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Have You Ever Tried to Cancel an EHR?

A caller’s attempt to cancel their Comcast service is going around the internet. About 10 minutes into the call, the husband got on the line and started recording the call for all of us to see how the Comcast retention rep acted. You can listen to it embedded below.

I imagine most of us have had an experience trying to cancel our service at one time or another. It’s not a fun experience. Although, I know some people who call to cancel their cable service every 3 months in order to have the customer retention representative give them a lower cost deal. You know that offering you a 3 month lower cost (or something like that) is one way they try to retain you as a customer.

As I listened to the call, I was thinking about some of the experiences I’ve read and heard about clinics cancelling their EHR service. Unlike a cable or TV service where it’s quite easy to switch services, switching EHR software is a much more involved process. In many cases EHR vendors hold you “hostage” more than the Comcast retention rep above.

In most cases, the EHR vendor will go radio silent on you or responses to your inquiries will take a really long time. Plus, when you ask for access to your EHR data, you’ll often get hit with a hefty price tag. It’s a shameful practice that many EHR vendors employ to try and lock their customers in and prevent them from switching EHRs. We’re entering the era of EHR switching and this is going to impact a lot of practices going forward.

I’ve debated for a while now creating an EHR “naughty” and “nice” list which outlines the good and bad business practices by EHR vendors. One of the challenges is defining what’s naughty and what’s nice. There’s a lot of grey area in the middle. Although, I think that aggregating this type of information would be really valuable. I’m just afraid that many EHR vendors won’t want to share.

I’ve written posts before about why I think holding a practice’s EHR data hostage is a terrible business practice. The medical community is small and an EHR vendor that tries to do this will definitely suffer from negative word of mouth. What do you think? Should we create a list of EHR vendors and their policy on EHR cancellations?

July 15, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Epic Go Live Impossible Without #Web25

The World Wide Web turned 25 this week, which gives us all cause to stop and reflect on its role in healthcare IT. It goes without saying that systems like electronic medical records would have a hard time really taking off without the Internet. Yes, they probably could exist without it, but if you think providers have workflow issues now …

I found out about the Web’s birthday on the very day I called my daughters’ pediatrician to schedule their annual well visits. The receptionist (who didn’t sound stressed at all) kindly informed me that they will be scheduling all future appointments into the new electronic medical record (Epic). Since that isn’t scheduled to go live until April 1, she took my appointment date and time down, and told me another staff member would call me back to let me know my appointments had been made in the new system.

It sounded like they are trying their hardest to avoid duplicate data entry into the old and new systems, but are having to rely on paper and pen to make sure everything ends up where it’s supposed to be come go live. Oh, the irony. I’ve got April 1 (April Fool’s Day, no less) circled on my calendar. I think I’ll give them a call back then to see if anyone sounds remotely stressed, or if things seem to be going smoothly.

This particular healthcare system probably won’t be in the “EMR Buying Frenzy” you may have read about recently. The numbers are downright shocking to me. HealthcareITNews.com reports, “[O]ne-third to half of all large hospitals are looking to trade out their old EMRs by 2016.” That is a ridiculous amount of money set to be spent by facilities that likely made similar investments in the not-too-distant past.

As a patient, I have to wonder how those second-round EMR purchases will affect the cost and quality of care. Will the price of procedures go up to help hospitals pay for these new systems? The money has got to come from somewhere. Just how frustrated will my physician be with new workflows, especially if they’ve JUST gotten used to the previous EMR? If any provider wants to chime in, please do in the comments below.

In another wonderful twist of irony, it is the World Wide Web that now allows me and other cost-conscious patients to research healthcare costs at our local facilities, not to mention come together online to commiserate about similar experiences. It will be interesting to see where the Web and healthcare IT are in another 25 years. Surely we’ll have achieved true interoperability by then!

March 13, 2014 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

From 5 EHR to the Cloud, EMR Is Just a Tool, Startups to Improve EMR Usability


This is a big preview of coming attraction. EHR vendors are going to have to be ready for this type of EHR purchase going forward. Well, maybe not 5 EHR, but it could be close to as complex. Add in all of the practice acquisitions and the EMR switching is happening.


This is a good reminder. EMR is a tool and how you use it determines its real value.


The real question is whether the EMR systems will allow it or at least which EMR vendors will support it. If they don’t, startups won’t be able to do much. Even if they do open it, I’m still not confident that a startup built on top of today’s EMRs can solve what pains EMR.

February 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

A List of Key Insights for EHR Data Conversion

Healthcare Scene sat down with Sean West, VP of Data Conversion at HealthPort, to discuss EHR data conversion. EHR data conversion is quickly becoming a hot topic for many organizations that rushed their initial EHR selection and implementation. In our video discussion embedded below, Sean West offers a number of key insights including the following:

  • Convert the Data Close to the EHR Conversion
  • Ensure You Have Enough Time to Make the Conversion
  • Consider How Much Data Needs to Be Converted
  • Look at the Impact on Performance of Converting All EHR Data
  • Evaluate Your Legacy EHR Vendors Willingness to Work with You on Data Conversion

Check out the following video for all the details:

We also asked Sean West about when an organization would want to consider a vendor neutral archive for their EHR. While the vendor neutral archive is incredibly popular with PACS systems, we’re just now starting to see the idea crop up with EHR data. In the following video, Sean West provides some good insight into when an organization might want to consider a vendor neutral archive for their EHR data.

December 17, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Why One Doctor Switched EMRs

Over the last several months, we’ve been flooded with statistics spelling out the reasons why doctors are choosing to dump their current EMR and invest in a new one and we’ve been writing about switching EMR for a while.  To bring some perspective to this discussion, I’ve reached out to physicians who have made the Big Switch and attempted to learn a bit about why they chose to move from one EMR to another.

Today, I bring you Dr. Christy Valentine, a New Orleans-based physician practicing internal medicine and pediatrics. Dr. Valentine operates a small practice consisting of herself and a nurse practitioner.

Back in 2007, as part of opening her own practice, Dr. Valentine decided to invest in an EMR from a company better known for hospital systems. (She’s asked me not to name the vendor — let’s call them Vendor X.) Having seen generations of paper medical records wiped out by Hurricane Katrina, she was eager to go digital and enjoy the peace of mind that backup storage offers.

Dr. Valentine looked at several EMRs but was most interested in Vendor X’s product, which was in use at the local academic medical center and under consideration by couple of major health systems in her area. “I felt I’d have a better chance of hiring people who were familiar with the technology,” Dr. Valentine recalls. “Being a small practice we really wanted to save time training individuals on the computer system.”

Dr. Valentine had purchased not only Vendor X’s EMR but also the billing system that went with it. She soon came to regret that choice, however. For one thing,, she said, Vendor X was slow to respond to customer service requests; she and her staff had to leave a message and wait for a response which sometimes never came.

Perhaps even worse, despite investing years in trying to make things right, the practice management system was a wash-out. “I had to scrap it completely and move to an outside billing service because it wouldn’t work for our practice,” Dr. Valentine said. And to top things off, the system never got easier to use despite Dr. Valentine’s sincere efforts to make things work.

In retrospect, she feels that her practice should have gone with a vendor that focuses on practices her size, she says. “I learned that you if you go for a vendors whose big fish is the hospital, you won’t be important to the vendor,” she said.

About a year ago, Dr. Valentine decided once and for all to dump Vendor X, largely because she was opening her second office and didn’t want to bring Vendor X over. Instead, her practice  brought up athenahealth’s EMR and practice management system a few months ago

Dr. Valentine has been happy ever since. She’s very pleased with the athenahealth customer service and finds the product easy to use. She feels that her system, unlike the old one, is easy to use and to customize with specialized templates. Even better, she feels ready to steam into Meaningful Use Stage 3 with athena as a partner.  “As soon as they tell us what they need we’ll be ready to jump right into it,” Dr. Valentine says.

August 29, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @annezieger on Twitter.

Being Moral and Right, ACOs, and Medical Bills: #HITsm Chat Highlights

Topic One: Will 2013 by the “Year Of The Great #EHR Switch” as predicted by Black Book Rankings. Why or Why not?

Topic Two: @Farzad_ONC told #healthIT vendors they must do what is “moral and right” or face consequences.” What acts cross the line?

Topic Three: A recent WSJ article said “#ACOs hold caregivers accountable without requiring patient accountability.” Do you agree?

Topic Four: What are your thoughts on the recent Time magazine article Bitter Pill: Why Medical Bills are Killing Us?

Topic Five: #HIMSS13 Free-For-All. What are your key sessions, conference suggestions and restaurant recommendations?

March 2, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

#eHealth100, Single EMR, EMR Adoption, and Wrong EMR Decision

You know what time it is if the post begins with a hashtag. That’s right. We’re taking a quick look at some of the interesting, insightful, fun, entertaining, beautiful or otherwise thought provoking tweets related to EMR and EHR.

We’ll lead off with a tweet nomination to the #eHealth100:


Yes, I was happy that Anneliz thought of me with this tweet nomination. Although, I must admit that I wasn’t sure what I was being nominated for, so I asked and got the following response about the goal of the #eHealth100


I appreciate being mentioned in this group. Considering the many people that make up the healthcare world, I just hope that each day I can make a small difference in people’s lives. It’s a beautiful thing when I can do that and provide for my family at the same time.


I love and hate the sarcasm in Dr. May’s tweet. I love the irony, but hate that it seems to be a major medical breakthrough.


I’m always looking for more numbers on EMR adoption. Although, then I realized that the article is from Venture Beat. Unfortunately, the people at Venture Beat don’t follow healthcare IT and especially EHR very well (they do follow other startups well). This can be seen in their reference to ZocDoc and Castlight as EHR companies likely to go public. They might go public, but they are definitely not EHR companies. I also love that they also have a quote saying that 90% of doctors don’t have an EMR which totally contradicts the CDC EMR adoption numbers they put at the beginning.

The long story short: 1. Don’t read Venture Beat for healthcare IT info. 2. We don’t really know how we’re doing with EHR adoption. We just know EHR adoption is on the rise.


I’ve sadly been predicting major EMR switching for a year or more. There are a number of reasons for this, but I’d say the biggest driver of EMR switching is thanks to the EHR incentive money and meaningful use.

December 30, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.