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#HIMSS14 Highlights: the Snail’s Pace of Interoperability

Ah, HIMSS. The frenetic pace. The ridiculously long exhibit hall. The aching feet. The Google Glass-ers. As I write this, day three for me is in full swing and I’ve finally managed to find some time to reflect on what I’ve seen, which includes a ridiculously long taxi queue at the airport, more pedicabs than I can count, beautiful weather and lots of familiar faces, which is what makes HIMSS so much fun. I’ve heard lots of buzzwords and sales talk, and seen only about an eighth of the exhibit hall, barely scratching the surface of what’s out there on the show floor.

Several common themes stand out based on the sessions and events I’ve been to, and the passions of those I’ve encountered. Whether it’s vendor breakfasts, social networking functions, exhibit elevator pitches or educational sessions, interoperability and engagement are still the buzzwords to beat. This particular HIMSS has given me a different perspective on each, and offered new insight into what’s happening with the Blue Button Connector. I’ll cover each of these in HIMSS Highlights posts over the next several weeks, starting with interoperability.

The industry seems far more realistic this year regarding interoperability – downright frustrated by the slow pace at which such a lofty goal is proceeding. Industry experts Brian Ahier and Shahid Shah perhaps expressed it best during a lively panel discussion at the Surescripts booth:

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Putting vendors’ feet to the fire will certainly initiate a quick and painful reaction, but probably not a sustainable one. True momentum will occur only when providers get singed a bit, too. Panelist comments at a Dell / Intel breakfast on analytics for accountable care brought this into sharper focus for me. The fact that too many disparate EMRs (and thus too many vendors poised to cause inertia) are making it hard for analytics to successfully be adopted and utilized at an enterprise level, highlights a bigger problem related to hindsight and strategy.

From my perspective – that of an industry observer and commentator – it seems many providers felt compelled to purchase EMRs because the federal government offered them money to do so, and hopefully just as many were optimistic about the role technology would play in positively affecting patient outcomes. Vendors saw a great business opportunity and moved quickly to develop systems that met Meaningful Use criteria (not necessarily going for best-fit as related to workflow needs and usability). Neither group truly knew what they were in store for, especially regarding longer term plans for health information exchange.

Providers now find themselves wanting to move forward with health information exchange and greater interoperability, but slowed down by the very IT systems they were so insistent on purchasing just a few years ago. Vendors (some more than others) are hesitant to crack open their products to allow data to truly flow from one system to another, and who can blame them? The EMR market, in particular, is poised to shrink, which begs the question, who will survive? What companies will be around at HIMSS 15 and 16? Those who keep their systems siloed, like Epic? Or those who are trying to break down the silos, such as Common Well Alliance members like athenahealth and Greenway?

It makes me wonder if providers wouldn’t have been better served with just had a handful of EMRs to choose from around the time of HITECH, all guaranteed to evolve as needed and play nicely with each other in the interest of health information exchange. Too many options have caused too many barriers. That’s not just my opinion, by the way. I’m willing to bet that a sizeable chunk of the 37,537 HIMSS 14 attendees would agree with me.

Do you disagree? Are providers (and patients) better served by more IT options than less? Let me know your thoughts, and impressions of interoperability advancement at HIMSS, in the comments below.

February 26, 2014 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

Survey Takers Show No Love for EMRs

Just in time for Valentine’s Day … in case it hasn’t crossed your device or desk, Modern Economics – a self-described web community for health professionals – recently released the results of a survey that attempted to gauge physicians’ satisfaction with EHRs. Of the nearly 1,000 folks polled, nearly 70% concluded their investment in EHRs had not been worth it. Other stats included:

  • 67% are dissatisfied with system functionality
  • 65% indicated systems resulted in financial losses
  • 45% indicated patient care is worse
  • 69% indicated care coordination has not improved
  • 73% of largest practices would not purchase current system

These numbers certainly reflect what many in the industry have been saying for the last few years, but I find the statistics related to care incredibly high. My friends over at HISTalk.com reported that survey takers were “self-selected,” so I have to wonder if the entire field of respondents was skewed to the negative from the beginning.

I came across an interesting tweet exchange about the survey results:

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I’m no expert, but I definitely think the horse has left the barn, and that if a more impartial survey were done, we’d find more providers satisfied with EHRs and their impact on patient care.

In Blue Button news, I came across several articles this week announcing that leading pharmacies and retailers have joined the Blue Button movement. According to HealthIT.gov, these organizations are “committing to work over the next year towards standardizing patient prescription information to fuel the growth of private-sector applications and services that can add value to this basic health information.”

It’s encouraging to see businesses like Walgreens and Kroger – two places I shop at -  pledge to bring more awareness of health data to their customers. Perhaps my next post will shed light on how these businesses will accomplish their Blue Button goals.

February 13, 2014 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

Breaking up with Your EMR is Hard to Do

In light of this week’s “holiday,” I thought I’d take a look at the current love/hate relationship the healthcare industry seems to have with electronic medical records and Meaningful Use.

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Thanks are due to @mdrache and @EHRworkflow for their inspiration for the title of this week’s post: EMRtweet1

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The nay sayers seem to have become especially vocal lately, which may be due in large part to the passing of time. Those that have implementations under their belt now feel qualified to talk about the efficacy of the solutions they selected. Negative EMR press may also have bubbled up to the service in light of the recent RAND report, which backpedaled on previous predictions of cost-savings associated with healthcare IT adoption. That study broke the ice, so to speak, and perhaps made providers more comfortable with voicing their discontent.

In any case, if current healthcare IT press is any indication, EMR technology currently on the market has often left providers dissatisfied for a number of reasons. No doubt this dissatisfaction will be a subject of many show-floor conversations at HIMSS in a few weeks. I wonder how EMR vendors are preparing their responses. What will be their top three talking points when it comes to EMR benefits? It seems Meaningful Use incentives have lost their luster, and in fact have left many providers disenchanted with healthcare IT in general.

John Lynn posted a very telling reader comment over at EMRandHIPAA.com from a provider who used his Meaningful Use malaise to create a new independent practice business model. Is this an indication that more providers may “revolt” against Meaningful Use and the trend towards hospital employment? If so, what will the private practice landscape look like in three to five years?

Just how easy is it for providers to truly “break up” with their EMRs? We’ve all read the multi-million-dollar rip-and-replace horror stories – talk about a bad breakup. And then there are the providers that stay in dysfunctional relationships with their EMRs because they can’t afford a new one, instead developing copious amounts of workarounds potentially at the expense of clinical care and accurate reimbursement.

As of last summer, KLAS reported that a whopping 50% of providers were looking to replace their ambulatory EMRs, compared to 30% in 2011. A recent Health Data Management webinar noted more than 30% of ALL new EMR purchases are made to replace an existing EMR.

To me, these numbers beg a number of questions. Were first- and perhaps even second-generation EMRs just not mature enough for providers’ needs? Did providers simply not do enough due diligence before making their purchases? Will these impending replacement EMR purchases stick? If you have updated EMR breakup statistics or a crystal ball, please send them my way.

February 13, 2013 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

Christmas Scavenger Hunt Inspires EMR Wish List

Happy holidays, dear readers! I hope my latest blog post finds you well, resting comfortably away from your usual place of employment, and not tied to a device despite being “on vacation” or attempting to take “time off.”

My family and I are a bit further South than usual, visiting family in Jacksonville and engaging in a time-honored tradition in nearby St. Augustine – the Holly Jolly Trolley. Never was there a better excuse to turn Christmas lights into a 3-D psychedelic experience.

We turned our annual light-seeing drive through the Blackhawk Bluff neighborhood into a Christmas lights scavenger hunt, checking off images from our list as we came across them during our drive. Suitable for the younger crowd, our checklist had images of traditional holiday décor – snowmen, stars, candy canes, candles, etc. The gingerbread man gave us the most trouble, and eventually we had to settle for seeing a gingerbread man windsock.

Driving home I got to thinking about what a similar hunt would look like, say, at HIMSS next year. Gather a group of providers, give them a list of EMR attributes and set them loose in the exhibit hall to find as many as possible within a certain amount of time. I wonder how many vendors/booths they’d have to stop at before they checked everything off the list.

For that matter, it would be interesting to turn the check list into a wish list – pinpoint a number of features providers most want in their EMR and see which vendor offers the most in one package. This would then of course lead to a comparison of price and customer reviews, but that’s another blog entirely.

What would such a check list / wish list look like? Based on the major healthcare trends that have come to light over the last year, I’m willing to bet these features (however pie-in-the-sky they might be) would be included:

  • Guaranteed security / protection, especially with regard to mobile EMR applications
  • Innate knowledge of ICD-9 to ICD-10 code translation
  • Ability to connect to any HIE at the click of a button
  • CPOE
  • Pop-up that suggests, on a patient-by-patient basis, how best to digitally engage with that particular person based on their preferred method of communication
  • Suggested protocols culled from evidence-based medicine analytics

What other features would likely be included? What vendors already offer a majority of these features? Do they exist, or will tomorrow’s start up be next year’s true game changer when it comes to success in the EMR marketplace? Please share your thoughts in the comments below.

December 27, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

Charles Woodson, Patient Engagement and EMRs

Just when I feared I’d have nothing to write about for this week’s post (despite the interesting news of the NFL’s love of electronic medical records), my husband unfortunately breaks his collarbone. This mountain biking mishap necessitated a variety of healthcare-related trips – a clinic for X-rays, orthopedic surgeon’s office for prognosis and treatment, and our local pharmacy with a handwritten prescription for a much-needed painkiller.

Perhaps the most important visit my husband made was to the World Wide Web, looking up all the information he could find about treatment, length of recovery, worst-case scenarios (which the Web is great at providing), and words of encouragement. Being that this happened on Sunday, Oct. 21st, he had to sift through quite a few Google pages to get through all the news surrounding Charles Woodson’s broken collarbone. Normally, we don’t pay any attention to football, unless it has to do with the Georgia Bulldogs (hoping for a win over Florida this weekend!), but it was pretty hard not to read up on the Green Bay player’s predicted six-week recovery.

Eventually, around page six of Google search results, my husband came across several mountain biking forums that had active discussions around riders’ recent collarbone injuries. My husband was in heaven – all of a sudden his six weeks of recovery now didn’t seem so long, now that he had fellow injured cyclists to commiserate with. (He’s taken to posting daily updates about his progress, and has received positive feedback already!)

Forums like these seem like perfect opportunities for patient engagement. The odds of a doctor weighing in on any given forum are probably pretty slim, but I wonder if those odds would increase if a healthcare institution sponsored the forum. For example, the practice of my husband’s orthopedic surgeon could offer an online community/forum for patients and non-patients to discuss the challenges around a particular problem, such as broken collarbones. The doctors within the practice might be tasked with posting a comment or two each week. Perhaps an alert or message could be programmed to pop up in a patient’s EMR, reminding the doctor to let patients know about these online resources. A service like this would certainly have saved my husband time in connecting with fellow patients, and it seems like a great marketing opportunity for providers.

I’m sure there are HIPAA-related concerns with an idea like this, and I wonder if the providers’ participation could somehow be tied into meeting patient engagement requirements as they pertain to some future stage of Meaningful Use, or accountable care requirements.

Are you aware of any vendors offering technology like this? Do you know of any physicians offering/sponsoring online communities? Please let me know in the comments below, especially if they pertain to collarbones!

October 26, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

AT&T/IBM Deal Pushes Cloud Back into the Healthcare Spotlight

I remember 2010 as if it were yesterday. I was somewhat new to the healthcare industry, attending my first Healthcare IT Summit, and trying to make sense of all the buzzwords flying around as a result of the HITECH Act being passed the year before. Cloud computing was definitely a hot topic – one that seems to have stood the test of time in the intervening years. Granted, I think its popularity has been somewhat superceded by phrases like mobile health, accountable care, patient engagement and electronic medical records (of course) over the last 18 months, but a recent flurry of cloud-related headlines may forecast a resurgence.

A report released earlier this year from MarketsandMarkets predicts that conditions are ripe for cloud computing to grow at an annual rate of 20.5 percent from this 2012 to 2017. (Bloomberg Businessweek puts the current market for cloud services at $14 billion.) The forecast makes a lot of sense when you look at it from the healthcare angle of Meaningful Use and EMRs. Providers, despite a few legislators’ recent objections, will likely continue to implement and attest during the next few years, leaving healthcare IT vendors – including those who put their EHRs in the cloud (Allscripts, NextGen and athenahealth are just a few that come to mind) – with no shortage of business opportunity.

And there are even more vendors behind those – the infrastructure folks like Verizon (See their recently announced HIPAA compliant cloud service) and Dell that provide the cloud’s backbone, so to speak. You may by now have seen headlines announcing that AT&T has partnered with IBM to offer a new model whereby “IBM … will provide the data-storage facilities and services, and AT&T will … offer the global network that clients will use to retrieve the data,” according to the Bloomberg write up. It is the closest relationship IBM has ever had with a phone carrier.

Undoubtedly, this new model will be tapped for healthcare purposes, but it’s still speculation as to just how it will be adopted for secure exchange of patient health information. I sent out a few feelers via my social networks to see if anyone related to either IBM or AT&T could provide more detail, and got back this statement from an IBM representative: “I would assume that there will be a HIPAA compliant component. It goes without saying that the healthcare industry is a HUGE segment for IBM.”

“Huge” just might be an understatement, as IBM has stated it wants to attain $7 billion in cloud revenue by 2015. In today’s terms, that’s just one vendor making up the current market value for cloud services.

I’ll be interested to see how this plays out, especially as previously lower profile (at least in the healthcare space) technology companies like Dell and IBM, and companies like AT&T and Verizon that are more widely known in the consumer market, continue to make healthcare IT headlines.

October 10, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

Getting Patients Comfortable with EMRs

Sometimes I feel as if the healthcare industry head honchos from every vertical get together once a month and determine when and how they’ll put out major press announcements. Sometimes they just seem so well timed. Take, for example, the release of a new video from the ONC’s HealthIT.gov website, “Health IT For You: Giving You Access to Your Medical Records.”

I really like the style of animation, and the incorporation of mobile devices like tablets into the video. My favorite line: “It’s time healthcare caught up to the way we live the rest of our lives.” So true! (Pretty clever of them to put a billboard for HealthIT.gov on the side of a bus that drives by.) Overall, it’s well done, short and simple enough to get the point across to patients that may be in waiting rooms. I hope that providers will think to incorporate it into their digital communications as well, and that the ONC will consider putting one out in Spanish.

If you have the nearly 3 minutes it takes to watch the video, you’ll notice the “padlock” image that appears over every transmittal of patient-to-doctor data, symbolizing that the information is secure, and presumably HIPAA-compliant.

Which brings me to that PR synchronicity I mentioned above. Results from a Harris Interactive survey conducted on behalf of the Breakaway Group, released around the same time as the video, found that “[b]arely a quarter of U.S. adults want medical records converted from paper to electronic, and 85% of the public [surveyed] expressed concerns about electronic health records.” Some of those surveyed cited concerns over privacy – thus, I suppose, inclusion of the “padlock” images in the ONC video.

This small swirl of press around patient engagement – a hot topic in healthcare at any time these days – serves to reemphasize the need for continued focus on patients’ knowledge of and reaction to electronic medical records. What with all sorts of ancillary reports coming out about physician adoption of, happiness with and resignation to this technology, it’s important to realize that it is the patient that should ultimately benefit – in a variety of ways – from the implementation.

August 10, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

The Intersection of EMRs and Health Information Management

It was with great regret that I canceled my trip to Healthport’s first HIM Educational Summit earlier this week. (A rampant stomach bug claimed me as the last victim in our family of four, and so I thought my healthcare conference colleagues would, in fact, appreciate my absence.) I had been scheduled to moderate a discussion on the exchange of personal health information within an accountable care organization (ACO) – a topic that I thought I knew a lot about, until I began researching the subject. Turns out that to truly grasp this topic from a health information management (HIM) perspective, you need to be well versed in the current state of ACOs, Office of Civil Rights audits, HIPAA rules and regulations, privacy and security breach prevention strategies, the bring-your-own-device movement …. Needless to say, HIM professionals seem to have their hands full at the moment, as they will likely interact with a few if not all of the aforementioned areas in the coming months.

I especially had been eager to see if this cartoon from Imprivata got a few chuckles from my audience. Pretty timely, no?

Courtesy of Imprivata

I was also looking forward to attending a number of sessions, including:
“The Effects of EHR on HIM”
“Where HIM & MU Intersect, and What’s in it for You”
“Meaningful Use: Countdown to Attestation”
“Is Your PHI Protected? Security Measures you Need to Know About”
“The Brave New World of HIEs”

In prepping for the event, I came across a great list of “The Top 10 Trends Impacting HIM in 2016.” Note that EHR and related technologies top the list. I guess it’s safe to say that concerns around them aren’t going away any time soon.

Courtesy of Precyse

I’d love to have readers weigh in on what relationship HIM professionals have with their EMR counterparts in the hospital setting. How do they impact your workflow? Is Meaningful Use making your lives easier or harder? And how in the world are you going to find the time to worry about 2016, when it seems you’ve got enough on your plate in 2012?

Please share your thoughts in the comments below.

July 26, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

EMRs Have Potential Role to Play in Curbing Global Contagion

I had some rare time to myself at home the other night and decided to finally watch the Netflix DVD that had literally been gathering dust on our entertainment center. (No matter how hard I try, I can’t seem to watch a movie and return it in less than a week these days.) For better or worse, I popped in the star-studded, virus-filled Contagion – an ode to the absolute insanity that could befall modern society should a highly contagious and highly untreatable virus strike nearly every society on Earth.

Other than the autopsy scene in which Gwyneth Paltrow’s character – otherwise known as the “index patient” – gets what I’ll delicately call a “facial,” I was pretty fascinated by the inner workings, procedures, protocol and backstabbing of the CDC and WHO. They, of course, used technology to track the virus’ origin and its rapid spread, and I kept waiting to hear a doctor refer to accessing victims’ electronic medical records to track development of their illnesses. (Come to think of it, this movie would have made for great EMR product placement opportunities.)

Though EMRs were given short shrift, the movie made a good case for population health management, and the corresponding role technology can potentially play in tracking outbreaks. I wondered if such an outbreak were to actually ever occur, would EMRs, HIEs and other data exchange programs help providers isolate worst cases of conatgion quicker?

Coming across a headline like “Officials search for more clues in disease killing Cambodian children” makes me wonder if the CDC and WHO are using population health management tools in their investigations, and if data exchange is playing a part in developing countries like Cambodia. A quick Google search of Kantha Bopha Children’s Hospitals, which seems to be ground zero for treatment of the outbreak, leads me to believe the hospitals likely don’t have the resources for sophisticated healthcare IT systems. A broader search for mention of EMRs in Cambodia yielded information from late last year on University Research Company’s Cambodia Better Health Systems Project participating in an Open Medical Record System Annual Implementer’s Meeting meeting in Rwanda, focused on enhancing EMR systems. So it seems that EMRs are definitely on the country’s radar to some extent.

Could EMRs in a developing country like Cambodia help to contain the spread of highly contagious diseases? Could they at least help spread message of the contagion amongst providers across affected regions, helping to transmit daily updates regarding spread, treatment, cause, etc.? These are all questions I’m sure global health agencies have already spent considerable time considering. I came across a very interesting report from the Rockefeller Foundation and its partners on this very subject. Highly recommended reading: “The Promise of Electronic Medical Records (PDF).”

Are you aware of more up-to-date implementations of EMRs in developing countries? Any third-world success stories we should know about? Please share your thoughts in the comments below.

July 11, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

EMRs Coming to a School Near You

As I mentioned in a previous post, my family and I are experiencing one of our busiest summers ever. With our decision to become landlords comes a simultaneous decision to move to a new area, for the usual reasons. We’ve found ourselves in love with a house in an entirely different county, and thus a new school system.

Now I don’t know about you, but summers seem to be getting shorter and shorter when it comes to the school calendar. Weeks between Memorial Day and Labor Day seemed to stretch on endlessly. But now we’re lucky to get a full eight weeks of summertime fun. Needless to say, we’ve got just about four weeks to get into our new home before the school year starts.

I’ll be registering our oldest daughter soon after the 4th of July break, and on my list of questions will be “Is there a school nurse on campus at all times?” After reading a recent article at LeHighValleyLive.com, I may just have to add, “Does the school participate in exchange of electronic medical records with local healthcare facilities?”

The article relates that Pennsylvania’s Bethlehem area school district’s board has approved “joining a regional partnership that would make the electronic medical records of Bethlehem and Allentown School District readily available to emergency room doctors and nurses alike.”

The Children’s Care Alliance is a partnership between the school districts and four hospital/healthcare systems. You can read the article linked to above for most of the details.

I’d also be interested to learn how they are going to go about choosing an EMR vendor. Will it be a strictly pediatric solution? It would be interesting to see an EMR created from scratch for the sole purpose of serving students in public school populations. Barring any HIPAA-related concerns, the opportunity for population health management research at this level would be enormous.

Being in the marketing business, I’d also be interested to know how they are going to get students and their parents to opt in to the program, and what sort of choices students will be left with if they opt out. Will they partner with local pediatricians to create support on that end? It seems like a great teaching tool with which to start creating a younger, more engaged patient base. Wouldn’t it be cool to have the school nurse come in to health class one day to explain the benefits of an EMR, and how students can access it or a corresponding, school-sponsored personal health record from the computer at their desk, or their iPads at home?

I do wonder, though, just how easily this alliance could be created in other communities. The price tag of $2.3 million seems high.

Perhaps I’ll ask that very question when I head to the school registration offices next week.

July 5, 2012 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.