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Disaster Planning, Horrors of Generic HIT Training, and Snap.MD: Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on November 25, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

EMR and HIPAA

Disaster Planning and HIPAA

Unfortunately, it appears that far too many healthcare providers don’t follow this rule. There aren’t very many that even have an emergency plan in place. However, this will soon need to be remedied. HIPAA security general rules state that not only must a patient’s privacy be protected, but the ePHI is available at all times — even in the case of an emergency. All healthcare providers, regardless of size, will need to implement some kind of disaster planning, regardless of their situation, in order to be in compliance with these regulations.

EMR Add-On’s that Provide Physician Benefit

MedCPU is a part of the inaugural NYC Digitial Health Accelerator class. They have developed a new concept that will likely to very helpful to many. It analyzes free text notes and structured data, and checks for compliance with rules and to identify any deviances. The company described one hospital using the services the company provides as a benefit given to doctors who use EHR. This is just one of many add-ons available, but some are seeing them to be a large reason why some doctors want to adopt EMRs.

Hospital EMR and EHR

Video: The Horrors of Generic HIT Training

Need a break from the day-to-day monotony? Be sure to check at this video on the horrors of generic HIT Training. It “offers a wry take on what happens when EMR training isn’t relevant for the doctor who’s getting the training. In this case, we witness the plight of a heart surgeon who’s forced through a discussion on primary care functions that she neither wants nor needs.”

Study: EMR ROI Stronger In Low-Income Setting

A recent study revealed something interesting. Hospitals in low-income areas actually may have a decent return on investment when an EMR is integrated. Three different areas were looked at and analyzed, and it was found that after five years of having an EMR, the hospital examined had a net benefit of over $600,000. Not all hospitals will benefit this much, but it’s encouraging to see more EMR success stories popping up.

Smart Phone Healthcare

Get Peace of Mind and Avoid the ER With Snap.MD

It’s the middle of the night, and your child breaks out in a rash all of his or her body. The doctor’s office doesn’t have middle of the night, on-call doctors, so the only option is the ER, right? Maybe not for long. Snap.MD, a new telemedicine system, may help parents decide if the Emergency Room is the best course of action. Parents of pediatric patients are connected to physician, who will help evaluate the situation via video conferencing.

Super Storms, Clouds and CollarBones – My HIT Week in Review

Posted on November 1, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

“Sandy” is a nickname I attribute to my mother-in-law – a sweet, caring woman who also goes by the name of “Nana” and loves to scrapbook. Her demeanor (even when riled up) is a far cry from the meteorological phenomenon forecasters have dubbed “Super Storm Sandy,” which, as of this posting, has caused 50 deaths and power outages in 17 states affecting a minimum of 8 million customers, according to a Good Morning America report.

Sandy hasn’t impacted my environs much, other than to ensure that trick-or-treating will be a bit colder than usual this far south. While it hasn’t impacted me physically (other than offering a respite from ‘round-the-clock election coverage), I have, of course, seen a flurry of healthcare IT media around disaster preparedness, ensuring security measures when natural disasters strike, and the unfortunate lessons learned when hospitals don’t think to upgrade backup generator systems before super storms strike.

Amidst the news stories that have crossed my desk in the past few days was one concerning the orthopedic center where my husband is receiving treatment for his broken collarbone. The practice – the largest of its kind in Georgia – has decided to implement Merge Healthcare’s cloud-based Merge Honeycomb Archive to “store patient images and provide a long-term disaster recovery solution.” (Their words, not mine.)

Merge Healthcare’s CEO mentions in the press announcement that “imaging accounts for up to 90% of all data stored in electronic health records. Add in privacy rules that require storage of electronic health data, including digital images, and you see how the need to securely store and share medical images has grown – specifically in the cloud.”

I suppose when natural disaster strikes, a statistic like this takes on more importance, though I’m actually surprised that imaging-related data takes up that much space. Digging through Google led me to press releases from 2005 announcing the practice had decided to implement Allscripts TouchWorks EHR, but I’m not sure how valid that information is at this point, considering its age and the absolute maze of information I found myself in regarding subsequent Allscripts product acquisitions, mergers and shut downs.

In any case, I was happy to find that my husband’s physician has access to healthcare IT tools, and his information is up in the cloud somewhere should we ever need it, which makes me feel just a little bit better about his recovery.

Clinical Data Access, New Open Source EHR, and Striiv – Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on October 28, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Hospital EMR and EHR

Call Me Maybe at #CHIME12

One of the most popular songs among teens recently is “Call Me Maybe.” Well, at CHIME 2012, a music video of this song was created, featuring many of the participants in #CHIME12. It’s a fun little video, and the song sure is catchy.

Senators Join Initiative to Scrutinize Meaningful Use

After four GOP leaders have demanded that HHS Katherine Sebilus account for “failures” they found with Meaningful Use. Recently, a few senators have joined in the fight as well. Several questions were raised about EMRs, Medicare, and Meaningful Use. Is this the push that was needed in order to get Congress interested in the future of EMRs?

EMR and HIPAA
SXSW Accelerator Event for Health Startups

SXSW has long been known as an amazing music, film and now IT event. In fact, many people laud the event as a great place where creative people from all industries come together. This year SXSW has a whole health IT campus and a section of their Startup Accelerator competition that’s just devoted to healthcare IT startups. It will be a great place for healthcare IT to mix with the rest of the IT startup world. Plus, I expect a number of very interesting health IT companies to launch in the SXSW accelerator.

Access to Clinical Data Too Easy Via Phone

Most doctor’s offices will verify information by asking for a name and birthdate. However, this system could easily be compromised. Is there a better way to verify this type of information, before discussing medical issues? This post talks about different ideas, and how patient portals might be the solution.

New Open Source (Free) EHR Offering Developed by A Doctor

A new open source EHR is about to be released. And it was developed by a physician. Michael Chen, MD,  the doctor behind it, was interviewed on EMR and HIPAA. He discusses why he wanted to create an open source EHR, future plans, and any challenges that might be associated with it in this post.

Happy EMR Doctor

EMR Use Improves Primary Care: New Study

While there has been some debate about if EMR improves patient care, a recent study indicates that it does; at least in some health specialties. Over 7000 patients with coronary artery disease and diabetes were studied over the course of nine months, and the results ruled in the favor of EMRs. Dr. Michael West has found in his own personal observations, EMR does indeed improve patient care as well.

Smart Phone and Health Care

Five Challenges of mHealth

While mHealth has many advantages and has improved health care in many ways, there have been some challenges that have come about. These challenges include privacy, data security, and funding.

Striiv Ups the Standard for Pedometers — Games, Challenges, and Charity Incorporated

A new generation for the classic pedometer has been created. Striiv recently released a $99 pedometer that really gives the old kind a makeover. It incorporates fitness games, goals, and a charity to convince people to get walking. For those that don’t want to spend $99 on a pedometer, the (free) mobile app is available for the iPhone, and has a lot of the same functions.

Greenway Medical (GWAY) Keeps Momentum Post-IPO

Posted on October 23, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

As readers may know, Greenway Medical Technologies is a health IT vendor that sells an integrated EMR and practice management solution, as well as interoperability tools.  The mid-sized vendor excited some criticism earlier this year when it decided to launch an IPO, as few vendors in its size class have done so to date. Naysayers argued that the moment wasn’t right for a company its size to compete with big health IT players for investors.

A few quarters later, Greenway’s stock is doing well, at about $18 per share, having started out at a $10 per share offering price. Analysts, myself included, aren’t surprised to see a well-positioned company in the ambulatory care space do well, but the $550 million firm has done better than expected.

Wall Street was taken by surprise by Greenway’s release of its 4th quarter results for fiscal 2012, in which the company reported revenue growth at 24 percent and raw profit margins at 60 percent (though overall profit stood at 16 percent after all other factors were considered).

What ‘s keeping the stock going seems to be nothing more than plain old fashioned dealmaking — and notably, larger deals that extend beyond lighting up one physician office at a time:

*  Greenway cut a deal with HIT vendor Relay Health (a McKesson subsidiary)  in which the two are offering HIE services.

*   Walgreens chose Greenway’s EHR to wire up its pharmacies for immunizations and health testing.

* Greenway snagged an agreement with Michigan Health Connect, the state’s largest HIE, to provide its technology for practices and clinics using the vendor’s solution.

If you’re seeing a pattern here, you’re not alone. Greenway isn’t just flogging its EMR/PMS to hospitals and medical practices, it’s providing the “last mile” HIE connectivity which has most providers scratching their heads.

Without a doubt, Greenway has formidable competition on the HIE technology side — a story we don’t have space for here — but it seems to me that the combo of having a EMR, PMS and HIE technology to offer is a huge plus.  Like the Wall Street folks, I’m interested to see if this combo keeps Greeway afloat. Things look pretty good at the moment.

Healthcare Social Media, Call for Halt on MU Payments, and Healthbox London – Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on October 14, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

EMR, EHR and HIPAA

Mobile EHR as a Solution for EHR Downtime

There has been some EHR downtime recently from major EHR vendors, which has given an opportunity for mobile EHRs to get more of a spotlight. Mitochin recently released a Mobile EHR, and John had the opportunity to review it. It has some different features than other mobile EHRs that are available, and appears to be a great alternative for accessing EHRs when downtime happens.

Healthcare Social Media Happenings

There’s lots of ways to “be in the know” with healthcare and social media. This post directs interested readers to different ways to get involved recently, including attending weekly #HITsm chats, following the happenings at the New York Digital Health Conference, and more.

Hospital EMR and EHR

Congressmen Want Halt on Meaningful Use Payments

Four congressmen are rallying against current Meaningful Use Stage 2 regulations, and half payments for MU. HIMSS has released a statement against this, and there is a lot of debate about what to do. Some of their complaints are warranted and should be taken seriously, it isn’t completely clear cut what the solution should be.

EMR and EHR Thoughts

Healthbox Expands to European Startups

Healthbox has been helping startups in the United States by providing them with seed capital and access to resources. The company is now expanding to Europe, specifically London. Startups have been able to submit applications since July and a decision on which startups that were selected was expected in September.

Smart Phone Health Care

My First (Actual) Experience With A Patient Portal

Medical practices all over the country are implementing patient portals. The pediatrician’s office that Katie takes her son to just created one, and in this post, she talks about her first look at it. What parts of your patient portal do you like?

EHR Incentives, Smart Bed Technology, and Remotoscope — #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on October 13, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This weeks #HITsm chat was hosted by John, which was exciting to observe. If you’ve been keeping up with the different sites from Health Care Scene, some of these topics might seem similar. Be sure to tune in every Friday at noon EST, and join the conversation with #HITsm.

Topic One: A few in congress called for a halt on EHR incentives. Is this politics or something more? Are their observations founded? 

Topic Two: Allscripts is the 2nd EHR vendor to discontinue their small practice EHR (MyWay), is this a trend and what’s the impact of it? 

 Topic Three: Is the hospital bed the ultimate medical device monitor? What other med device monitors do you see on the horizon? 

Topic Four: What do you think of the remotoscope which allows you to diagnose ear infections at home using your iPhone? 

Consumers Hungry For Online Health Data Access

Posted on September 24, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

We may be at a major tipping point, folks. It seems that consumers are becoming eager to interact with both their doctors and their health data online, after years of fear and disinterest.  In fact, it seems that doctors  may be lagging behind.

A new survey from Optum Institute, a part of health insurer UnitedHealth’s Optum division, took a look at attitudes across several major stakeholder groups, including 1,000 physicians, 2,870 U.S. adults and 400 U.S. executives.

Optum found that three out of four patients were interested in accessing their health records online through EMRs, and more th an 60 percent wanted to connect with doctors via e-mail or other Internet vehicles.

And that’s not all. According a summary of the study in MedCityNews:

  • 76 percent of patients are willing to go online to view test results
  • 65 percent want appointment reminders via email
  • 62 percent of patients want to communicate online with their primary care physician

Meanwhile, physicians don’t seem to be keeping up. Only 40 percent of physicians said they had the ability to allow patient EMR access or communicate securely via the Internet.

Why such a gap? Apparently, many of the doctors Optum surveyed have only basic EMRs in place which don’t support patient data access or communication.  For example, only 46 percent of physicians’ EMRs offer patient-specific information to help them make decisions and manage their health.

It’s hard to tell from a survey like this whether patients merely like the idea of greater connectivity, or are ready to insist that their doctors get on board.  So I wouldn’t go out on a limb at this point and suggest that doctors will lose patients if they don’t get their EMRs souped up quickly.

This does suggest, however, that when physicians make patient data access easier and begin to communicate online, they’ll certainly make some new fans.

Primary Docs See Hope For Stronger Financials With EMR

Posted on September 21, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Apparently, some primary care physicians are optimistic about the financial impact EMRs will have on their practice, according to a new survey.

Vendor Hello Health recently completed a survey of 100 practicing physicians without EMRs to discuss their attitudes about key business issues.  Not surprisingly, 37 percent of respondents said EMR adoption was their number one challenge at present; an equal percentage said that financial issues were their biggest worry.

Here’s what, to me, is the most interesting part of the study.  Among doctors for whom practice financial health was a primary concern, 51 percent felt that implementing an EMR would help solve their problems.

Their theory was that EMRs would help by improving coding and documentation to substantiate claims, as well as improving efficiencies and reducing costs.

Of doctors who didn’t think EMRs would help their financial situation, 46 percent felt that the systems would lead higher costs and overhead, and 15 percent felt productivity would decrease.

Now, I’m going to go all cynical on y’all.

I was pretty surprised to read that some doctors feel EMRs will actually improve their financial situation. Sure, improving coding and documentation itself is certainly a worthy financial goal.  The thing is, that’s not exactly what EMRs are designed to deliver.

As for improved efficiencies and reduced costs, well, I don’t find that very credible at all.  Not that some practices don’t achieve this goal,  but if the respondents  had anything near-term in mind they’re likely to be quite disappointed.

Realistically, if I wanted to invest in technology that improved my coding, I’d go with a computer-assisted coding or souped-up billing system. And I’d begin gunning my ICD-10 engines right away. Getting psyched about my pending EMR is nice, but probably setting oneself up for a letdown.

Health IT Q&A, Speciality EMRs, and Secure Messaging: Around Health Care Scene.

Posted on September 16, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

EMR and HIPAA

Health IT Q&A With Scott Joslyn, CIO and Senior Vice President, MemorialCare Health System

This post features Scott Joslyn from MemorialCare Health System. He talks about a few different Health IT topics, including benefits and disadvantages to EHR and voice recognition. Joslyn is definitely an expert on Health IT, so this is a post you don’t want to miss.

Verizon Hopes To Be Secure Healthcare Network For All

Verizon is more than just switches, routers, and cables. Katherine Rourke discovered what the company has in store in the future with mHealth. She talked with Dr. Tippett from Verizon, who said Verizon’s Connected Health Division is “aiming to set the bar higher.” The company is hard at work, so expect some great things coming from Verizon.

Hospital EMR and EHR

Specialty EMRs: Behind the Curve? 

Are specialty EMRs worth investing in? There is debate on both sides of the issue, and a general consensus doesn’t appear to be developing anytime soon. Anne talks about assertions made in a statement recently about specialty EMRs, and offers her own two cents on the topic.

Study Suggests Most HIEs Aren’t Sustainable

HIEs are very expensive. Unfortunately, according to a recent study, the investment in them don’t seem to have any financial or clinical payback. There’s so much time and effort being put toward HIEs — would money be better spent elsewhere? Likely, but Anne Zieger doesn’t see things changing anytime soon.

Smart Phone Health Care

App Developers Urged to Consider Older Generations

There are apps developed that could make managing diseases like diabetes so much easier. However, these apps may not be designed with all age groups in mind. Researchers from North Carolina State are urging app developers to keep older generations in mind, who aren’t able to use certain apps as they are currently designed.

Happy EMR Doctor

EMRs’ Big Gaping Hole of Secure Messaging

This post is the first in a series from Dr. West, highlighting insights from his recent participating at a breakfast panel in Washington D.C. He talks about issues with secure messaging, including the lack of EMRs that have secure messaging included in their system. In the end, he discusses how secure messaging could impact patients and doctors positively.

Study: ICD-10 Could Slam Operations

Posted on September 11, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

We all know physicians are dreading the ICD-10 deadline. Who wouldn’t be a bit blue around the gills if they had to switch from a system with 17,000 codes to one with about 141,000 codes? Now, a study by practice management vendor Nuesoft has given us some specifics as to just what worries them.

Nuesoft surveyed 480 physicians, administrators, office managers and billers in their survey, “Attitudes Toward the Transition to ICD-10 and ANSI-5010.”  All told, they found that 96 percent of respondents were concerned about the transition, with 60 percent reporting that they were “highly” or “significantly” concerned.

As the Nuesoft chart below details, physicians are a bit freaked out over impact of ICD-10. As the chart below indicates, roughly one-third of the physicians questioned were “highly concerned” about the impact of the ICD-10 transition, and another 20-odd percent were “significantly concerned.”

Thirty percent of physicians expect that the ICD-10 transition will affect their operations very negatively, and 45 percent “somewhat negatively.”   The results were more or less the same for the other categories, which included finances, staff state of mind and personal state of mind (physician).

Thanks to Nuesoft for delving further into the headache that will dominate medical practice for years to come. Now, though, Nuesoft, how about a follow up? What I’d love to know, personally, is what differentiates those doctors who weren’t worried from those that are.  That could prove to be an eye-opener. Maybe we have something to learn from them?

P.S.  Now, as a treat for those who made it to the bottom of this piece, here’s Nuesoft’s hip hop video on the subject: