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Ebola and EHR Workflow

Posted on November 20, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Earlier this month, the EHR Workflow fanatic addict expert, Charles Webster, MD, put together a webinar on EHR workflow (imagine that). However, he decided to piggyback the Ebola headline and talk about EHR workflow and a bit about how it applied to the Ebola incident. I love the marketing behind it.

EHR workflow is a topic of interest to me and so this summer I had Charles Webster, MD do an EHR workflow series over on EMR and HIPAA. Turns out, he covers a number of the same EHR workflow topics in the webinar embedded below:
-What it workflow?
-What is workflow technology?
-What is a workflow engine?
-What is a workflow editor?
-What is workflow visibility?

If you have an interest in EHR workflow, here’s Chuck’s webinar:

Is your company comfortable committing to a social media plan that will actually have impact?

Posted on March 19, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


The above video was shot by Chuck Webster (the man synonymous with EHR workflow) during the Social Media and Influencer session that I participated in at HIMSS. Chuck has done a nice job putting together the video clips of me talking during that session on his blog. Here’s a look at some of the other clips he’s put together:

“The key is — How are you interesting? And how are you valuable? — to the people you’re interacting with.”

“Why are you doing social media?” Sales, something broader, brand experience….?

On curation “We read everything so you don’t have to!” vs “If it’s great content, people will read it.”

“The beauty of social media is it shouldn’t cost you much to start.”

“Is your company comfortable committing to a social media plan that will actually have impact?”

“I love negative engagement!… It’s beautiful! … people will respect you even more.”

Thanks Chuck for recording the session. I hope that many of my readers get some value out of the videos. Plus, I’d be remiss if I didn’t also mention my upcoming Health IT Marketing and PR Conference. If you are interested in the topics I discuss in these videos, then come and enjoy 2 days hearing from a few of the brightest minds in the health IT marketing and PR world. Not to mention some bright minds from outside of health IT as well.

Are “User” And “Process” – Centered EMR Design On A Collision Course?

Posted on April 3, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Most of the critiques I read of EMR design ding the EMR for its difficulty to use or its inability to accomodate the workflow of the institution that bought it — and of course, sometimes both. What I’ve never heard suggested, however, is the following idea proposed by Chuck Webster, a guy who clearly doesn’t stop short when he decides to study something. (He’s an MD, an MSIE and an MSIS in intelligent systems design, which is only one of the reasons I think he’s onto something here.)

In a thoughtful and nuanced blog entry, Dr. Webster outlines the work of a pioneer in usability design, Donald Norman, and comes away with the conclusion that the current trend toward “human-centered design” might actually be a mistake.  What a pain — health IT limps along catching  up with a trend from the 1980s, and now may be too late to catch the bus.

In any event, Dr. Webster argues instead of focusing on human/user-centered design, EMR vendors should be focused on activity- or process-centered design. I love what he says about one of the potential problems with human-centered UIs:

Optimization around a user, or user screen, risks the ultimate systems engineering sin: suboptimization. Individual EHR user screens are routinely optimized at the expense of total EHR system workflow usability…I’ve seen EHR screens, which, considered individually, are jewel-like in appearance and cognitive science-savvy in design philosophy, but which do not work together well.

It’s better, he suggests, to have EMRs model “interleaved and interacting sequences of task accomplishment” first and foremost. For example, he writes, key task collections that should be considered as a whole include workflow management systems, business process management, case management and process-aware information systems.

While there’s much more to say here, of course, I’ll close with Dr. Webster’s words, who once makes his point with wonderful clarity:

User-centered EHR design does help get to good EHRs. Good isn’t good enough. If EHRs and HIT are going to help transform healthcare they need to be better than world-class (compared to what?). They need to be stellar. Traditional user-centered design isn’t going to get us there.

The question I’m left with, readers, is whether you can have your cake and eat it too. Does one side of UI/UX design literally have to be jettisoned to support the other?