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EMR Analysis Detects Childrens’ Growth Disorders

Posted on September 16, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

EMRs can be used to detect growth disorders in children, according to new research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association . The study, which was written up in FierceEMR, used a special automated growth monitoring algorithm integrated into an EMR system to track childrens’ growth.

To conduct the study, researchers compared three “control” years to an “intervention” year. An annual average of 33,029 children were screened, according to FierceEMR.

Researchers found that in a control year an average of four children were diagnosed with a growth disorder. During the intervention year, however, 28 new diagnoses of growth disorders were made among 32,404 children, FierceEMR reports.

Looked at another way, the rate of growth disorder diagnoses was 0.1 per 1000 screened children in the control years versus 0.9 per 1000 screened children in the intervention year, FierceEMR noted.

These study results are part of an emerging body of literature suggesting that EMRs to help clinicians detect and manage disease states.

For example, another study appearing in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that EMRs can be associated with a drop in emergency department visits and hospitalizations among diabetics.  That study, which analyzed all of the 169,711 records for patients enrolled in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California diabetes registry during a four-year period, found a 10.5% decline in hospitalizations for preventable ambulatory care sensitive conditions where EMRs were in use.

Another study, which recently appeared in BMJ Quality & Safety, recently concluded that EMRs can help reduce hospital readmissions of high-risk heart failure patients by sorting out high from low risk patients in the ED.

Doctors Want Patients To Update, But Not Have Full Access To EMRs

Posted on March 12, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

So, it seems that doctors are willing to open up the kimono, but only so far. A new Accenture study has concluded that while most U.S. doctors surveyed are ready to have patients update their electronic health record, only a minority believe patients should have access to their full record.

Accenture, which announced these results last week at HIMSS, did an eight-country survey of 3,700 doctors cutting across Australia, Canada, England, France, Germany, Singapore, Spain and the U.S.

When it came to U.S. doctors, 82 percent reported that they were comfortable having patients update their own EMR data. But when asked, less than a third (31 percent) felt that patients should have access to their full record. Sixty-five percent felt that  patients should have limited access and 4 percent no access at all.  (Interestingly, the results were similar across all eight countries, Accenture reports.)

Breaking things down further, while almost half (47 percent) of U.S. doctors surveyed felt that patients should not be able to update their lab results, most said patients should be able to update several types of information, including:

* Demographics (95 percent)
* Family medical history (88 percent)
* Medications (87 percent)
* Allergies (85 percent)

Most doctors (81 percent) also believe patients should be able to add clinical updates to records, specifically self-measured items like glucose and blood pressure levels or new symptoms.

On the other hand, only 21 percent of doctors surveyed currently allow patients to have online access to their medical summary or patient chart, despite the fact that 49 percent believe that giving patients access to their records is crucial to providing effective care, Accenture said.