.

I get that there are reasons why you may want a staff to verify a patient’s record to ensure it was entered correctly and is complete. That’s absolutely understandable and would not have likely been an issue for Anne. However, to disregard the work a patient had done on their intake paperwork is messed up. Let alone not tapping into a patient’s history that may have been entered at another clinic owned by the same organization or collecting/updating the info electronically through a patient portal. I’m reminded of @cancergeek’s recent comment about the excuse that “it’s how we’ve always done it.”

In the past this might not have mattered too much. Patients would keep coming back. However, the tides of consumerism in healthcare are changing. Do you enjoy doing duplicate work? Of course not! It’s time to purge duplicate work for patients and healthcare staff as well!

What Does It Take to Create the Ideal Patient Experience? – #MyIdealPtExp

Posted on December 14, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This new world of social media has created so many virtual friends for me. Over time I’ve had a chance to meet so many of them in person. While sometimes it’s a disappointment meeting someone in person, I’ve also had the opposite experience. This happened at RSNA when I got a chance to meet Andy DeLaO (@CancerGeek) in person. I’d always been impressed by his insightful tweets over the years. So, I was blown away when he was even more impressive and insightful in person. I love it when that happens.

One of the most impressive things he showed me was his new effort around what he calls My Ideal Patient Experience. He even had these really cool coins to hand out which was a great way for me to remember his concept:
My Ideal Patient Experience
Andy the team behind My Ideal Patient Experience has gone through the research and defined the patient experience using these 4 pillars:

  • Time
  • Trust
  • Transparency
  • Transitions

However, it’s worth considering the connective tissue between all 4 pillars:

Time Leads To Trust, Trust Leads To Transparency , Transparency Leads To Transitions; The 4t’s Lead To Relationships And Success!

Andy and his team have been at this for a while even though they’re just now getting their official patient experience website launched. I love that they’re even keeping track of their stats:

  • 50,850 Patients Impacted
  • 878 Physicians Engaged
  • 46 Clients Worked With
  • 30 Completed Projects

If you’re looking to improve the way you engage with patients or your patient experience, take a second to look at the consulting, market research, healthcare engagement, and education resources they offer. After my experience finally meeting Andy in person, I’m excited to see the impact for good “My Ideal Patient Experience” will have on healthcare. Plus, I look forward to digging into the concepts even more in the future.