Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

Physician Practices Lack Good Models For EMR Adoption

Posted on September 14, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

“All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.”
― Leo TolstoyAnna Karenina

When hospitals roll out an EMR, they go through complex and rich information-gathering process. Health IT leaders tackle problems of scale, systems integration and feature development with support from multiple leaders in other departments. There are best practices to consider and vendor selection processes to observe, references and case studies to collect, and user group meetings they can attend to fine tune their EMR rollout and answer questions.

But when it comes to physician practices, particularly the smaller ones that dominate the medical landscape, the way is not as clear. Often without even a full-time IT staff member to assist them in their selection process, EMR adoption by physician groups is far less structured. Sure, physicians may check references like their hospital colleagues do, explore customer case studies and participate in software demos, but in most cases their process is far less systematic and informed than that of a hospital.

What’s more, if their EMR implementation runs into trouble, smaller medical groups may have far less support than hospital IT leaders. After all, not only are they less likely to get much help in selecting an EMR, they probably don’t have a robust network of peers who can answer questions in context. Like any small business, they make their idiosyncrasies work for them, but when they get into trouble with IT they are unhappy in their own unique way.

Standardizing Physician EMR Adoption
Of course, practice leaders who are struggling with their EMR investment can turn to the vendor that sold them the system, but that can backfire pretty easily. While the vendor is obviously the last word on how the contract is structured, they may or may not have a strong incentive to address gripes and concerns, even if they are obligated to address outright failures of the system.

If the vendor offers a fairly open support model, practices may get some help as they evolve. But if their vendor charges by the hour for support, it’s unlikely many practices be willing to pay for the time to address anything but major problems. That may cut practices off from the knowledge and context they need.

Given these concerns, I’d argue that we need to develop a generalizable, reproducible model for physician EMR adoption and rollout. As I envision it, it should include:

  1. A standardized form smaller practices can use to identify their key needs, allowing them to pick and weight their priorities from an evidence-based list of key selection criteria
  2. A frequently-updated database, maintained by a third party, which collects physician ratings on how a given vendor meets these well-articulated needs
  3. A post-implementation form, once again drawn from research evidence, helping them identify and weight their EMR’s performance based on objective criteria

The idea behind all of this is to standardize physician groups’ EMR selection and rollout, and turn what can be a groping, uneven process into an evidence-based one. Not only will this help physicians from the outset, it allows for building a knowledge base which cuts across vendors, geographies, practice sizes and technical sophistication levels. If physicians had such tools, their process of learning would become iterative and collaborative in a far more effective way.

Don’t get me wrong, I know that virtually any software selection process will address issues that don’t make it into a model like the above.  But if you offer practices a more structured way to adopt an EMR, they are more likely to be happy with their overall results. This is going to become even more and more important as small practices switch EHR software due to EHR consolidation and other factors.

Finding an EHR With Online Tools

Posted on January 5, 2016 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

So, you want to dump your EHR and find another, or about to join the fray? Once you’ve got a handle on your requirements, this review lists some online tools that might help. Ideally, they’ll point to the one that’s best for you. Even if they can’t do that, they should help identify what you don’t want. Along the way, they may also raise some new issues, or give you some new insights.

Full Disclosure: I manage EHRSelector.com, but it’s not included.

Finding EHR Tools

The web has a surfeit of EHR evaluation tools. I’ve only reviewed those that are vendor independent and employ some filtering or ranking. That excludes spreadsheets and PDFs that just list features. I also skipped any that charge. I found the nine shown in Table I and reviewed below. Table II explains my definitions.


EHR Tool Table IEHR Tool Table II

EHR Tools Reviewed

1. American EHR. American’s tool gives you several ways to look at an EHR. Its side by side list compares 80 features. It asks users to rank a dozen features on a 1 to 5 scale. To use the tool, you pick a practice size and specialty. You can also see how users rated a product in detail, which shows how it stacks up against all its others. Unfortunately, its interface is a hit or miss affair. When you change a product choice sometimes it works and sometimes it just sits there.

2. Capterra. Capterra ranks the top 20 most popular EHRs, or at least the most well known. To do this, it adds up the number of customers, users and social media scores. That is, how often they’re mentioned on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Users rank products on a 1 to 5 scale and can add comments. It has a basic product filtering system.

3. Consumer Affairs. It examines ten major vendors using a short breakdown of features and user reviews. Users rate products on a 1 to 5 scale and can add comments.

4. EHR Compare. This tool solely relies on user ratings. Users score 20 EHR features on a 1 to 5 scale. It may add additional features depending on specialty. It only has a handful of reviews, which is a drawback.

5. EHR in Practice. EHR in Practice provides a short list of features and thumbnail EHR descriptions.

6. EHR Softwareinsider. This site uses ONC attestations to rank vendors. Its analysis shows those rankings along with Black Book ratings. Users rank products on a 1 to 10 scale. Interestingly, users can earn a $10 Amazon gift card for their reviews. For a fee, a vendor can move their product to the top of a list, though ES says that does not influence other factors.

7. Select Hub. There is one big if to using this site, if you can get in. As with some sites, SH requires that you register to get to its rankings. The problem is that once you do, you may wait for a day or more for a confirming email link. Even then, it didn’t see the confirmation, so I had to repeat, etc. If you get in, you’ll find some interesting features. Its staff briefly analyzes a product’s performance for each function. The other is that you can set up a project for yourself and others to query vendors.

8. Software Advice. Software Advice is a user rating site based on a 1 to 5 scale. It offers filters by rating rank, specialty and practice size as well as a short product summary.

9. Top Ten Reviews. As the name implies, Top Ten shows just that. There are two problems with its rankings. It doesn’t explain how it chose them or how they are ranked. It provides a thumbnail for each product.

What to Use. Several of the EHR comparison are just popularity contests. They have limited filters and depend on user reviews from whoever walks in the door. Two, however, go beyond that and are worth exploring: American EHR and Select Hub. Both have interface problems, but with persistence, you can find out more about a product than using the others.

With that said, you may also may find it useful to go through the user ranked tools. They may help you cull out particular products or interest you in one you’ve overlooked. Finally, if I’ve left something out, please let me know. I’ll add it in a revised post.

KLAS Gives athenahealth, Not Epic, its 2013 “Best in KLAS” award

Posted on February 6, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

While Epic Systems may still be that the giant in the room, according KLAS, athenahealth is the best overall software vendor for 2013.

athenahealth’s taking first place pushes Epic to second for the first time in eight years. athenahealth got the most positive opinions from the thousands of providers participating in the KLAS poll, notably praise for the usability of its athenaClinicals, athenaCollector and athenaCommunicator products, according to EHR Intelligence.

athenahealth CEO Jonathan Bush was all too happy to take a victory lap. “The old guard of each IT leaders is finally being displaced by more nimble innovative models designed for healthcare’s future – not for its past,” Bush told EHR Intelligence.

Epic still remains in first place as for its overall software suite, reports EHR Intelligence. And it took home multiple prizes this year. But there’s a revolution brewing outside the Epic palace, it would appear. Not one that calls for angry peasants and pitchforks, but clearly some level of entrenched discontent is at work here.

Other well-known vendors of EMRs took their lumps as well. For example, Cerner came in at seventeenth, McKesson at 20th, and Allscripts came in 23rd.

So what to make of all of this? As my colleague John Lynn notes, awards of this kind are best taken with a grain of salt. After all, providers don’t need software that wins popularity contests, they need software which they can afford, which can handily meet Meaningful Use standards and which doctors and nurses and other clinicians can use without a hitch. Being sure their vendors win sexy awards really isn’t on their worry list.

Still, the fact that Epic has been unseated after eight years at the top of KLAS’s best vendor list may mean something. Perhaps Epic’s grip on the market is loosening a bit?

EMR and EHR Ratings Confusion

Posted on October 30, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently got a comment from Tammie on my post about EMR and EHR rating websites. Here last line really hits home:

If we cannot trust the reliability of web published EMR/EHR ratings, then are we not to trust the surveys and polls conducted by the professional organizations or the selections by the Regional Exchange Centers either? I can’t recall ever researching something so thoroughly and have so much information available to me and yet be still so utterly confused.

It’s a definite challenge. I’d suggest going through a methodical process that’s described in my free EMR Selection e-Book. Still a challenge, but this approach helps.

EMR and EHR Rating Websites

Posted on October 20, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

There are a number of EMR and EHR rating websites out there. The problem that I have is that none of them are really very good at all. They all have MAJOR weaknesses and some are just completely and utterly flawed. Some require the EMR and EHR vendors to pay them to be rated. Doesn’t that just wreak of conflict of interest?

There’s just so many ways to have the ratings of EMR and EHR vendors be skewed. Dr. Oates, Founder of SOAPware, recently wrote a blog post about the problems with many of the EMR and EHR rating websites and reports. Certainly he has a vested interest in his EMR software to be ranked highly, but this part aside he raises some very important questions about the accuracy and value of these various ranking systems.

Here’s one sample of the challenge of ranking and rating EMR and EHR vendors:

In addition to accepting user evaluations, many of the ranking systems require that vendors also fill in yes/no to a large list of features. Historically, many vendors have demonstrated tendencies to answer “yes” to functionalities to which a “no” would have been more accurate. Because we tend to answer honestly, we have sometimes ended up inaccurately appearing to be less functional than some others.
There are inherent problems with each of these surveys in that the survey results can, and often are, manipulated by the vendors who are paying a the most of attention to them. Because these surveys are the result of users offering information, some vendors will expend great effort to be certain that many, mostly happy users of their product are in some fashion encouraged to participate in the surveys. SOAPware has typically avoided such activities, because it ends up being a game to see who can motivate the most satisfied users to engage the ranking system.

This is just a small sample of the challenges of trying to honestly and effectively get quality ratings and reviews of EMR and EHR vendors. Yet, providers and practice managers have an insatiable appetite to try and get information on the various EMR and EHR vendors.

Trust me, this is not an easy issue. If I knew the solution, I’d have already done it myself. I write about this since I think it’s a valuable and important message for doctors to be very very careful trusting any of the data coming out of these EMR and EHR ratings websites. Instead, go download the Free copy of my EMR Selection e-Book and do the work necessary to rate them based on your specific practice needs.