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The Meaningful Use Revolution

Meaningful Use change is afoot in the world of EHR software. Many doctors, hospitals and EHR vendors were set up to step away from meaningful use stage 2. Many would have filed for an exception, others would have opted out of Medicare, and others would have just taken the penalties on the chin. It wouldn’t have been pretty and the people at CMS/ONC/HHS realized this was happening and had to do something to avoid the meaningful use stage 2 fall out. It wouldn’t have looked good to have billions of dollars of EHR incentive money sitting on the table with no one wanting it.

CMS decided to cover this wound with a bandaid fix that essentially delays meaningful use stage 2. There are still a lot of details of the proposed rule that are unclear. For example, can anyone attest to meaningful use stage 1 or is that option only available to those EHR vendors who aren’t ready for meaningful use stage 2? I’ve sent that question to CMS, but still haven’t gotten an answer.

Can you imagine the fallout if this is indeed the case? Basically they’d be saying, “All of you EHR vendors and organizations that were good and stayed up with the latest regulations are going to have to do more work and attest to the stricter MU2 criteria while we reward those EHR vendors and organizations that weren’t ready for MU2 with a simpler option.” Can you imagine the backlash that would occur if this is indeed what they decide to do? For that reason alone, I can’t imagine them keeping it that way. I think they have to just open up all the stages/certifications to anyone and everyone regardless of your EHR vendor’s readiness for MU2. (Note: I haven’t dug in to see if this is really a viable option or if a 2014 Certified EHR required changes to the software which make it so it can’t do both MU2 and MU1, but I think it should work out fine. For example, CQMs are tied to certification year and not MU stage. Update: Lynn Scheps from SRSSoft sent me the following update “Prior to the publication of the proposed rule, 2014 CEHRT was required for everyone who wanted to earn an incentive in 2014, so part of the certification requirements was that the EHR could be used for stage 1 or stage 2.”)

What’s even more important is that this is really just the start of the meaningful use revolution. I’ve pointed out my article to “blow up meaningful use” a few times before and that message is starting to be shared by other healthcare IT influencers. For example, the title of this post came from a post by EHR certification and Meaningful Use expert, Jim Tate’s post “You Say You Want a Meaningful Use Revolution” which was a great follow up to his “Meaningful Use Zombie Land” post.

It has become really clear that there’s a lot of confusion afoot. The thing people want most from government regulation is clarity and ICD-10 and now meaningful use are suffering from a lack of clarity. John Halamka summarizes this issue really well:

at some point we need to recognize that layering fixes on top of existing Meaningful Use regulation, some of which was written by CMS and some of which was written by ONC creates too much complexity. I have direct access to the authors of the regulations and email them on a daily basis. It’s getting to the point that even the authors cannot answer questions about the regulations because there are too many layers. I realize that we are reaching the end of the stimulus dollars, but as we head into Stage 3, I wonder if we can radically simplify the program, focusing on a few key policy goals such as interoperability, eliminating most of the existing certification requirements, and giving very clear direction to hospitals and professionals as to what must be done when.

I’m glad to see that John Halamka and myself are on the same page. We need to simplify meaningful use and focus on interoperability. That’s a simple and clear message that providers will understand. I was excited that EHR vendor athenahealth offered a similar view in their post “We Should Be Pushing Interoperability Boundaries, Not EHR Certification Timelines.”

Jim Tate has a good call to action to those who care about what’s happening with meaningful use. As of last night, only 8 comments had been made during the public comment period for the meaningful use stage 2 delay NPRM. You can submit your comments on the rule incredibly easy at the following link: http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=CMS-2014-0064-0002 I’ll be taking this post and my “blowing up meaningful use” and modifying them as my comments. I hope you’ll take the time and share your thoughts on the delay and the future of meaningful use.

May 29, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Does EHR Have an Image Issue?

I was incredibly struck by a comment Tom Cox, MD made in reply to Katherine Rourke’s post about “Teaching to the EMR Template.” Here it is in case you missed it:

Of course this is happening. And, physicians in practice see it happening. But, we are powerless to change the system as many of us are held captive by our employer’s choice of EHR. EHR’s are less about health care and more about monitoring of healthcare. So, whether or not the ‘note’ is helpful to others is not important.

We’ve certainly written about EHR backlash a number of times before including my prediction of a coming Physician EHR revolt. However, Dr. Cox’s words about being powerless are quite a challenge and frankly scary.

What’s even more disheartening for me is that EHR doesn’t have to be this way. Sure, billing requirements are onerous and do put some pressures on doctors that do nothing to improve healthcare. The same could be said for meaningful use. However, there are plenty of EHR benefits to consider as well. Unfortunately, I think most of those are getting overwhelmed by some of the bad stories (and there are bad stories).

Many like to blame the news outlets for only covering the bad EHR examples. Certainly I won’t be arguing against laying some of the blame on those of us covering EHR. A disaster can often be easier to write about than an EMR success story. Plus, they’re easier to find. Not to mention readers can’t help but read it. However, I believe there’s something more happening here.

There’s plenty of blame that can be placed on the EHR vendors who do a shoddy job. We can throw some blame on doctors who don’t go through a rigorous EHR selection process or who skimp on EHR training. There’s certainly plenty of blame to go around for why EHR needs an image overhaul.

The challenge with the image of something like an EHR is that there’s no one person that holds responsibility for that image. There’s an entire industry that shapes the image of EHR. The only way to change it is for the industry to change. I only hope the fact that EHR is nearly a requirement for practicing medicine today won’t mean that bad actors will continue to scar the EHR image. My hope is renewed when I meet with EHR vendors who do have the physician and patients best interest in mind.

Maybe all of this is just the reality of the post EHR golden age environment.

October 17, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

March Madness and the EHR Vendor Shakeout

I’m not sure how many of my readers love March Madness as much as I do. I just love the emotion and the all day experience of March Madness. Unfortunately there haven’t been quite as many last minute buzzer beaters for the win as there have been in years past, but I still love the emotions of the games. These young kids have worked almost their entire life for this moment. I love to see the raw emotions from both teams.

As I think about March Madness, I couldn’t help but think about the EHR Madness we’re experiencing right now. We don’t have 68 teams in the EHR tournament. Instead, there are more like 300+ EHR vendors. In fact, in just the last week or two I’ve had two EHR vendors I’d never heard of contact me. Yes, we’ve seen some EHR software put out to pasture, but we still have a long ways to go before the EHR market really shakes itself out.

The nice thing for EHR vendors is that unlike the NCAA tournament which only has one winner, the EHR world is likely going to have many many successful companies. First, because many EHR vendors will likely get acquired by larger EHR vendors. Second, because it’s fair to say that the EHR world is going to be a heterogeneous environment. There won’t be one EHR to rule them all (although some EHR vendors still think they might get there).

Which type of vendors am I putting my money on in the EHR battle?

While many EHR vendors might win some short term battles, I think the big EHR winners are going to be those who end up battling through the mess of regulation while still having a laser focus on the impact to doctors. The most expensive employee in every healthcare institution is the doctors. EHR software that takes these high paid doctors away from seeing patients is going to have a real challenge long term.

I’ve written about the EHR Backlash a number of times before. I think productivity is going to be at the core of the EHR backlash. I’m hopeful that EHR vendors are taking this idea to heart, but I also still see a very long road in front of us to reach EHR nirvana.

I’ve been digging into the idea of a Smart EMR lately. At the core of the idea is how to make a doctor more efficient at what they do while increasing the quality of care provided. That certainly stands in stark contrast to many of the other EHR initiatives we see out there today.

March 29, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

EMR Farce, Connected Health, and Lusty Love Affair with Magic EMR


This is a well reasoned take from John Mandrola, MD on the challenges that EMR has with many doctors. Another entry in the EHR Physician Revolt. The tone of the article is right. Dr. Mandrola isn’t against EHR and technology in general. He’s just against them in their current form. When I say current form, I suggest that is thanks to current billing requirements and other government regulations.


This is related to the first tweet. This shouldn’t be the case.


Wouldn’t we all love an EHR that was connected? Yes, I’m using connected in the broadest terms. I’m talking about connected to patients, connected to hospitals, connected to labs, radiology, insurance companies, nurses, doctors, etc etc etc. A few of those in the list are connected, but far too many of the others aren’t.


This comment by Linda was too good not to point out. She’s right. EMR is here to stay, but the honeymoon period for EMR’s is over. Doctors are starting to ask the right questions when evaluating EHRs. This will make some EHR vendors very happy and others not as much.

February 24, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

EHR Apps, EHR Early Adopters, and EHR Backlash


I love this approach. The challenge is that this likely has to be built from the ground up with this in mind. Is any EHR on that trajectory now?


I applaud all the early adopters of EMR (yes, if you were an early adopter it was EMR and not EHR). I’d love to hear more from those who were adopting EMR early on. I started with EMR 8 years ago. So, I wasn’t really early in adoption, but I was one of the early EMR bloggers.


I think the concept of EHR Backlash is interesting. The link in the above tweet is to a post I did on EMR and HIPAA that’s been one of my most popular posts ever. I really think it’s a look into the future of the EMR environment. I think most doctors will appreciate that post.

February 10, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.