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Fascinating Drawings from #DoMoreHIT Dell Healthcare Think Tank Event

Posted on March 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week I got the change to spend the day at SXSW at the Dell Healthcare Think Tank event. This is my third year in a row participating and it’s always an exciting event. In case you missed it, I’ve embedded the 3 Healthcare Think Tank sessions on EMR and HIPAA so you can watch the recorded video stream from the event.

Also, during each of the three sessions of the event, an artist was capturing what was being said. You can see each of the three drawings below (Click on the drawing to make it larger).

Session 1: Consumer Engagement & Social Media
Consumer Engagement and Social Media

Session 2: Bridging the Gap Between Providers, Payers and Patients
Bridging the Gap Between Payers Providers and Patients

Session 3: Entrepreneurship & Innovation
Healthcare Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Will EHR Vendors Become Service and Consulting Companies?

Posted on October 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This is the topic of a really interesting LinkedIn discussion: Will EHR Vendors Become Service and Consulting Companies?

I think this is a really great question and one that’s worthy of serious consideration. I think we’ve seen this happen time and time again in the IT industry. Some of the best examples are IBM, HP, and Dell. As their IT hardware and software becomes a “commodity” then they leverage their relationships and domain expertise to change into a service and consulting company. Usually this also involves them spending their extra cash to acquire the leading consulting company (or companies) in the industry as well.

In some ways we’re already seeing this happen. Epic announced a consulting division of their company in order to retain their senior staff. Cerner’s always made a good chunk of their money from consulting services.

Of course, thanks to meaningful use incentive money and some still massive upgrade costs, EHR vendors haven’t needed to shift their business model to a service and consulting model yet. There’s still plenty of money to be made just selling the software, training, etc.

What will also be interesting to watch is whether the large service and consulting companies like Accenture, IBM, HP, Dell, etc. will eat up the market share so that the EHR companies don’t have as much of an opportunity to grow a service and consulting business. No doubt it will be a big dog fight. Not to mention many of the current EHR consulting companies (although, you could see many of these getting acquired by the EHR vendors).

I guess my short answer to this question is: In the short term, we’re not likely to see a massive shift towards services and consulting, but long term it’s very likely to happen. What are your thoughts?

Windows XP Is No Longer HIPAA Compliant

Posted on April 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those of you who missed it, thousands in healthcare are now out of compliance with HIPAA thanks to Microsoft’s decision to stop supporting Windows XP. I wrote about the details of Windows XP and HIPAA compliance previously. Microsoft stopped supporting the Windows XP operating system on April 8, 2014 and as Mac McMillan says in the linked post, OCR has been clear that unsupported systems are not HIPAA compliant.

I asked Dell if they had any numbers on the number of PCs out there that are still running XP. Here was their response (Note: These are general numbers and not healthcare specific)

The latest data I’ve seen shows that around 20-25% of PCs are still running XP (number vary depending on the publication). But most of those are consumer devices or very small businesses. Larger organizations seem to be complete, on track to completing by April, or have already engaged Dell (or competitor) to migrate them.

Dell also told me that globally, they have helped more than 450 customers (exact count is 471) with Windows 7 migration and automated deployment.

I’m not sure I agree with their assessment that the larger organizations have pretty much all upgraded beyond Windows XP. I agree that they’re more likely to have upgraded, but I’m sure there’s still plenty of Windows XP in large hospital systems across the nation. I’d love to hear from readers to see if they agree or disagree with this assertion.

I’ve heard some people make some cases for why Windows XP might not be considered a HIPAA violation if it was a standalone system that’s not connected to a network or if it was in a highly controlled and constrained use case. Some medical devices that still require Windows XP might force institutions to deal with HIPAA like this. However, I think that’s a risky situation to be in and may or may not pass the audit or other legal challenges.

I think you’re a brave (or stupid if you prefer) soul to still be running Windows XP in healthcare. Certainly there wasn’t a big disaster that occurred on April 8th when Windows XP was no longer supported. However, I’d hate to be your organization if you have Windows XP and get a HIPAA audit.

If you haven’t updated your HIPAA policies lately, you may want to do that along with updating Windows XP. This whitepaper called “HIPAA Compliance: Six Reality Checks” is a good place to start. Remember also that once an auditor finds one violation (like Windows XP), then they start digging for even more. It’s a bit like a shark that smells (or however they sense) blood in the water. They get hungry for more. I don’t know anyone that enjoys a HIPAA auditor, let alone one that really starts digging for problems.

Matching Healthcare IT Project Plans to Reality

Posted on March 17, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m traveling today to the Dell Healthcare Think Tank Event, hosting a G+ hangout discussing HIPAA with Mac McMillan, battling some allergies (where was that allergy warning app when I needed it?), finishing up plans for the Health IT Marketing and PR Conference, and still keeping all the other projects I have moving forward. So, today I thought I’d keep it simple and share this insightful quote from Eric Haglund’s Appropriate IT blog:

It is possible to force a project plan to match reality but impossible to force reality to match a project plan. So why is it the latter is attempted more then the former?

-S. Yetter

I don’t know Eric, but I love blogs from in the trenches people like Eric. Too bad he stopped blogging back in the middle of 2009. The great part is that even though he wrote the blog post back in 2009, it’s still just as insightful in 2014.

I look forward to participating in a discussion around this quote.

MinuteClinic Goes With Epic – What’s It Mean?

Posted on March 12, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Retail clinic operator MinuteClinic has decided to purchase and roll out the Epic EMR, upgrading from its home built system it’s used until now.  MinuteClinic, a division of CVS Caremark, expects the rollout to take about 18 months.

This is a big win for Epic.  An estimated 274,000 physicians will use the company’s EMR, and roughly 51% the US population will have a record in Epic when its current customer rollouts are complete.

And MinuteClinic has big expansion plans, which will bring Epic to a wide range of new environments.  According to Andrew Sussman, MD, president of Minute Clinic and senior vice president/associate chief medical officer, CVS Caremark,  the company is expanding rapidly, having added more than 350 clinics in the past three years, and planning to reach 1,500 clinics by 2017.

“EpicCare will take us to the next level by offering enhanced connectivity with other providers, more advanced patient portal capabilities and key analytics to run our practice more efficiently and improve patient care,” Sussman said in a press statement.

What’s particularly interesting about this deal is not just that Epic has racked up another big customer, though keeping an eye on their progress is definitely important. No, what’s more newsworthy is the possibility that epic is slowly but steadily changing its strategy, from selling only to large hospitals to exploring other customer relationships on the ambulatory side.

Not only is Epic rolling out a large ambulatory deal with MinuteClinic, the EMR vendor has struck a deal with the Cleveland Clinic and Dell under which the Clinic and Dell offer providers EMR consulting installation configuration and hosting service for Epic.  Bearing in mind the needs of ambulatory providers, the Cleveland Clinic deal even allows buyers to have the Epic EMR hosted mostly by Dell.

Certainly Epic won’t stop pursuing big hospital deals, but the MinuteClinic and Cleveland Clinic agreements suggest that Epic may be looking for other markets beyond the large hospital market. It looks like ambulatory is on their radar and we know they’ve been working hard to grow internationally.

Cleveland Clinic, Dell Offer Joint Epic EHR Service

Posted on February 27, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Even when you’re a juggernaut the size of Epic, eventually you’re going to reach the point where your customer base is saturated and you need unique new directions to go. This new deal between Dell and the Cleveland Clinic may do just that for Epic.

This week at HIMSS, the two are announcing an agreement in which the two will offer consulting, installation, configuration and hosting services for Cleveland Clinic’s version of Epic. Under the deal struck between the two parties, customers can choose between a hosted version of the Epic instance and a full install on their site.

Cleveland Clinic execs say that their knowledge of using Epic, which they have for more than three years, will give them special expertise in helping providers adjust to Epic.  The Clinic has been selling Epic to providers  through its MyPractice Healthcare Solutions business.  To date, MyPractice has sold EMRs to more than 400 providers, including physicians, nurse practitioners and midwives within a 50 mile radius of Cleveland.

Working with Dell, the two companies plan to offer the new EMR service nationwide. The Cleveland Clinic will handle the EMR installation for new customers, and Dell provides the technology infrastructure. Epic gets a licensing fee for each of these deals, the customers’ relationship will be with Dell and the Cleveland Clinic.

As Dr. C. Martin Harris, CIO of the Cleveland Clinic, told Modern Healthcare, most medical practices and hospitals have EMRs in place, leaving only a much smaller group of first-time EMR buyers. But, Harris said, that minis still a big number. (And there’s always the practices still looking to switch.)

Turning Dell and the Cleveland Clinic into a sales channel for Epic seems like a pretty smart move. With the help of players who know the smaller physician practice market, it might open up a new opportunity for Epic which it hadn’t much of a shot at before.

Dell Healthcare Think Tank Live Stream

Posted on March 19, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today, I’m going to be part of the Dell Healthcare Think Tank discussing some of the major challenges, trends and issues facing healthcare IT. This is an exciting event that’s going to be live streamed for everyone to watch in real time and it will also be recorded for those that want to watch the video later.

Here’s a quick look at the list of people that are participating:
Dell Healthcare Think Tank Participants

Here’s a list of the topics that we’ll be covering along with the schedule (all times are Central time)
Dell Healthcare Think Tank

I’ve embedded the live stream below, so you should be able to open this post to see the live stream (or a link to the recorded version after the event). If that doesn’t work, then you can visit this page to see the live stream.

Also, for those of you on Twitter, you can follow along at the #DoMoreHIT hashtag.

HFMA ANI Las Vegas: That’s a Wrap

Posted on June 28, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

Though it was only my second time attending the annual HFMA ANI show, I think it’s fast proving to be my favorite when compared to HIMSS – at least when both are held in Las Vegas. The shorter exhibit hall hours; a smaller, more manageable venue; and a general feeling of being less rushed to accomplish every task I set myself was a welcome contrast to the breakneck speed at which we all seem to attend HIMSS.

Though the ANI show had a more laid back vibe, it was by no means any less meaningful to its attendees and exhibitors. Some of the exhibitors I spoke to noted that while booth traffic wasn’t as brisk as they’d have liked, they were having deeper, more meaningful conversations with the folks that did stop by. Others told me that it didn’t seem like many members of the hospital C-suite were in attendance, and decided to send their seconds-in-command instead. (Perhaps they were too busy back home attending to projects related to any of the following healthcare IT acronyms – EMR, HIE, ACO, CPOE, ICD-10, SCOTUS.)

I didn’t get a chance to attend any educational sessions, but from the tweets that I saw, most folks really enjoyed keynotes from Olympian Carl Lewis and renowned pilot Sully Sullenberger. Speaking of tweets, the volume of chatter on Twitter was pretty dismal. There were a few devoted tweets around the #ANI2012 hashtag of course, but for the most part, Twitter (and social media in general) was non-existent.

I walked the show floor Tuesday to see if I could spot any technologies tied into EMRs, and didn’t find much to choose from – at least not as many as I came across last year. I did have some interesting conversations with the folks at Nuance about new solutions being sold under the Dragon Medical umbrella.

Population health management was a phrase I heard (or saw) a number of times, as was predictive analytics and the ubiquitous “Big Data” – all three of which tie together in the world of hospital CFOs. In my mind, it seems that it will be necessary from a financial standpoint for hospitals to get a firm grasp of what “Big Data” means to their organization, and then how to use predictive analytics to derive meaning from that data in their population health management programs, especially if they plan on successfully participating in any sort of coordinated or accountable care program. MedAssets is doing some interesting work around this concept that I hope to learn more about once I get back home and settled.

I’d be interested to hear your thoughts about the show, especially if you were an attendee. How did it compare to last year? Did you think, like me, that many folks were seduced by the lure of the pools at Mandalay Bay to the detriment of folks working the exhibit booths? Gather your thoughts while you peruse a few pictures I took on the show floor:

I stopped by the MedAssets booth to talk population health management with Carol Romashko, Director of Marketing.

AfterHours UR intrigued me with its pleasant logo and hospital utilization review service founded by nurses.

The folks at Executive Health Resources had a catchy come-by gimmick with a caricaturist creating portraits on etch-a-sketches.

 

EnableComp definitely had kid-friendly schwag. I'm still kicking myself for not going by there during the last hour of the show.

Emdeon's Cash Stacker games seemed to be a big hit on the show floor.

HumanArc knows that creativity really does pay off, at least when it comes to attracting passers by with Lego-inspired logos.

It was interesting to me, being an Atlanta native, to note how many Georgia-based revenue cycle management clients MediRevv has.

My favorite part of the Nuance booth was the tag line "Use it for Good."

Objective Health, formerly known as McKinsey Hospital Institute, had a very inviting booth. It was nice chatting with their CEO, Dr. Russ Richmond.

I didn't see any "whack a mole" type attractions, but this game from PNC definitely grabbed attendees' attention.

I didn't get a chance to stop by the Premier booth, unfortunately, but it was certainly eye-catching.I heard several interesting customer success stories from the Protiviti team, which I hope to cover in greater detail in the near future.

The VisiQuate booth impressed me with its high-tech feel.

It certainly wasn't all work and no play. I enjoyed Dell's evening event at the Shark Reef Aquarium with Stephen Outten, Content Marketing and Social Media Strategist at Dell, and Amanda Woodhead, Manager of Corporate Communications at Emdeon.

Healthcare IT in China

Posted on September 8, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve had an ongoing fascination with China. I think it first started in high school when some Chinese policies were the topic for the debate team I was on. I traveled all over the US (literally coast to coast) debating the impact of various chinese policies like the controversial one child policy. Add in the amazing size of China (the billion+ people still astounds me) and let’s just say I’m absolutely intrigued by China.

Needless to say, this fascination with China has grown into an interest in healthcare IT in China. In fact, I’ve been considering attending a healthcare IT conference in Asia to learn even more. Plus, I think the US healthcare system can learn a lot by looking outside our borders at other countries.

I recently found an article by Ben Zhou, a Dell Senior Executive over China, where he shared some really interesting information about the changing healthcare landscape in China and healthcare IT in China.

The whole article is worth a read, but for those short on time here’s the section on healthcare IT in China:

The Chinese government began investing in a Hospital Information System (HIS) several years ago. In 2008, data from the Ministry of Health shows that 80 percent of hospitals implemented HIS. In the next five years, they will invest more in a national Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system.

Chinese EMR systems have developed slowly over the past few years because of the absence of a single standard for all EMR system providers. As a result, hospitals are unable to share information or provide qualified health services to patients.

To support EMR systems, hospitals will invest more in data centers, IT outsourcing, and mobility. Cloud services would be an attractive solution for hospitals looking for flexible computing and managing EMR systems effectively. Mobility solutions would enable doctors to receive and update information anywhere and at any time.

Sounds like the face some similar challenges to us (ie. single standard for all EMR system providers). Although, an 80% HIS implementation by Chinese hospitals is pretty impressive. I wish we could say the same for the US hospitals.

I’ll be keeping an eye on China. If we thought it was hard to provide healthcare to a few hundred million people. Imagine doing the same for well over a billion people. Not to mention, many of which are in rural areas.

Late EHR buyers focused on vendor customer service

Posted on February 14, 2011 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

A new user poll suggests that vendor support is more important than ever to providers  searching for EHRs.  New research from the Black Book Rankings concludes that late adopters of EHRs  are especially concerned about finding vendors who will support their products  through implementation.

Researchers surveyed roughly  30,000 medical  records professionals, hospital execs and medical practice administrators, asking them how vendors rated on 18 performance indicators useful  in comparing customer experience.

The study found that:

* CPSI, Healthland Clinicals  and HMS were rated as offering the best customer  experience for hospitals under 100 beds

* Cerner, Dell and Quadramed  got top rankings for community hospitals  of 101-249 beds

* Dell, Epic  and Siemens were rated best  among major medical centers of 250+ beds and academic medical centers

EHR vendors, are you ready to do a  lot of handholding?  If not, it seems you may get edged out by EHR developers who are. Consider yourself warned.