Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

The Impact of Patients Recording Their Doctors Visits

Posted on September 14, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Martine Ehrenclou has a great article titled Patients Secretly Record Visits with Their Doctors that is worthy of further discussion. Here’s an excerpt from the article to get the discussion started:

Since I suspected this office visit might contain some complicated and possibly stressful information, I considered recording what the surgeon said by using an app on my iPhone. I envisioned asking the doctor’s permission to record the conversation and decided against it because he might not have responded well to that idea. Some physicians and other providers react with suspicion and a defensive medicine posture when asked by patients to record what they’ve said.

My husband’s surgeon had a reputation for highly successful surgeries but not the greatest bedside manner. He’d always been pleasant with us, but since my husband’s recovery had been compromised with episodes of pain, I decided that an audio device could have instigated alarm. That would have interfered with the doctor’s focus on Jamie. With only 7-10 minutes, we had to make the most of this office visit. I wanted my husband out of pain.

In place of an audio recording, I took notes instead.

I’m sure that many patients have gone through the same situation. They want to have the valuable information that the doctor has shared, but they’re afraid of the impression they’ll give the doctor if they tell them they’re going to record the visit. Unfortunately, that’s the culture of fear that we’ve created in our healthcare system. Doctors are rightly afraid of the medical malpractice implications of anything they do.

The article goes on to talk about some patients who secretly record their visit with their doctor. A commenter and the author both described this trend of patients secretly recording doctors visits as alarming. However, that feels like a bit of a contradiction to me. The article talks about how asking your doctor to record the visit could compromise the patient-doctor relationship. In order to avoid compromising it, recording the conversation privately seems like the natural alternative.

What’s worth noting is that these private recordings might not be admissible in court depending on your state. I’m not a lawyer, so I’m not sure of the exact laws, but I know that in many states both patients have to be aware that a recording is being made. This should actually provide much comfort to doctors. If a secret recording isn’t admissible in a medical malpractice case, then the doctor should be glad that the patient is secretly recording the visit. It would illustrate that the patient really just wants to review what the doctor said as opposed to trying to ensnare the doctor in some legal lawsuit. Sounds like deep patient engagement to me.

Since pretty much all of us now have an audio recording device in our pocket (better known as a cell phone), this topic is going to become more and more popular. More and more patients are going to want to record their office visit. No doubt some will do this in full disclosure to the doctor and others will do it privately.

I wonder when we’ll see the first doctors flip the script on the patient and suggest that the patient record the office visit. We probably won’t see this happen for the full visit anytime soon, but you could easily see the doctor recording the plan and instructions part of the visit and sending it to the patient or the doctor encouraging the patient to record it themselves. In fact, I recall Kareo doing something like this for doctors using Google Glass. It’s a happy medium where the doctor is likely more comfortable having what they say recorded. A great part of a patient portal would be a list of all the things a doctor’s instructed the patient as part of a visit.

Of course, all of this leads to my concept of a video EHR that captures the audio and video of every visit. I’ve been talking about it more and more lately. I’ll have to do a full post on my vision for a video EHR in a future post. If the idea of a video EHR makes you uncomfortable, that’s no surprise. However, it’s not as far fetched as you might think.

Another EHR Glass Implementation

Posted on July 18, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

HealthTech has a really terrible write up of the latest EHR vendor to put out a Google Glass EHR implementation. The iPatientCare EHR application is called miGlass. However, the article states that it’s the first wearable EHR App for glass, but we’ve already written about one from DrChrono and Kareo’s Google Glass implementation was probably the first one that I saw. Plus, there are a number of hospital based EHR implementations that have happened as well. Maybe iPatientCare was the first and they just didn’t get any coverage until now.

Timing aside, the article lists the technology available on this new Google Glass EHR application, miGlass:

  • Web browser based EHR and PM System
  • Microsoft .net Technology
  • Services Oriented Architecture
  • HL7 CCD and ASTM CCR for Interoperability
  • HL7 Integration with leading Lab
  • Information Systems
  • SureScripts/RxHUB Certified ePrescribing
  • Reporting & Analytics using Cognos and Business Objects
  • Available on iPhone and iPad

Maybe the article just made a mistake (I make them all the time as you know), but that list seems like a list of EHR technology and not Google Glass application functionality. iPatientCare also has a video that’s not even worth linking to since it doesn’t say anything about what the Google Glass application really does.

While I love to see EHR vendors experimenting and testing the integration of Google Glass into their EHR, I still haven’t seen the killer use case in action. Although, there are a few hospital EHR Google Glass implementations that I’d like to see in action. I do love the potential of Google Glass. There’s something beautiful about an always on, always connected application that’s sitting there waiting for you when it’s needed. Plus, as the camera recognition technology gets better, the workflow will get better as well.

Imagine walking into an exam room and as you do it, your Google Glass scans a QR code on the door and pulls up the patient waiting for you in the room. Hopefully that’s the naive and simplistic view of where the technology is going to be taken. As more EHR vendors tinker with the technology it will be really interesting to see what becomes a reality.

Is your company comfortable committing to a social media plan that will actually have impact?

Posted on March 19, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


The above video was shot by Chuck Webster (the man synonymous with EHR workflow) during the Social Media and Influencer session that I participated in at HIMSS. Chuck has done a nice job putting together the video clips of me talking during that session on his blog. Here’s a look at some of the other clips he’s put together:

“The key is — How are you interesting? And how are you valuable? — to the people you’re interacting with.”

“Why are you doing social media?” Sales, something broader, brand experience….?

On curation “We read everything so you don’t have to!” vs “If it’s great content, people will read it.”

“The beauty of social media is it shouldn’t cost you much to start.”

“Is your company comfortable committing to a social media plan that will actually have impact?”

“I love negative engagement!… It’s beautiful! … people will respect you even more.”

Thanks Chuck for recording the session. I hope that many of my readers get some value out of the videos. Plus, I’d be remiss if I didn’t also mention my upcoming Health IT Marketing and PR Conference. If you are interested in the topics I discuss in these videos, then come and enjoy 2 days hearing from a few of the brightest minds in the health IT marketing and PR world. Not to mention some bright minds from outside of health IT as well.

Consumers Are Ready For Wearable Tech

Posted on January 15, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Though they’re pretty, interesting and fun, I’ve never taken wearable devices that seriously as a force that could have impact on healthcare delivery in the here and now.  Well, it seems that I was wrong.  While it’s not certain that the health system can afford these devices — they don’t exactly come in at an easy consumer price point — it seems consumers are ready to use them if given the chance.

According to a new study by Accenture, more than half of consumers “are interested in buying wearable technologies such as fitness monitors for tracking physical activity in managing their personal health,” according to a report in Health IT Outcomes.

According to Accenture, consumers were primarily interested in devices like smart watches and wearable smart glasses such as Google Glass, even though these devices are not yet available commercially.  Consumers were also very interested in phablets, an emerging device category combining smart phone and tablet PC functions.

I can’t help think that this is a very positive trend.  For one thing, consumer wearables can be an important gateway to remote patient monitoring, something that’s less likely with devices that are used and put aside, like wired glucose monitors, pulse oximeters and blood pressure cuffs.

What’s more, wearables can fit into a healthcare ecosystem in which devices talk to one another and other wireless systems (such as their desktop, laptop or smart phone), whereas the other smart devices I’ve mentioned have less flexibility in that arena.

So, who pays for the wearables?  At least at first, it will probably make more sense for providers to invest in these devices and use them to conduct tests of remote patient monitoring and its impact on care.

But as consumers pick up the wearables themselves, providers might want to focus on building a network which seamlessly integrate these devices, as it seems almost a given that consumers will buy them when they’re available and affordable.  It will take years to get that right, so now it’s probably time to start. Get prepared for the Internet of everything!

Halamka on Google Glass, Wrong EHR, and EHR Customer Support

Posted on July 29, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


Always great to read John Halamka’s view on the latest technology like Google Glass. I think there’s a place for wearable computing in healthcare. Plus, I’m excited that we’re just at the very early stages of its development.


Are the wrong EHR vendors going to die off?


I think it always has made or broken an EHR implementation. It’s not an easy task implementing an EMR. Many underestimate the effort required to do it right.