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Department Of Defense (DOD) EHR Delayed By “Aggressive Schedule”

Posted on September 7, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

The Department of Defense has announced that it will be delaying the deployment of its massive EHR project, citing issues identified in testing and an “aggressive schedule” as reasons for the decision. If the DoD and its vendors are right, the deployment delay will be a negligible few months, though one setback to an effort of this kind usually to leads to another.

On the plus side, military officials said, they’ve made significant progress with developing user-approved workflows, interfaces and technical integration of its legacy system to date. But they’re not ready to engage in the concurrent system configuration, cybersecurity risk management, contractor and government testing yet.

The deployment has been in the works for little over a year. Last summer, the DoD Healthcare System Modernization Program awarded the $4.3 billion contract to upgrade its existing Military Health System EHR to a group including Cerner and defense contracting firm Leidos. The Cerner/Leidos team won out against some tough competition, including a partnership including Allscripts, HP and Computer Sciences Corp. and an Epic/IBM bid.

The ten-year project is about as large and complex an integration effort as you’re likely to see even by Cerner standards. The effort will connect healthcare systems located at Army hospitals, on Naval vessels, in battlefield clinics across the globe. MHS GENESIS will bring all of this data — on active-duty members, reservists, and civilian contractors — into a single open, interoperable platform. The new platform should serve 9.5 million military beneficiaries in roughly 1,000 locations.

The project is upgrading the DoD from AHLTA (Armed Forces Health Longitudinal Technology Application), which has been in place since 2004. AHLTA has many flaws, though none that would surprise a health IT expert. (For example, when patients are referred to non DoD providers, the data is not captured and integrated into the system.)

Ultimately, it won’t matter very much whether the DoD manages to kick off its project on time. The larger question, here, is whether over the course of a 10-year integration effort, the project becomes, as Forbes columnist Loren Thompson puts it, “obsolete before it’s even built” and incapable of the data sharing that fueled its conception. Of course, any systems integration with a long timeline faces that risk, but not all industries are changing as quickly as healthcare.

The truth is, this is arguably an awkward time for any large entity to be making big interoperability plans. I’d argue that while there are more initiatives than ever aimed at the problem, they’ve effectively made things worse rather than better. After all, the unfortunate truth is that the more people compete over interoperability standards, the less possible data sharing becomes.

This Image Says it All – Paperless EHR Training

Posted on May 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I love irony and so I loved this picture and message posted to Instagram by @Liz_Money. She said:

“The irony of teaching a paperless EMR. I have a massive binder of paper. And this is just the first draft of curricula that will have endless edits and reprints. #paperguilt”

Paperless EHR Training

For those keeping track at home, I think this is Epic, but it could be Cerner since she does some work on both.

All I can say is…we can do better!

Ice Storms and The Benefit of a Connected EHR

Posted on March 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’ve often heard the good and bad stories that come out of disasters like Hurricane Katrina or Superstorm Sandy. In some cases, the EHR is a savior and is able to get the doctor the data they need because the EHR is still up and running and can be accessed remotely. In other cases, the power supplies are flooded and the EHR is down for the count (check out this video interview where I discuss why Las Vegas data centers don’t have these natural disaster issues).

A similar story hit my inbox right before HIMSS that looked at the benefits of having an EHR during all the ice storms (#Snowmageddon as Jennifer Dennard called it).

What happened in this story is that hundreds of patients and medical people were stuck at the physician office because of the storm (ironically this was at University of Alabama – Birmingham health system, the same place that brain surgeon walked 6 miles in the storm to do surgery). No one brought their medications, since they assumed they’d go in for a 15 minute appointment, then go home for the day. This left the patients and the practice in a challenging situation.

The good part is that the Kirklin Clinic, where this occurred, was on the Cerner EHR which had ePrescribing and access to the patients prescription history. Plus, there was a pharmacy a few minute walk away from the clinic.

This is a pretty small example, unless you’re the patient trapped in the clinic and needed access to your meds. Then, the fact that the clinic could quickly access your med history and write a prescription for you to get your medication while you waited out the storm is literally a life saver.

The problem with stories like this is that they’re hard to add in to an EHR ROI calculation. I believe there are hundreds of small examples like this where a connected EHR with your medical history can not only provide better patient care, but also save lives. There’s just no good way to put a possible saved life on an ROI calculation.