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Integrating With EMR Vendors Remains Difficult, But This Must Change

Posted on October 4, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Eventually, big EMR vendors will be forced to provide a robust API that makes it easy to attach services on to their core platform. While they may see it as a dilution of their value right now, in time it will become clear that they can’t provide everything to everyone.

For example, is pretty unlikely that companies like Epic and Cerner will build genomics applications, so they’re going to need to connect using an API to add that functionality for their users. (Check out this video with John Lynn, Chris Bradley of Mana Health and Josh Siegel of CareCloud for more background on building a usable healthcare API.)

But as recent research points out, some of the vendors may be dragged kicking and screaming in that direction before they make it easy to connect to their systems. In fact, a new study by Health 2.0 concludes that smaller health IT vendors still face significant difficulties integrating with EMRs created by larger vendors.

“The complaint is true: it’s hard for smaller health tech companies to integrate their solutions with big EMR vendors,” wrote Health 2.0’s Matthew Holt on The Health Care Blog. “Most EMR vendors don’t make it easy.”

The study, which was supported by the California Health Care Foundation, surveyed more than 100 small health technology firms. The researchers found that only two EMR vendors (athenahealth and Allscripts) were viewed by smaller vendors as having a well-advertised, easy to access partner program. When it came to other large vendors, about half were happy with Epic, Cerner and GE’s efforts, while NextGen and eClinicalWorks got low marks for ease of integration, Holt reported.

To get the big vendors on board, it seems as though customer pressure is still critical at present, Holt says. Vendors reported that it helped a great deal if they had a customer who was seeking the integration. The degree to which this mattered varied, but it seemed to be most important in the case of Epic, with 70% of small vendors saying that they needed to have a client recommend them before Epic would get involved in integration project.

But that doesn’t mean it’s smooth sailing from there on out.  Even in the case where the big EMR vendors got involved with the integration project, smaller tech vendors weren’t fond of many of their APIs .

More than a quarter of those using Epic and Cerner APIs rated them poorly, followed by 30% for NextGen, GE and MEDITECH and a whopping 50% for eClinicalWorks. The smaller vendors’ favorite APIs seemed to be the ones offered by athenahealth, Allscripts and McKesson. According to Holt, athenahealth’s API got the best ratings overall.

All that being said, some of the smaller vendors weren’t that enthusiastic about pushing for integration with big EMR vendors at present. Of the roughly 30% who haven’t integrated with such vendors, half said it wasn’t worth the effort to try and integrate, for reasons that included the technical or financial cost would be too great. Also, some of the vendors surveyed by Health 2.0 reported they were more focused on other data-gathering efforts, such as accessing wearables data.

Still, EMR vendors large and small need to change their attitude about opening up the platform, and smaller vendors need to support them when they do so. Otherwise, the industry will remain trapped by a self-fulfilling prophecy that true integration can never happen.

Building a Usable Healthcare API

Posted on August 31, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve long believed that a rock solid API is going to be required by healthcare IT software companies and EHR vendors in particular. If we want hospitals and doctors to be able to accomplish everything they need to accomplish, we need APIs to connect providers to services that will better serve the patients. EHR vendors aren’t going to do everything. With this in mind, we thought that it was time to start a discussion on how to build a usable healthcare API.

On Thursday, September 8th at 3:30 PM ET (12:30 PM PT), join us LIVE in our latest Healthcare Scene interview, as we discuss healthcare APIs with the following experts:

2016 September - Building a Usable Healthcare API-Headshots
There are a lot of people who talk generally about an API, but very few that have executed it well in healthcare. CareCloud and ManaHealth are two healthcare companies that are trying to implement a health care API in the right way, so we’re excited to sit down with them to talk about their experience building healthcare APIs.

If you’ve never watched one of our live video interviews, you can watch it live on this YouTube page (includes Live Chat room as well) or just visit this post on the day of the event and watch the video embedded below:

We look forward to shedding more light on what it takes to build a high quality, usable healthcare API.

Be sure to Subscribe to Healthcare Scene on YouTube to be updated on our future interviews or watch our archive of past Healthcare Scene Interviews.

$5 million for a PMS and Revenue Cycle Management

Posted on October 13, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’d been meaning to post this for a while. It’s the news that the company CareCloud got a $5 million round of financing after their initial $2.3 million round of financing. Here’s the description of Care Cloud from the Techcrunch post:

A cloud-based app suite, CareCloud attempts to modernize the process of being a healthcare provider; physicians can use CareCloud’s web-based apps to streamline the managing of their businesses as well as collaborate with other doctors in the CareCloud’s healthcare provider social network.

The interesting part of this to me is that when I visited the CareCloud website it seems that they are basically a PMS and Revenue Cycle Management company. That seems like a lot of funding for such a niche.

The website does mention the healthcare provider social network which kind of sounds like a health information exchange, but really doesn’t give any details of how CareCloud plans to connect all these doctors together. Plus, without an EHR software or connections to other EHR software, what information are they planning to share?

I guess I’m still trying to get the vision of what $2.3 million was spent on initially and where they plan on spending the next $5 million. That’s a lot of cash if they’re just going to be a PMS and Revenue Cycle Management company. Of course, maybe they just need to spend some of that $5 million and update their website to portray what they’re really trying to do.