Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

Top 10 Reasons for Full EHR Data Migration

Posted on September 26, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

EMR switching has become a really hot topic in healthcare IT and I predict that it’s only going to become more important. EHR vendors will continue to consolidate which will force healthcare organizations to switch EHR software. Health systems will continue to acquire healthcare organizations which will also drive EHR switching. Given these trends, it’s important to have a good answer to the question “Should we migrate our EHR data to the new EHR or not?

Galen Healthcare Solutions has put out a detailed whitepaper on EHR data migration that does a great job highlighting best practices for EHR data migration based on their decade of clinical data migration experience. Together with the whitepaper, they offer these 10 reasons a healthcare organization should migrated their EHR data:

  1. Eliminate Legacy Systems
  2. Lower Costs
  3. One System for All
  4. Maximize Productivity
  5. Strengthen Compliance
  6. Prescribe Electronically
  7. Enhance Operational Efficiency
  8. Reduce Human Error
  9. A Greener Solution
  10. Meet Quality Measures

They obviously go into a lot more detail for each of these 10 points in their Free EHR switching whitepaper, but even just looking at the list it’s pretty compelling. At the end of the day for me, the overarching reason to migrate your EHR data is number 7 on the list: Enhancing Operational Efficiency. Is there anything less efficient than limping along an old EHR system that people quickly forget how to use? It’s inefficient for the IT people, but even less efficient for the end users that want access to the clinical data.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not saying that EHR data migration is easy work. We’d like to think that you just export the data from your old EHR and import it into your new EHR. That’s now how it works. Check out the complex process that Galen uses to do an EHR data migration:
ehr-data-migration-process
You can certainly take out some of the steps in this chart if you don’t care about the integrity of your data. Yep, that’s a reality that exists in no healthcare organization. The integrity of your health data really matters in healthcare. People’s lives are on the line.

The problem is that if the data is stuck in your old legacy EHR and not accessible, then it’s as good as gone. The ideal situation is to migrate your EHR data to your new system in a way that the integrity of the data is maintained. That’s something that takes real experience and expertise to do it right. However, when done right it you can gain all the benefits of accessible data along with the ability to sunset your old EHR application.

Have you switched EHR software? How did you approach EHR data migration? What would you have done the same or different?

Galen Healthcare Solutions is a sponsor of the Tackling EHR & EMR Transition Series of blog posts on Hospital EMR and EHR.

I Really Don’t Want to Be Your “Worst” Patient

Posted on April 29, 2016 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by M. Maxwell Stroud, Lead Consultant at Galen Healthcare Solutions.
Max - Healthcare IT
“I really don’t want to be your “worst” patient. Really, I don’t.”  These are the words that I think to myself as I prepare to ask my new specialist if he has interfaces with either of the hospital labs in my hometown 40 miles away.  My provider humors me and lets me know that if I go to one lab he will get a fax, and another and he will be able to view the results in a portal.  Sigh.

I have for a long time kept all of my care to one healthcare organization in town – in part because I am a firm believer in one chart for one person and I personally don’t want to have to deal with the mess of coordinating all of my records or manually schlepping things from office to office.  I love the concept of “one source of truth” and I know how far away we really are from that.  So why venture out of town and (gasp) to different healthcare organization?  Because that is where the best specialist was that was seeing new patients and mine had left town.

As a patient, I get to make that choice.  I get to decide where I get my care – as I should.  I also make the choice knowing that it will result in me having two distinct medical records in orgs 40 miles away from each other.  I also know that it means I am, at times, going to have to put on my advocacy hat and make sure that my records are correct, that my labs got where they need to go and that everyone has the information that they need so that I can get the best care.

Wait. What?  The patient is the only person in this continuum of care who is making sure the right person has the right data at the right time?  Yep.  Some might say that I am a control freak or that I need to relax a little – but I am informed by the life experiences of the patients that have been a part of my life.  I have seen what happened when my father got admitted to the hospital without an accurate medlist available.  I have seen the binder that my sister has to carry with her on the train that has her MRIs and PET scans to take to her next oncology appointment in the city.

It blows my mind that just a little over a month ago I was at the largest healthcare IT conference in the country (HIMSS16) discussing interoperability, and now I am on the phone with the nurse at the clinic because she cannot find my lab results … “Oh wait” she says “they are in the print and scan pile.”  Great.  Just great.

I have heard the argument that patients are not interested in their data.  There is a chance I could be an outlier – I live my life in a world of health data and I am acutely aware of how it is used in my care and the care of others.  I really think the truth is you don’t know how important it is to you until it becomes important to you.  One life event, one family member’s crisis, one rare diagnosis – and you begin to understand that you are the most important person in your own healthcare.

We have centered record keeping around the physical location of care.  This makes sense when you think historically.  Patients used to be less mobile, receive care locally and lived locally.  Additionally, the role of the “legal medical record” is a legal representation of the care provided and decisions made by a healthcare organization.  Organizations still need to document medical decision making, but patients are becoming more and more mobile.  People move from city to city, or even within health networks in the same town.  In the digital age, even if the legal medical record lives with the provider —  the data needs to follow the patient.

We can do better by patients and consumers.  The information is there, it is just not yet connected in the way that will make it available, actionable and meaningful to everyone who needs it.  It’s not just about finding an easy button to import discrete data, but also a culture change.  Truly putting the patient at the center of the data is simultaneously mission critical and more than a little revolutionary.

About M. Maxwell Stroud
M. Maxwell Stroud, MSW MSW is a Lead Consultant at Galen Healthcare Solutions with a professional background in both healthcare and social work. Max has been consulting in Health IT for over 8 years.  She has worked with every aspect of health IT in ambulatory care including facilitating clinics through the transition from paper to electronic formats, supporting teams through major system-wide upgrades as well as add-on implementations and integration projects.       Max has a passion for collaborative process and building processes that bring all stakeholders to the table to build systems that meet the needs of the business organization, the providers and the patients.  Max can be found on Twitter at @MMaxwellStroud

4 Health IT and EHR Blogs

Posted on August 12, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I’ve been putting together these blog posts about other Health IT and EHR bloggers, I’ve been astounded how many former bloggers have stopped blogging. I guess I was write to post one of my first blogger features as “EHR Blogger Attrition.” I imagine many previous bloggers are still sharing content, but have likely moved to other social media which is much easier to sustain. A tweet can be generated much more quickly than a blog post.

With that in mind, I feel grateful that I’m still able to blog and that enough people come and read my blog posts that I can provide for my family with my blogging. While some might define my blogging as micro blogging, I think there’s more value in a blog post than a tweet. You don’t have to dig into subjects in a tweet. People don’t go looking through your old tweets like they do blog posts.

Those musings aside, here are some other Health IT and EHR bloggers you might find interesting:
Health Blawg – David Harlow has a fascinating blog covering many of the various healthcare regulations that encumber our lives. Many lawyers are afraid to blog, but David has overcome that fear and created regular healthcare content that’s well worth following.

The Health Care Blog – While this blog isn’t exclusively health IT, a large portion o the topics are Health IT related. This blog never ceases to amaze me at the number of people they have contributing quality content to their site. It doesn’t have one voice, and that’s what makes the site so great. You might read a post about healthcare analytics and then one on value based contracts. Plus, it has one of the most active communities for comments. In fact, I often find myself more interested in the comments than the post itself.

Phil Baumann – While Phil is an RN by training, he’s more of a healthcare communicator and marketer than anything. Phil’s been doing this long enough that he doesn’t pull any punches. He just says it the way it is and isn’t afraid of saying things others aren’t comfortable saying. That makes for a good blog.

Galen Healthcare Solutions – I always like to feature at least one health IT company that’s creating great blog content. Galen Healthcare Solutions is definitely one of the best out there and they’ve been doing it consistently for a long time. Looks like their first blog post was in July 2008. I’m not sure who’s behind their consistency, but they deserve a lot of credit for the work they’ve done. It’s a great blog.

EHR and Healthcare IT Mosaic Image

Posted on June 23, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s definitely true that a picture is often worth 1000 words. That’s how I felt when I saw this image that Galen Healthcare Solutions posted on their blog.

What a great look at the challenge of our current healthcare IT environment. The blog post also discusses how the moasic helps us appreciate the complexity when talking about Interoperability, Patient Matching, Reporting and Analytics, and Trust.