Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

Debating Gender’s Role in Healthcare Leadership

Posted on August 17, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

Some of you may have noticed a new hash tag popping up in healthcare’s tweet stream – #HITChicks was coined earlier this summer by Julie Moffitt, Regional Affairs Coordinator at HIMSS and @HIEChick on Twitter. To me, it was a fun and playful way of bringing together women who actively tweet about various aspects of healthcare.

Men, or #HITDudes, if you will, also joined the conversation:

And let’s not forget:

The article that Michael Gaspar references above, “Healthcare Lacks Female Execs,” pulls stats from a RockHealth report (whose founder, by the way, is a woman), which relates that women account for 73 percent of medical and health services managers, but only 4 percent of healthcare organization CEOs and 18 percent of hospital CEOs. According to the 100 women surveyed for the report, we lack enough self-confidence and simply don’t have enough time to take on executive roles.

Is self-confidence really that much of an issue that it would prevent a woman from taking on a leadership position? I find that particular statistic very surprising, especially considering the number of female healthcare executives in my home state of Georgia – Donna Hyland of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Dee Cantrell of Emory Healthcare, Gretchen Tegethoff of Athens Regional Medical Center, Deborah Cancilla of Grady Health System, Carol Burrell of Northeast Georgia Health System …. We certainly aren’t experiencing a dearth down here.

Of course, anytime you have an article (or a hash tag) that differentiates women from men, you have to consider whether you’re promoting a “problem” that doesn’t really exist anymore. Do we really even need to make distinctions between male and female when it comes to climbing the corporate ladder? Do we owe it to young women to ensure that they have proper role models to look up to – and do those role models have to be the same gender?

It’s a loaded question that I’ll put to you, dear readers. Should we continue to point out the differences between men and women in healthcare leadership positions? Why or why not? Please discuss amongst yourselves in the comments section below.

Why You’re Never Going to Leave a Healthcare IT Job at 5:30

Posted on April 19, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

Anybody catch the recent Mashable.com or CNN articles on the feedback Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg has received because she makes it a point to leave work at 5:30 pm every day? (You can read them here and here.) In a nutshell, Sandberg has always left the office around that time – a practice she started when she first had kids, but has only felt comfortable talking about it now that she is in upper management and (presumably) somewhat immune to corporate push back. ( Don’t confuse leaving work with not working, by the way. Sandberg, like many others, checks email at all hours.)

Mashable CEO Pete Cashmore, who authored the CNN.com story, summarizes the mini-controversy that has evolved in the tech world as a result of Sandberg’s coming clean: “In a competitive industry where your work is never truly complete, has it become socially awkward to leave work at a time that used to be the standard? And are those working eight-hour days that end at 5 p.m. being quietly judged by their co-workers? Whatever happened to “work-life balance”?

Good questions, to be sure. So good, in fact, that I felt compelled to pose a similar query to a panel of current and former healthcare CIOs – all guys, by the way – at the recent Women in Technology International (WITI) / GAHIMSS event, “Women in Healthcare IT Talk.”

Piedmont Healthcare CIO Mark Pasquale was refreshingly candid in his response: “I don’t have a work-life balance.” His point being that, as a CIO overseeing a near-future EPIC ERP system go-live, his work day never really ends, especially given how connected he is via multiple mobile devices. He also pointed out that, as 85% of Piedmont’s install team is internal, Piedmont spent copious amounts of time preparing that staff for the time commitment required to travel to Epic headquarters in Madison, Wisc., for training. Pasquale kept an open door, and said many staff members came by multiple times to hash out whether committing to such an intense project was the right move for them.

From left to right: Christopher Kunney, The BAE Company; Sonny Munter, Georgia Dept. of Community Health; Mark Pasquale, Piedmont Healthcare; Praveen Chopra, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

Fellow panelist Christopher Kunney, HIT Strategist at the BAE Company and former CIO of Piedmont, made the point that you have to be aware of what you’re signing up for when you enter healthcare’s executive ranks. Long days aren’t unusual; they are the norm. Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta CIO Praveen Chopra concurred, adding that his wife makes him limit use of his Blackberry on vacation to just one hour a day. Sonny Munter, CIO of Georgia’s Dept. of Community Health, joked that he leaves his job everyday at 4pm – but gets going around 6 in the morning. Munter added that he makes it a point to surround himself with good staff members, which also helps in balancing his work and family obligations.

From left to right: Lisa McVey, McKesson; Gretchen Tegethoff, Athens Regional Medical Center; Patty Lavely, CIO Consulting LLC; Deborah Cancilla, Grady Health System

A second panel of healthcare executives – all female – pretty much agreed with their male counterparts. Patty Lavely, founder of CIO Consulting LLC and former CIO of three different health systems, did echo Facebook’s Sandberg just a bit in her comment on the subject: “There comes a time when you have to say, ‘This [work] will be here for me tomorrow. I need to go home and have dinner with my family tonight.”

All of the panelists mentioned the need to prioritize workplace projects and challenges in a way that is suitable to the particular balance they need in their lives. They have triaged, so to speak, their commitments, priorities, deadlines, etc. to fit their schedules.

So, can healthcare IT folks – providers or vendors, executives or otherwise – ever be off the clock, never mind leave the office between 5 and 6? Share your stories and advice in the comments below.

Social Media Resources for Healthcare IT Job Seekers

Posted on March 28, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

In my attempts to prepare for a panel discussion during last week’s TAG Health-sponsored HIT Job Fair, I corresponded with a number of you, dear readers, on how you and your colleagues have or are currently using social media in your job hunt. Thanks to everyone who shared their experiences, tips and tricks with me. I was able to relay some of it to the eager job seekers in the audience – many of whom were only vaguely aware of the potential social media can play in helping candidates: manage their personal brand and digital footprint; educate themselves on a particular niche as they transition from one industry into another; and of course, find job openings.

McKesson and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta were just a few of the employers at TAG Health's recent job fair.

The following is a list of resources that I didn’t have time to share during the job fair. Many of them come directly from the fingertips of EMRandEHR.com readers.

* Social Networking for Career Success – great book – no matter what industry you’re in – by Miriam Salpeter of Keppie Careers. You can follow her on Twitter and learn more at her website, KeppieCareers.com, which also includes a guide to Google+ in the books section.

* NWHIT.org – a website devoted to Health IT Workforce Development in the Northwestern States, part of the Community College Consortia to Educate Health IT Professionals Program. It includes some great advice blogs by Health IT Talent Specialist Yvette Herrera-Greer, as well as a session from Matthew Youngquist of Career Horizons on using LinkedIn as an effective tool for job seekers in the Health IT sector. You can also join the organization’s group on LinkedIn – just search for NW Healthcare IT Workforce.

* the @HIMSSJobMine Twitter account is a great national resource, as is the @TAG_Health account if you’re in Georgia.

* Twitter hashtags you may want to consider paying attention to include #HealthIT, #Jobs, or the name of the company, technology or position you’re interested in, such as #CIO, #Allscripts, #Epic, #EHR, etc.

* Pinterest – yep, you read that right. I’d say it’s a little too early to tell whether it will be a valuable resource for folks in healthcare IT, but the recent Forbes article I came across on the subject is worth a look, especially if you’re already a fan of the new social media sight. (Side Note: You can Find Healthcare Scene and EHR Screenshots on Pinterest also)

* CareerEnlightenment.com – a website devoted to helping people use social media to get jobs. Blogger Joshua Waldman is also the author of Job Searching with Social Media for Dummies.

Have additional resources and tips to add? Please share yours in the comments below.

One Student’s Perspective on Electronic Medical Records

Posted on December 7, 2011 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

I’ve had the good fortune in the past year or two to watch one of my daughters’ favorite babysitters blossom into a full-time nursing student at the University of West Georgia. Not only do my girls benefit from her great bedside manner, including an infinite amount of patience, but I get an occasional inside glimpse into the world of digital medical record keeping in the greater Atlanta area.

Her training at West Georgia has taken her to Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta – Egleston, Wellstar Cobb and Austell, Fayette Piedmont, Tanner Medical Center and Gentiva Healthfield Hospice. She graciously offered to share her rookie’s perspective on the electronic medical records – including SCM/Quest (Allscripts Sunrise Clinical EHR system) and Meditech – she has used at several of the facilities she has trained in.

How long have your healthcare training facilities had EMRs in place?
All except Gentiva Healthfield Hospice – in-home hospice care, for the most part, sticks with paper charting. If they were to make the switch to an EMR, they would have to have access to a central database from their personal computers/iPads/Blackberries, etc. All others have had some sort of electronic database for at least five years.

How intuitive did you find them to be in your first training sessions/rounds?
Once I had been trained in the first system I encountered, the rest seemed very user-friendly. They have been in use long enough now that they are efficient and fairly self-explanatory.

They all allow an employee to cluster patient care and spend enough time with the patient because the time stamp on documentation can be changed to the time that the intervention was completed. For example, I could complete a full assessment on a patient, bathe them and administer their medications without having to document in the computer every few minutes. I could just open their EMR after completing their care and add the correct time stamp on my documentation.

What were the easiest to use, and what were the most difficult?
Meditech was the most difficult to use, perhaps because I had limited access as a student. It was difficult to find complete admission notes and patient histories.

Speaking from a “rookie’s” perspective, what would you tell vendors of these systems to better their products?
Add a patient verification requirement before each documentation session, i.e. each set of vital signs, medications given, etc. (Something simple, like a box with the patient’s name and DOB and an “Ok” button)

Did your supervisors express any enthusiasm or dissatisfaction with any particular systems?
All expressed enthusiasm, but they also were concerned any time a system was to be updated with even minor changes. Fayette Piedmont uses one EMR system for Labor and Delivery, and a completely different system for the rest of the hospital. This means, for the staff, that a new baby’s records have to be re-entered into a new system once they are discharged from labor and delivery and admitted to the NICU or postpartum unit. It also means the pharmacy has difficulty accessing vital information when, for instance, they need to know a baby’s weight to send the appropriate dose of medication to the NICU.

How aware are you of post-implementation training that goes on with EMRs, based on the facilities you’ve trained at? Do your supervisors ever mention it?
Once an employee is hired, they usually must display proficiency with the charting system within a specified training period. When Fayette Piedmont updated SCM/Quest, they did not retrain each employee, but they did send out a packet with a detailed description of the changes. From what I have seen, the older nurses who may have preferred paper charting at one point do not seem to have any problems with the electronic charting.

Have you been made aware of any increase/decrease in positive clinical outcomes as a result of physicians/nurses using these systems? Any examples you feel comfortable sharing?
The major changes to these systems each time they are updated usually involve the addition of safeguards. For example, the newest version of SCM/Quest has the patient’s name, weight, room number and allergies on every page of the charting system, and in multiple locations on the page.

For the employees who pay attention, this has reduced many documentation errors. There is also an embedded link to drug guides in every electronic medication order with explicit instructions and safe dose ranges. For the employee who knows these features are there, they are a tremendous help, and they do serve to protect the patient. It is still possible to document in the wrong patient’s chart, without realizing it, in any system.

Needless to say, it will be interesting to see how her experience with EMRs changes as she continues her studies and then moves into the professional world of nursing, which will likely coincide with healthcare facilities continuing to move through the various stages of Meaningful Use.

Stay tuned for next week’s post, in which I’ll profile an EMR educator, and find out what other students are facing when it comes to EMR training. In the meantime, what sort of healthcare IT-related challenges will our new workforce face in the coming year? Please share your thoughts in the comments below.