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Dumb Question 101: What’s Workflow Doing in an EHR?

Posted on March 29, 2016 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

This was going to be a five year relook at Practice Fusion. Back then, I’d written a critical review saying I wouldn’t be a PF consultant. Going over PF now, I found it greatly changed. For example, I criticized it not having a shared task list. Now, it does. Starting to trace other functions, a question suddenly hit me. Why did I think an EHR should have a shared task list or any other workflow function for that matter?

It’s a given that an EHR is supposed to record and retrieve a patient’s medical data. Indeed, if you search for the definition of an EHR, you’ll find just that. For example, Wikipedia defines it this way:

An electronic health record (EHR), or electronic medical record (EMR), refers to the systematized collection of patient and population electronically-stored health information in a digital format.[1] These records can be shared across different health care settings. Records are shared through network-connected, enterprise-wide information systems or other information networks and exchanges. EHRs may include a range of data, including demographics, medical history, medication and allergies, immunization status, laboratory test results, radiology images, vital signs, personal statistics like age and weight, and billing information.[2]

Other definitions, such as HIMSS are similar, but add another critical element, workflow:

The EHR automates and streamlines the clinician’s workflow.

Is this a good or even desirable thing? Now, before Chuck Webster shoots out my porch lights, that doesn’t mean I’m anti workflow. However, I do ask what are workflow features doing in an EHR?

In EHRs early days, vendors realized they couldn’t drop one in a practice like a fax machine. EHRs were disruptive and not always in a good way. They often didn’t play well with practice management systems or the hodgepodge of forms, charts and lists they were replacing.

As a result, vendors started doing the workflow archeology and devising new ones as part of their installs. Over time, EHRs vendors started touting how they could reform not just replace an old system.

Hospitals were a little different. Most had IT staff that could shoehorn a new system into their environment. However, as troubled hospital EHR rollouts attest, they rarely anticipated the changes that EHRs would bring about.

Adding workflow functions to an EHR may have caused what my late brother called a “far away” result. That is, the farther away you were from something, the better it looked. With EHR workflow tools, the closer you get to their use, the more problems you may find.

EHRs are designed for end users. Adding workflow tools to these assumes that the users understand workflow dynamics and can use them accordingly. Sometimes this works well, but just as often the functions may not be as versatile as the situation warrants. Just ask the resident who can’t find the option they really need.

I think the answer to EHR workflow functions is this. They can be nice to have, like a car’s backup camera. However, having one doesn’t make you a good driver. Having workflow functions shouldn’t fool you into thinking that’s all workflow requires.

The only way to determine what’s needed is by doing a thorough, requirements analysis, working closely with users and developing the necessary workflow systems.

A better approach would be a workflow system that embeds its features in an EHR. That way, the EHR could fit more seamlessly its environment, rather than the other way around.

#HIMSS16 Exhibitors with Great Workflow Stories

Posted on February 12, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: You can see the recorded video of this discussion in the YouTube video embedded below:

HIMSS16 Exhibitors with Great Workflow Stories-blog

Chuck Webster, MD, or as most people know him, @wareflo, is famous for always talking about healthcare workflow. You can talk about EHR and he’ll bring up workflow. You can talk about population health and he’ll discuss the workflow aspects of it. You can talk about buying a cheeseburger at McDonalds and he’ll talk about workflow. You can talk about your tweeting strategy and he’ll talk about workflow. He should really consider changing his name to Mr. Workflow.

One thing I’ve always found interesting is that each year Chuck goes through the list of HIMSS exhibitors (yes, all ~1300 of them…he’s insane like that!) and identifies which ones are using workflow technology to solve the problems of healthcare. With that in mind, I thought a blab with Chuck and other HIMSS16 vendors who include some aspect of workflow in their solutions would be a great intro to #HIMSS16. So, on Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at Noon ET (9 AM PT), I’ll be sitting down with Charles Webster and some #HIMSS16 vendors that are interested in workflow.

You can join my live conversation with Chuck Webster and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask Chuck questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at Noon ET (9 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’re hoping to include as many people in the conversation as possible. The discussion will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

If you’re a healthcare IT vendor that has a solution that helps with healthcare workflows, we’d love to have you join us on the blab (video, chat, or just viewing). If you want to hop on video, you’ll probably want to visit the blab directly. Otherwise, if you just want to watch us chat, the video below will go live on the day of the blab.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

Does Meaningful Use Inspire Innovative or Mediocre Systems?

Posted on December 12, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was absolutely intrigued by Dr. Webster’s tweet about the impact of meaningful use (MU) and the types of systems it inspires. I think everyone would agree that MU has done nothing to inspire innovative EHR systems to be created and I think most would agree that it’s mostly fostered the creation of mediocre systems.

I’m not saying that meaningful use has no redeeming qualities. It definitely drove adoption of EHR software. Some of the meaningful use requirements like ePrescribing and CPOE were already moving forward for many organizations and meaningful use threw gas on those fires. I think those will turn out to be really beneficial components to meaningful use.

We could talk about the overall impact of MU (good or bad), but I’m not sure how productive of a conversation that would be. Meaningful Use is the reality of today. So, instead of focusing backwards on something we can’t change, I’m interested to think about what meaningful use could become. For all intents and purposes, that’s going to be called meaningful use stage 3 (unless ONC decides to spend time on a rebranding).

The key question: Could Meaningful Use inspire innovative EHRs and other innovative health IT?

While I’m skeptical of government regulation doing much for innovation, I think there’s a chance that this could happen. The key change will be that meaningful use needs to move away from its prescriptive approach and requirements. Innovation rarely comes from prescriptive approaches to anything.

Instead of being so prescriptive, meaningful use should focus on creating frameworks for which innovation can happen. My initial analysis of FHIR is that this is directionally right when it comes to inspiring innovation in healthcare IT. I need to dig into the details a bit more, but the concepts of creating an open framework for health IT companies to innovate on top of EHR data is what things like meaningful use should incentivize. Reimbursement should help to encourage this type of innovation. HIPAA should be clarified to support this type of innovation.

RHIR is just one example and I’m sure there are many others. It’s an open approach which encourages the right things while not damaging those for which it doesn’t make any sense. To me that’s the major difference between a prescriptive requirements list versus a framework oriented approach.

Do we really care that doctors game the system to be able to meet the 5% patient engagement requirement of meaningful use? What value does that provide the healthcare system if they’re not truly engaging? That’s too prescriptive. I’m all for patient engagement. Doctors are too. However, these prescriptive MU requirements just cause doctors to game the system as opposed to truly engage.

What do you think could be done with MU so that it inspires innovative EHRs instead of mediocre systems?