What Happens When An EHR Vendor is Acquired?

Posted on January 12, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

With meaningful use money running out, and as the EHR industry matures, we’re going to see more and more consolidation in the EHR market. Many EHR vendors are going to start running out of money. Other larger EHR vendors are going to want to try and buy up market share. In some ways this has already begun. See Greenway being purchased by Vitera Healthcare Solutions and Cerner acquiring Siemens to name some of the larger ones that have happened recently. Although, anyone that’s been a user of Bond EHR (people still miss that EHR software), Allscripts MyWay, Misys, etc etc etc knows the challenges of when your EHR vendor gets acquired.

While your EHR being acquired by another EHR vendor is almost never a good thing for your EHR software’s future, L Nelms visited this post on EMR and EHR News and offered an even worse story of an EHR being acquired and the fallout the doctors felt. I’ve removed the name of the vendors since the principle could apply to many vendors that get acquired.

After completing Stage one of Meaningful Use, I am now dropping out of the whole damn thing. This decision is based entirely on my continued dissatisfaction with the EMR program I chose. I started using EHR Vendor A in 2012. As many know, EHR Vendor A was subsequently bought by ABC corporation who refused to honor the original contract which promised no additional fees. ABC corporation, knowing that they had customers “right where they wanted them” — knowing that switching programs would incur tremendous costs and disruption to the practices’ work flow, immediately imposed a $250.00 monthly “support fee”, requiring automatic payments from the customers credit card. I do not know what constitutes “support” from this company, as I had problems with the program and attempted to contact them numerous times from Nov 19, 2014 to Dec 9, without a SINGLE reply in any form from them. On Jan 1, 2015, they increased this fee to $300.00.

They continue to inundate us with newsletters telling us how wonderful they are, including an alert urging us to “respond today” to arrange to get the new certified software installed. This was sent on Christmas Eve! They warned us repeatedly that we must be using the new software ON Jan 1,2015, in order to meet MU. What they didn’t mention until the day before the install, was that there is a “one-time installation fee of $99.00” (charged immediately, of course, to you credit card).

I asked if I could do the install myself and was told “yes, but we’re not really charging for the install, we’re charging for the SQL server update (which actually can be done oneself ). But I was told I had to pay. And now, the new certified software, which is COMPLETELY different from the previous version, is a nightmare. It is agonizingly slow, painstakingly labor intensive, and heaven forbid I should require tech support who, on top of being nowhere to be found, are so disrespectful (the last one one I spoke to actually said — when I expressed my dissatisfaction with not being able to get my data when I terminate my contract — “well we didn’t force you to buy our program”

Which doesn’t explain why I feel so violated…..

I should clarify that my data from EHR Vendor A is “available”: after many cryptic replies from them over several days, I was finally told that I can access the data from the server, but then — and you all know the story– I must take out a second mortgage on my home to have the data converted to some semblance of a usable format. This may not be illegal (only because the the recklessness of the companies has not yet been regulated), but it is certainly of questionable ethicacy

I think this is a fear that many doctors have when selecting and purchasing their EHR software. It’s why many of them still choose to go with the big name EHR vendors. Stories like this one scare doctors away from a small EHR vendor with an uncertain future. Although, I’ve written previously about the uncertain future of large EHR vendors as well.

The EHR industry should do better than this. I hope this story is an aberration, but I’m afraid we’re going to see more and more stories like it as the EHR industry consolidates. There will still be many good EHR actors out there that are appalled by these stories like I am. Hopefully, more and more doctors will find those good actors who are sincere in their efforts to provide a quality product with a quality user experience for the doctor. They’re out there, but bad actors like what’s described above give the good apples a bad name.