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AMA Touts Physician Interest In Digital Health Tools

Posted on October 13, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

A few months ago, the group’s annual meeting, American Medical Association head Dr. James Madara ignited a firestorm of controversy when he suggested that many direct to consumer digital health products, apps and even EMRs were “the digital snake oil of the early 21st century.” Madara, who as far as I can tell never backed down completely from that statement, certainly raised a few hackles with his pronouncement.

Now, the AMA has come out with the results of physician survey whose results suggest that community doctors may be more excited about digital health’s potential than the AMA leader. The survey found that physicians are optimistic about digital health, though some issues must be addressed before they will be ready to adopt such technologies.

The study, which was backed by the AMA and conducted by research firm Kantar TNS, surveyed 1,300 physicians between July 7 and 18. Its content addressed a wide range of digital health technologies, including mobile apps, remote monitoring, wearables, mobile health and telemedicine.

Key findings of the study include the following:

  • While physicians across all age groups, practice settings and tenures were optimistic about the potential for digital health, their level of enthusiasm was greater than their current adoption rates.
  • The majority of physicians surveyed (85% of respondents) believe that digital health solutions can have a positive impact on patient care.
  • Physicians reported that they were optimistic a digital health can reduce burnout, while improving practice efficiency, patient safety and diagnostic capabilities.
  • Physicians said liability coverage, data privacy and integration of digital health tools with EMR workflows were critical to digital health adoption, as well as the availability of easy-to-use technologies which are proven to be effective and reimbursement for time spent conducting virtual visits.

All told, physicians seem willing to use digital health tools if they fit into their clinical practice. And now, it seems that the AMA wants to get out ahead of this wave, as long as the tools meet their demands. “The AMA is dedicated to shaping a future when digital health tools are evidence based, validated, interoperable, and actionable,” said AMA Immediate Past President Steven J. Stack, M.D

By the way, though it hasn’t publicized them highly, the AMA noted that it has already dipped its oar into several digital health-related ventures:

  • It serves as founding partner to Health2047, a San Francisco-based health care innovation company that combines strategy, design and venture disciplines.
  • It’s involved in a partnership with Chicago-based incubator MATTER, to allow entrepreneurs and physicians to collaborate on the development of new technologies, services and products in a simulated health care environment.
  • It’s collaborating with IDEA Labs, a student-run biotechnology incubator, that helps to support the next generation of young entrepreneurs to tackle unmet needs in healthcare delivery and clinical medicine.
  • It’s playing an advisory role to the SMART project, whose key mission is the development of a flexible information infrastructure that allows for free, open development of plug-and-play apps to increase interoperability among health care technologies, including EHRs, in a more cost-effective way.
  • It’s involved in a partnership with Omada Health and Intermountain Healthcare that has introduced evidence-based, technology-enabled care models addressing prediabetes.

Personally, I have little doubt that this survey is a direct response to the “snake oil” speech. But regardless of why the AMA is seeking a rapproachment with digital health players, it’s a good thing. I’m just happy to see the venerable physicians’ group come down on the side of progress.

 

Apple EMR

Posted on August 24, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This tweet seems to have hit a nerve with me:

I realize that James Edwards was just being funny on Twitter, but I guess I’ve had too many people who seriously thought that Apple would get into the EMR business. They won’t. They never will. And I think it’s funny to think that just because Apple touches it, people think it will be all better.

Apple could pour its billions of dollars of cash into the EHR market and doctors would still complain about their solution. More and more I’m realizing that an EHR can only be so good because of the reimbursement and regulatory requirements that the EMR has to meet. Certainly, EHR software should be better than it is today, but it won’t be perfect until we see a sea change in the technology available (see my Video EHR idea) and/or the regulatory and reimbursement environment. Not even Apple can solve those.

However, beyond the fact that I don’t think Apple could make a beautiful EHR, I also think that Apple has no interest in being in the enterprise business. Yes, EHR software is an enterprise software and becoming more so every day. That’s not in Apple’s wheelhouse and they’re not going to get there either.

There are plenty of opportunities for Apple in healthcare. Consumer health devices and consumer health applications are the sweet spot for Apple and I could see them being a major player there. There’s so much opportunity there with their iPhone and iPad footprint. I think all of that is just a matter of time. Just stop talking about Apple entering the EHR space. It’s not going to happen.

Providers: Today’s Telehealth Tech Won’t Work For Future

Posted on July 5, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

A new study has concluded that while healthcare leaders see major opportunities for growing their use of telehealth technologies, they don’t think existing technologies will meet the demands of the future.

For the study, which was sponsored by Modern Healthcare and Avizia, researchers surveyed more than 280 healthcare executives to see how they saw the future of telehealth programs and delivery models. For the purposes of the study, they defined telehealth as encompassing a broad mix of healthcare approaches, including consumer-focused wireless applications, remote monitoring of vital signs, patient consultations via videoconferencing, transmission of still images, use of patient portals and continuing medical education.

The survey found that 63% of those surveyed used telehealth in some way. Most respondents were with hospitals (72%), followed by physician groups and clinics (52%) and a grab bag of other provider organizations ambulatory centers in nursing homes (36%).

The most common service lines in use by the surveyed providers included stroke (44%), behavioral health (39%), staff education and training (28%) and primary care (22%). Other practice areas mentioned, such as neurology, pediatrics and cardiology, came in at less than 20%. Meanwhile, when it comes to telehealth applications they wish they had, patient education and training was at the top list at 34%, followed by remote patient home monitoring (30%) and primary care (27%). Other areas on providers’ wish lists include cardiology (25%), behavioral health (24%), urgent care (20%) and wound care (also 20%).

Not only did surveyed providers hope to see telemedicine extended into other service lines, they’d like to see the technologies used for telehealth delivery change as well. Currently, much telehealth is delivered via a computer workstation on wheels or ‘tablet on a stick.’  But providers would like to see technology platforms advance.

For example, 38% would like to see video visits with clinicians supported by their EMR, 25% would like to offer telemedical appointments through a secure messaging app used by providers and 23% would like to deliver telemedical services through personal mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones.

But what’s driving providers’ interest in telehealth? For most (almost 75%) consumer demand is a key reason for pursuing such programs. Large numbers of respondents also cited the ability to improve clinical outcomes (66%) and value-based care (62%).

That being said, to roll out telehealth in force, many respondents (50%) said they’d have to make investments in telehealth technology and infrastructure. And nearly the same number (48%) said they’d have to address reimbursement issues as well. (It’s worth mentioning, however, that at the time the study was being written, the number of states requiring reimbursement parity between telehealth and traditional care had already risen to 29.)

This study underscores some important reasons why providers are embracing telehealth strategies. Another one pointed out by my colleague John Lynn is that telehealth can encourage early interventions which might otherwise be delayed because patients don’t want to bother with an in-person visit to the doctor’s office. Over time, I suspect additional benefits will emerge as well. This is such an exciting use of technology!

Health Organizations Failing At Digital Health Innovation

Posted on May 3, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Few healthcare providers are prepared to harvest benefits from digital health innovations, a new study suggests. The study, by innovation consultancy Enspektos LLC, concludes that digital health innovation efforts are fairly immature among healthcare organizations, despite the enormous wave of interest in these technologies.

While this should come as no surprise to those of us working in the industry, it’s a little depressing for those of us — including myself — who passionately believe that digital health tools have the potential to transform the delivery of care. But it also reminds providers to invest more time and effort in digital health efforts, at least if they want to get anything done!

The study, which was sponsored by healthcare IT vendor Validic, chose 150 survey participants working at health organizations (hospitals, pharmaceutical firms, payers) or their partners (technology firms, startups and the like) and asked them to rate digital health innovation in the healthcare industry.

The results of this study suggest that despite their high level of interest, many healthcare organizations don’t have the expertise or resources needed to take full advantage of digital health innovations. This tracks well with my own experience, which suggest that digital health efforts by hospitals and clinics are slapdash at best, rolling out apps and doling out devices without thinking strategically about the results they hope to accomplish. (For more data on digital health app failures see this story.)

According to Enspektos, only 5% of health organizations could demonstrate that they were operating at the highest level of proficiency and expertise in digital health innovation. The majority of health organizations worldwide are experimenting with and piloting digital health tools, researchers concluded.

Apparently, digital health is moving slowly even with relatively mature technologies such as mobile platforms. One might think that mobile deployments wouldn’t baffle IT departments, but apparently, many are behind the curve. In fact, health organizations typically don’t have enough technical expertise or large enough budget to scale their digital health efforts effectively, Enspektos researchers found.

Of course, as a digital health technology vendor, Validic is one of many hoping to be the solution to these problems. (It offers a cloud-based technology connecting patient-recorded data from digital health apps, devices and wearables to healthcare organizations.) I’m not familiar with Validic’s products, but their presence in this market does raise a few interesting issues.

Assuming that its measures of digital health maturity are on target, it would seem that health organizations do need help integrating these technologies. The question is whether a vendor such as Validic can be dropped into the technical matrix of a healthcare organization and bring its digital health program to life.

My guess is that no matter how sophisticated an integration platform they deploy, healthcare organizations still have a tremendous amount of work to do in thinking about what they actually want to accomplish. Most of the digital health products I’ve seen from providers, in particular, seem to be solutions in search of a problem, such as apps that have no bearing on the patient’s actual lifestyle and needs.

On the other hand, given how fluid digital health technology is at this point, perhaps vendors will be creating workflow and development models that healthcare organizations can adapt. It remains to be seen who will drive long-term change. Honestly, I’m betting on the vendors, but I hope more healthcare players step up, as I’d like to see them own this thing.

Digital Disease Management Tools Aren’t Too Popular

Posted on April 19, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Despite having a couple of chronic illnesses, I don’t use disease management tools and apps, even though I’m about as digital health-friendly as anyone you can imagine. So I guess the results of the new survey, suggesting that I’m not alone, shouldn’t come as a surprise.

The study was conducted by HealthMine, which recently surveyed 500 insured consumers to find out whether they used digital health devices and apps. Researchers found that while 59% of respondents suffer from chronic conditions, only 7% of these individuals used a disease management tool.

This was the case despite the fact that 50% reported using fitness/activity trackers or apps, and that 52% of respondents were enrolled in a wellness program. Not only that, two thirds of those involved in a wellness program said their program offered incentives for using digital health tools.

Disease management tools may not be in wide use, but that doesn’t mean that the consumers weren’t prepared to give digital health a try. When they drilled down further, HealthMine researchers learned that in addition to the half of respondents that used fitness trackers, consumers were interested in a wide variety of digital health options. For example, 46% used food/nutrition apps, 39% used weight loss apps, 38% used wearable activity tracker apps, 30% used heart rate apps, 28% used pharmacy apps, and 22% used patient portals or sleep apps.

To get consumers interested in disease management tools, it might help to know what motivates them to pick up any digital health app for their use. The biggest motivators cited were desire to know their numbers (42%), followed by improving their health (26%), the knowledge that someone on the other side of the app is tracking results (19%), and incentives for using the app (10%). (It’s worth noting that while incentives weren’t the biggest motivator to use digital health tools, 91% of respondents said that incentives would motivate them to use digital health tools more often.)

All that being said, I think I know what’s wrong here. In my experience, the apps consumers reported using are directed at helping consumers handle problems which, though complex, can be addressed in part by measuring a few key indicators. For example, achieving fitness is a broad and multifactorial goal, but counting steps is simple to do and simple to grasp. Or take food/dieting apps: eating properly can be a life’s work, but drawing on a database to dig out carb counts isn’t such a big deal.

On the other hand, managing a chronic illness may call for data capture, interaction with existing databases, monitoring by a skilled outside party and expert guidance. Pulling all of these together into a usable experience that consumers find helpful — much less one that actually transforms their health — is far more difficult than, say, tracking calories in and calories burned.

I’d argue that truly effective disease management tools, which consumers would truly find useful, calls for institutional commitment by vendors or providers that neither is ready to supply. But if disease management tools came with a particularly intuitive interface, a link to live providers and perhaps more importantly, education as to why the items being tracked matter, we might get somewhere.

Consumers Take Risk Trading Health Data For Health Insurance Discounts

Posted on August 28, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

When Progressive Insurance began giving car owners the option of having their driving tracked in exchange for potential auto insurance discounts, nobody seemed to raise a fuss. After all, the program was voluntary, and nobody wants to pay more than they have to for coverage.

Do the same principles apply to healthcare? We may find out. According to a study by digital health research firm Parks Associates, at least some users are willing to make the same tradeoff. HIT Consultant reports that nearly half (42%) of digital pedometer users would be willing to share their personal data in exchange for a health insurance discount.

Consumer willingness to trade data for discounts varied by device, but didn’t fall to zero. For example, 35% of smart watch owners would trade their health data for health insurance discounts, while 26% of those with sleep-quality monitors would do so.

While the HIT Consultant story doesn’t dig into the profile of users who were prepared to sell their personal health data today — which is how I’d describe a data-for-discount scheme — I’d submit that they are, in short, pretty sharp.

Why do I say this? Because as things stand, at least, health insurers would get less than they were paying for unless the discount was paltry. (As the linked blog item notes, upstart health insurer Oscar Insurance already gives away free Misfit wearables. To date, though, it’s not clear from the write-up whether Oscar can quantify what benefit it gets from the giveaway.)

As wearables and health apps mature, however, consumers may end up compromising themselves if they give up personal health data freely. After all, if health insurance begins to look like car insurance, health plans could push up premiums every time they make a health “mistake” (such as overeating at a birthday dinner or staying up all night watching old movies). Moreoever, as such data gets absorbed into EMRs, then cross-linked with claims, health plans’ ability to punish you with actuarial tables could skyrocket.

In fact, if consumers permit health plans to keep too close a watch on them, it could give the health plans the ability to effectively engage in post-contract medical underwriting. This is an unwelcome prospect which could lead to court battles given the ACA’s ban on such activities.

Also, once health plans have the personal data, it’s not clear what they would do with it. I am not a lawyer, but it seems to me that health plans would have significant legal latitude in using freely given data, and might even be seen to sell that data in the aggregate to pharmas. Or they might pass it to their parent company’s life or auto divisions, which could potentially use the data to make coverage decisions.

Ultimately, I’d argue that unless the laws are changed to protect consumers who do so, selling personal health data to get lower insurance premiums is a very risky decision. The short-term benefit is unlikely to be enough to offset very real long-term consequences. Once you’ve compromised your privacy, you seldom get it back.

Accenture: “Zombie” Digital Health Startups Won’t Die In Vain

Posted on August 24, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve been screaming for a while about how VCs are blowing their money on questionable digital health ventures. To my mind, their investment patterns suggest that the smart money really isn’t that smart. I admit that sorting out what works in digital health/mHealth/connected health is very challenging, but it’s far from impossible if you immerse yourself in the industry. And given how much difference carefully-thought out digital health tools can make, it’s exasperating to watch failing digital health startups burn through money.

That being said, maybe all of those dollars won’t be wasted. According to no less an eminence grise than Accenture, failing digital health ventures will feed the stronger ones and make their success more likely. A new report from Accenture predicts that these “zombie” startups — half of which will die within two years, it says — will provide talent and technology to their surviving rivals. (OK, I agree, the zombie image is a bit unsettling, isn’t it?)

To bring us their horror movie metaphor, Accenture analyzed the status of 900 healthcare IT startups, concluding that 51% were likely to collapse within 20 months.  The study looked at ventures cutting across social, mobile, analytics, cloud and sensors technologies, which include wearables, telehealth and remote monitoring.

While most researchers try to predict who the winners will be in a given market, Accenture had a few words to say about the zombie also-rans. And what they found was that the zombies have taken in enough cash to have done some useful things, collecting nearly $4 billion in funding between 2008 and 2013.

The investments are part of an ongoing funding trend. In fact, digital health dollars are likely to pour in over the next two years as well, with healthcare IT startups poised to take in $2.5 billion more over the next two years, Accenture estimates. Funding should focus on four segments, including engagement (25%), treatment (25%), diagnosis (21%) and infrastructure (29%), the study found.

So what use are the dying companies that will soon litter the digital health landscape? According to Accenture, more-successful firms can reap big benefits by acquiring the failing startups. For example, healthcare players can do “acqui-hiring” deals with struggling digital health startups to pick up a deep bench of qualified tech staffers. They can pick up unique technologies (the 900 firms analyzed, collectively, had 1,700 patents). And acquiring firms can harvest the startups’ technology to improve their products and services lineups.

Not only that — and this is Anne, not Accenture talking — acquiring healthcare firms get a wonderful infusion of entrepreneurial energy, regardless of whether the acquired firm was booking big bucks or not. And I speak from long experience. I’ve known the leaders of countless tech startups, and there’s very little difference between those who make a gazillion dollars and those whose ventures die. Generally speaking, anyone who makes a tech startup work for even a year or two is incredibly insightful, creative, and extremely dedicated, and they bring a kind of excitement to any company that hires them.

So, backed by the corporate wisdom of Accenture, I’ve come to praise zombies, not to bury them. While they may give their corporate lives, their visions won’t be wasted. With any luck, the next generation of digital health companies will appreciate the zombies’ hard work and initiative, even if they’re no longer with us.

Millennials Reshaping Digital Health

Posted on February 26, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I thought that the infographic below was really interesting and a nice balance to Paul’s previous post Mobile Health and Me…I Think Not! The infographic is based on the report, “Healthcare Without Borders: How Millennials are Reshaping Health and Wellness”, which looked to study Millenial healthcare values. There’s clearly a large divide between generations when it comes to how they approach healthcare. It will be interesting how this divide impacts healthcare going forward.

how-millennials-are-reshaping-digital-health

Mobile Health and Me…I think not!!

Posted on February 20, 2015 I Written By

All that I read tells me, or at least tries to, that the future of healthcare is embedded in mobile healthcare. Through the magnificence of technology, I can see how my health is, test results were and when done, shop for a doctor to fix me if I’m broken. I have the opportunity to find the least expensive option for a cure or, when and if I have the time and after a self-diagnosis I can research my options on the care I need to fix whatever is broken. AND, I can do it all from my iPhone. Are you kidding??? You guys believe that there really are Super Heroes flying around out there, right??

I know that I am not a kid anymore. I know that even though my local hospital is rated as one of the best in the country, it and the doctors in it are a long, long way from the health technology I read so much about. Do we really want them to “compete” for our business?

Forsaking the fact that I live out in the pucker brush, if I get sick, I don’t want to find out about it because I researched the results of some tests, did a self diagnosis and went shopping for a cure. I want MY doctor to tell me what the problem is, if there is one and what can be done to fix it. If I agree with MY doctor, I want him to come up with a cure and whom I might need to be referred to to make it happen. I know that that is not technologically advanced, but it works.

That is one of my problems with all this and I guess I qualify for the title of Dinosaur. I can accept that, but I am also a parent. I take that responsibility very seriously.

One of my son’s is at the tail end of baby boomers and the other at the leading edge of Millennials. Both are very technology savvy. I think that the healthcare expectations I read about are nuts and even if it means being labeled a Dinosaur, I have to caution them about mHealth.

I watched my youngest son ignore the fact that the cold he was suffering from was very severe and getting worse. He finally went to one of those minute clinics and found out that he really had the flu and a touch of pneumonia to go with it. They suggested that he go to where I was trying to get him to go to. A real doctor. Had he done it originally he wouldn’t have lost three weeks because he was too sick to do much.

Then there is my very tech savvy baby boomer son. He understands HIT and mobile health better than most. Two times in the last three years he needed medical care. The first time he went to the minute clinic and they gave him Ibuprofen. It cured the hurt. The second time, he was doing an EHR implementation at a major university hospital. He spoke to one of the doctors he was working with, explained his issues, and was referred to the emergency room. They diagnosed him, treated him and sent him home because he was still contagious. He had also done a self diagnosis, on his smart phone. while sitting in an airport. His diagnosis was faulty.

Having gone through 3-4 life threatening illnesses in my life, the future methods of healthcare scares the heck out of me. It’s the future of medicine, I’m told. Iron Man, Bat Man, where are you when we need you?

Possible Future EHR UIs at CES

Posted on January 16, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you haven’t been following all of my CES Digital Health coverage, you might want to check out some of the following articles:
Initial CES 2015 Observations
Wearables Explosion at CES 2015
A Video Look at the Digital Health, Fitness and Wellness Section of CES 2015
A Look at Digital Health at CES 2015

While I was mostly focused on the Digital Health section of CES, I also took note of a number of new user interface approaches that various companies were demoing at CES. Since it’s CES, some of these are still conceptual, but they got my EHR UI thoughts going.

Finger Mouse
The Motix Touch Mouse was one of the most intriguing new user interfaces I’ve ever seen in the 10 years I’ve been attending CES. Your hands basically stay on the keyboard and a motion capture device follows your finger which works like a mouse on screen. It was a really interesting evolution of the mouse. Unfortunately, they didn’t have a great form example which would replicate the EHR world in which I live. So, I’m not sure how well this finger mouse would work filling out the long forms that many have in their EHR. However, the concept was really intriguing to consider.

Here’s a video demo of the Motix Touch Mouse:

3D Rudder
The 3D Rudder really blew my mind when I tried it out. I’m not exactly sure of its application in the EHR and healthcare IT world, but the experience of controlling your computer with your feet was really amazing. Plus, the foot control was able to work in 3 dimensions which made it really unique. It took me a second to learn, but I’d love the new way to look at how an input control could work.

You can see the 3D Rudder’s Indiegogo campaign, and here’s a video demo of the 3D Rudder:

While the mouse and keyboard have been tremendously powerful input devices for computers, I’m fascinated to consider how the evolution of computer input will go. We’ve seen the amazing growth of voice and touch over the past couple years. However, I think and hope we’re just getting started with how simple it will be to control the computers of the future. I believe the small innovations like the two mentioned above are part of the process of improving computer UIs as we know them.