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Practice Fusion Founder Launches Wearables Startup

Posted on May 31, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Free EMR vendor Practice Fusion has always been something of a newsmaker. Since its launch in 2005, the company has drawn both praise and controversy for its revenue-generation approach, which has included the analysis and sale of de-identified patient data and advertising to physicians.

But it’d be hard to question Practice Fusion’s success, particularly given that it found its legs during a hyper-competitive period of EMR vendor growth capped by the Meaningful Use incentive program. Over the company’s lifespan, it has grown to serve over 110 million patients, and reportedly supported more than 70 million patient visits over 2015. It also attracted over $150 million in venture and private equity funding. Will it provide a great return for investors, time will tell, but they’ve definitely left their mark on the EHR industry.

At the helm of Practice Fusion until last year was CEO and Founder Ryan Howard. Howard – whom I’ve interviewed now and again over the years — certainly doesn’t lack for confidence or creative thinking. So I was intrigued to learn that Howard has stuck his toe into the wearables market. Clearly, Howard has not wasted time since August 2015, when he was booted out as Practice Fusion CEO. And if he believes a wearables startup can make money in this rapidly-maturing niche, I’m inclined to give it a look.

Howard’s new startup, dubbed iBeat, is creating a watch which constantly monitors and analyzes users’ heart activity. The device, which transmits its data to a cloud platform, can alert emergency medical services and, using an onboard GPS, provide the wearer’s location when a user has a heart attack or their heart slows down below a certain level. Unlike competitor AliveCor, whose electrocardiogram device can detect heart rhythm abnormalities such as atrial fibrillation, it has no immediate plans to get FDA approval for its technology.

iBeat expects to sell the device for less than $200, though if users want the emergency alert service they’ll have to pay an as-yet unnamed extra monthly fee. That puts it smack in the middle of the pack with competitors like the Apple Watch. However, the startup’s focus on cardiac events is fairly unusual. Another unusual aspect to the launch is that Howard is targeting the 50- to 70-year-old Baby Boomer market. (Imagine a more-focused version of the LifeAlert “I’ve fallen and I can’t get up” service, which focuses on the 75-plus market, Howard told MobiHealthNews.)

My take on all of this is that there may very well be something here. As I wrote about previously, my own heart rhythm is being monitored by a set of devices created by Medtronic, a set-up which probably cost a few thousand dollars in addition to the surgical costs of implanting the monitoring device. While Medtronic’s technology is doubtless FDA approved, for not-so-serious cases such as my own a $200+ plus smart watch might be just the ticket.

On the other hand, I doubt that uncertified devices such as the iBeat watch will attract much support from providers, as they simply don’t trust the data. So consumers are really going to have to drive sales. And without a massive consumer marketing budget, it will be difficult to gain traction in a niche contested by Apple, Microsoft, Fitbit and many, many other competitors. Not to mention all the competitors in the “I’ve fallen and I can’t get up” category as well.

Regardless of whether iBeat survives, though, I think its strategy is smart. My guess is that more-specialized wearables (think, I don’t know, iSugar for diabetics?) have a bright future.

Smart Home Healthcare Tech Setting Up to Do Great Things

Posted on March 31, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Today, I read a report suggesting that technologies allowing frail elderly patients to age in place are really coming into their own. The new study by P & S Market Research is predicting that the global smart home healthcare market will expand at a combined annual growth rate of 38% between now and the year 2022.

This surge in demand, not surprisingly, is emerging as three powerful technical trends — the use of smart home technologies, the rapid emergence of mobile health apps and expanding remote monitoring of patients — converge and enhance each other. The growing use of IoT devices in home healthcare is also in the mix.

The researchers found that fall prevention and detection applications will see the biggest increase in demand between now and 2022. But many other applications combining smart home technology with healthcare IT are likely to catch fire as well, particularly when such applications can help avoid costly nursing home placements for frail older adults, researchers said. And everybody wants to get into the game:

  • According to P&S, important players operating in this market globally include AT&T, ABB Ltd, Siemens AG, Schneider Electric SE, GE, Honeywell Life Care Solutions, Smart Solutions, Essence Group and Koninkllijke Philips N.V.
  • Also, we can’t forget smart home technology players like Nest, and Ecobee will stake out a place in this territory, as well as health monitoring players like Fitbit and consumer tech giants like Apple and Microsoft.
  • Then, of course, it’s a no-brainer for mobile ecosystem behemoths like Samsung to stake out their place in this market as well.
  • What’s more, VC dollars will be poured into startups in this space over the next several years. It seems likely that with $1.1 billion in venture capital funding flowing into mHealth last year, VCs will continue to back mobile health in coming years, and some of it seems likely to creep into this sector.

Now, despite its enthusiasm for this sector, the research firm does note that there are challenges holding this market back from even greater growth. These include the need for large capital investments to play this game, and the reality that some privacy and security issues around smart home healthcare haven’t been resolved yet.

That being said, even a casual glimpse at this market makes it blazingly clear that growth here is good. Off the top of my head, I can think of few trends that could save healthcare system money more effectively than keeping frail elderly folks safe and out of the hospital.

Add to that the fact that when these technologies are smart enough, they could very well spare caregivers a lot of anxiety and preserve older people’s dignity, and you have a great thing in the works. Expect to see a lot of innovation here over the next few years.

Fitbit Data in the EMR?

Posted on November 3, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

People keep telling me they want their Fitbit and other personal device data in their doctors EMR. While it seems reasonable that your doctor would want as much data as possible available to them in the EMR, a whole wave of Fitbit data is unlikely to impact the care your doctor provides you. Your doctor doesn’t have enough time to look at your current chart. When is she going to have time to look through all your Fitbit data?

There likely are times when Fitbit and other health sensor data is going to impact the care you receive and the care provided by a doctor. However, I don’t believe your EHR vendor is going to provide those insights. At best your EHR would be a storage place for that data. I don’t see many EHR vendors doing the work required to turn that outside health sensor data into actionable insights.

Most doctors I know would be happy to have an external system inform them of insights related to your health sensor data. In fact, many would welcome it. David Chou recently blogged about the move to more personalized care and much of that is built on the back of this sensor data. He takes it even further including the system reminding you to order a low calorie diet when your GPS shows you visiting a fast food restaurant. Will EHR software do that? I don’t think so.

I guess you could summarize my view on health sensor data in that I’m bullish on the potential of what all this health sensor data can do for a person’s health, but I’m bearish on the EMR being the software that does it. The EMR might play a role in presenting the insights to the doctor, but that doesn’t require the EMR to have all the data. They just become a communication pathway. What do you think?

Doctors, Not Patients, May Be Holding Back mHealth Adoption

Posted on June 24, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Clearly, mHealth technology has achieved impressive momentum among a certain breed of health-conscious, self-monitoring consumer. Still, aside from wearable health bands, few mHealth technologies or apps have achieved a critical level of adoption.

The reason for this, according to a new survey, may lie in doctors’ attitudes toward these tools. According to the study, by market research firm MedPanel, only 15% of physicians are suggesting wearables or health apps as approaches for growing healthier.

It’s not that the tools themselves aren’t useful. According to a separate study by Research Now summarized by HealthData Management, 86% of 500 medical professionals said mHealth apps gave them a better understanding of a patient’s medical condition, and 76% said that they felt that apps were helping patients manage chronic illnesses. Also, HDM reported that 46% believed that apps could make patient transitions from hospital to home care simpler.

While doctors could do more to promote the use of mHealth technology — and patients might benefit if they did — the onus is not completely on doctors. MedPanel president Jason LaBonte told HDM that vendors are positioning wearables and apps as “a fad” by seeing them as solely consumer-driven markets. (Not only does this turn doctors off, it also makes it less likely that consumers would think of asking their doctor about mHealth tool usage, I’d submit.)

But doctors aren’t just concerned about mHealth’s image. They also aren’t satisfied with current products, though that would change rapidly if there were a way to integrate mobile health data into EMR platforms directly. Sure, platforms like HealthKit exist, but it seems like doctors want something more immediate and simple.

Doctors also told MedPanel that mHealth devices need to be easier to use and generate data that has greater use in clinical practice.  Moreover, physicians wanted to see these products generate data that could help them meet practice manager and payer requirements, something that few if any of the current roster of mHealth tools can do (to my knowledge).

When it comes to physician awareness of specific products, only a few seem to have stood out from the crowd. MedPanel found that while 82% of doctors surveyed were aware of the Apple Watch, even more were familiar with Fitbit.

Meanwhile, the Microsoft Band scored highest of all wearables for satisfaction with ease of use and generating useful data. Given the fluid state of physicians’ loyalties in this area, Microsoft may not be able to maintain its lead, but it is interesting that it won out this time over usability champ Apple.

Wearables Trendsetters Don’t Offer Much Value

Posted on June 1, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Today I was looking over my Twitter feed and this tweet popped up:

The referenced article appeared on the corporate site of Qmed, a supplier to the medical device industry. I found this interesting, as it’s pretty obvious that wearables and other mHealth toys will evolve into medical-grade devices over time.

But the choices the article made for hottest wearable firms, while worth a look, demonstrate pretty clearly that few wearables makers can point to any real, meaningful healthcare benefit they offer. (That’s obviously not Qmed’s fault — none of this is aimed at the editor who pulled this piece together — but it’s still a significant point.)

Some of the wearables listed are half-hearted medical device plays, others are fashionable eye candy for upscale geeks, and still others are tadpoles evolving from some other industry into a healthcare mode. Here’s some examples from the list, and why I’m skeptical that they deserve a high five:

* The list includes Apple courtesy of  its Apple Watch.  Right now nobody seems to know quite how the Apple Watch, or any smartwatch for that matter, serves anyone except gadget geeks with extra cash. How, exactly, will having a smartwatch improve your health or life, other than giving you bragging rights over non-owners?

* There’s Fitbit, which is undeniably the wearables success story to beat all others. But just because something is cool doesn’t mean it’s accomplishing anything meaningful. At least where healthcare is concerned, I fail to see how its cursory monitoring add-ons (such as automatic sleep monitoring and heart rate tracking) move the healthcare puck down the ice.

* The list also includes Misfit, whose $850K success on Indiegogo has vaulted it into the ranks of hipster coolness. Admittedly, its Shine is a lovely piece of wearables jewelry, and the Flash is cool, but again, should healthcare leaders really care?

* I admit to a certain interest in Caeden, a Rock Health wearables firm which apparently started out making headphones. The Qmed article reports that the company, which got $1.6M in funding this year, is creating a screenless leather wristband which does health monitoring. But I’m critical of the “screenless” aspect of this product; after all, isn’t one of the main goals of monitoring to engage patients in the process?

I could go on, but you probably get the point I’m trying to make. While the devices listed above might have their place in the consumer health device food chain, it’s not clear how they can actually make patients do better or feel better.

I do have to offer kudos to one company on the list, however. Chrono Therapeutics has an intriguing product to offer which could actually save lungs and lives. The company, which took in $32M in financing last year, has created a slick-looking wearable device that delivers doses of nicotine when a smoker’s cravings hit, and tracks the doses administrated. Now that could be a game change for consumers trying to beat nicotine addiction. (Heck, maybe it could help with other types of addiction too.)

I only hope other wearables manufacturers pick a spot, as Chrono Therapeutics has, and figure out how to do more than be cool, look good or sell to trendies.

Fitbit Data Being Used In Personal Injury Case

Posted on December 8, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Lately, there’s been a lot of debate over whether data from wearable health bands is useful to clinicians or only benefits the consumer user. On the one hand, there are those that say that a patient’s medical care could be improved if doctors had data on their activity levels, heart rate, respirations and other standard metrics. Others, meanwhile, suggest that unless it can be integrated into an EMR and made usable, such data is just a distraction from other more important health indicators.

What hasn’t come up in these debates, but might far more frequently in the future,  is the idea that health band data can be used in personal injury cases to show the effects of an accident on a plaintiff. According to Forbes, a law firm in Calgary is working on what may be the first personal injury case to leverage smart band data, in this case activity data from a Fitbit.

The plaintiff, a young woman, was injured in an accident four years ago. While Fitbit hadn’t entered the market yet, her lawyers at McLeod Law believe they can establish the fact that she led an active lifestyle prior to her accident. They’ve now started processing data from her Fitbit to show that her activity levels have fallen under the baseline for someone of her age and profession.

It’s worth noting that rather than using Fitbit data directly, they’re processing it using analytics platform Vivametrica, which uses public research to compare people’s activity data with that of the general population. (Its core business is to analyze data from wearable sensor devices for the assessment of health and wellness.) The plaintiff will share her Fitbit data with Vivametrica for several months to present a rich picture of her activities.

Using even analyzed, processed data generated by a smart band is “unique,” according to her attorneys. “Till now we’ve always had to rely on clinical interpretation,” says Simon Muller of McLeod Law. “Now we’re looking at longer periods of time to the course of the day, and we have hard data.”

But even if the woman wins her case, there could be a downside to this trend. As Forbes notes, insurers will want wearable device data as much as plaintiffs will, and while they can’t force claimants to wear health bands, they can request a court order demanding the data from whoever holds the data. Dr. Rick Hu, co-founder and CEO of Vivametrica, tells Forbes that his company wouldn’t release such data, but doesn’t explain how he will be able to refuse to honor a court-ordered disclosure.

In fact, wearable devices could become a “black box” for the human body, according to Matthew Pearn, an associate lawyer with Canadian claims processing firm Foster & Company. In a piece for an insurance magazine, Pearn points out that it’s not clear, at least in his country, what privacy rights the wearers of health bands maintain over the data they generate once they file a personal injury suit.

Meanwhile, it’s still not clear how HIPAA protections apply to such data in the US. When FierceHealthIT recently spoke with Deven McGraw, a partner in the healthcare practice of Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, she pointed out that HIPAA only regulates data “in the hands of, with the control of, or within the purview of a medical provider, a health plan or other covered entity under the law.”  In other words, once the wearable data makes it into the doctor’s record, HIPAA protections are in force, but until then they are not.

All told, it’s pretty sobering to consider that millions of consumers are generating wearables data without knowing how vulnerable it is.

Microsoft Joins Battle for Wearables Market

Posted on November 4, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Following the lead of several other companies big and small, Microsoft has jumped into the wearables healthcare market with a watch, a fitness tracker and a cloud-based platform that condenses and shares data.

It’s little wonder. After a few years of uncertainty, it seems pretty clear that the wearables market is taking off like a rocket. In fact, 21% of US consumers own such a device, according to research by PricewaterhouseCoopers. That’s slightly higher that the number of consumers who bought tablets during the first two years after they launched, PwC reports. Not only Microsoft, but Apple and Samsung, as well as smaller players with a high profile — such as Fitbit — are poised to take the sector by storm.

Microsoft’s new entry is called Microsoft Health, a platform letting users store health and fitness data. The date in question is collected by a Microsoft Health app, available on Android, iOS and Windows Phone. The platform also gathers data generated from the Microsoft Band, a smart and designed to work with Microsoft’s new platform.

The idea behind pulling all of this data into a single platform is to integrate data from different devices and services in a smart way that allows consumers to generate insights into their health. The next step for Microsoft Health, execs say, is to connect all of that data in the platform to the tech giant’s HealthVault, a Web-based PHR, making it easier for people to share data with their healthcare providers.

Other tech giants are making their own wearables plays, of course. Google, for example, has released Google Fit, a fitness-based app designed to help users track physical activity. Google’s approach is  Android smart phones, relying on sensors built into the smart phones to detect if the user is walking, running or biking. Users can also connect to devices and apps like Noom Coach and Withings.

Apple, for its part, has launched HealthKit, its competing platform for collecting data from various health and fitness apps.  The data can then be accessed easily by Apple users through the company’s Health app (which comes installed on the iPhone 6.) HealthKit is designed to send data directly to hospital and doctor charts as well. It also plans to launch a smart watch early next year.

While there’s little doubt consumers are interested in the wearables themselves, it’s still not clear how enthusiastic they are about pulling all of their activity onto a single platform. Providers might be more excited about taming this gusher of data, which has proved pretty intimidating to doctors already overwhelmed with standard EMR information, but it remains to be seen whether they’ll find fitness information to be helpful.

All told, it looks like there will be a rollicking battle for the hearts and minds of wearables consumers, as well as the loyalty of providers.  As for me, I think it will be a year or two, at minimum, before we get a real sense of what consumers and providers really want from these devices.

Health IT Venture Funding For EMRs At Low Ebb

Posted on January 17, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

For several years, most health IT venture funding has focused either on EMRs or data and network infrastructure to support EMRs.  With the EMR market arguably completely saturated, it seems the money is flowing in a different direction.

According to a new report by Mercom Capital Group covered in iHealthBeat, health IT venture capital funding hit  $2.2 billion across 571 deals in 2013, nearly double the $1.2 billion and 163 deals executed in 2012.

So where did the money go? According to Mercom, consumer-centric health IT companies raised $1.1 billion, personal health companies raised $198 million and social health companies raised $166 million last year.  The mobile healthcare sector raised almost $564 million, not surprising at all given the speed at which mobile health is accelerating.

Meanwhile, roughly $1.1 billion was raised by medical practice centric companies, including $179 million by population health companies, $162 million but practice management companies and a scant $166 million by EMR companies.

According to the report the top five venture funded companies of 2013 were Evolent Health, which raised $100 million, Practice Fusion, which raised $85 million, Fitbit, which raised $73 million, MedSynergies, which raised $65 million, and Proteus Digital Health, which raised $45 million.

So, as it turns out, Practice Fusion took the lion’s share of EMR venture funding last year, leaving the rest of the industry to scavenge for what remained in terms of VC interest.

What does it say in terms of the health of the EMR business?  Well, it’s not necessarily a sign of anything terribly negative in terms of EMR vendors’ future; after all, you’re not seeing a lot of new EMR companies jumping into the business, for good reason.

On the other hand, it does suggest that the market for EMRs has solidified, and is not perceived to have dramatic growth potential by VCs.  I suppose we shouldn’t be surprised or concerned for that matter. If EMR vendors aren’t in explosive growth mode at this point, it’s just because they’re serving the customers they’ve got. It could be worse.

Is Remote Monitoring Data A Blessing, Or A Distraction?

Posted on August 1, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

This week, Venture Beat reported on some growing remote monitoring efforts in which a handful of Massachusetts hospitals are working to pull the data into their EMR. The hospitals are hoping to get their arms around a growing body of data which increasingly lives not only in wireless medical devices (such as glucometers and pulse oximeters) but also smartphones, smart wristbands, FitBit devices and other health-tracking technology.

One of the players involved in the new effort is Partners HealthCare, whose Center for Connected Health is focused on collecting and making use of such data. Its latest initiative sweeps patient data collected at home — such as blood pressure, weight and blood glucose — into the Partners EMR, making it accessible as part of routine clinical workflow. (The data collected by patients is transmitted wirelessly and automatically subsumed into the EMR.)  Patients can also review the data through a patient portal known as Patient Gateway.

According to Partners, this process is designed to change care delivery by allowing doctors to keep a close watch on patients when they’re not in the hospital or doctor’s office.

This is all well and good, especially for monitoring the chronically ill, whose condition may fluctuate dangerously and require timely intervention. But the question is, is this new flood of data going to be manageable for doctors?  Can a physician managing thousands of patients really give appropriate attention to every data point a FitBit or smartphone produces?  Certainly not.

Perhaps that’s why Kaiser Permanente recently told a conference that it was going to be rather picky as to what data flows into its EMR. According to Lead Innovation Designer Christine Folck:

“Don’t come to us telling us you can upload [data] into our electronic medical record. We don’t necessarily want it there. We have too much information in our electronic medical record. Kaiser Permanente was one of the first to go nationwide with our electronic medical record, we are fully integrated, but the problem is now everybody wants to upload into it. Our physicians don’t want it all there. They really don’t need to know how much exercise each of their patients is getting on a daily basis; they just don’t have time to process all of that.”

So, while there’s clearly benefit to tracking chronic conditions via remote monitoring, it seems clear that there will be some pushback from doctors, who can’t possibly absorb all of the data the healthier “quantified self” types are producing.  It looks to me like we’re going to have to narrow down what categories of data are actually helpful in an EMR and which aren’t.