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MinuteClinic Goes With Epic – What’s It Mean?

Posted on March 12, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Retail clinic operator MinuteClinic has decided to purchase and roll out the Epic EMR, upgrading from its home built system it’s used until now.  MinuteClinic, a division of CVS Caremark, expects the rollout to take about 18 months.

This is a big win for Epic.  An estimated 274,000 physicians will use the company’s EMR, and roughly 51% the US population will have a record in Epic when its current customer rollouts are complete.

And MinuteClinic has big expansion plans, which will bring Epic to a wide range of new environments.  According to Andrew Sussman, MD, president of Minute Clinic and senior vice president/associate chief medical officer, CVS Caremark,  the company is expanding rapidly, having added more than 350 clinics in the past three years, and planning to reach 1,500 clinics by 2017.

“EpicCare will take us to the next level by offering enhanced connectivity with other providers, more advanced patient portal capabilities and key analytics to run our practice more efficiently and improve patient care,” Sussman said in a press statement.

What’s particularly interesting about this deal is not just that Epic has racked up another big customer, though keeping an eye on their progress is definitely important. No, what’s more newsworthy is the possibility that epic is slowly but steadily changing its strategy, from selling only to large hospitals to exploring other customer relationships on the ambulatory side.

Not only is Epic rolling out a large ambulatory deal with MinuteClinic, the EMR vendor has struck a deal with the Cleveland Clinic and Dell under which the Clinic and Dell offer providers EMR consulting installation configuration and hosting service for Epic.  Bearing in mind the needs of ambulatory providers, the Cleveland Clinic deal even allows buyers to have the Epic EMR hosted mostly by Dell.

Certainly Epic won’t stop pursuing big hospital deals, but the MinuteClinic and Cleveland Clinic agreements suggest that Epic may be looking for other markets beyond the large hospital market. It looks like ambulatory is on their radar and we know they’ve been working hard to grow internationally.

Cleveland Clinic, Dell Offer Joint Epic EHR Service

Posted on February 27, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Even when you’re a juggernaut the size of Epic, eventually you’re going to reach the point where your customer base is saturated and you need unique new directions to go. This new deal between Dell and the Cleveland Clinic may do just that for Epic.

This week at HIMSS, the two are announcing an agreement in which the two will offer consulting, installation, configuration and hosting services for Cleveland Clinic’s version of Epic. Under the deal struck between the two parties, customers can choose between a hosted version of the Epic instance and a full install on their site.

Cleveland Clinic execs say that their knowledge of using Epic, which they have for more than three years, will give them special expertise in helping providers adjust to Epic.  The Clinic has been selling Epic to providers  through its MyPractice Healthcare Solutions business.  To date, MyPractice has sold EMRs to more than 400 providers, including physicians, nurse practitioners and midwives within a 50 mile radius of Cleveland.

Working with Dell, the two companies plan to offer the new EMR service nationwide. The Cleveland Clinic will handle the EMR installation for new customers, and Dell provides the technology infrastructure. Epic gets a licensing fee for each of these deals, the customers’ relationship will be with Dell and the Cleveland Clinic.

As Dr. C. Martin Harris, CIO of the Cleveland Clinic, told Modern Healthcare, most medical practices and hospitals have EMRs in place, leaving only a much smaller group of first-time EMR buyers. But, Harris said, that minis still a big number. (And there’s always the practices still looking to switch.)

Turning Dell and the Cleveland Clinic into a sales channel for Epic seems like a pretty smart move. With the help of players who know the smaller physician practice market, it might open up a new opportunity for Epic which it hadn’t much of a shot at before.

EMRs Get Personal with 23andMe

Posted on October 18, 2013 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

I had the pleasure of visiting the dentist this week. My dental hygienist and I end up having pretty lengthy conversations as we catch up on the previous six months. It’s almost like therapy in that you get to lay down the whole time, talk a bit, listen a bit, talk some more. At any rate, we commiserated about our experiences with cancer; I with my near-brush with melanoma and she with melanoma and then some. Due to her history with several kinds of cancer, she is thinking about having her daughter take a look at genetic testing service 23andMe.

The company’s $99 spit kit can generate reports on 256 health conditions and traits including inherited traits, carrier status for those traits, genetic health risks, likely drug responses, and updates on your DNA as they become available. As a recent Fast Company article on the company and its founder Anne Wojcicki notes, 23andMe’s mission is to bring the “power of genetic testing to everyday consumers so they can better manage their own health care, and [to use] the aggregated data from those tests to help doctors, scientists, hospitals, and researchers discover new cures for diseases that emanate from troublesome genetic mutations.”

As I left my dentist’s office, which ironically had just switched from paper to digital, I thought about the likelihood of genetic data ever finding its way into a personal health record or EMR. The Fast Company piece mentioned one doctor who pretty much didn’t want to have anything to do with his patient’s genetic data, which I duly noted she presented to him on sheaves of paper. One is a mighty small sample, of course, and so I can’t help but wonder what other providers think the value of this kind of data has, and how likely they might be to try and incorporate it into a medical record. 23andMe’s terms of service do state that, “Genetic Information that you choose to share with your physician or other health care provider may become part of your medical record and through that route be accessible to other health care providers and/or insurance companies in the future.”

But how will it get there? Is there an interface in the works? A partnership between 23andMe and an up-and-coming PHR or EMR? The company entered into a Parkinson’s study last year with Cleveland Clinic, so it obviously has direct relationships with providers. A news release announcing the study noted that findings from the study would not be placed in Cleveland Clinic patients’ medical records. Why not?

Genetic testing seems to be about empowering patients to take more proactive roles in managing their health today in an effort to prevent what might happen to their health in the future. It would make sense to share these test results with providers who can aid in that journey. I’m hoping providers in the audience can tell me if it makes sense for them to join in their patient’s genetic journey, or if they’re more likely to opt out. Please share your comments below.