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I Want to Thank the Academy, Err, the Hospital CIO: EHR Hospital Market Share

We’re always interested in who’s up and who’s down. Whether it’s TV shows, Senate races, book sales or baseball stats, we want to know who’s up, who’s down and who’s going nowhere.

We’re big on trends, shares and who’s going where. The closer the race, the more avid the interest – My Nats would be sitting pretty if only the Braves weren’t so pesky. The EHR market place is no exception for interest, even if the numbers are a lot harder to follow than the National League East.

In my last foray into EMR market share, I looked at SK&A’s stats from their rolling survey of US medical practices.

Another company, Definitive Healthcare similarly tracks the hospital EHR marketplace. They’ve generously shared their findings with Healthcare Scene and I’ve used them here. Please note: Any errors, mistakes or other screw-ups with their numbers are mine alone. With that said, here’s what I’ve found.

How Many Divisions Does the Hospital Market Have?

Definitive divides the hospital market into several categories that can be daunting to follow. That’s not their making. It’s the nature of the market.

The major division that Definitive reports on is inpatient versus ambulatory systems. You might think that ambulatory systems are only for non hospital setting, but hospitals, of course, have many outpatients and use ambulatory EHR systems to serve them.

The Inpatient Marketplace

Among inpatient systems, EPIC leads with a 20 percent share shown in Tables I and II. The market is highly concentrated with EPIC, Cerner and Meditech commanding 54 percent. The remaining 46 percent scatters with no one breaking double digits.

Table I All Inpatient Hospitals EHR Vendor Market Shares

Table II All Inpatient EHR Shares

 The Ambulatory Hospital Marketplace

The picture for hospital ambulatory systems used is notably different. See Tables III and IV. While EPIC and Cerner vary slightly from their inpatient share, the other vendors shift all over the place. Allscripts barely registers 4 percent in inpatient, jumps to third place with 14 percent.

Siemens and HMS drop off the top ten being replaced by eClinicalWorks and NextGen. At 22 percent is the catchall, Other EHRs. This is up 8 percent from its inpatient 14 percent.

Table III All Ambulatory Hospitals

Table IV All Amb Hospitals

Inpatient EHRs: Health Systems and Independent Hospitals

Definitive also breaks down inpatient hospitals by health system hospitals v independents. Almost a majority of health systems, 47 percent, choose EPIC and Cerner. See Tables V and VI. Indeed, the top four vendors, EPIC, Cerner, Meditech and McKesson astoundingly have a 74 percent share. The other vendors are at 7 percent or less.

Table V Inpatient Healthcare Systems Hospitals

Independent hospitals differ a bit from this pattern. Non major vendors have 12 percent and open source Vista has 5 percent, but otherwise the pattern is similar.

Table VI Inpatient Independent Hospitals

Inpatient Hospitals by Size: Under and Over 100 Beds

Hospitals with 100 plus beds, no surprise, favor EPIC, Cerner and Meditech. These three have a monopolistic 64 percent. See Table VII.

Table VII Inpatient Hospitals with =>100 Beds

Small, Inpatient Hospital Systems: A More Competitive Market

Small hospitals are a different story. The top five vendors are bunched around 14 percent each. See Table VIII. The mix of vendors is starkly different. Meditech and Cerner lead with EPIC third. However, Epic drops nine percent from the prior group to 14 percent in this.

In the prior tables, the top three vendors have a market majority. In this group, 65 percent of the market belongs to the third through tenth vendors. You can see the difference in competition in Tables VIII and IX.

Table VIII Inpatient Hospitals =>100 Beds

Table IX Inpatient Hospitals <100 Beds

Hospital Ambulatory EHR Systems by Bed Size

The ambulatory market for hospitals with 100 plus beds is similar to the inpatient market. EPIC, Cerner and Allscripts have a 53 percent share.

The remaining share is split among several vendors, with eClinicalWorks, and athenahealth making an appearance. Significantly, Other EHRs ranked second.

Smaller hospitals’ ambulatory systems, as with smaller inpatient hospitals, show a competitive market. The category Other EHRs actually leads with a 21 percent share. Tables X and XI show the difference between these two markets.

Table X Ambulatory Systems =>100 Beds Table XI Ambulatory Systems <100 Beds

Market Shares: What’s the Conclusion?

In this and previous posts, I’ve looked at EHR vendor market shares sliced up in several ways. I’ve used what I consider reliable, independent data sources from SK&A and Definitive Healthcare. I used their information because they are careful to include all practices in their surveys not just those that bother to reply.

I also used them for the simple reason that they were freely available to us. There are other sources, such as KLAS, that produce market surveys, but they charge about $2,500 for their analysis. Moreover, they keep all but the most general findings behind their paywall.

What then is the message from all these numbers? It’s this: there is a competitive market, but it’s only robust among small practices. Those with three or less practioners have the most competitive market with eClinicalWorks in the lead. Within major segments, EPIC, Cerner and Meditech dominate. The non hospital market is more mixed, but EPIC, Cerner, etc., share increases as practice size grows.

For these larger practices, it’s monopolistic competition. If you’re looking for an EHR and you have ten or more docs, you can find any number of vendors. It’s most likely you’ll end up choosing among just a few big guys.

This reminds me of when we shopped for kitchen cabinets and counter tops. We were impressed with some dramatic possibilities. The sales rep, who we got to know well, laughed:

“When folks start out they focus on the avant garde. Then they realize they’re choosing for several years. Suddenly they get more conventional.”

If you come by our place, you’ll see our oak cabinets and white tile counter top. I think it goes that way with hospital execs choosing EHRs. They may toy with something different, but in the end, they’ll go with what they know. After all, no one every got fired for buying EPIC. Well, almost no one.

Next: Attribution and Market Share

If you still haven’t got your fill of market numbers, I have one more topic to explore. I’m interested in knowing how market share relates to MU attestations. That is, does a high market share guarantee a high attestation rate? The next post in this series will look at that.

If you have questions on market share, please post a comment or write me at: carl@healthcarescene.com

July 7, 2014 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

A Look at the Nashville EHR Market

I always love the discussions of the top healthcare markets in the US. When I hear this discussion, two cities that don’t likely get enough love and have a lot of healthcare companies are Nashville and Atlanta. Other people love to talk about Boston and San Diego is strong on the biotech side and has a growing mobile health side as well. Those are definitely some of the top cities for healthcare companies.

With this in mind, I was intrigued when Keith Cawley from Technology Advice emailed me some findings from a survey they did of the Nashville EHR market.

Here are the most interesting findings:

  • Epic, the number one national electronic health record vendor, does not rank among the top five vendors in Nashville
  • Nashville healthcare providers are significantly more satisfied with their EHR programs than providers nationwide
  • 16 percent of providers in Nashville have already switched EHRs
  • Adoption rate among certain specialties is significantly higher than national averages
  • Cost appears to be the number one consideration for Nashville EHR buyers

This feels a bit like a slam on Epic, but I don’t think that Keith has a dog in that fight. I think the findings that Epic does well nationwide, but hasn’t done well in Nashville is quite interesting and worthy of further exploration.

They also put out the Nashville EHR market infographic below. Most interesting to me is the percentages and how the EHR market is still very diverse. Of course, the market can be broken down into smaller segments where we see more domination by certain vendors, but we’re still seeing a lot of EHR diversity in every region.

Nashville EHR Market Infographic.

July 2, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Is Epic the “Microsoft” of Healthcare?

Iltifat Husain, MD from iMedicalApps has penned an interesting article about Apple’s partnership with Epic being a game changer for patients. For those keeping track at home, I’ve predicted something very different with the Apple – Epic partnership. I’m quite skeptical that anything will come from it. Although, I was even more struck by Iltifat’s description of Epic:

If your hospital is currently changing its EMR, more than likely, it’s going to Epic. Epic has essentially become the Microsoft for EMRs.

While there’s no arguing that Epic has done very well and has a large portion of the EHR market, I think it’s far from fair to say that Epic is the de facto choice for hospitals. In fact, many hospitals don’t even get that choice because of Epic’s business practices.

One thing I keep learning more and more is that healthcare is very regional. Maybe where Dr. Husain practices medicine Epic is the Microsoft of that community. However, there are other communities where this just isn’t the case. In fact, I have a story waiting in the hopper for my site Hospital EMR and EHR that talks about the Nashville EHR community. I think we have to be really careful generalizing our regional biases.

We’ll see how this plays out over time, but I don’t think Epic has quite reached Microsoft like dominance in the EHR industry. What do you think? Should I be giving Epic more credit than I’m giving them? Also, let me be clear. Epic has done amazing. Although, Microsoft created a relative monopoly in multiple product lines.

July 1, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Epic Joins IBM To Pitch DoD Contract

Hoping to be the lucky vendors that win a massive pending DoD deal, Epic Systems has team up with global technology giant IBM to compete for the DoD’s Healthcare’s Management Systems Modernization contract.

The new project comes after years of  struggles and changes of direction by the DoD, which has worked for years to integrate its system with the VA’s EMR. Back in 2009, the two giant federal agencies kicked off an effort to create an integrated medical record, the iEHR, which would offer every service member the ability to maintain a single EMR throughout their career and lifetime. But those efforts failed miserably, and the iEHR project was halted in February 2013.

Since then, the DoD has announced that it’s moving along with its iEHR plans once again, a sprawling project which the Interagency Program Office estimates the cost somewhere between $8 billion and $12 billion.

Meanwhile, the DoD Healthcare Management Systems Modernization is moving ahead, slated to replace the current Military Health System. The DHMSM should serve some 9.7 million beneficiaries.

The two partners certainly bring a strong bench to the table. Epic offers an interoperable platform which is one of the most adopted EMR systems in the country, and according to company officials,its open architecture supports more than 20 billion data transactions between systems every year.  Epic says that its customer community, which currently includes 100 million patients, exchanges more than 2.2 million records each month with of the EMR vendors, HISPs, HIEs, the VA, DoD and Social Security Administration.

IBM, meanwhile,is contributing its system integration, change management and expertise , ad experiments in delivering large-scale solutions in partnership with complementary software and services providers. IBM’s Federal Healthcare practice will lead the effort, backed by IBM global information technology,research and health care organizations which already collaborate with Epic in support of EMR solutions internationally.

Without a doubt, IBM is the grandfather of all big iron providers, so they don’t have a lot to prove.  And Epic is a clear leader in the enterprise EMR space, by some measures leading the pack by a considerable margin. It’s likely they’re a top contender for the job.

If the DoD does indeed choose the partnership of Epic and IBM to make its health IT transition, it seems likely that they’ll have recruited more than enough firepower to get the job done — though there’s always the question of whether Epic, which is used to bossing hospitals around, will function as well when the big bureaucracy of the DoD is calling the shots.

But what’s more worrisome is whether the DoD will work effectively with these two private sector companies, assuming t hey win the bid. As noted, the DoD’s track record with change management is nothing to write home about, to say the least, and bureaucratic waffling could conceivably undermine even the most expert efforts to bring DoD’s healthcare architecture into the future. As big and powerful as they are, IBM and Epic may be in for one heckuva ride. In fact, John’s even suggested that the best thing for Epic might be for them to not win the DoD EHR contract.

June 19, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @annezieger on Twitter.

EHR Product Market Shares Rankings: The Envelope Please!

In politics, it’s the horse race, that is, who’s in front and where’s the rest of the pack. We have our own EHR version, who’s got the biggest market share and where’s everyone else.

In politics, there’s no end of polling by candidates, parties, media and all stops in between. We aren’t so lucky. You can count the reliable EHR market share estimates on one hand and not need your thumb. Of those available, I’ve found SK&A’s to be the most comprehensive and reliable free option, though they do require a registration.

Leaders of the Pack

Table I shows the top 20 EHR vendors’ installed base for all US practitioners. Not surprisingly, Epic leads with about 11 percent. Table II shows the market’s concentration: the top seven have almost half the market.

Table I All practioners

The remaining 13 vendors have about a 20 percent market share. The remaining vendors, about 470 companies, have the remaining 30 percent. But don’t go away just yet. There’s more to the story.

Table II All Shares

Market Share by Practice Size

Market share by practice size refines the picture a bit more. For their analysis, SK&A divided practices into five classes shown in Table III. Each of these is examined in turn.

Table III Group Size

As you’ll see, the larger the number of practitioners in a class, the more concentrated the market becomes. However, the greatest number of practices is in the smaller classes. For example, SK&A reports that 80 percent of practices have 10 or less practitioners.

For example, both EPIC and eClinicalWorks have a ten percent market share. EPIC does this by having a large percent of practices with the highest number of practitioners.

 eClinicalWorks, on the other hand, achieves its share by selling to a many, smaller practices. As a result, you’ll see ECW’s market share drop as the numbers in a class increases, while EPIC’s share will go up.

Class 1 – 1 to 3 Practitioners

Table IV shows the top twenty vendors and again shows a heavy concentration in a few vendors. eClinicalWorks is the leading small practice EHR vendor with a 10 market share. The eight top vendors have half the market in this class.

Table IV 1 to 3 Practitioners

The other 12 top vendors have a 20 percent market share. The remaining 470 vendors split the remaining 30 percent.

Two EHR cloud vendors, Practice Fusion and athenahealth, have an 11 percent market share. While others offer hosted or private cloud products, these two are the sole cloud only solutions in the top 20.

This market segment shows less diversity than those before it. In this case, four vendors have almost half the market, Epic, Allscripts, eClinicalWorks and NextGen.

Class 2 – 4 to 10 Practitioners

The remaining 52 percent, Table V,  is spread among 16 vendors. Notably, athenahealth and Practice Fusion drop in this class to about 3 percent.

Table V 4 to 10 Practitioners

As the next classes show, the market tightens up considerably with a few vendors having greater and greater shares.After NextGen, the other 16 vendors have 30 percent of the market. This leaves all the remaining vendors with 23 percent of the market.

Class 3 – 11 to 25 Practitioners

In this class, Tables VI and VII, three vendors have a market majority: Epic, Allscripts and NextGen. The top seven vendors have over three-quarters of it. The concentration among is so great that three top 20 vendors, AdvancedMD, AmazingCharts and Office Ally are no shows.

Table VI 11 to 25 Practioners

Table VII 26 to 40 Practioner

Class 4 – 26 – 40 Practitioners

Table VIII shows the bunching of vendors in this practitioner class. Only about half of the major vendors had any significant share. All the remaining top 20 vendors lack any significant shares.

Table VIII 26 to 40 Practitioners

Epic’s dominance is even more pronounced in this final class as shown in Table IX. EPIC’s share 47.7 percent and GE has 11.9. Together, they have market share of about 70 percent.

Class 5 – 41 Practitioners and More

Epic’s dominance is even more pronounced in this final class as shown in Table IX. EPIC’s share 47.7 percent and GE has 11.9. Together, they have market share of about 70 percent.

Table IX 40 Plus Practioners

The remaining five vendors have a 20 percent market share: Allscripts, Cerner, NextGen, McKesson. The other 400 plus vendors divide the remaining 10 percent.

There are some interesting changes in this class’ shares, Table X, compared to the previous classes. Cerner drops from second place with 12.5 percent to fourth place with 9.2 percent.

Table X 40+ Practitioners

MEDICTECH all but disappears dropping from 4.7 percent to 0.9. On the other hand, EPIC, GE, Allscripts, NextGen and Greenway increased their shares.

Source and Other Boring Details

The net has many EHR market share analyses, however SK&A’s stands out for several reasons. Most importantly is the active way they gather their statistics. They call every medical practice in the US every six months. This includes all hospitals, private or affiliated practices and urgent care clinics, etc. This approach means that few practices are left out and the answers gathered are on the same basis.

This differs substantially from studies that hang a question out and scoop in whatever they get. They don’t give all practices an equal chance to answer. They are flawed compared to those that actively contact practices or based on statistical samples.

Many other studies base their estimates on ONC’s MU attestations. In fact, most market studies I’ve seen cite ONC. The problem with ONC’s count is that it only includes those in the MU program. Those who don’t, perhaps 40 percent, are left out.

SK&A is not the only company that uses an active approach to determining market share. However, it is the only one I know of that actively surveys the market using that approach and publishes the results free. This is unusual.

I also want thank them for briefing me on their methodology. They did this with only the barest of descriptions of what I was up to.

Future Posts – Hospital and MU v Market Share

There are two other, related topics I’ll cover in future posts.

Hospital Practices

The first is a look at hospital based EHRs. Definitive Healthcare, similar to SK&A, actively surveys the in-patient market by calling practices. They have generously furnished their analysis to healthcarescene.com. Where SK&A breaks down its findings by class size, Dimension looks at hospitals by factors such as:

  • Bed size
  • Independent v affiliated hospitals, and
  • In-patient v ambulatory systems used in hospitals.

MU EHRs v Market Share

The last issue I want to look at is how the vendor rankings in MU’s attestations actually compare to those in this analysis. A preliminary look shows many differences.

May 27, 2014 I Written By

When Carl Bergman isn't rooting for the Washington Nationals or searching for a Steeler bar, he’s Managing Partner of EHRSelector.com, a free service for matching users and EHRs. For the last dozen years, he’s concentrated on EHR consulting and writing. He spent the 80s and 90s as an itinerant project manger doing his small part for the dot com bubble. Prior to that, Bergman served a ten year stretch in the District of Columbia government as a policy and fiscal analyst.

Epic Go Live Impossible Without #Web25

The World Wide Web turned 25 this week, which gives us all cause to stop and reflect on its role in healthcare IT. It goes without saying that systems like electronic medical records would have a hard time really taking off without the Internet. Yes, they probably could exist without it, but if you think providers have workflow issues now …

I found out about the Web’s birthday on the very day I called my daughters’ pediatrician to schedule their annual well visits. The receptionist (who didn’t sound stressed at all) kindly informed me that they will be scheduling all future appointments into the new electronic medical record (Epic). Since that isn’t scheduled to go live until April 1, she took my appointment date and time down, and told me another staff member would call me back to let me know my appointments had been made in the new system.

It sounded like they are trying their hardest to avoid duplicate data entry into the old and new systems, but are having to rely on paper and pen to make sure everything ends up where it’s supposed to be come go live. Oh, the irony. I’ve got April 1 (April Fool’s Day, no less) circled on my calendar. I think I’ll give them a call back then to see if anyone sounds remotely stressed, or if things seem to be going smoothly.

This particular healthcare system probably won’t be in the “EMR Buying Frenzy” you may have read about recently. The numbers are downright shocking to me. HealthcareITNews.com reports, “[O]ne-third to half of all large hospitals are looking to trade out their old EMRs by 2016.” That is a ridiculous amount of money set to be spent by facilities that likely made similar investments in the not-too-distant past.

As a patient, I have to wonder how those second-round EMR purchases will affect the cost and quality of care. Will the price of procedures go up to help hospitals pay for these new systems? The money has got to come from somewhere. Just how frustrated will my physician be with new workflows, especially if they’ve JUST gotten used to the previous EMR? If any provider wants to chime in, please do in the comments below.

In another wonderful twist of irony, it is the World Wide Web that now allows me and other cost-conscious patients to research healthcare costs at our local facilities, not to mention come together online to commiserate about similar experiences. It will be interesting to see where the Web and healthcare IT are in another 25 years. Surely we’ll have achieved true interoperability by then!

March 13, 2014 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

MinuteClinic Goes With Epic – What’s It Mean?

Retail clinic operator MinuteClinic has decided to purchase and roll out the Epic EMR, upgrading from its home built system it’s used until now.  MinuteClinic, a division of CVS Caremark, expects the rollout to take about 18 months.

This is a big win for Epic.  An estimated 274,000 physicians will use the company’s EMR, and roughly 51% the US population will have a record in Epic when its current customer rollouts are complete.

And MinuteClinic has big expansion plans, which will bring Epic to a wide range of new environments.  According to Andrew Sussman, MD, president of Minute Clinic and senior vice president/associate chief medical officer, CVS Caremark,  the company is expanding rapidly, having added more than 350 clinics in the past three years, and planning to reach 1,500 clinics by 2017.

“EpicCare will take us to the next level by offering enhanced connectivity with other providers, more advanced patient portal capabilities and key analytics to run our practice more efficiently and improve patient care,” Sussman said in a press statement.

What’s particularly interesting about this deal is not just that Epic has racked up another big customer, though keeping an eye on their progress is definitely important. No, what’s more newsworthy is the possibility that epic is slowly but steadily changing its strategy, from selling only to large hospitals to exploring other customer relationships on the ambulatory side.

Not only is Epic rolling out a large ambulatory deal with MinuteClinic, the EMR vendor has struck a deal with the Cleveland Clinic and Dell under which the Clinic and Dell offer providers EMR consulting installation configuration and hosting service for Epic.  Bearing in mind the needs of ambulatory providers, the Cleveland Clinic deal even allows buyers to have the Epic EMR hosted mostly by Dell.

Certainly Epic won’t stop pursuing big hospital deals, but the MinuteClinic and Cleveland Clinic agreements suggest that Epic may be looking for other markets beyond the large hospital market. It looks like ambulatory is on their radar and we know they’ve been working hard to grow internationally.

March 12, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @annezieger on Twitter.

Cleveland Clinic, Dell Offer Joint Epic EHR Service

Even when you’re a juggernaut the size of Epic, eventually you’re going to reach the point where your customer base is saturated and you need unique new directions to go. This new deal between Dell and the Cleveland Clinic may do just that for Epic.

This week at HIMSS, the two are announcing an agreement in which the two will offer consulting, installation, configuration and hosting services for Cleveland Clinic’s version of Epic. Under the deal struck between the two parties, customers can choose between a hosted version of the Epic instance and a full install on their site.

Cleveland Clinic execs say that their knowledge of using Epic, which they have for more than three years, will give them special expertise in helping providers adjust to Epic.  The Clinic has been selling Epic to providers  through its MyPractice Healthcare Solutions business.  To date, MyPractice has sold EMRs to more than 400 providers, including physicians, nurse practitioners and midwives within a 50 mile radius of Cleveland.

Working with Dell, the two companies plan to offer the new EMR service nationwide. The Cleveland Clinic will handle the EMR installation for new customers, and Dell provides the technology infrastructure. Epic gets a licensing fee for each of these deals, the customers’ relationship will be with Dell and the Cleveland Clinic.

As Dr. C. Martin Harris, CIO of the Cleveland Clinic, told Modern Healthcare, most medical practices and hospitals have EMRs in place, leaving only a much smaller group of first-time EMR buyers. But, Harris said, that minis still a big number. (And there’s always the practices still looking to switch.)

Turning Dell and the Cleveland Clinic into a sales channel for Epic seems like a pretty smart move. With the help of players who know the smaller physician practice market, it might open up a new opportunity for Epic which it hadn’t much of a shot at before.

February 27, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @annezieger on Twitter.

#HIMSS14 Highlights: the Snail’s Pace of Interoperability

Ah, HIMSS. The frenetic pace. The ridiculously long exhibit hall. The aching feet. The Google Glass-ers. As I write this, day three for me is in full swing and I’ve finally managed to find some time to reflect on what I’ve seen, which includes a ridiculously long taxi queue at the airport, more pedicabs than I can count, beautiful weather and lots of familiar faces, which is what makes HIMSS so much fun. I’ve heard lots of buzzwords and sales talk, and seen only about an eighth of the exhibit hall, barely scratching the surface of what’s out there on the show floor.

Several common themes stand out based on the sessions and events I’ve been to, and the passions of those I’ve encountered. Whether it’s vendor breakfasts, social networking functions, exhibit elevator pitches or educational sessions, interoperability and engagement are still the buzzwords to beat. This particular HIMSS has given me a different perspective on each, and offered new insight into what’s happening with the Blue Button Connector. I’ll cover each of these in HIMSS Highlights posts over the next several weeks, starting with interoperability.

The industry seems far more realistic this year regarding interoperability – downright frustrated by the slow pace at which such a lofty goal is proceeding. Industry experts Brian Ahier and Shahid Shah perhaps expressed it best during a lively panel discussion at the Surescripts booth:

interoppanel

interoptweet3

interoptweet1

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Putting vendors’ feet to the fire will certainly initiate a quick and painful reaction, but probably not a sustainable one. True momentum will occur only when providers get singed a bit, too. Panelist comments at a Dell / Intel breakfast on analytics for accountable care brought this into sharper focus for me. The fact that too many disparate EMRs (and thus too many vendors poised to cause inertia) are making it hard for analytics to successfully be adopted and utilized at an enterprise level, highlights a bigger problem related to hindsight and strategy.

From my perspective – that of an industry observer and commentator – it seems many providers felt compelled to purchase EMRs because the federal government offered them money to do so, and hopefully just as many were optimistic about the role technology would play in positively affecting patient outcomes. Vendors saw a great business opportunity and moved quickly to develop systems that met Meaningful Use criteria (not necessarily going for best-fit as related to workflow needs and usability). Neither group truly knew what they were in store for, especially regarding longer term plans for health information exchange.

Providers now find themselves wanting to move forward with health information exchange and greater interoperability, but slowed down by the very IT systems they were so insistent on purchasing just a few years ago. Vendors (some more than others) are hesitant to crack open their products to allow data to truly flow from one system to another, and who can blame them? The EMR market, in particular, is poised to shrink, which begs the question, who will survive? What companies will be around at HIMSS 15 and 16? Those who keep their systems siloed, like Epic? Or those who are trying to break down the silos, such as Common Well Alliance members like athenahealth and Greenway?

It makes me wonder if providers wouldn’t have been better served with just had a handful of EMRs to choose from around the time of HITECH, all guaranteed to evolve as needed and play nicely with each other in the interest of health information exchange. Too many options have caused too many barriers. That’s not just my opinion, by the way. I’m willing to bet that a sizeable chunk of the 37,537 HIMSS 14 attendees would agree with me.

Do you disagree? Are providers (and patients) better served by more IT options than less? Let me know your thoughts, and impressions of interoperability advancement at HIMSS, in the comments below.

February 26, 2014 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

KLAS Gives athenahealth, Not Epic, its 2013 “Best in KLAS” award

While Epic Systems may still be that the giant in the room, according KLAS, athenahealth is the best overall software vendor for 2013.

athenahealth’s taking first place pushes Epic to second for the first time in eight years. athenahealth got the most positive opinions from the thousands of providers participating in the KLAS poll, notably praise for the usability of its athenaClinicals, athenaCollector and athenaCommunicator products, according to EHR Intelligence.

athenahealth CEO Jonathan Bush was all too happy to take a victory lap. “The old guard of each IT leaders is finally being displaced by more nimble innovative models designed for healthcare’s future – not for its past,” Bush told EHR Intelligence.

Epic still remains in first place as for its overall software suite, reports EHR Intelligence. And it took home multiple prizes this year. But there’s a revolution brewing outside the Epic palace, it would appear. Not one that calls for angry peasants and pitchforks, but clearly some level of entrenched discontent is at work here.

Other well-known vendors of EMRs took their lumps as well. For example, Cerner came in at seventeenth, McKesson at 20th, and Allscripts came in 23rd.

So what to make of all of this? As my colleague John Lynn notes, awards of this kind are best taken with a grain of salt. After all, providers don’t need software that wins popularity contests, they need software which they can afford, which can handily meet Meaningful Use standards and which doctors and nurses and other clinicians can use without a hitch. Being sure their vendors win sexy awards really isn’t on their worry list.

Still, the fact that Epic has been unseated after eight years at the top of KLAS’s best vendor list may mean something. Perhaps Epic’s grip on the market is loosening a bit?

February 6, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @annezieger on Twitter.