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Digital Health, Connected Health, Wireless Health, Mobile Health, Telehealth – You Choose

Posted on May 7, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Neil Versel posted a great poll asking people which term they prefer. You can vote on it below:

I usually don’t dig into the terminology and branding side of things. At the end of the day, for me it’s all about making sure that we understand each other. If you call something digital health or connected health or mobile health, they’re all the same genre of item. To be honest, I mostly ignore all of those words and want to know what the application actually does.

However, Neil brought up a good point in his post about the lack of consensus in his poll. Here’s his summary of the poll results:

In any case, these results, however unscientific they may be, are representative of the fact that it is so hard to reach consensus on anything in health IT. They also are symbolic of the silos that still exist in newer technologies.

Consensus in healthcare is really hard. I’m reminded of what someone at the Dell Healthcare Think Tank event I participated in said, “Healthcare is second only to florists when it comes to market fragmentation.” It’s like steering a ship with hundreds of rudders all pointing different directions. Certainly not an easy task and not something I see changing soon.

Windows XP Is No Longer HIPAA Compliant

Posted on April 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those of you who missed it, thousands in healthcare are now out of compliance with HIPAA thanks to Microsoft’s decision to stop supporting Windows XP. I wrote about the details of Windows XP and HIPAA compliance previously. Microsoft stopped supporting the Windows XP operating system on April 8, 2014 and as Mac McMillan says in the linked post, OCR has been clear that unsupported systems are not HIPAA compliant.

I asked Dell if they had any numbers on the number of PCs out there that are still running XP. Here was their response (Note: These are general numbers and not healthcare specific)

The latest data I’ve seen shows that around 20-25% of PCs are still running XP (number vary depending on the publication). But most of those are consumer devices or very small businesses. Larger organizations seem to be complete, on track to completing by April, or have already engaged Dell (or competitor) to migrate them.

Dell also told me that globally, they have helped more than 450 customers (exact count is 471) with Windows 7 migration and automated deployment.

I’m not sure I agree with their assessment that the larger organizations have pretty much all upgraded beyond Windows XP. I agree that they’re more likely to have upgraded, but I’m sure there’s still plenty of Windows XP in large hospital systems across the nation. I’d love to hear from readers to see if they agree or disagree with this assertion.

I’ve heard some people make some cases for why Windows XP might not be considered a HIPAA violation if it was a standalone system that’s not connected to a network or if it was in a highly controlled and constrained use case. Some medical devices that still require Windows XP might force institutions to deal with HIPAA like this. However, I think that’s a risky situation to be in and may or may not pass the audit or other legal challenges.

I think you’re a brave (or stupid if you prefer) soul to still be running Windows XP in healthcare. Certainly there wasn’t a big disaster that occurred on April 8th when Windows XP was no longer supported. However, I’d hate to be your organization if you have Windows XP and get a HIPAA audit.

If you haven’t updated your HIPAA policies lately, you may want to do that along with updating Windows XP. This whitepaper called “HIPAA Compliance: Six Reality Checks” is a good place to start. Remember also that once an auditor finds one violation (like Windows XP), then they start digging for even more. It’s a bit like a shark that smells (or however they sense) blood in the water. They get hungry for more. I don’t know anyone that enjoys a HIPAA auditor, let alone one that really starts digging for problems.

Matching Healthcare IT Project Plans to Reality

Posted on March 17, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m traveling today to the Dell Healthcare Think Tank Event, hosting a G+ hangout discussing HIPAA with Mac McMillan, battling some allergies (where was that allergy warning app when I needed it?), finishing up plans for the Health IT Marketing and PR Conference, and still keeping all the other projects I have moving forward. So, today I thought I’d keep it simple and share this insightful quote from Eric Haglund’s Appropriate IT blog:

It is possible to force a project plan to match reality but impossible to force reality to match a project plan. So why is it the latter is attempted more then the former?

-S. Yetter

I don’t know Eric, but I love blogs from in the trenches people like Eric. Too bad he stopped blogging back in the middle of 2009. The great part is that even though he wrote the blog post back in 2009, it’s still just as insightful in 2014.

I look forward to participating in a discussion around this quote.

MinuteClinic Goes With Epic – What’s It Mean?

Posted on March 12, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Retail clinic operator MinuteClinic has decided to purchase and roll out the Epic EMR, upgrading from its home built system it’s used until now.  MinuteClinic, a division of CVS Caremark, expects the rollout to take about 18 months.

This is a big win for Epic.  An estimated 274,000 physicians will use the company’s EMR, and roughly 51% the US population will have a record in Epic when its current customer rollouts are complete.

And MinuteClinic has big expansion plans, which will bring Epic to a wide range of new environments.  According to Andrew Sussman, MD, president of Minute Clinic and senior vice president/associate chief medical officer, CVS Caremark,  the company is expanding rapidly, having added more than 350 clinics in the past three years, and planning to reach 1,500 clinics by 2017.

“EpicCare will take us to the next level by offering enhanced connectivity with other providers, more advanced patient portal capabilities and key analytics to run our practice more efficiently and improve patient care,” Sussman said in a press statement.

What’s particularly interesting about this deal is not just that Epic has racked up another big customer, though keeping an eye on their progress is definitely important. No, what’s more newsworthy is the possibility that epic is slowly but steadily changing its strategy, from selling only to large hospitals to exploring other customer relationships on the ambulatory side.

Not only is Epic rolling out a large ambulatory deal with MinuteClinic, the EMR vendor has struck a deal with the Cleveland Clinic and Dell under which the Clinic and Dell offer providers EMR consulting installation configuration and hosting service for Epic.  Bearing in mind the needs of ambulatory providers, the Cleveland Clinic deal even allows buyers to have the Epic EMR hosted mostly by Dell.

Certainly Epic won’t stop pursuing big hospital deals, but the MinuteClinic and Cleveland Clinic agreements suggest that Epic may be looking for other markets beyond the large hospital market. It looks like ambulatory is on their radar and we know they’ve been working hard to grow internationally.

Dell Healthcare Think Tank Live Stream

Posted on March 19, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today, I’m going to be part of the Dell Healthcare Think Tank discussing some of the major challenges, trends and issues facing healthcare IT. This is an exciting event that’s going to be live streamed for everyone to watch in real time and it will also be recorded for those that want to watch the video later.

Here’s a quick look at the list of people that are participating:
Dell Healthcare Think Tank Participants

Here’s a list of the topics that we’ll be covering along with the schedule (all times are Central time)
Dell Healthcare Think Tank

I’ve embedded the live stream below, so you should be able to open this post to see the live stream (or a link to the recorded version after the event). If that doesn’t work, then you can visit this page to see the live stream.

Also, for those of you on Twitter, you can follow along at the #DoMoreHIT hashtag.